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april 2014


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T R IBE Z A

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features

d e pa rtm e nt s

Art of Style 46

Communit y

Cayenne-Spiked Farm Feast 58 Best Foot Forward 68

on the cover: c a r ly b e i l e r o f c h e e r u p c h a r l i e ' s ; photo by j essic a pag es .

Style

Social Hour

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Profile in Style

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Column: Kristin Armstrong

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Behind the Scenes

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Exposed

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Inspiration Board

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TRIBEZA Talk

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Street Style

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Style Pick

Arts

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

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Artist Spotlight

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Last Look

APRIL 2014 tribeza.com

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Dining

Dessert Pick

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: street style photo by jessica pages; art of style photo by andrew chan; evan voyle's boot photo by jessica pages; 5x7 art photo by nicole mlakar; crawfish boil photo by kate leseuer; dolce neve gelato photo jessica pages.

Contents


B

y all accounts, it’s been a long winter. Sure, Texas may have had it easier than other subzero regions of the country. But still, we weathered snow days, scraped ice from windshields, and threw old sheets over young citrus trees in the backyard. Rising temperatures and the intoxication of spring bring more than bluebonnets—they welcome the season of festivals and garden parties (like the Umlauf Garden Party on April 24, complete with alfresco art accompanied by cocktails and snacks from great restaurants). Spring also stirs our senses, so it’s a delicious time for the Austin Food & Wine Festival to roll into town and fire up its grills (and our appetites), April 25–27. Globe-trotting television host Andrew Zimmern, one of the festival’s headliners, is also an old friend and one of my favorite people, so I asked him about Austin’s food scene, his travel essentials, and the tacos on his horizon (page 30). It’s the perfect time of year to eat outdoors and savor the evening air. In the new column Austin Tables (page 58) we explore the lovely and unique ways Austinites come together over a meal. I can’t think of a better start than a rowdy crawfish boil on an East Austin farm. For more refined occasions, we asked expert party host and blogger Carla McDonald how to set the perfect spring table (page 108). As we shed winter’s layers, we’re drawn to the fresh styles of spring. In “The Art of Style” (page 46) we took inspiration from The Contemporary Austin's upcoming "Five x Seven" show and created playful ensembles inspired by specific works from the exhibition. I hope you’ll join me at the show at Brazos Hall on April 2. To ensure that you step out in style, we asked five local tastemakers for their footwear essentials in “Best Foot Forward” (page 68). Their inspired picks run the gamut from lace-up gladiators to the perfect nude ankle boot (warning: a shopping spree might ensue). We also chat with some of the Austin’s most thought-provoking designers, who are inspired by everything from well-constructed menswear to Japanese denim, including Richard Cole from Paleo Denim (page 90) and Esby’s Stephanie Beard (page 82). What I love most about Austin style is that it’s not stuffy or serious. It’s not “Fashion” with a capital F. Instead, we cherish interesting, locally made treasures, a spirit of individuality, and a little bit of funk. I can’t think of a better example than the staff at Cheer Up Charlie’s (page 94). (No, their hip crew is not from Central Casting—they really are that adorable.) Which is why Carly Beiler, one of their bartenders, inadvertently landed on our cover. With this issue we bid a sad farewell to Staley Hawkins, our marketing events coordinator, who is as kind and impossibly cheerful as her golden retriever, Stella. Staley has creatively staged countless Tribeza parties over the last two years. We’re proud that she’s chasing her dreams to Los Angeles, but we’ll miss her terribly. Parting after a job well done and with a legion of fans—that’s my idea of style.

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Paula Disbrowe paula@tribeza.com

paula disbrowe photo by wynn myers, hair and makeup by franchiska bryant; staley and ashley photo by jessica pages; kate and david photo by ashley horsley

Editor’s Letter

Top: Staley Hawkins and art director Ashley Horsley see petals at the "Best Foot Forward" shoot. Bottom: Kate LeSueur photographs farmer David Burk at Rain Lily Farm.


Keep Austin Beautiful. Hire an Artisan.

www.dalgleish.net


BRAND NEW Boutique Apartment

Living in Downtown Austin A u s t i n a r t s + c u lt u r e

PUBLISHER

George T. Elliman EDITOR-in-chief

Paula Disbrowe

art director

Ashley Horsley

Events + Marketing Coordinator

Staley Hawkins

contributing editor

Leigh Patterson

Senior Account ExeCutives

Ashley Beall Andrea Brunner

principals George T. Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres Interns Hayley Albrecht Emma Banks Christina Ewin Harrison Robinson

Columnist

Kristin Armstrong Illustrator

Joy Gallagher WRITERs

Emma Banks Karen Spezia

Photographers Miguel Angel Andrew Chan Kate LeSueur Nicole Mlakar Michael A. Muller Wynn Myers Leah Overstreet Jessica Pages John Pesina Bill Sallans

mailing address 706a west 34th street austin, texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 fax (512) 474 4715 www.tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing www.csiprinting.com Copyright @ 2014 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

the mark of responsib le forestry

111 Sandra Muraida Way | Austin, TX 78703 866-995-0871 | gables.com/parktower


social hour

austin

Social Hour

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Art Night Austin

HELM Boots Redesign Party

The Art Alliance Austin curated a night of food, film, art, music, and

HELM Boots launched its brand redesign with a Fourth Friday event at their

theatre with Art Night Austin, a location-spanning event hosted at both

East Sixth Street storefront. The redesign, undertaken by local designer Chris

Women & Their Work gallery and the Scottish Rite Theatre. For 64

Bilheimer (see page 86), included changes to HELM’s logo, website, signage, and

years, the Art Alliance has been dedicated to ensuring that the roles of art

boot packaging.

and creativity have a place at the core of the city's identity. Art Night: 1. Connie Freeman & Lauren Hoffer 2. Amy Bresnen & Olivia Cuenca 3. Natalia Luczynski & Phillip Wozny 4. Preston Lavinghouse & Asa Hursh 5. Jack Chapman & Warrick Nichols HELM: 6. Clifton Mooney, Kirstie Ferriso & Tyler Dunson 7. Tessa Baker & Alex Lakeland 8. Cameron Crow & Stacey Matthews 9. Wesley Verhoeve & Madeline Vu 10. Beth Cozzolino & Mouleena Khan

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P h oto g r a p h y by M i g u el a n g el & j o h n p e s i n a


1 2 1 4 W e s t 6 t h S t. ď Ź A u s t i n , T X 7 8 7 0 3 www.juliangold.com (512) 473-2493


social hour

austin

Want to stay i n -the know abo u t u pcom i ng events i n au st i n ? S i gn u p for o u r ema i l newsletter at T R I B E Z A .c o m

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Dine with Swine at Swift's Attic

Austin chefs from Swift's Attic, Noble Pig, Mettle, and Olivia joined with Tender Belly Farms for a five-course, pork-centric feast at Swift's Attic to benefit LifeWorks, a local nonprofit focused on helping youths and families to achieve self-sufficiency.

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Raven and Lily Launch Party

Eco-chic clothing line Raven + Lily celebrated its Spring 2014 collection with a launch party at the Westlake home of Clayton and Carly Christopher, founders of Sweet Leaf Tea and Deep Eddy Vodka.

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Dine with Swine: 1. Zack Northcutt , Tom Nall & Austin Nall 2. Stephen Dayton & Esther Sullivan 3. Brandon Fuller & Whitney Martin 4. Harlan Scott & Abby Burleson 5. Lindsey Stern & Guest 6. Natasha Powell & Natalie Paramore Raven + Lily: 7. Mylinda Royer & Carly Christopher 8. Brandon & Kirsten Dickerson 9. Evan Wilson, Grace Chiang & Claire Mead 10. Candice Deprang Boehm & Rachel Yo 11. Matt Garcia & Liz Shapiro 12. Kelsey Bentley & Sallie Wright Milam

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P h oto g r a p h y by j o h n p e s i n a & M i g u el a n g el


THE NEW CENTER FOR DOWNTOWN LIVING

SKYDECK

AMENITIES+VIEWS • • • •

STUNNING INSIDE & OUT

LUXURY SKYDECK L-SHAPED SWIMMING POOL DOG PARK & GROOMING AREA OWNERS’ CLUB ROOM

WEST VIEW The materials, designs, square footages, features and amenities depicted by artist’s or computer rendering are subject to change and no guarantee is made that the project or the condominium units will be of the same size or nature as depicted or described.


social hour

austin

Austin Film Awards

The Austin Film Society and chairs Bobbi and Mort Topfer hosted the 14th annual Texas Film Awards, honoring Rising Star Amber Heard, director

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David Gordon Green, and musician Mac Davis among other celebrated names in the industry. The night, MC'd by Luke Wilson, raised over $500,000 for programs that support the Austin film community.

Elevate Austin Austin Tidbits hosted a night of "cocktails, conversation, and carnitas" at its SXSW party, #ElevateAustin, where

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guests rang in SouthBy with PureWow and CBS Local at La Condesa's Malverde lounge.

CUSP on Rainey

CUSP by Neiman Marcus hosted a VIP SXSW party on Rainey Street, featuring live music from Atlantic Records and celebrating women who are "rocking the fashion, music, and tech scenes."

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Austin Film: 1. Ria Manuel, Martha Gonzalez & Joel Nolan 2. Celine Adams & Sam Elkin 3. Katie Sweeten & Taylor Hight 4. Lauren Reed & Todd Johnston Elevate: 5. Dani Lachowicz & Katherine Spiller 6. Amanda McArthur & Anne Campbell 7. Ricardo Dias & Rebecca Wallace 8. Edward Kim, Lillian Brown & Kelsey Whitaker CUSP: 9. Laura Villigran Johnson & Larissa de Luna 10. Chris & Abby Hendel 11. Camille Styles & Wynn Myers 12. Mistelle Johnson & Jennifer Carnes

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P h oto g r a p h y by j o h n p e s i n a & M i g u el a n g el


Austin and Washington Political Powerbroker – Clint Hackney and wife Susan

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community

column

Real Deal BY K RISTIN ARMSTRONG I llu s tr atio n by Joy G a ll ag h er

Spring is going to mean a little more to Austinites this year, be-

cause for once it actually feels like we had a winter. I have been layered in monochromatic colors long enough; it’s time to kick off my boots and wiggle my painted toes into some strappy shoes. Heck, I’m even ready to switch gears from cedar allergies to pollen, just to change things up. This is the time of year when nature goes through a transformation, breaking out of dormancy and bursting into color and new life. The air smells different. The light looks different, and green returns. The season tastes different, with new spring foods coming along. The world sounds different in the mornings, too, when we wake up to the chatter of the early birds again. It’s time to stretch and shake off the winter, come out of hibernation and renew ourselves inside and out. Spring is a wake-up call to remember what it means to feel beautiful and fully alive. But there is no amount of style that can make a woman lovely on the outside when she doesn’t feel loved and lovely on the inside. There is no dress that can make us confident. No manicure color that can make love ooze out of our hands when we touch the lives of our people. No shoes that can make us walk the walk or truly stand tall. No wrap can cover us from the chill of loneliness when our heart is running on fumes. No sunglasses can cut the glare of selfishness and help us really see people. No lipstick can make our smile real, our words kind, or our laughter contagious. No watch can keep us from wasting precious time by not being present and authentic. No lingerie is as sexy as genuine generosity, loyalty, and warmth. No earrings can sparkle the way a woman does when she really listens. No handbag is big enough for the woman who refuses to shed her baggage and travel light.

What I’m saying is this: we spend time and money making the outside pretty, and that’s not a bad thing. But what if this spring we spent some time (and maybe money?) making the inside fresh and absolutely gorgeous. I know some women who are good-looking people, but nowhere near beautiful because their hearts aren’t right. I also know some average-looking gals who are stunning, gorgeous and a magnet to men, women, children, and dogs everywhere they go—because they radiate beauty from heart center. I have a hard enough time understanding and applying this wisdom to myself, let alone translating it to my daughters as they walk the bouncy rope bridge between girls and women. But I try to convey the absolute necessity of being our real selves. I tell them that being free, open, and at ease in our own skin is the best outfit. I try to explain that we get more beautiful when we seek what is beautiful—when we do what we love, when we see the humor, when we embrace the light in ourselves and in one another. I tell my girls that when we stare at oceans, mountains, trails, sunrises, sunsets, stars, flowers, fireworks, and tables at farmers’ markets, we can’t help but absorb all of that beauty in our bones. I explain that of all the things you do to get ready to face the world, the most important thing is to brush your teeth, because a smile is the finest accessory of all. Being really beautiful—I mean being an absolute stunner, an eye-popper, a neck-twister, a knockout, a perfect ten—is well within the reach of every woman. Because the secret (shhhh!) of beauty is not the thing you think people remember about you. Beauty is a little bit about what you look like, but it’s everything about the way you make people feel.

i l lu s t r at i o n by j oy g a l l ag h er For a limite d- e dit i on p r int , c onta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c om .

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www.poshpropertiesaustin.com 512.947.9684


community profile

exposed

Andrew Zimmern BIZARRE FOODS

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ndrew Zimmern calls Minneapolis home, but the James Beard Award–winning host of the Travel Channel’s Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern has clocked some serious time eating his way through Austin and Texas. I know this firsthand—Andrew is an old friend, and for two episodes of Bizarre Foods America I played tour guide, drove him around the back roads of the Hill Country (in a vintage canary yellow pickup, sans power steering), and feasted on belt-busting amounts of smoked brisket in Lockhart. Zimmern returns to Austin this month for the Austin Food and Wine Festival (austinfoodandwinefestival.com), April 25– 27, when he’ll join chefs like Tyson Cole and Tim Love (along with top winemakers and sommeliers) for hands-on grilling demos, the crazy competitive “Rock Your Taco,” and a knockout feast under the stars. Given his significant time on the road (Zimmern travels about 240 days a year), I couldn’t resist asking about how he plane-hops in comfort and style— and about the dishes on his Austin short list. p. di s b row e

9 Questions for andrew

What do you look forward to eating when you touch down in Austin? Frankly, belt-busting amounts of brisket . . . I also love exploring the places my local food-focused friends send me. I always want to hit Barley Swine, Uchi and Uchiko, and Foreign & Domestic to see what my chef pals are up to. This year, of course, I am going to check out Qui and Rene Ortiz’s new menu at Fresa’s. Why do you think Austin food is in the national spotlight? Austinites don’t mind being experimented on in restaurants. They are patient with works in progress, and they don’t hold grudges for a misstep. There are several cities like this across America, and it keeps creativity at a highly ramped level. Over time, it creates an atmosphere for great dining to thrive. Tell us a few don’t-miss moments at the Austin Food and Wine Festival.

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The taco competition is unlike any taco events at any of the big fests. The level of creativity and expression of “taco” blow my mind. It’s superb. The music attached to the events is beyond cool, and the intimacy of the festival makes it one of my favorites. What makes AFW unique and particularly fun for you? The intimacy, the immediacy, the meat always roasting in the center of the tented site, the easy laughter of the crowd, the insanely cool lineup of local chefs that I only get to see here, the Food Republic lounge, where I get to answer questions about REAL FOOD ISSUES that other places don’t ask me. Eating pretzels from Easy Tiger . . . I could go on forever. You’re a voracious reader. (A) When do you have time, and (B) what’s on your nightstand? I am, but I’m also a workaholic insomniac with a hard-on for literature. I am just finishing Command and Control, Eric Schlosser’s riveting new book about nuclear warheads aimed at our faces. I love short fiction, and George Saunders’s Tenth of December is insane. Check out William Boyd’s new Bond book. I have that started on my iPad. What can we expect from you in 2014?

Hopefully more of everything! I am expanding my AZ Canteen restaurant work, and I have a new line of kitchenware coming out based on oven/fire/ stove-to-table products that I have seen around the world. I’m also expanding my production companies’ work and will be producing more talent that I find around the world . . . and I am working on several new shows for myself, along with more Bizarre Foods. What are you most proud of? My wife and son, and playing in this year’s Major League Baseball All-Star Game Celebrity Softball event. Of all the places you’ve traveled, where would you like to buy a few acres to retire on? Colombia is a place I just visited, and there are some pretty amazing islands just off the coast of Cartagena. I can’t resist this question: Who is at the table at your dream dinner party, and what’s on the menu? I would host a stag including Teddy Roosevelt, Truman Capote, my kid but 20 years from now, Bill Murray, Jack Nicholson, Winston Churchill, John Lennon, Leonardo da Vinci, and a few others I’m blanking on. We’re probably dining on take-out Chinese and hopefully playing cards late into the night. p h oto COURTESY OF AUSTIN FOO D & W INE FESTIVAL


exposed

Andrew's Style Essentials

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1. Baseball Cap: my Goorin Bros 'cock' hat is always on my head when my NORTH hat isn't. 2. Music: The last few years have all been about Alt-Country for me, Beck's latest (Morning Phase) is blowing my mind these days and I can't stop listening to it. Every day last week I listened to Girl From the North Country, the dylan/cash/perkins version. Something is happening to me in my old age. 3. Kicks: I collect Pumas and have to be wearing them almost all the time when I travel. The Super TT CC is a great one. 4. Skincare: I'm a Kiehls guy. The men's anti wrinkle and facial fuel energizing moisturizers are superb, all with SPF because I am always outdoors. 5. Magazine: Monocle. Addicted. I do everything on my iPad except Monocle because I just love the layout, design and the weight of it in my hands. 6. Scent: Hotel rooms can't help but smell like hotel rooms and since I spend 240 days in a year in them I like to use a room scent to keep things peaceful. Jo Malone makes several that are favorites. Pine from last year is my fave. Lime basil mandarin from this year is great too. 7. Jeans: My new obsession are my Joe's Jeans. The Brixton is my favorite pair. Goes anywhere.

tribeza.com APRIL 2014

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april Calendars arts & entertainment

Entertainment Calendar Music AN EVENING WITH JULIO IGLESIAS

April 1, 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater WHITE DENIM

April 3, 7pm Stubb’s BBQ

TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS

April 4, 7pm Stubb’s BBQ

GROUPLOVE

April 5-6 Stubb’s BBQ

LOCAL NATIVES

April 9, 7pm Stubb’s BBQ

OLD SETTLER’S MUSIC FESTIVAL

April 10-13 Salt Lick Pavillion

April 11-12 Long Center

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS TV TAPING LOS LOBOS

April 14, 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater PET SHOP BOYS

April 16, 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater THE NATIONAL

April 21-23 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater HAIM

April 23, 8pm Stubb’s BBQ VAMPIRE WEEKEND

April 24-25, 7pm Stubb’s BBQ

SHERYL CROW & JACK INGRAM

April 10, 10am Hotel San Jose

April 24, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater

JENNIFER NETTLES

ALICE IN CHAINS

JAZZ BRUNCH

April 10, 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater THE MAVERICKS

April 11, 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater

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April 28, 6:30pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater THIEVERY CORPORATION

April 29, 7pm Stubb’s BBQ

Film

METROPOLIS

April 2, 7pm Stateside at the Paramount DR. BRAIN GREENE: ICARUS AT THE EDGE OF TINE

April 10, 7pm Paramount Theatre

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR

April 13, 6pm Paramount Theatre

THE 2014 AUSTIN FLY FISHING FILM TOUR

April 17, 7pm Paramount Theatre

Theatre STOMP

April 1-6 Paramount Theatre IN THE HIGHTS

April 9-19 B. Iden Payne Theater MOTIONHOUSE

April 11, 8pm Bass Concert Hall

Comedy GEORGE LOPEZ

April 12, 7:30pm Bass Concert Hall AZIZ ANSARI

April 18-19 Bass Concert Hall

MOONTOWER COMEDY FESTIVAL

April 23-26 Various Locations

Children SESAME STREET LIVE “MAKE A NEW FRIEND”

April 3-6 Frank Erwin Center

CEDAR PARK SPRING EGGSTRAVAGANZA

April 13, 2pm Elizabeth Milburn Park PINOCCHIO

April 18-May 24 Zach Theatre

Other FIVE X SEVEN

April 2, 6:30pm Brazos Hall THE LAWN PARTY

April 3, 5pm The French Legation Museum THE ONE PARTY

April 4, 11am Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa AUSTIN UNDER 40 AWARDS

April 4, 5:30pm Austin Music Hall

LUMINARIA

April 4, 6pm Four Seasons Hotel Austin PETCASSO

April 6, 6pm AT&T Conference Center JILLIAN MICHAEL

April 6, 7pm Long Center

THE CIVIL RIGHTS SUMMIT

April 8-10 LBJ Presidential Library

UNITED WAY FOR GREATER AUSTIN ZINE RELEASE PARTY

April 10, 6pm Delta Millworks

ELIZABETH ANN SETON BOARD LIVE! GALA

April 12 Camp Mabry

AUSTIN RECOVERY SPEAKER SERIES FEATURING MATTHEW PERRY

April 15, 11:30am ACL Live at the Moody Theater

WOMEN ON THEIR TOES

April 17, 10:45am Hyatt Regency

AUSTIN FASHION WEEK

April 24-May 3 Various Locations


arts & entertainment

C A l e n da r s

Arts Calendar APRIL 5 WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

WOMEN & THEIR WORK GALLERY

ART ON 5Th

THE CONTEMPORARY

Mallory Page: Married in a Fever Opening Reception, 6pm

Leslie Wilkes: Optic Verve Through May 15

The Art of Dr. Seuss: A Retrospective and Charles Long International Touring Exhibition Through April 20 Opening Reception, 7pm

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY

Marking Time Opening Reception, 6pm DAVIS GALLERY

Second Nature: New Works by David Everett and Billy Hassell Opening Reception, 7pm APRIL 25 FLATBED PRESS AND GALLERY

Time and Weather Opening Reception, 6pm APRIL 26 SUNSET VALLEY

Sunset Valley Art Festival, 9am WOMEN & THEIR WORK GALLERY

Star Bash

Ongoing DAVIS GALLERY

Living in Layers: Peggy Weiss and Micky Hoogendijk Through April 5

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BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt Through May 18 Perception Unfolds: Looking at Deborah Hay’s Dance Through May 18 Between Mountatins and Sea: Arts of the Ancient Andes Through August 17 HARRY RANSOM CENTER

The World at War Through August 3

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

Milt Kobayashi: New Works Through April 12

event picks

16th Annual Umlauf Garden Party Insp i rat i on and L i bat i ons on the L awn

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ne of the most popular fetes of the season offers a chance to frolic on the lush and lovely grounds of Umlauf Sculpture Garden on April 24. Charles Umlauf’s sculptural talents will be enhanced by more than twenty top Austin restaurants serving samplings of their cuisine, along with wine pairings provided by Twin Liquors. The evening party, an annual gathering of Austin’s most passionate art patrons, benefits Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum’s education programs and long-term restoration. Honorary Chair Will Meredith, Event Chair Emily Pratte and Co-Chair Ashley Holt ensure you won’t want to miss what featured Artist Margo Sawyer plans to unveil. Additional works from Umlauf and other artists will be on display at an additional event at the Hotel Ella (1900 Rio Grande St) Art Exhibition Opening Event on Tuesday April 29 from 6-10pm. The event is the official unveiling of the art exhibition currently being showcased around the grounds and throughout the hotel. More information at umlaufsculpture.org. p. disbrowe

photography courtesy of umlauf sculpture garden

APRIL 12


January 18 – April 20, 2014

Charles Long

CATALIN and Pet Sounds

Jones Center and Laguna Gloria

May 3 – August 31, 2014 Opening Weekend Events, May 2–4

A Secret Affair: Selections from the Fuhrman Family Collection Jones Center and Laguna Gloria

Orly Genger Current

Laguna Gloria

Jones Center 700 Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701

Laguna Gloria 3809 West 35th Street Austin, Texas 78703

thecontemporaryaustin.org Director’s Circle: Michael and Jeanne Klein, Suzanne Deal Booth and David G. Booth, Michael A. Chesser, Johnna and Stephen Jones, The Still Water Foundation, Melba and Ted Whatley, Anonymous 2014 Exhibition Sponsors: Deborah Green and Clayton Aynesworth, Susan and Richard Marcus, Jane Schweppe, Diane Land and Steve Adler, Sue Ellen Stavrand and John Harcourt, Don Mullins, Amanda and Brad Nelsen, Pedernales Cellars, Gail and Rodney Susholtz, Lora Reynolds and Quincy Lee, Janet and Wilson G. Allen, Shalini Ramanathan and Chris Tomlinson, Teresa and Darrell Windham, Austin Ventures, Oxford Commercial, Vinson & Elkins LLP, Lindsey and Mark Hanna Additional Support Generously Provided By: ACL Live at The Moody Theater, Pedernales Cellars, Luxe Interiors + Design, The Texas Tribune, Hotel Saint Cecilia, Hotel San Jose, W Austin, Four Seasons Hotel Austin, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin Hotel, The Austin Chronicle, KUT/KUTX

This project is funded and supported in part by a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts and in part by the City of Austin Economic Growth & Redevelopment Services Office/Cultural Arts Division believing an investment in the Arts is an investment in Austin’s future. Visit Austin at NowPlayingAustin.com.


museums & galleries

Art Spaces Museums The Contemporary austin: laguna gloria

3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org. the contemporary austin: Jones Center

exhibition spotlight

Mallory Page at Wally Workman Gallery

M

allory Page tells a story with every brushstroke that she paints. Color to canvas, there emerges a pure sensory image that the eye can experience. It is by means of this same process that Page has fashioned her latest collection of works, premiering as the exhibit “Married in a Fever” at Wally Workman Gallery on April 5. “Married” tells the story of love through sensory, often monochromatic fields. Each painting is simple upon initial observation but, upon further reflection, reveals its intricacies through light, color, and layering. That is the beauty of much of Page’s work: subtle complexity. “Over the years I studied artists’ writings and discovered how they have interpreted and used love,” Page says. “Some were historically reckless, using the fuel from one new love to another. New love, crazy love, true love, self-love, love lost, and passion—each holds a different connotation of profound inspiration. Love can compel feelings that can be intensely moving or profoundly destructive.” Page calls New Orleans her home, but it’s safe to say that Austin is more than happy to have her and her work. The show will run at Wally Workman until April 26. More information at wallyworkmangallery.com and mallorypage.com. e. banks

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org Austin Children’s Museum

201 Colorado St. (512) 472 2499 Hours: Tu 10–5, W 10–8, Th–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 austinkids.org austin galleries

5804 Lookout Mountain Dr.

(512) 495 9363 By Appt. Only austingalleries.com

Blanton Museum of Art

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org

The Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–6, Su 12–6 thestoryoftexas.com Elisabet Ney Museum

304 E. 44th St.

(512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney French Legation Museum

802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org George Washington Carver Museum

1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver Harry Ransom Center

300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ Library and Museum

2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org

Mexic–Arte Museum

419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. Henry Museum

409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5

Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: W–F 10–4:30, Sa–Su 1–4:30 umlaufsculpture.org

image courtesy of mallory page

arts & entertainment


arts & entertainment

Galleries Art on 5th

3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com The Art Gallery at John-William Interiors

3010 W. Anderson Ln. (512) 451 5511 Hours: M–Sa 10–6, Su 12–5 jwinteriors.com Artworks Gallery

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

Austin Art Garage

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com Austin Art Space Gallery and Studios

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com capital fine art

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com champion

800 Brazos St. (512) 354 1035 By Appt. Only championcontemporary.com Creative Research Laboratory

2832 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 322 2099 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–5 uts.cc.utexas.edu/~crlab

Davis Gallery

837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com Flatbed Press

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com Gallery Black Lagoon

4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com Gallery Shoal Creek

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3 galleryshoalcreek.com grayDUCK gallery

608 W. Monroe Dr. (512) 826 5334 Hours: W 11-6, Th 4-8, F-Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com Jean–Marc Fray Gallery

1009 W. 6th St. (512) 457 0077 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 jeanmarcfray.com La Peña

(512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

Mondo Gallery

1011 West Lynn Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 (512) 236 1333 studiotenarts.com

4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com The Nancy Wilson Scanlan Gallery

6500 St. Stephen’s Dr. (512) 327 1213 Hours: M-F 9-5 sstx.org Okay Mountain Gallery

1619 E. Cesar Chavez St. Sa 1-5 or by appointment (512) 293 5177 okaymountain.com

Wally Workman Gallery

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

Women & Their Work

Pro–Jex Gallery

Yard Dog

1710 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. C (512) 472 7707 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–4 Red Space Gallery

1203 W. 49th St. By appointment only redspacegallery.com

Russell Collection Fine Art

Lora Reynolds Gallery

sofa

1009 W. 6th St., #101

502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By Appt. Only fluentcollab.org

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

Lotus Gallery

Testsite

1118 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1831 Hours: M-Sa 10-5, Su 12-4

Positive Images

227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W-Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

studio 10

1319 Rosewood Ave. By appointment only sofagallerytx.com Stephen L. Clark Gallery

1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828

1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

Alternative Spaces ARTPOST: The Center for Creative Expression

4704 E. Cesar Chavez St. artpostaustin.com Austin Presence

330 Bee Cave Rd., #700 (512) 306 9636 Hours: Tu–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austinpresence.com

M u s e u m s & Ga l l e r i e s

Bay6 Gallery & Studios

Roi James

5305 Bolm Rd. (512) 553 3849 By appointment only bay6studios.com

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

Big Medium

Space 12

5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 bigmedium.org Clarksville Pottery & Galleries

4001 N. Lamar Blvd., #550 (512) 454 9079 Hours: M-Sa 11-6, Su 1-4 Co-Lab Project Space

613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By appointment only colabspace.org farewell Books

913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 476 DOMY Hours: Mon-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 domystore.com Julia C. Butridge Gallery

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9:30, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/ dougherty/gallery.htm Pump Project Art Complex

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org

Quattro Gallery

12971 Pond Springs Rd. (512) 219 3150 Hours: M–Tu 10–3, W–Sa 11–4 quattrogallery.com

3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

Fredericksburg AGAVE GALLERY

208 E. San Antonio St. Hours: M-Sa 10-5 (830) 990 1727 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL

234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY

314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY

214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com WHISTLE PIK

425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 To have your gallery considered for listing in the Arts Guide, please send a request to events @tribeza.com.

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b y l e i g h pat t e r s o n

sneak peek

W h en sh e ’ s n ot sel l i n g b ag s , w e wa n t ed to k n ow:

Jen, what’s in your bag? Pur s e “Handmade in India, this bag is my personal favorite

because of the mix of structured leather and feminine details. And it tucks perfectly into my laptop tote.” $5 “Back when I was in high school, my dad told me that I should ALWAYS carry cash with me. I'm not sure if his advice is still relevant today, but you'll never find me without at least a little cash.” Ch apstick & Lip G loss “I've always been a plain Chap-

Stick kind of gal, but upon turning 30 this past December I decided it's time to transition to lip gloss.” Coin Pur s e “I needed something cute to organize my busi-

ness cards in my clutch and this handwoven ikat coin purse does the trick. In ikat weaving, the threads are dyed individually and then woven together on a hand loom.” Girl sGuild Keych a in “My friends Cheyenne and Di-

IN MY BAG : Jen Lewis of Purse and Clutch

Jen Lewis was frustrated with working in the nonprofit world when she “accidentally” started a fair-trade retail concept that directly benefits international artisans. Last year, one of Lewis’s college friends asked for help selling bags made by artisan groups in India. “People associate a certain ‘look’ with fair trade,” Lewis says, “but I looked at these bags and realized that they were totally beautiful and contemporary-looking; they just needed to be marketed differently.” Enter Purse and Clutch, Lewis’s new venture that offers fair-trade bags in an online, user-friendly marketplace. Since launching the site in April 2013, Lewis has started working with ten international artisan groups. “My goal is to meet the need of buyers who want something stylish, but want to be able to support economic growth in

ana are the GirlsGuild co-founders [a local organization that pairs girls with creative and entrepreneurial female mentors; girlsguild.com]. Cheyenne designed the P&C logo, and Diana was instrumental in our About page. I love the reminder on my key ring of the amazing collaborative community we have here in Austin.” Book “I never want to be that girl engrossed in her smart-

phone while waiting for a meeting. I usually have a book of some sort with me and am currently loving this philosophical read reminding me to focus on the present. "On the Shortness of Life: Life is Long if you Know how to Use It" by Seneca, a Spanishborn philosopher of Rome who lived in the first century A.D.” Paper & Pen “I have the worst memory of anyone I know.

Having a place to jot down things as they come to mind is imperative in running a business.”

developing countries,” Lewis says.

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briggo.com

p h oto g r a p h y by m i c h a el a . m u l l er


SM A LL BATCH , BIG FL AVOR

S tephan i e M c C lenny of C onf i t u ras On the heels of a third Good Food Award (for pickled blueberries!) and in anticipation of the East Austin Urban Farm Tour (eastaustinurbanfarmtour.com) on April 13, Stephanie McClenny of small-batch jam and preserves kitchen Confituras shares a special recipe with TRIBEZA, and dishes on how she plans to literally preserve local canning history. Q: Tell me more about pickled blueberries. A: These sweet yet tangy preserves have a cult following when they come out every July! They are delicious when served on a charcuterie plate with cheese and pâté. Q: Can you share a bit of canning wisdom for an amateur? A: Our best advice is to keep it small. You really can make just a few

1. Heat berries and water in a medium saucepan over high heat until boiling, then lower heat and simmer for about 15-20 minutes or until the berries have lost most of their color. 2. Strain berries out (save them to make jam!) and return berry-colored water to pan. add sugar. bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for about 5 minutes until sugar is completely dissolved (you will no feel grit on the bottom of the pan) and the syrup has thickened somewhat. 3. Taste the syrup at this point to determine if you like the level of rosemary infusion (remember, a little goes a long way!). you can do this bringing a teaspoon of syrup to room temperature quickly in the freezer on a plate. 4. Add a few drops of red wine vinegar at this point (if using) to make a tangy 'shrub', or fruit vinegar. 5. If canning, pour mixture into hot jars and process for 10 minutes in a hot water bath. alternatively, allow to cool and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. 6. To serve, place 1-2 ounces syrup in 6 ounces Topo Chico, cava, or other sparkling wine. Garnish with a sprig of fresh rosemary.

jars of jam at a time. Also, use high-quality, fresh ingredients (local if you can get them), and follow recipes and instructions to the letter at first. You must know the rules before you can break them.

aus tin obsession s

Q: What are you working on right now?

T h r ee lo c a l t h i n g s

A: We are very excited about our new project: Preserving Austin. We recently won the top grant from the Austin Food & Wine Alliance and will be using it to collect and archive oral histories from local canners with assistance from Foodways Texas. Preserving Austin also includes the process of building out a 1979 VW Transporter van—our “ConfiTour-Bus”—complete with a recording booth for the oral histories, a small jam-making demo kitchen, and a traveling canning museum that will visit farmers' markets, schools, fairs, and other events. Learn more about Confituras and where to pick up their delicious and seasonal preserves at confituras.net.

TOMS S hoe s founder B l a k e M yc o s k i e can ’t get enough of 1. Perla’s Seafood & Oyster Bar “Whenever [my wife] Heather and I are in town, we always make time for Perla’s: have to order the fish tacos and oysters. ”

2. Uchiko: “A favorite sushi spot: we order the Brussels sprouts cooked with fish caramel, the Madai Japanese bream, and the P–38 roll with Japanese yellowtail.

3. By George

str awberry rosemary syrup/shrub 2 pounds fragrant, local strawberries 2 cups sugar 1 quart water 1 small bunch fresh rosemary red wine vinegar to taste (optional, to make a 'shrub' or tangy fruit vinegar) i l lu s t r at i o n s by a s h l e y h o r s l e y | b l a k e p h oto co u rt e s y o f g e t t y i m ag e s

“I love stopping by and checking out what new stuff they have. It’s always a great stop whether I’m looking for something for myself or a gift for my wife.”

The popular shoe and eyewear company TOMS opened its second U.S. brick-and-mortar location last month in Austin (1401 S. Congress Ave.). During SXSW, TOMS also announced the newest component of the brand’s charity-driven umbrella: TOMS Roasting Co. Extending its “One for One” principle, the roasting company will provide “one week of clean water to a person in need for every bag of coffee purchased.” More information at toms.com tribeza.com APRIL 2014

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art style of

Fa s h i o n P h oto g r a p h y by A n d r e w C h a n A rt P h oto g r a p h y by N i co l e M l a k a r S t y l i n g b y L e i g h Pat t e r s o n & As h l e y H o r s l e y H a i r + M a k e u p b y G a b r i e l a C ot to n o f J o s e L u i s S a lo n M o d e l Av e r y o f Wa l l f lo w e r M a n a g e m e n t

After the muted palette of winteR, we’re eager for

a splash of color. Classic shapes in pretty pastel hues and pops of unexpected brightness create the magic of spring style. This year, our muse is The Contemporary Austin’s upcoming “Five x Seven” show on April 2. On the following pages you’ll find unique, quirky ensembles that are each inspired by a specific work of art in the museum’s fifteenth annual exhibition, where hundreds

Top by Aeron, $349;

of artists create and sell unique five-by-seven inch pieces. The art-

Necklace by Growing

work is all displayed anonymously and priced at $150, with the artist’s name only revealed after the purchase.

Jewelry, $175, both available at Kick Pleat. Pants by The Row, $890; Shoes

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Af t e r t h e b i g r e v e a l o n Ap r i l 2 , v i s i t T R I B E Z A .c o m t o

by Givenchy, $770,

d i s c o v e r w h i c h a r t i s t s c r e at e d t h e “ F i v e X S e v e n ”

both available at

w o r k s t h at i n s p i r e d o u r s p r i n g fa s h i o n p i c k s !

By George.

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Top by Parker, $187; Pants by Theory, $265, Jacket by Theory, $415; all available at Neiman Marcus. Hat by Etudes, $318; Shoes by Dieppa Restrepo, $243, both available at Kick Pleat.

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Blazer by Joie, $288; Dress by Alexander Wang, $295; Sandal by Vince, $125; Earrings by Oscar de la Renta, $345; all available at Neiman Marcus.


Top by Maiyet, $525; Pant by The Row, $2,290; both available at By George. Necklace by Last Horizon, $353, available at Kick Pleat.

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Dress by Aeron, $397; Necklace by Double Take, $331; Shoes by Ancient Greek, $243; Bag by Clare Vivier, $201; all available at Kick Pleat.

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Overalls by Townson, $143; Shirt by Rebecca Taylor, $325; Shoes by Rag and Bone, $495; Earrings by Oscar de la Renta, $345; all available at Neiman Marcus.


As light fades on Rain Lily Farm, a table laden the South’s ultimate springtime feast beckons friends around the table.

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aus tin tables

b y p a u l a d i s b r o w e | p h o t o g r a p h y b y k at e l e s u e u r

In East Austin, friends welcome spring with a crawfish boil, verdant fields, and potent rhubarb margaritas (pooches welcome, no utensils required).

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au s t in t ab les Sometimes all you need is a margarita in a mason jar and a porch on which to sip it.

here were plenty of things to like about work-

Rain Lily Farm with partner Kim Beal, was in need of a farmer.

ing the land in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. In

“I’ve wanted to work and run Rain Lily for some time,” David

fact, it was the prospect of the fertile soil, cool,

says. “When I was working at Montesino, I’d deliver vegetables

moist air, and the local abundance (berries, hazelnuts, seafood, and

here. I’d walk around the property because I love its smallness,

Pinot Noir) that first enticed David Burk and Melody McClary to

and it’s clean and pretty. It’s a quaint garden with flowers planted

leave their jobs as property managers at Montesino Ranch in Wim-

in front of the rows and an opportunity to grow great food, but

berley and move west in 2012.

it’s manageable—no tractors, no long-distance driving to sell my

But after a couple years, the couple started to pine for friends in

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goods.”

Texas and the community that they’d developed in Austin. Family

As luck would have it, Farmhouse Delivery, Scherzer’s company

also played a part; David’s sister, Amanda, was about to have her

that delivers local produce and foodstuffs to your doorstep, was

first baby. Almost immediately after they started to ponder the idea

also looking for a buyer. Proximity to Austin, a manageable lot,

of coming home, they learned that Stephanie Scherzer, who owns

the opportunity to do what they do best . . . sold!

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Fresh squeezed lime juice and rhubarb syrup create the tart-sweet base for the perfect spring cocktail.

When in doubt, serve free hot dogs and cold draft beer. Shirt ($79) and rattlesnake Lucchese boots ($999) from Allens Boots.

The essentials for any good boil: plenty of red spices, aromatics like onion and lemon, and potatoes and corn to soak up the seasonings.

*Get the recip e f or Rhu barb M arg aritas at T r i b e za .co m

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au s t in tab les A branch of fresh bay leaves add an herbaceous perfume to the pot.

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Hot, spice-infused vegetables cool while the crawfish simmer; a 25-pound bag of Louisiana mudbugs.

A field of sprouting leaves makes a dreamy backdrop for an easy evening; David scratches a show-stealing puppy named Little Fannie.

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Farmhouse Delivery colleagues and cans of local beer round out Melody and David’s (center) peel-and-eat feast.

So in January they loaded Melody’s 1996 Volkswagen Golf with

pearl snap shirts and jeans, flip-flops and cowboy boots, babies and the

cookbooks, plants, and an old iron fan, and David packed his 1971 Ford

occasional squawking chicken—that the folks at Farmhouse Delivery

pickup truck. “We were both worried about each other’s car breaking

do best, and an extension of their deep commitment to building com-

down, but not our own,” David says with a laugh. The highlight of the

munity through food.

trek was driving through Flagstaff at sunrise (even though it was 10 degrees outside and the Golf had no heater).

64

While the mudbugs are purged in a tank of cold water, Melody prepares tart-sweet rhubarb syrup that will infuse margaritas made with

These days, David and Melody once again find themselves living

silver tequila and lime juice. A bowlful of fragrant red spices is poured

alongside green and purple rows of sprouting produce. As the farmer,

into the rolling boil, along with a tumble of potatoes, onions, corn, and

David spends his days pruning olive and fig trees, as well as tending

lemon. After the vegetables are tender, the crawfish are plunged into

chickens, ducks, and a goat named Magpie. He grows plants from seed,

the spicy bath.

keeps up with the hoeing and weeding, and occasionally plays a lit-

When the light begins to fade, the food is ready. The entire meal is

tle Ping-Pong. As the buyer for Farmhouse Delivery, Melody procures

spread over an antique German table covered with butcher paper, and

produce, meats, and bakery items, and builds relationships with their

everybody rolls up their sleeves and digs in. A blue heeler puppy scam-

community of farmers, ranchers, and suppliers.

pers around and an old ranch dog snoozes on the porch. A table along-

Each spring, David’s birthday coincides with crawfish season in

side a field is a familiar pleasure for David and Melody, but this par-

Louisiana, so they typically celebrate with a spicy boil. After all, ev-

ticular meal has something extra-special—it tastes like coming home.

eryone knows things taste better outside, particularly when eaten with

“I’ve always loved this time of year,” David says. “It’s almost spring and

spice-dusted fingers, shoulder to shoulder with friends, and with a ba-

everybody is ready to get outside and enjoy the weather. If the food is

sin of iced beer cans waiting nearby. It’s the kind of casual gathering—

good, then life is good. It’s easy for us that way.”

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aus tin tabl es

A vintage German beer garden table (scored from Round Top) holds wildflowers cut from the farm; friends gather under a pecan tree for one of spring’s fleeting pleasures.

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au s t in tab les

Newspaper or butcher paper make the best tablecloth; order your Louisiana crawfish at Quality Seafood (5621 Airport Blvd, 512.861.7020).

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b y pa u l a d i s b r o w e | p h oto g r a p h y b y j e s s i c a pag e s styling by ashley horsley

T o k i c k o f f t h i s s e a s o n o f s t r a p p y s a n da l s , s p o r t y e s pad r i l l e s , a n d c r i s p w h i t e Va n s , w e a s k e d f i v e s h o e - o b s e s s e d lo c a l ta s t e m a k e r s to s h a r e w h at t h e y w i l l b e s t e p p i n g o u t in this spring. Their personal styles run the gamut from c l a s s i c to c o w b oy to s n e a k e r s — s o f r o m h e e l s to h i g h to p s , w e ’ v e g ot yo u c o v e r e d

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Inneva Wovens ($200)

nike.com Breathable and lightweight, Inneva Wovens can take you from the gym to out at night. One of the most eye-catching shoes you’ll see, thanks to the woven detailing. O w n e r , A potheca r y C a f é a n d W i n e B a r

t h e s n e a k ER f r e a k Potent espresso drinks, a simple menu of freshly prepared foods, a carefree spot to sip wine and a dog-friendly patio create a laid-back atmosphere at Apothecary Café and Wine Bar (apothecaryaustin.com). It’s no coincidence that this vibe matches owner Niraj Mehdiratta’s personal style, which he describes as clean and minimal. “I gravitate toward

Runner Alloy ($265)

brands that emulate this aesthetic and focus on fit and construction,

etq-amsterdam.com

labels like A.P.C., Acne Studios, Our Legacy, and Public School,” he says. “A great pair of sneakers, like the ones from Common Projects,

Menswear aficionados are coveting Amsterdam-based ETQ and its spring collection of footwear. Check out these suede

can get me from an early photo shoot in the morning to behind the bar

trainers, a perfect complement to spring-

at Apothecary in the evening to promoting and catching a show with

weight T-shirts and jeans.

my Holy Mountain crew at night.” (Mehdiratta is also a co-owner of the music venue Holy Mountain.) Chuck Taylor High Tops ($75)

eastdance.com Because no sneaker collection is complete without. I love this all-black-everything pair from Converse.

Common Projects Original Vintage Low ($449)

needsupply.com Common Projects are the Holy Grail, my favorite line of sneakers, hands down. They’re luxe with impeccable construction and a minimal aesthetic—perfect for a night out. *Nice Kicks (2815 Guadalupe St) has a wide range of Nikes and Vans. Check out By George (524 N Lamar Blvd) for a selection of Common Projects.

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White Vans ($45)

zappos.com When it comes to classics, nothing says spring like a crisp pair of white Vans. They’re easy to wear with anything, look great as they age, and are super-affordable. tribeza.com

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Suede-Heeled Sandals ($59.90)

zara.com I find I’m wearing these Zara suede sandals with everything! The blue serves as a neutral, and the lower heel gives me height (something I desperately need!) without being uncomfortable. These shoes easily go from day to night.


Delman “Darci” Bootie ($498)

nordstrom.com These lace-up suede booties make me so happy! When they’re worn with shorts and skirts, the nude color really helps elongate your legs. I’d wear these with everything from cropped jeans and a blazer during the day to a mini skirt at night.

st y l e d i r ecto r f o r goti d bits .com

t h e pa r t y g i r l Copper Caprio ($110)

There are worse things than a job that demands attending a

vincecamuto.com

steady stream of fabulous parties. That’s the lucky charge for

I just ordered these and cannot wait to wear them every day to the pool with jean shorts.

Anne Campbell, the style director for gotidbits.com, a website that delivers “the inside scoop for the gal about town” on everything from lipstick to cocktail spots. Campbell’s functions and fetes require shoes that are both fetching and comfortable.

Soludos Espadrilles ($43)

soludos.com I’m a mom of two by day, and these cute Soludos espadrilles allow me to get the kids in and out of car seats comfortably. Black Gladiator Heels

*Also available at Adelante (1206 W 38th

($129)

St), Dog & Pony (2712 Guadalupe St), and

macys.com I’ve added some gladiator sandals to my wardrobe, and I find that I put them on more than any of my other shoes. Black goes with everything.

Saint Bernard Sports (401 W 3rd St). Vivi Yellow Espadrille ($32)

valentinashoes.com I think I may love dressing my two daughters even more than I enjoy dressing myself! I adore these yellow espadrilles from local Valentina Shoes. The golden color is so reminiscent of summer . . . I may have to get them in pink, white, and red too!

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Chippewa Engineer Boot ($300)

stagaustin.com I gravitate toward black and classic, generally. ow n e r , the n eo n j u n g l e

t h e URBAN COWBOY As a kid, Evan Voyles divided his time between Austin and his family’s ranch in the Hill Country. So it’s no surprise that the talent behind the Neon Jungle (theneonjungle.com), a custom shop devoted to the iconic imagery of American roadside signage, is almost always clad in cowboy boots (custom-made, created from his own designs). But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t succumb to seasonal whimsy. “For spring I will switch to my green pair of boots, and retire the winter reds for the moment,” he says.

The Dash ($369)

helmboots.com Black SeaVees Army Issue Low ($43)

stagaustin.com A new twist on an old style of what I call tennis shoes.

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Helm’s lace-up desert-style boot has a kind of two-tone texture in an espresso color with milk-white soles. Many of my friends swear by their Helm boots and shoes, as does my wife, designer Gale Chovan.


Custom Cowboy Boots (from $1,095)

kimmelbootcompany.com Kimmel Boots tribeza.com

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Common Projects Modern Leather Slide ($375)

kickpleat.com I feel that this is a modern take on the flip-flop.

ow n e r , k ic k p l eat Clio Wedge Ancient Greek Sandals ($260)

t h e MIMIMALIST

kickpleat.com

With regular appearances in Lucky and Vogue, Wendi Martin has created a local niche and a national following for Kick Pleat, her urban-chic boutique. Her flawless eye for classic pieces

This is such a simple and lovely spring/ summer shoe. I like that the foot looks naked. Also there is the ever-so-slight wedge, so they are flattering on the leg.

(from both up-and-coming designers and internationally known

The nude color works with just about

brands) have made her a favorite with local fashionistas. Kick

anything—black, white, and color—so

Pleat’s newly expanded shoe section is an extension of Koletar’s

these shoes are very versatile.

well-edited aesthetic. “I am a casual person, and while I love to wear beautiful things, they have to be comfortable,” she says. “For spring I am drawn to a shoe that is simple, works with many items and dimensions, and of course works with our weather.”

Rachel Comey Mars

Common Projects Low-Heeled

Ankle Boot ($386)

Strap Sandal ($459)

kickpleat.com

kickpleat.com

This is leather with no dye or color, so the shoe

I like the accessible heel that is comfortable and

will age beautifully as you wear it. I like where

wearable. I also appreciate that the shoe is femi-

this bootie hits, low on the ankle. That makes

nine and minimal. Shoes have been quite chunky

it wearable with many bottoms and flattering

for a while, and although I like that too, this feels

on the leg. The wooden heel is beautiful and

refreshing because there are thin, simple straps.

the nude color makes it wearable with any

These shoes are timeless.

color. I would wear this shoe year-round.

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Robert Clergerie Frak Platform Sandal ($520)

kickpleat.com The platform shoe can elevate many outfits. I like that they’re casual and comfortable, but still stylish. They’re flattering on the leg and wearable with pants, skirts, dresses, and jeans. If I have a difficult dimension to deal with, like an oversized pant, I just add these guys and it all works. tribeza.com

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The Christophe Spat Boot ($199–$299)

dandysuit.com Boots that are as cozy as socks, and a style you don’t see around anymore. Plus they’re casual and affordable. Dandy’s reproduced the first ready-to-wear button-up spat boot on the market two years ago.


Jeffery West Lemmy Boot ($575)

jeffery-west.us Beautiful and entirely unique English shoes.

ow n e r , d a n d y ’ s

t h e s o u t h e r n da n dy Stacy Adams Madison

As the owner of Dandy’s, a downtown boutique that

Boot ($199)

specializes in turn-of-the-century gentlemen’s wear

stacyadams.com This is a classic, comfortable, and afford-

(think suits, bow ties, even ye olde mustache wax),

able cap-toe boot that has been made

Chris Bykowski knows a thing or two about channeling

since the 1870s. Some people are intimidat-

your inner Gatsby. His proclivity toward classic, time-

ed by the shine, but after you get yourself

less construction will transform any dude into a proper

a pair and break them in/rough them up a little, they look amazing.

Southern gent, and extend well beyond wildflower season. “I’m not the type of guy to wear linen shorts, bright colors, and canvas deck shoes in the spring,” he says. “I wear boots all year long. It’s a lifestyle.”

The Strand Cap-Toe 78N Hobnail Boot ($385)

dandysuit.com The most durable work boot I’ve ever seen, and at a great

Oxford ($365)

dandysuit.com A beautiful, classic cap-toe brogue; my favorite on the market.

price. Dandy’s can order these for you from England, handmade to your specs.

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Stephanie is wearing the esby Westlake Dress in over-dyed black ($250).


profile in

style

Stephanie Beard Women’s clothing with a menswear sensibility.

That’s what Austin designer Stephanie Beard

set out to create in the inaugural collection esby (said like the phonetic pronunciation of “SB,” Beard’s initials), her first clothing line, which offers timeless, season-less pieces for women that emphasize comfort and proper fit. Originally from North Carolina, Beard moved to New York in 2003, and gained a technical background in the children’s design department at Tommy Hilfiger. From there, she went on to work at Levi’s and eventually Converse, where she spent the majority of her New York career in the menswear department. “I worked a lot on the Converse One Star line, which is sold at Target,” Beard explains. “Being involved in the whole process, from fabrics and wash to factory communication, I really focused on what you could do to get as much value as possible in a piece of clothing.” After five years at Converse, Beard left the East Coast in 2012, in search of a place that would allow her to live more affordably and throw all her energy (and savings) into her own clothing line, an idea that had been simmering in the back of her mind for years. Enter Austin. At home, Beard speaks with an easy drawl about her own style. Her daily “uniform,” she explains, is a mix of comfort, proper fit, and a handful of specific pieces that she’s overly sentimental about: for example, a light and perfectly versatile chambray shirt; high-waisted skinny jeans that she pairs with a blousy top or tunic; a couple of Australian-discovered basics that just have, she says, “the best weight.” Her one-bedroom apartment in southeast Austin, which she shares with her boyfriend, Nick Boyles, is similarly utilitarian. “Simple can still be interesting,” she says. And at 650 square feet (“believe me, it feels huge compared to the 250-square-foot place I lived in before this”), Beard has made the most of it, creating a home that feels consistent with her design principles. “In New York, I had a friend build me some great reclaimed-shelving units that are the central part of the living space,” she explains. Many of the pieces inside have a similar provenance, made either by friends or by Beard. The neutrality of the wood furniture is balanced by a healthy number of plants (Beard rattles off: “I’m obsessed with desert plants, clay-textured pieces, cactus, succulents . . .”) and textiles, vintage or purchased from “seriously weird rug websites,” like the gorgeous white-and-dark-brown-patterned Moroccan rug in her bedroom. It’s this same mix of personality and function that drives esby, which Beard funded in March through a Kickstarter campaign. This allowed her to quit her day job at STAG and dive into her dream—the first run of her line is being produced in a small factory in New Orleans and will be released in boutiques and on her website this summer. And despite the line’s underlying simplicity, esby isn’t just for the minimalist: “Busy women need to feel confident in what they’re wearing,” Beard says. “It takes me fifteen minutes to get ready and feel good because everything that I’m wearing just fits! That’s what I’m about—cutting out what’s unnecessary and figuring out what works.” Learn more about Stephanie, follow the development of esby, and preorder season one of her collection at esbyapparel.com. l . patterson P h oto g r a p h y by w y n n m y er s

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profile in style

3.

1.

2.

4. 1. Bookshelf mementos: A painting of Beard’s dog, Pete; a hand-sculpted sandstone piece Beard made in college; a vintage Woodworks lamp. 2. Beard’s business card holder, from a sample she got while working at STAG. 3. The [esby] “East End Tee” ($150) in sky grey. “One of my favorite pieces from season one because it goes with everything.” 4. Raw North Carolina cotton piled in an IKEA basket. 5. “[Beard’s boyfriend] Nick and I built this eight-foot, two-seater desk with stained wood and plumbing piping so we both have enough room to work in our apartment.” 6. “Most of my jewelry pieces were gifts from friends traveling the world. The


9.

7.

5.

6.

8.

10.

leather cuff is from the San Telmo street fair in Argentina.” 7 “I bought this hat by Scala while living in NYC, but I wear it more since I've moved: it's a great Austin hat.” 8. “The [esby] large scarf in the blue floral Indian Ikat pattern ($98) is just as great used as a park blanket during warmer months.” 9. A headboard Beard made from found pallets painted with a whitewash stain. Hung above the bed is a cactus print from Mercury Design Studio. 10. Pete the Boston Terrier. P h oto g r a p h y by w y n n m y er s

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style

“My biggest vice is buying design books,” he says. “They are always inspiring, and each page is a unique lesson in problem solving.”

behind the scenes

The Look Maker C h r i s B i l h e i m e r designs a l b u m co v ers f or bands l ike R . E. M . and G reen Day, and creates the hip v ibe behind some o f A u stin ’ s coo l est brands.

Y

ou might not know Chris Bilheimer's name, but you’ve probably held his work in your hands. The designer has been R.E.M.'s art director since 1994, and he's been the creative force behind

all of Green Day's releases since 1997's Nimrod. The albums he's designed have garnered combined sales of more than 30 million copies and have received three Grammy nominations for packaging. How did the road to rock stars start? In 1989, Bilheimer was a 23-year-old student pursuing an art and painting degree at the University of Georgia. In the small town of Athens, it was no big deal to run into Michael Stipe at a bar called the Globe or at the 40 Watt Club, a popular music venue. He eventually met Stipe through a mutual friend at the end of R.E.M.’s Green tour, and after a life-changing road trip (see opposite page) he was hired by the band full-time. So while his friends were washing dishes in restaurant kitchens or pulling pints of ale to make ends meet, Biheimer was hanging with one of the hottest bands on the planet. When it comes to college jobs, he hit the lottery. His fortuitous friendship and talent led to a 20-year staff position that was a springboard for an impressive career. Since then he’s worked for dozens of bands, including Nirvana, Weezer, Beck, and Smashing Pumpkins, and has designed for comedians David Cross, Sarah Silverman, and more, as well as for film and television posters and campaigns. To create the merchandise, Web design, and packaging that surround a new album, Bilheimer spent years flying back and forth to Los Angeles to camp out in the art department of Warner Brothers, and work with other major labels, among them Dreamworks, Capital, Geffen, and Interscope, creating the array of items like billboards, canvas banners, stand-up cardboard CD holders, and window clings (as well as other crazy stuff like View-Master cartridges and random inflatables) that Bilheimer’s basement studio.

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would announce a new album. The industry has changed a lot since

P h oto g r a p h y by l e a h ov er s t r ee t


the intimacy and immediacy of those days. “Now it’s pretty common for me to design an album for a band I’ve never met,” he says. He admits he misses some of the ephemera, and the crescendo of a project, but that nostalgia is tempered by a lack of waste. “It's a bummer to see so much paper and plastic end up in the garbage,” he says. Bilheimer and his wife, Hillary, moved to Austin three years ago. She was determined to learn the art of creating handmade shoes. Through six degrees of an album cover that Bilheimer designed, they met Joshua Bingaman, the owner of Helm Boots. That led to Hillary becoming Helm’s brand manager and Bilheimer’s latest project of rebranding the boot company. “The boots that Helm has designed for the future are evolving the American heritage aesthetic into newer territory, and I wanted a design that would match that,” he says. “It should feel new and

Hand-drawing the type for a poster for Billy Reid's SXSW showcase.

modern but with a classic foundation.” Ultimately the artist sees himself as a problem solver. “Every job is a collaboration,” he says. “I’m a conduit for other people’s visions.” Chris and Hillary love Austin because it feels like “a big metro Athens.” After being in such a small college town, where everyone is abuzz with more or less the same cultural events, “I actually love the fact that a band like the Pixies can blow through town and we don’t even know about it.” p. disbrowe Best Michael Stipe Moment “There are too many to count, but one is

in 1993. I flew to L.A. and met up with Michael and we drove across country back to Athens. We spent five days driving and meeting people and taking photos. It was on this trip that we saw a bunch of old road signs that inspired Michael for some T-shirt designs. After the trip, I was hired to design the shirts, since I had seen exactly what he was talking about and that led to my full-time job. In Utero by Nirvana had just come out, and we listened to it the entire trip. On cassette.”

Left: Some of his favorite possessions: a Steve Keane painting of his American Idiot album cover and a thank-you note from Bob Odenkirk and David Cross of Mr. Show. Right: “I took thousands of Polaroids over the years. Some became album covers. This batch is from an exhibit in Athens in 2011.”

His recently adopted pooch, Nina. tribeza.com april 2014

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FOR THE LAST 25 YEARS

In 1989, we set out to change the way child abuse cases were handled. Since then, we have provided 71,823 services to children, 41,700 services to adults, and 13,322 forensic interviews. Thank you Austin for your unwavering support of abused children in our community. www.centerforchildprotection.org


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style

i n s p i r at i o n b oa r d

I ns pi r at i on B oa r d :

Richard Cole, Paleo Denim

For denim designer Richard Cole, creating the perfect pair of jeans is like paleontology. As a child growing up outside Cleveland, Cole would accompany his father—an amateur paleontologist—on fossil-hunting adventures. “On those trips you get plenty of opportunities to broadly ponder evolution and the changes in time,” he explains. “Also, no tools that you bring survive the quarries—they’re too tough—so whatever gear you bring gets torn up and changes on a much faster scale.” For Cole, these early observations evolved into an overarching philosophy about work and craft, and a personal interest in intricate craftsmanship and old-school techniques. His ultimate medium of choice? Denim. His Austin-based line, Paleo Denim, officially launched last year after a successfully funded Kickstarter campaign. In Paleo, Cole aims to create a ready-to-wear line of jeans that regards every element—from stitching to cut—with a history-influenced but local sensibility. “In general, I’m inspired by anything that explores or exposes time,” Cole says. “Denim is so transfixing because it is in constant flux and only gets more beautiful as it ages. The pair of jeans you bought last year is not the same as the one you have now.” Cole is a self-taught designer; his mother showed him how to sew when he was home on college break as a film major at Syracuse. The process sparked an obsessive interest: “I started tearing apart old Levi’s for the patterns and hunting down industrial sewing machines,” he says. Inspired by meticulous, intricately stitched Japanese denim and old-school construction methods that allow for lengthy labor time (“If it's worth doing, it's worth doing well”), Cole spent the last four years in Austin learning more about the craft, hauling a growing collection of vintage sewing machines with him along the way. Researching denim and the best way to source it has taken him from West Texas to North Carolina to Japan. He spent 2013 figuring out how to transform Paleo from a hobCole is currently in a development phase of creating two new styles: a skinny and tapered leg. His jeans—as well as small leather goods and bike accessories—can be

by to a full-time endeavor. Cole recently showcased his wares at

found at paleodenim.com. Paleo also has a drop-off box for denim repair that chain-

several artisan markets and pop-up shops and has since seen the

stitch hemming at Sam Hill vintage menswear (1710 E. 2nd Street ).

project evolve from “three machines and a kitchen table to a full production workshop.” L . patterson


richard's 2.

4.

3.

1.

Inspiration Board

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15.

8. 5.

13.

7. 11.

6.

10.

12.

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1. Traditional Hmong Batik Textile “A beautiful piece from Laos, batik-dyed with natural indigo. This dyeing method has been used for thousands of years; it really helps put the American obsession with denim into perspective.” 2. 1960s Union Special Parts Manual “It contains hand-drawn technical illustrations of every variant of every component in the machine.” 3. 12.5-Inch Wiss #20 Fabric Shears “It might seem strange but I'm very partial to these shears—they've cut almost every pair of jeans I've ever made.” 4. Samurai 5000XX, Lot 11 Jeans “The first pair of Japanese jeans I ever purchased. The construction and fabrics were far and away better than anything I had ever handled.” 5. Key Ring and Thread Snipper “Daily tools; the snipper is my constant companion in the shop.” 6. Lightning Magazine “The Japanese obsession with Americana has brought the craft of denim to new heights. Short of visiting Okayama prefecture, Lightning magazine is the best place to see otaku-grade denim.” 7. Selle Anatomica Saddle “A great hybrid of traditional leather and modern design. It looks great and handles 10 miles of commuting a day.” 8. Grandfather’s drafting tools “My grandfather was an engineer and I use his tools when drafting patterns.” 9. Hiawatha vintage tobacco tin “I love the typography [on the exterior] but what’s really inspiring is the attitude that nothing should be designed to be immediately disposable.” 10. Vintage Oil Can “I use it to oil the sewing machines at the start of every day.” 11. Motorcycle Windscreen Shard “From my first motorcycle trip when I was 19.” 12. Union Special Receipt “I bought my Union Special overlocker from the original owner and it came with a wealth of documents in the drawer. This receipt is dated June 14th, 1960. Little things like this make tracking down the old machines worth it.” 13. Fern fossil from St. Clair, PA “This is the kind of thing my father and I would look for on our fossil-hunting trips. This fern imprint has survived 300 million years but it’s still amazingly fragile.” 14. Gold Thread “The cotton/poly core base thread for all my jeans, a custom thread color I developed with American and Efird of Mt. Holly, NC.” 15. Tan Thread “A waxed polyester five-cord thread for all of my leather work, sourced in Maine.” photography by bi l l sa l l ans

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THURSDAY APRIL 24, 2014 6: 30 –9: 30 PM FEATURED ARTIST Margo Sawyer HONORARY CHAIR Will Meredith EVENT CHAIR Emily Pratte EVENT CO-CHAIR Ashley Holt MUSIC BY Nash Hernandez Orchestra Tim Lopez and Friends

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style

street fa shion

Cheer Up Charlie's

Carly Beiler

Vintage Wrangler jean jacket, Vince jeans, L.L. Bean boots, and handmade jewelry made from sterling silver, turquoise, coral, and citrine.

Inside the new downtown home of beloved dive bar Cheer Up

Charlie’s—at the former Club de Ville space—there’s a palpable energy that’s impossible to ignore. The bar has created its own fun, bold, and characterfilled voice in Austin’s nightlife scene, and if the line that winds down Red River to get in on a Saturday night is any evidence: it’s working. This is the welcoming committee: From vintage Jammerz pajama pants to re-imagined Callahan’s General Store cowboy boots, Cheer Up Charlie’s colorful cast of barkeeps defines Austin cool. Think wardrobes where wacky Goodwill scores meet Diane Von Furstenberg, where more is definitely more, and where every article of clothing—from a black T-shirt to a turquoise pinky ring—has a story attached. l. patterson

900 Red River St. | cheerupcharlies.com Dustin Gaudet

Gradfather’s vintage Levi’s jean jacket, Nudie jeans, T-shirt from 1995 Houston Mogwai concert, laceless Asics Tiger sneakers, and a “sound guy hat.”

Maggie Lea

Madewell shirt, Urban Outfitters jeans, ASOS shoes.

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Cole Evans

His mom’s fishpatterned shirt, Levi’s 511 jeans, and Sperry Topsiders.

P h oto g r a p h y by j e ss i c a pag e s


Candice Bertalan

All vintage—found at Austin thrift stores—with H&M jeans.

Brian Almaraz

Vintage Diane Von Furstenberg short-sleeve sweatshirt, late 1980s Jammerz pants from Prototype Vintage, vintage leather oxfords, “Neopolitan ice cream jacket” from Treasure City Thrift Store, sunglasses from Buffalo Exchange, and “a gold chain a friend left at my house.”

Max Beiler

Vintage camo jacket, Fresh Jive jeans, BDG T-shirt and hoodie, Tretorn shoes.

Paul Schmidt

Shiva Lingam necklace from Nature's Treasures, vintage gold bolo tie, black turtleneck from Blue Velvet, suede jacket and circle sunglasses from Buffalo Exchange, boots from Callahan's General Store.

David Dubois

Kill City Black Jeans, combat boots, BloodMilk cross necklace, Ethiopian and Tuareg jewelry, Ray Ban sunglasses. P h oto g r a p h y by j e ss i c a pag e s

India Gail

Shirt from a friend’s clothing swap, Urban Outfitters bell bottoms, Steve Madden platform shoes. tribeza.com april 2014

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A New World of Timeless

Furnishings

Transitional Hand made Pieces from Mexico, Peru The Mediterranean The Orient & Texas too!

12600 Hill Country Blvd., Ste R-140 • Bee Caves, Texas 78738 512.454.8603 • Mon-Sat 10am- 9pm • Sun 12pm - 6pm www.cierrainteriors.com

The World at War, 1914–1918 Drawing on the Ransom Center’s extensive collections, this exhibition illuminates the experience of the war from the point of view of its participants and observers, preserved through letters, drafts, and diaries; memoirs and novels; and photographs and propaganda posters. Through August 3, 2014 21st and Guadalupe Streets Free admission, donations welcome www.hrc.utexas.edu

2 346 G UADAL UPE ST REET | 5 12.236.1435

Find Us On Facebook & Instagram @cjaneaustin


style

pick

Ethiopian Leather tote, with a hand-carved Indian wood bangle and a hand-beaded Kenyan shimmer bangle. Each piece is made by women employed through R+L.

The Spring '14 Lookbook, shot by Dickerson's husband, Brandon, while visiting R+L's newest partnership with the Maasai tribal women in Ambolselli, Kenya.

The R+L Distressed Leather tote from Ethiopia, with a plant-dyed North Indian scarf, and Indian wood and metal tassel necklace.

Raven + Lily

Raven + Lily's CEO and Co-founder Kirsten Dickerson in the brand's new brickand-mortar storefront on Manor Rd.

Charity- dri v en brand gets a loca l face with new M anor Road storefront

T

Part of a growing group of businesses opening or relocating east to he work of 800 international women showcased in a humble space on Manor Road. Such is the brick-and-mortar face of Ra- Manor Road this year, Raven + Lily will neighbor Sugar Mama’s Bakeven + Lily, the Austin-based, socially conscious lifestyle brand shop and Jesse Griffiths’s anticipated Dai Due restaurant. Inside, the founded by Kirsten Dickerson and Sophia Lin, which opens its first store- shop will stock its own brand as well as homewares and accessories from like-minded companies. front on Manor Road on April 2. The design of the shop was conceived by Austin architects Matt The company, Dickerson explains, was born out of a desire to combine her passions for both style and ethical design. Started in 2008, Raven + Garcia and Bart Whatley, with an eye toward creating a storefront to Lily takes a fashion-forward approach to artisan-made products, high- “showcase our commitment to being an ethical brand,” Dickerson says. lighting and directly benefiting particular regions or women’s groups All the furniture pieces and fixtures are handmade by U.S. and international artisans, and many of the design details were undertaken by through one-of-a-kind apparel, jewelry, and accessories collections. Dickerson, who is the brand’s CEO, has spent 20 years in interna- local artists and designers, from Joe Swec’s hand-painted exterior sign tional humanitarian work, but she also has experience as an art direc- to Dave Massman’s walnut, metal, and brass studio tables to Ramona tor and stylist (often for the music videos and films made by her hus- Press’s screen-printed shopping bags and wrapping paper. They also band, local filmmaker Brandon Dickerson). Raven + Lily, she explains, partnered with the Royal Design Studio to create hand-painted murals perfectly combines the two worlds. From the start, Dickerson has been based on Raven + Lily stencils, which “help raise funds for skills training intentional about contextualizing the company’s role, straddling both of women in Ethiopia,” Dickerson says. And with plans to hugely expand the company this year—the goal is to the trend-driven retail world and the growing genre of socially driven lifestyle brands. “People want to wear Raven + Lily and buy our prod- double the number of artisans the company employs by the end of 2014—a physical store is just the latest incarnation of this local face uct not even knowing the ethical value behind it,” she says. 2406 Manor Rd. with with global intentions. l. patterson “Though everything is truly story-driven design, it has to ravenandlily.com be competitive and fashion-forward to be sustainable.”

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dessert

pick

Dolce Neve Gelato

A

mong the many recent imports to Austin’s booming restaurant scene, it’s hard to imagine a more purely pleasurable addition than Dolce Neve, a new gelato shop located on the increasingly bustling strip of South First Street. Dolce Neve (Italian for “sweet snow”) is housed in a quaint, cheery bungalow designed by Austin legend Dick Clark. But inside the doors the vibe is pure Italy, with an authentic gelato experience (complete with fedoras and charming accents) scooped up by people who have it in their DNA. Say “Ciao” to Francesca, Marco, and Leo, a trio of Italian entrepreneurs with a penchant for silky frozen sweets. Francesca Ferrarese, the store’s Gelato Maestro, trained at Carpigiani Gelato University and refined her skills at Pisa’s Gelateria De’ Coltelli, one of Italy’s most famous gelato shops. Along with her brother, Marco Ferrarese, and her fiancé, Leo Silvestrini, she brought her expertise to Austin to fulfill their shared dream of starting their own gelateria. So what’s the big deal—and the big dif-

100

april 2014 tribeza.com

Crisp cones bring out the kid in everyone.

A clean, well-lighted space makes for a cheery refuge on South First.

Make mine a double: chocolate and pistachio nirvana.

ference—between gelato and ice cream? It comes down to the process and the ingredients. First of all, gelato is churned slowly and incorporates less whipped air, which results in a denser, silkier texture and more-concentrated flavors. And unlike ice cream, gelato is made with less cream and fewer, if any, egg yolks, resulting in a lower fat content. But let’s face it, we’re not counting calories here; gelato is all about pleasure. On any given day Dolce Neve features about 20 different flavors ($3.95 a single scoop, $4.90 for a double) each made in small batches to ensure freshness. There are classics like pistachio, hazelnut, and stracciatella, the Italian take on chocolate chip. There are also seasonal blends like cream with strawberries or dark chocolate with black cherries. You’ll also find modern combinations like carrot with blood orange, and ginger, ricotta with honey and pistachio, and goat cheese speckled with Texas pecans. It’s hard to go wrong with the flavor of the moment--salted caramel—but the best option

1713 S. 1st Street 512.804.5568 www.dolcenevegelato.com

might be the namesake flavor, Crema Dolce Neve, a rich, decadent egg custard brightened with a kiss of lemon. The refreshing sorbetto selections feature punchy citrus like Texas grapefruit and Meyer lemon. Adventurous eaters will enjoy trying savory gelatos, such as Parmigiano-Reggiano, and the occasional vegan and dairy-free offerings. Careful attention is paid to how the gelato is stored and displayed. Don’t expect a garish carnival of colors under plastic sneeze guards. Instead, as in many of Italy’s finest gelaterias, selections are displayed in a sleek pozetti cabinet. Each flavor is covered with a fitted stainless-steel lid, protecting it from the harmful effects of sun, air, heat, and humidity and preventing it from forming an unappetizing film on top. In addition to cones and cups, Dolce Neve offers frozen novelties like pretty gelato sandwiches ($5.10), granitas, and gelato-on-a-stick treats. There’s even affogato, one of my favorite Italian dessert “drinks”—a shot of hot espresso poured over two scoops of gelato. It’s hard to imagine a better end to an evening. k. spezia P h oto g r a p h y by j e ss i c a pag e s


TRULUCK’S DOWNTOWN

IS NOW OPEN! T H A N K Y O U F O R Y O U R PAT I E N C E D U R I N G O U R R E M O D E L

Riley Hutton General Manager Austin Downtown

Our new restaurant features an expanded lounge, additional private party rooms, an elegant dining room and panoramic views of the Austin skyline. We look forward to serving you!

Downtown 4th and Colorado 512 482 9000 Arboretum 183 and Great Hills Trail 512 794 8300 Make your reservation today at www.trulucks.com


Dinner & Drinks

dining guide

From brisket to brussels sprouts, our picks of the best places to eat and drink 219 WEST

APOTHECARY CAFÉ

THE BACKSPACE

and bar hotspot stays

octopus is a perfect dish,

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

612 W 6th St

AND WINE BAR

507 San Jacinto

open until 2am on the

as are the potatoes bravas.

1115 E 11th St

(512) 474 2194

4800 Burnet Rd

(512) 474 9899

weekends.

Reservations recom-

(512) 542 9542

Lively warehouse district

(512) 371 1600

Delicious thin crust pizza

mended.

A cozy, French-inspired

hangout, with a rooftop

Apothecary’s calm ambi-

and wine selections in a

BAR LAMAR

bar and some of the best

ance and excellent wine

cozy setting.

(at the downtown Whole

BARLEY SWINE

happy hour tapas in town.

selection make for a classy

Foods Market)

2024 S Lamar Blvd St

34TH STREET CAFÉ

fast, lunch, and dinner.

spot to get wine and a

BANGER’S SAUSAGE

525 N. Lamar Blvd

(512) 394 8150

BOTTICELLI’S

quick bite with friends.

HOUSE AND BEER

(512) 345 5000

Chef Bryce Gilmore offers

1321 S Congress Ave

GARDEN

Grab a bottle and a snack

small plates with locally

(512) 916 1315

1005 W 34th St (512) 371 3400

ARRO

79 Rainey St

to share, then the Whole

sourced ingredients which

An inviting trattoria with

Consistently good Ameri-

601 W 6th St

(512) 386 1656

Foods bartenders will

pair with craft beers and

warm Tuscan colors.

can fare that toes the

(512) 992 2776

Banger’s brings the Ger-

uncork it and provide

fine wines, guests sit at

Small bar up front and

casual/fancy line—good

From Easy Tiger and 24

man biergarten tradition

glasses for you at no extra

communal high top tables.

cozy booths in back.

for weeknight dinners

Diner’s ELM Restaurant

stateside with an array of

charge.

and weekend indulgences

Group, this recently

artisan sausages and over

alike. Order the chicken

opened spot offers rich

100 beers on tap.

piccata.

French favorites and an excellent wine list.

360 UNO TRATTORIA

102

bistro serving up break-

BENJI'S CANTINA BAR MIRABEAU

BOULDIN CREEK CAFÉ

716 W 6th St

1900 S 1st St

800 W 6th St Ste 100

(512) 476 8226

(512) 416 1601

BAR CONGRESS

(512) 436 9633

Rooftop dining on West

Affordable wholesome

200 Congress Ave

Another unique addition

6th, Benji’s offers a fresh,

vegetarian cuisine, includ-

& WINE BAR

ASIA CAFÉ

(512) 827 2755

to Austin’s dining scene

innovative approach to

ing soups, salads, and

3801 N Capital of TX Hwy

8650 Spicewood Springs

A classy middle ground

from Chef Parind Vora. A

Tex-Mex where seafood

sandwiches.

(512) 327 5505

Rd, Ste 115

between downtown eater-

diverse and approachable

and Mexican influences

Great espresso bar and a

(512) 331 5788

ies Second Bar + Kitchen,

menu with rice bowls,

adorn the menu.

mostly-Italian wine list,

Authentic Chinese cuisine

and the upscale Congress

sandwiches, cioppino, and

complete with an outdoor

in a comfortable atmo-

restaurant, Bar Congress

more, with a patio offering

BESS BISTRO

(512) 382 1189

patio for sipping.

sphere.

stirs up classic cocktails

a view of bustling down-

500 W 6th St

Argentinean specialties

and delicious upscale fare.

town Austin.

(512) 477 2377

like meat sandwiches on

A rustic, underground

baguettes, empanadas,

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ 1201 E 6th St

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR

ASTI TRATTORIA

319 Congress Ave

408 E 43rd St

BAR CHI SUSHI

BARLATA

restaurant owned by

and tasty pastries. Inti-

(512) 472 1884

(512) 451 1218

206 Colorado St

1500 S Lamar Ste 150

Sandra Bullock serving

mate patio seating.

Classic American offer-

The chic little Hyde Park

(512) 382 5557

(512) 473 2211

up French-inspired dishes

ings in a charming spot;

trattoria offers delicious

A great place to stop when

Hoppin' Spanish tapas

with Southern twists: The

BUFALINA

perfect spot for a decadent

Italian cuisine, like saf-

you’re going out for a night

restaurant in a modern

fried green tomatoes are

1519 E Cesar Chavez

downtown brunch.

fron risotto with seafood.

on the town, this sushi

South Austin setting. The

the perfect indulgence.

(512) 524 2523

april 2014 tribeza.com


v i e w t h e e n t i r e r e s ta u r a n t g u i d e o n l i n e at t r i b e z a .co m

CURRYOSITY

EAST-SIDe SHOWROOM

Mexico’s interior. Dine al

cocktail al fresco on the

1100 E 6th St

fresco on the charming

lovely patio.

(512) 467 4280

Rainey Street patio.

Wood-fired pizza in an

sharp aesthetics, and

elegant, trendy vibe; get

excellent service make it a

the Fresca pie.

refreshing indulgence on

(512) 574 3691

West Sixth Street. Indoor

An exploration of aromat-

Delicious vintage cocktails

CAFÉ JOSIE

and outdoor seating is

ic curries across the Asian

in an eccentric space.

ELEPHANT ROOM

616 W 34th St

1200 W 6th St

available.

continent, from India to

Enjoy local art, music, and

315 Congress Ave

(512) 420 8400

Thailand.

cuisine by Sonya Cote.

(512) 473 2279

Fresh, inspired sandwich-

Cool jazz in a dark base-

es, soups, and salads in

EASY TIGER

ment; go early for an inti-

a charming, refashioned

709 E 6th St

mate cocktail, or late for

cottage and porch.

(512) 614 4972

jams in a packed house.

(512) 322 9226 Innovative and flavorful

CONGRESS

plates with fresh ingredients.

200 Congress Ave (512) 827 2760

2209 E Cesar Chavez St

DARUMA RAMEN 612-B E 6th St

FOODHEADS

CANTINA LAREDO

An upscale dining expe-

(512) 369 3897

201 W 3rd St

rience with great wine

Rich chicken broth-based

Delicious bake shop up-

(512) 542 9670

pairings.

ramen and a simple,

stairs and beer garden

ELIZABETH STREET

2330 W N Loop Blvd

veggie-friendly menu from

downstairs. Enjoy the

CAFÉ

(512) 459 4121

An excellent upscale

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

Mexican restaurant with a

CONTIGO

the owners of the popular

signature house-made

1501 S 1st St

An Austin institution for

late-night happy hour.

2027 Anchor Ln

Kome Sushi Kitchen on

sausages.

(512) 291 2881

over 30 years, serving up

(512) 614 2260

Airport Blvd.

A charming French-

delicious interior Mexican

EDEN EAST

Vietnamese eatery with

menu and a killer brunch.

755 Springdale Rd

a colorful menu of pho,

Reservations recom-

(512) 428 6500

banh mi, and more. Vi-

mended!

Weekends at the farm

brant and comfortable surrounding patio.

Chavez

Ranch-to-table cuisine

111 E Cesar Chavez

and an elegant take on

(512) 478 2991

bar fare.

Local celebrity chef Shawn

DRISKILL HOTEL BAR 604 Brazos St (512) 391 7162

Cirkiel has turned what

COUNTER CAFÉ

With a blend of his-

have never been more deli-

used to be a drab TGI

626 N Lamar Blvd

tory, class, and charm the

cious: Chef Sonya Cote of

Friday's into Austin's hot-

(512) 708 8800

Driskill Bar is unbeatable

Hillside Farmacy teamed

EPICERIE

(512) 653 1187

test new dining venture.

It’s nothing fancy, but

if you want a classic, old-

up with Springdale Farms

2307 Hancock Dr

Crowned Best BBQ Res-

Chavez boasts homemade

this tiny shotgun-style

school Austin experience.

this year to create a (liter-

(512) 371 6840

taurant in America by Bon

mole and tamales, and a

diner has some of the city’s

al) farm-to-table concept

A café and grocery with

Appetit, Aaron Franklin’s

gorgeous view overlooking

best breakfast offerings

restaurant on the East

both Louisiana and

eponymous eatery is a

Lady Bird Lake.

(and the lines outside to

side, serving a seasonal

French sensibilities by

true Austin institution. Go

prix fixe menu under a the

Thomas Keller-trained

early and be prepared to

Sarah McIntosh.

wait! (It is worth it.)

Due Forni 106 E 6th St Ste 106

match). Both the pancakes

(512) 391 9300

CHINATOWN

and hamburger are leg-

Serving up Roman and

canopy of a majestic Texas

3407 Greystone Dr, (512)

endary.

Neapolitan style pizza

elm tree.

from two specially de-

343 9307 & 107 W 5th St (512) 637 8888

COUNTER CULTURE

signed brick ovens, Due

Some of the best tradi-

2337 E Cesar Chavez St

Forni combines the art of

(512) 524 1540

simple, delicious food and

town. Fast service in the

An East Austin haven for

timeless, easy wine.

dining room and delivery

vegans and vegetarians.

tional Chinese food in

is available. CRU WINE BAR

EAST SIDE KING 1618 E 6th St

900 E 11th St

FABI + ROSI EL ALMA

509 Hearn St

1025 Barton Springs Rd

(512) 236 0642

(512) 609 8923

A husband and wife team

Chef-driven, authentic

cook up delicious Europe-

Mexican cuisine.

an-style dishes like pork schnitzel and paella.

EL NARANJO

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

238 W 2nd St

(512) 422 5884

85 Rainey St

FINO RESTAURANT

1200 W 6th St

(512) 472 9463

Chefs Paul Qui, Moto

(512) 474 2776

PATIO & BAR

(512) 297 2525

An excellent place for a

Utsonomaya and Ek Tim-

Husband and wife team

2905 San Gabriel St

date; drink a bottle of

rek offer out-of-this-world

Iliana de la Vega and

(512) 474 2905

crowded, Clark’s’ extensive

wine at one of the cozy

pan-Asian food from three

Ernesto Torrealba serve

Mediterranean plates for

caviar and oyster menu,

sidewalk tables.

trailers.

up authentic cuisine from

sharing. Sip a handcrafted

Small and typically

FRANKLIN BARBECUE

Frank 407 Colorado St (512) 494 6916 Their official motto proclaims, "Hot dogs and cold beer," and...yep, that's basically it. Bacon-infused bloodies, a dozen different artisan hot dog options, and one of the best beer lists in town: Frank is both a markedly more civil alternative to dirty downtown night and your hangover's best friend. tribeza.com april 2014

103


v i e w t h e e n t i r e r e s ta u r a n t g u i d e o n l i n e at t r i b e z a .co m

FRESA’S

4800 Burnet

a spontaneous night out.

JUSTINE’S BRASSERIE

Delectable cocktails, tasty

LUCKY ROBOT

915 N Lamar Blvd

(512) 458 1100

Fresh and simple. Try the

4710 E 5th St

tacos and appetizers,

1303 S Congress Ave

(512) 428 5077

Upscale-casual Italian;

roasted olives and the kale

(512) 385 2900

delicious main courses,

(512) 444 8081

Tasty chicken al carbon,

solid pasta specials, in-

salad too!

With its French bistro

all inspired by the hip and

A futuristic dining experi-

refreshing agua frescas, and

credible desserts (orange

fare, impressive cocktails,

bohemian Condesa neigh-

ence on Congress, inspired

the best guacamole around.

olive oil cake!), and an

JACK ALLEN’S

and charming décor inside

borhood in Mexico City.

by the vibrant culture and

interesting wine list.

KITCHEN

and out, Justine’s has Aus-

7720 Hwy 71 W

tin looking east. Expect a

LAMBERTS DOWN-

crowd, even late at night.

TOWN BARBECUE

LUCY’S FRIED

401 W 2nd St

CHICKEN

GOODALL'S KITCHEN AND BAR

HAYMAKER

(512) 852 8558

1900 Rio Grande St

2310 Manor Rd

Savor country favorites

(512) 495 1800

(512) 243 6702

from Chef Jack Gilmore

KOME

(512) 494 1500

5408 Burnet Rd

Modern spins on Ameri-

It's comfort food meets

on the covered patio.

4917 Airport Blvd

Not your standard BBQ

(512) 514 0664 &

can classics and locally-

sports bar meets beer

(512) 712 5700

fare, meats are given an

2218 College Ave

sourced veggie sides inside

pub in Cherrywood, an

JEFFREY’S BAR

More than just sushi, this

Austin twist, like the rib-

(512) 297 2423

the new Hotel Ella.

easygoing place to get a

1204 W Lynn St

eatery serves up Japanese

eye glazed with brown

This year the South Con-

craft beer and elevated bar

(512) 4775584

comfort food, including de-

sugar and mustard. Tucked

gress favorite opened a

G’RAJ MAHAL

food. Get the namesake:

This historic Clarksville

licious, homemade ramen.

away in the historic Schnei-

new outpost off Burnet

91 Red River St

The Haymaker is an open-

favorite got a welcome

der Brothers Building in the

Road. Different loca-

(512) 480 2255

faced roast beef sandwich,

facelift this year from

KOREA HOUSE RES-

2nd Street District.

tion, same straight-up

With an extensive yet

topped with flavorful slaw,

Larry McGuire, all while

TAURANT & SUSHI BAR

cozy covered patio, G’Raj

tomatoes, a fried egg, deca-

maintaining the execu-

2700 W Anderson Lane

LA TRAVIATA

Moon pies to fried green

Mahal offers a surprising

dent gruyere sauce, and—

tion, top-notch service,

Ste 501

314 Congress Ave

tomatoes to corn muffins

amount of ambiance for a

wait for it—french fries.

and luxurious but wel-

(512) 458 2477

(512) 479 8131

to the crème de la crème:

coming atmosphere that

Grab a four-top and cook

Authentic Italian in a cozy

fried chicken.

HILLSIDE FARMACY

makes Jeffrey’s an old

your own bulgogi in the

downtown setting; known

GREEN PASTURES

1209 E 11th St

Austin staple.

middle of the table.

for their wickedly rich and

MANUEL’S

RESTAURANT

(512) 628 0168

delicious Spaghetti alla

310 Congress Ave

811 W Live Oak St

Hillside Farmacy is locat-

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

KORIENTE

Carbonara.

(512) 472 7555 &

(512) 444 4747

ed in a beautifully restored

1601 Waterston Ave

621 E 7th St

Feast on continental

50s-style pharmacy with

(512) 477-5584

(512) 275 0852

LENOIR

(512) 345 1042

brunch under the patio’s

a perfect porch for people

Rustic, continental fare

Healthy, tasty Korean

1807 S 1st St

Definitely not your stan-

majestic oaks. Try the

watching on the East Side.

with an emphasis on fresh,

options like bulgogi and

(512) 215 9778

dard Tex-Mex, upscale

milk punch: it’s legendary!

Oysters, cheese plates, and

local and organic ingredi-

curry dishes all served up

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a

Manuel’s hits all the right

nightly dinner specials.

ents. Serving lunch, after-

by the friendly staff.

luxurious French-inspired

notes for it’s upscale Mexi-

prix-fixe meal in an inti-

can cuisine, cleanly presented in a classy setting.

food trailer.

GUERO’S TACO BAR 1412 S Congress Ave & 4800 Burnet Rd (512) 447 7688 No frills tacos and one of the most famous patios on South Congress. Try the Queso Flameado with chorizo and jalapenos.

104

cuisine of Tokyo.

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, a beautiful patio, and unique cocktails. HOUSE PIZZERIA 5111 Airport Blvd

GUSTO ITALIAN

(512) 600 4999

KITCHEN & WINE BAR

A choice pizza place for

noon snacks, and evening

Southern goodness, from

10201 Jollyville Rd

cocktails, the shady porch

LA BARBECUE

mate dining room and table

is the perfect spot for a

1200 E 6th St

that seats just 34 diners.

late-afternoon paloma.

(512) 605 9696 LOBBY LOUNGE AT

JULIO’S

La Barbecue whips up

THE FOUR SEASONS

(512) 236 1022

4230 Duval St

classic barbecue with free

98 San Jacinto Blvd

Created by Rainey Street

(512) 452 1040

beer and live music.

(512) 478 4500

proprietor Bridget Dun-

Pass time in the luxurious

lap, Mettle offers a diverse,

An old school, family-run

507 Calles St

Tex-Mex favorite in Hyde

LA CONDESA

confines of the Four Sea-

often-experimental menu

Park. Cash only! Order the

400 W 2nd St

sons’ lobby bar, where they

exciting for omnivores and

green chicken enchiladas.

(512) 499 0300

whip up both classic and

vegetarians alike.

adventurous cocktails. april 2014 tribeza.com

METTLE

In the heart of South First,


P E R F E C T LY

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CO-CHAIRS: DEB DAVIS GROVES & MARTHA COONS

Brazos Hall • Downtown Austin PRESENTED BY:

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v i e w t h e e n t i r e r e s ta u r a n t g u i d e o n l i n e at t r i b e z a .co m

MOONSHINE

homes. A spacious patio

QUATTRO GATTI

for late-night noshing:

SOUTH CONGRESS

straight from Naples and

303 Red River St

overlooks Lady Bird Lake.

RISTORANTE

think triple-fried duck fat

CAFÉ

classic antipasti.

908 Congress Ave

fries and crispy Brussels

1600 S Congress Ave

sprouts.

(512) 447 3905

THE CLAY PIT

A south Austin hotspot,

1601 Guadalupe St

(512) 236 9599 Both a popular din-

PARKSIDE

(512) 476 3131

ner and brunch spot,

301 E 6th St

Downtown Italian restau-

Moonshine’s decadent

(512) 474 9898

rant dishing up delicious

SALVATION PIZZA

we recommend South

(512) 322 5131

Southern comfort food is

This downtown spot is

antipasti and huge por-

624 W 34th St

Congress Café’s legend-

Zip in for a buffet-style

a downtown favorite.

crowded, but the happy

tions of Italian fare; great

(512) 535 0076

ary brunch: carrot cake

lunch or settle in for a long

hour–with half-price oys-

date-night spot.

A cozy spot that serves up

French toast and migas

dinner of contemporary

delectable flavor combina-

are to die for.

Indian cuisine. THE DOJO SAKE BAR

NORTH

ters and tasty cocktails—is

11506 Century Oaks Ter

a local favorite.

QUI

tions of New Haven style

1600 E 6th St

pizza pies in an inviting

PÉCHÉ

SWAY

Guests enjoy modern

(512) 436 9626

bungalow.

1417 S 1st St

AND IZAKAYA

Italian cuisine in a sleek

208 W 4th St

Chef Paul Qui’s new HQ

(512) 326 1999

9070 Research Blvd

interior at this Domain

(512) 494 4011

is one of the hottest new

SANTA RITA TEX-MEX

The culinary masterminds

(512) 458 3900

standout.

Enjoy prohibition-style

spots in town for Japanese

CANTINA

behind La Condesa cook

It's small plates and (in-

cocktails at Austin’s first

food: an unparalleled

1206 W 38th St

up Thai cuisine with a

tentionally) slow service at

NO VA KITCHEN & BAR

absinthe bar, alongside

dining experience set

(512) 419 7482 &

modern twist. An intimate

the Dojo, a new Japanese

87 Rainey St

standout dishes of smoked

under an airy, beautiful

5900 W Slaughter Ln

outdoor area, complete

izakaya restaurant near

(512) 382 5651

duck salad and citrus-

backdrop.

Ste 550

with a Thai spirit house,

Burnet and 183. A great,

Subtle design elements

dusted salmon.

(512) 288 5100

makes for an unforget-

vegetarian-friendly spot to

RAMEN TATSU-YA

Fresh ingredients, tradi-

table experience.

go with a group and order

8557 Research Blvd Ste 126

tional recipes, and out-

(512) 339 4440

make the space cohesive and modern, and its

PERLA’S SEAFOOD &

creative twists on classic,

OYSTER BAR

(512) 339 0855

standing margaritas com-

SWIFT’S ATTIC

all of the kimchee-rice

comforting dishes from a

1400 S Congress Ave

Japanese comfort food at

bined with bright décor,

315 Congress Ave

dishes are superb, and the

pork belly/sirloin burger

(512) 291 7300

its finest in Austin’s first

attentive service, and solid

(512) 482 8842

beet and avocado tempura

to seasonally topped flat-

A South Congress staple:

brick and mortar, ramen-

menu offerings.

Overlooking Congress

is a deep-fried treat worth

bread pizza are downright

Expect the freshest fish

centric eatery.

Avenue, Swift’s Attic

indulging in.

delicious.

and oysters flown in daily

SECOND BAR +

draws from global inspira-

from both coasts, carefully

RANCH 616

KITCHEN

tions and serves up inven-

THE GROVE WINE BAR

OLIVIA

prepared with simple yet

616 Nueces St

200 Congress Ave

tive cocktails in a historic

6317 Bee Cave Rd

2043 S Lamar Blvd

elegant flavors. Go early

(512) 479 7616

(512) 827 2750

downtown building.

(512) 327 8822

(512) 804 2700

on a nice day to eat oysters

Eclectic and spicy! Mmm,

Another venture from

A brunch favorite em-

and people-watch on their

the crispy oysters, or the

Chef David Bull, Second

TAKOBA

wine bar and Italian

phasizing fresh and local

fantastic front porch.

Ranch Slice of Ice, best

offers a swanky bistro

1411 E 7th St

restaurant. The wine list

in town.

experience in the heart of

(512) 628 4466

boasts more than 250

the 2nd Street District.

Bold, authentic flavors

wines by the bottle.

produce; an exciting and diverse menu, from foie

POLVO’S

gras to French toast.

2004 S 1st St

SALTY SOW

Lively, popular Westlake

with ingredients imported

(512) 441 5446

1917 Manor Rd

SIENA RISTORANTE

straight from Mexico; cozy

TRACE

PAGGI HOUSE

Between the salsa bar,

(512) 391 2337

TOSCANA

outdoor seating.

200 Lavaca St

200 Lee Barton Dr

patio seating, and deli-

Salty Sow serves up cre-

6203 Capital of Tx Hwy

(512) 473 3700

cious margaritas, this is

ative signature drinks,

(512) 349 7667

THE BACKSPACE

At W Austin, TRACE

Eclectic fine dining in an

one of Austin’s beloved

including a yummy Blue

Set in a Tuscan-style villa,

507 San Jacinto St

focuses on responsibly- and

inviting setting of one of

Tex-Mex icons.

berry-Lemon Thyme

Siena captures the essence

(512) 474 9899

locally-sourced ingredients

Smash. The food menu,

of its namesake region.

Exquisite pizzas hot out of

from Texan farmers and ar-

the wood-fired brick oven

tisans. Great outdoor seat-

Austin’s famous landmark

heavy with sophisticated

106

everything on the menu;

gastropub fare, is perfect april 2014 tribeza.com

(512) 542 3660

ing and excellent service.


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style

last look

3.

1.

Setting the Perfect Spring Table She had us at cold gin, an abundance of

orchids, and the tagline “I feel a party coming on.” We’ve written about Carla McDonald, noted local hostess extraordinaire, philanthropist, and businesswoman, before. So we were de-

6.

lighted (but not surprised) when she spun her

2.

penchant for entertaining into her whimsical new blog, The Salonierre (thesalonniere.com). Named after 17th- and 18th-century Parisian women who knew a thing or two about throw-

5.

ing a grand fete, The Salonniere celebrates the art of hosting and attending (etiquette, proper dinner party seating) grown-up parties. Evoca-

4.

tive photos from Hollywood’s Golden Era and a friendly, conversational tone connect McDonald’s tips and observations on everything from flower arrangements to potent elixirs, and topics ranging from ball season in Vienna to the lore behind the original margarita.

8.

With more than 20 years of experience in public relations and event planning (when she threw parties for everyone from Luciano Pavarotti to George Clooney), McDonald has plenty of parties to draw from. Which brings us to her inspiration

7.

9.

for spring. After a long, cold, icy winter in Austin, she’s ready “to celebrate the bright, fresh citrus colors and tastes of spring.” What follows? Her personal picks for decking out an alfresco table with the best looks of the season. Don’t forget your perfectly paired playlist, with selections like Herb Alpert’s “Tangerine” and “Lemon Tree,” Katy Rose’s “Lemon,” REM’s “Orange Crush,” etc. You get the picture: have fun—and feel your own party coming on. p. disbrowe

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april 2014 tribeza.com

1. A handwritten note on “hello, darling” cards ($40 for 10, dempseyandcarroll.com) 2. Gin: Halcyon organic distilled gin ($34); it’s bright and citrusy, perfect for spring cocktails. 3. Linen napkins: Sferra Festival in Tangerine (4 for $58 at Feather Your Nest, 3500 Jefferson St, Austin, featheryournesthome.com) 4. Citrus-inspired centerpieces. 5. Après-dinner seating: fun grassy ottomans (GH Design, gh-design.net) 6. Flatware: Modern Flatware in gold, so fresh for spring! ($29-$104 at westelm.com) 7. Dessert plates: Hermes Jardin Orchid Collection. I like to use a different dessert plate to wake up the senses after dinner. (The Menagerie, 1601 W 38th St, Ste 7, themenagerie.com) 8. Candlelight: Go for simple white, unscented candles in classic glass hurricanes ($19-$39 at westelm.com) 9. “Make Mine a Double” Grasshopper cocktail napkins to get everyone in the mood. ($32 for 4 at augustmorgan.com)


Shown: refined Corte 1251 chairs.

PERHAPS IT’S TIME

TO RETHINK YOUR USUAL

DINNER PARTY

ROSTER.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


April Style Issue 2014