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CITY SHAPERS

Fashion meets fundraising sheroes

ENV ISIONI NG COMMUNIT Y

Reclaiming a neighborhood's vital past

N O. 186 | CO M M U N I T Y

Cultivating community

MODEL CITIZENS

16 YEARS


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WE ARE WHERE OUR CLIENTS ARE. We are where our clients are. In the best locations.

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Austin Westlake • 3700 Bee Caves • Suite 102 Austin • TX 78746 • USA • +1 512 328 3939

Lakeway • 900 Ranch Rd. 620 S. • Suite A-100

NOW OPEN AT THE DOMAIN AustinNORTHSIDE • TX 78734 • USA • +1 512 263 7997 3210 Esperanza Crossing, Ste 122 Austin, TX 78758

©2015 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

512-975-2622

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IN THE BEST LOCATIONS. We are where our clients are. In the best locations.

Ǝ

Austin Westlake • 3700 Bee Caves • Suite 102 Austin • TX 78746 • USA • +1 512 328 3939

Lakeway • 900 Ranch Rd. 620 S. • Suite A-100

NOW OPEN AT THE OAKS Austin AT •LAKEWAY TX 78734 • USA • +1 512 263 7997 1510 RR 620 S, Ste 100 Lakeway, TX 78734

©2015 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

512-975-2622

| AUSTIN.EVUSA.COM


theGardenRoom

1601 W. 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas ~ 512-458-5407 - 5:30pm Monday through Saturday 10:00am gardenroomboutique.com


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CO N T E N T S | F E AT U R E S

CITY SHAPERS 13 Who keep Austin's community gardens growing.

P. 48

ENVISIONING COMMUNITY Six Square sheds light on East Austin's past.

P. 60

MODEL CITIZENS Fashion meets fundraising sheroes.

P. 66

FEELING RESIDUAL ELECTION DIS -EASE? Join the club.

FEBRUARY

P. 76

Chelsea Collier, profiled in City Shapers

10 FEBRUARY 2017 |

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CO N T E N T S | DE PA RT M E N TS

Social Hour p. 18

Life + Style

F I N D M O R E AT

S T Y LE PICK p. 82

ST Y LE P IC K : VINEYARD MARKETPLACE

WILL SOON BE GETTING A NEW FACILITY

COLUMN: KRISTIN ARMSTRONG p. 25 LOC AL LOVE p. 28 PROFILE p. 32 TRIBEZ A TALK p. 34

YOUR MOST V EXING CONUNDRUMS, SOLV ED Don’t miss Dear Sage for another helping of must-read advice. This month, our ever-wise, straight-talking counselor gives practical tips to a reader already questioning his new year’s resolutions (you, too, huh?), someone looking for love in the wrong place at the wrong time, and a reader dealing with a persistent bout of the winter blues.

LO CAL LOV E: CENTRAL TEXAS FOOD BANK

Community + Culture

TRIBEZA.COM

Food + Thought K AREN ’S PICK p. 88

CONVERSATION p. 90 DINING GUIDE p. 92

DINNER CONVE R SAT I O N :

ROA D T R IP + R E NOVAT ION We adore this image from our January feature on the lovely #marfamodernbook. But we can’t decide what we want more: a little weekend road trip to Marfa (and a few days in one of these amazing residences), or a complete kitchen re-do inspired by this rustic take on minimalism. Choices, choices ...

AYAVA HOUSE

M U S I C PIC K : ELIAS HASLANGER'S MONDAY CHURCH

Arts + Happenings

@ TRIBEZ A

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C ALENDARS p. 40 MUSIC PICK p. 41 ART PICK p. 42 EVENT PICK p. 44

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O N T H E C O V E R : K AT H Y T E R R Y , C O - O W N E R O F

A Look Behind !…! p. 96

P . T E R R Y ' S B U R G E R S TA N D S , I N A G O W N F R O M T H E G A R D E N R O O M . S TO RY O N PAG E 6 6. P H OTO BY P H I L I P ED S EL


TO

R EJUV ENATE T H E S OU L

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spirit is all part of becoming closer to the true spirit of your destination.

THREE SPRINGS SPA • OMNI BARTON CREEK RESORT & SPA • AUSTIN, TX


EDITOR'S LETTER

T  

his is Tribeza’s inaugural Community Issue. In the past, the theme of our February magazine has been love. A readers’ survey we conducted last year revealed (gasp!) that our Love Issue was probably the least read. We revamped the themes, but love, still,

really does win. This February, instead of covering romantic love and all its accoutrements, we are shining the light on those who love their community rather fiercely. People who spend many of their waking hours crafting a greater common good. This Community Issue is a big, fat valentine to our neighbors who are making a difference in how we live, get around and experience life and health, in Austin and beyond. This issue is also my last as editor. I’ve so enjoyed the last eight months working with my good amigo, publisher George Elliman, and the fun, intrepid team here. We have a great new editor coming on board who brims with curiosity and experience in unearthing stories you will want to read. This ain’t no Miss America final stroll down the runway with voiceover narration and sappy music. But, okay, perhaps just a moment of what I’ve learned in this job. After living and working in Austin for 30 years, I thought I knew our town. Wrong! Sad! (Channeling a Twitter voice here.) I’m grateful to have met so many amazing, interesting, authentic, talented people. To work with and help tell their stories is icing on an already insulin shock kind of sweet cake. I recently came across a lovely quote in “Brain Pickings.” The philosopher Daniel Dennett talks about the secret of happiness: “Find something more important than you are and dedicate your life to it.” After you read this issue you may be, like me, inspired by the people in it, who are doing just that. One of those featured, Kathy Terry, responded to a question of what inspires her community work, quoting her dad. “The greatest gift we can give each other is our time.” That was also my late dad’s go-to, and the reminder made the email type a little blurry. But it also has a lovely refocusing effect. Here’s to you and wherever your unique, inimitable and perfect journey takes you in this community and beyond. Forward ho!

MP Mueller mp@tribeza.com

14 FEBRUARY 2017 |

tribeza.com

Behind THE SCENES

This month’s Model Citizens photo shoot was about as much fun as you can have on the clock. The photographer and art director, Philip Edsel, stylist Jane Black and hair and makeup folks, Pepper Pastor and Geoffrey Britt worked their magic behind the scenes. It was a nighttime shoot at Austin Park N Pizza. Though this team had never worked together before, it felt kind of like a slumber party with some of your besties with lots of laughs. For Austin homeboy Philip, hanging with women who give back to the community is part of his DNA. His mom, Nancy Edsel, is a past president of the Junior League of Austin and has been active for 16 years. “I feel like I grew up in the JL offices,” Philip said, smiling.


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16 YEARS

F E B RUA R Y 2 017

N O. 1 8 6

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR +

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

MP Mueller

SENIOR EDITOR

SALES & OPER ATIONS

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Hannah Zieschang

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Building with Sacred Geometry bridges the gap between the physical world we live in and the spiritual world we seek.

An Architectural Practice Applying Sacred Geometry

Elizabeth Arnold ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Brittani Sonnenberg

A r c h i t e c t

EXECUTIVE

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

B a r t h o l o m e w

SENIOR ACCOUNT

Nicole Beckley Martha Lynn Coon Libba Letton Mary Garwood Yancy, PhD PHOTOGR APHERS

Matt Conant Philip Edsel Robert Gomez Dwayne Hills Jessica Pages Amy Price Breezy Ritter Casey Chapman Ross Hayden Spears Reagen Taylor Tysechea West

Joanna Steblay MANAGER

Joe Layton INTERNS

Khortlyn Cole Defne Comlek Henry Davis Andi Lozano Caitlin Moore PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A

www.Bar tholomewAIA .Co TR@BartholomewAIA.Co

VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

Social HOUR THE BLACK FRET BALL

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Austin nonprofit Black Fret kicked off its third annual Black Fret Ball at The Paramount Theatre on December 10, where its 2016 grant recipients were announced in front of a sold-out house of over 1,100 attendees. The Black Ball was sponsored by title sponsor Dell Inc., as well as Deloitte Consulting, SunPower Inc., GSD&M, NY Life, Whole Foods Market and Personify.

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CHIX DINNER SERIES HOLIDAY PARTY Hosted by SPUN Ice Cream, Texas Keeper Cider and Anjore, the party at the cidery’s taproom benefitted Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas. The local, female-owned businesses began the monthly events to celebrate community and better the city one cause and one chicken meal at a time. The holiday edition featured chicken tamales, waffle cone cookies and ice cream hot chocolate with peppermint snow.

THE BLACK FRET BALL: 1. Terrany Johnson & Marie-Laure Carvalho 2. Colin Kendrick & Matt Ott 3. Roggie Baer & Tim Palmer 4. Colin Kendrick, Kerry Edwards & Matt Ott CHIX DINNER SERIES HOLIDAY PARTY: 5. Helen Schafer, Ben Paley, Leah Saloway, Carly Sheridn, Blake Thomason and Julian Frachtnan 6. Ashley Cheng & Christina Cheng 7. Andrea Turnipseed, Claire Burrows & Justine Harrington

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A M Y P R I C E A N D L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

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INTRODUCING TWO WORLDS, ONE MACALLAN

12 YEARS OLD Traditional sherry-seasoned casks from both sides of the Atlantic. Defined by a new, unmistakable American oak style.

© 2017 THE MACALLAN DISTILLERS LIMITED, THE MACALLAN SCOTCH WHISKY, 43% ALC./VOL., IMPORTED BY EDRINGTON AMERICAS, NEW YORK, NY. DEMONSTRATE YOUR DISCERNMENT, ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. ®


Social HOUR THE CONTEMPORARY EVENT!—! JIM HODGES AND DAN RATHER

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On Thursday, December 15, The Contemporary Austin celebrated the reopening of its newly expanded and renovated Jones Center venue, the exhibition “Monika Sosnowska: Habitat,” and the stunning new outdoor sculpture “With Liberty and Justice for All (A Work in Progress)” by artist Jim Hodges. The museum thanked donors to all three projects with

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a seated dinner for nearly 170, featuring a fascinating conversation between Jim Hodges and journalist Dan Rather.

ITALY!—!AMERICA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TEXAS’ APERITIVO On December 21, members of Austin’s ItalyAmerica Chamber of Commerce gathered at Gusto Italian Kitchen + Wine Bar for their monthly aperitivo. The IACC works to strengthen ties between businesses across

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Texas and Italy. Amid lively conversations in guests enjoyed delicious bites and wines.

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THE CONTEMPORARY EVENT,—, JIM HODGES AND DAN RATHER: 1. Chris Mattsson, Teresa Windham, Deborah Green & Brian Sharples 2. Kristin Belt & Wheat Belt 3. Sally Metcalfe & Kevin Witcher 4. Jill Nokes & Jack Nokes 5. David Wynne & Lauren Springer 6. Mark Hanna & Lindsey Hanna ITALY,—,AMERICA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TEXAS’ APERITIVO: 1. Eldon Rude, Anne Bruno & Giacomo Butera 2. Patricia Martinez & Peter Pfeiffer 3. Joe LaRocca, Franco Rotondi & Vince DiLoreto

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M A D E L I N E H A R P E R A N D B R E E Z Y R I T T E R

both Italian and English, members and


GIVE BACK TO THE CITY YOU LOVE! MARCH 2-3 CELEBRATING 5 YEARS OF AMPLIFY AUSTIN DAY 700 Nonprofits. 7 Counties. 24 hours to Give.

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Community + CULTURE C U LT U R A L D I S PATC H E S F R O M AU S T I N ' S C R E AT I V E CO M M U N I T Y Undivide-us, Kellie Jetter and Brian Cooper's innovative new venture, aims to build bridges between disparate points of view. PHOTOGRAPH BY BUSTER JETTER

K R I S T I N ' S CO L U M N

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LO C A L LOV E

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PROFILE

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tribeza.com T R I B E Z A TA L K 34 | FEBRUARY 2017

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Helping Austin children heal from the trauma of abuse. Together, we can make a difference. www.centerforchildprotection.org

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

ANNA M. LEE Center for Child Protection Community Board Member Realtor ÂŽ, Elite 25 sm | 512.968.6419 | AnnaMorrisonLee.com


K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Before Falling in Love, Read this LIST by Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

t’s interesting to be 45 years old and dating, and raising teenage daughters at the same time. Their eyes are on me — observing my

choices, my behavior, my happiness and the way my boyfriend treats me. They watch me with an arched eyebrow, wondering if my words and my actions will match up or if I will trip and fall headfirst into the crack of hypocrisy. It’s a gift to have the blessed chance for a total love remodel while we are all living in the same house. I can imagine it would be one thing for a couple married for over twenty years to be espousing dating rules, regulations and wisdom. And I believe it’s quite another to be living it out, real time, right in front of them. My heart is on the line, in every sense. I decided to start compiling a list for my daughters, before they fall in love. But really this list is for all of us, and for all of our girls. So here you have it: tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

You are beautiful. Over the years you will

you are worth fighting for, they will fight for you.

spend a lot of time, energy and money on this

If you give yourself away, they will think there

subject. Wondering if you are. Trying to manifest

is nothing valuable to protect. It’s always painful

and manage it. Measuring yourself against

to walk away, but if you can’t do it without

others, competing and straining for something

despair and desolation then you know you have

as elusive as vapor. Here is what you need to

given too much and gone too far. Stop doing

know. There will always be girls whom you think

that. Your heart and its container are precious

are prettier, when you look at beauty through a

and divine – guard them wisely.

lens of comparison or scarcity. Being obsessed,

You are undeniable. Being 100%

uncomfortable, edgy, bony, backstabbing,

authentically you is an aphrodisiac to a real

uncertain and striving is unnatural, unfeminine

man. Anyone who encourages you to play small,

and the opposite of beauty. As such it repels

think less, feel less deeply, have less opinions, be

instead of attracts. The most gorgeous, sexiest,

quieter, be different somehow is not the man for

loveliest women of any age have always been

you. Anyone who silences your inner voice, who

the ones who are unattached to it, unaffected

contradicts what you know to be true for you,

by it. They are comfortable and confident in

who minimizes your faith in God or in yourself,

their skin. Men have always been magnetized

who makes you wonder if you are enough, who

and mesmerized by these women. I can recall

makes bad choices seem palatable, who isolates

several girls in high school, college and beyond

you from your people, who makes you feel

who were not the best looking girls by my picky

shame or desperation, or who makes you doubt

standards, yet the guys fought and pined over

who you were raised to be — run, girl. Run.

them. They always had dates with the best guys.

It’s never too late. It’s not too late to say I love

Why? Because these women are smart, soft,

you. It’s not too late to say you’re sorry. It’s not

safe, funny, affectionate and free. Because they

too late to call off an engagement. Or to rethink

understand that real beauty is intertwined with

your options. Or to have a baby. Or to say enough

warmth and kindness. Because being around

is enough. Or to say I made a really bad choice

an irresistible woman like this makes everyone

and I’m doing it differently now, so please get out

feel good — always has, always will.

of my way. It’s not too late to start over. It’s never

You are sacred. Yes, you. Boys and men will

too late to find love, or yourself, again.

treat you the way you treat yourself. If you hold yourself in high regard, they will hold you gently and reverently. If you know your worth, they will treat you like a priceless gem. If you show

A N YON E W HO ENCOU R AGES YOU

them softness, they will show you strength. If

TO PL AY SM A LL , T HIN K LESS , FEEL LESS

you show them strength, they will show you

DEEPLY, H AV E LESS OPIN IONS ,

respect. If you have a no-tolerance policy for crap, they won’t give you any. If you are hard to get, they will try harder. If you believe you are worth waiting for, they will wait. If you believe

26 FEBRUARY 2017 |

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BE QU IET ER , BE DIFFER EN T SOMEHOW IS NOT T HE M A N FOR YOU.


L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

local

LOVE

Arrows in the Quiver YOU R G O OD ( A N D S A S S Y ) G I F T GU I DE FOR VA L E N T I N E ’ S DAY

by Libba Letton

Pastel Landscape(s)

JAN WEAVER, LOCAL ARTIST Just like your coworker’s pictures of their last camping trip to Big Bend, looking at photos of real artwork never does justice to the real thing. You have

alentine’s Day, IMHO, is overrated. Like New Year’s

to see Jan’s work in person to appreciate the vivid, bright, intense colors that

Eve, there’s pressure to make it a fantastic magical

she uses. A longtime resident of Travis Heights, Jan works out of a studio

fairy night of love and passion. Expectations

there, often traveling to find new things to paint. She has landscapes like this

are seriously raised … a gorgeous, La La Land-type, spur-of-

available at an ideal gift size at 6” x 8”. $150 (512) 560-9644

the-moment romantic engagement, with perhaps some light dancing thrown in. In real life, VD experiences come in somewhere between a cupid-themed Hallmark movie binge (which is actually soul crushing in terms of expectations and dashing them) and hives

Sterling Silver Ring

JULIE KONVICKA

from the macadamia nuts under heavy disguise in that

juliekonvicka.com This is for those of you

drug store box o’ chocolates. My worst Valentine’s Day evening,

bold enough to give

about a husband ago, involved me having cramps, agreeing

a non-engagement ring

to a mediocre, hastily chosen Chinese restaurant for dinner,

on Valentine’s Day. Julie

and my partner deciding, “Hey, this seems like a good place to

Konvicka abandoned

order a margarita!” The night ended with him pouting over

the world of high tech

his bad cocktail, and me opening my fortune cookie and finding

to become a silversmith,

it empty. Message from the Universe, table nine!

moving to Brazil to learn,

Let’s say adios, mofo, to the way it’s been done. Let’s

and ending up in Austin.

start fresh. Beyond flowers, chocolate and (sheesh) teddy bears.

She hammers and sculpts

When it comes to buying gifts or planning an activity, do

sterling silver and gold into shapes that echo the mathematics of nature and

what I do — take all the credit for someone else’s creativity.

perfect form. She calls this ring “Monarch.” In Austin, you can find Julie’s

To that end, check out the ideas below, all local, for something

work at Blanton Museum Shop, Maya, Positive Images and Women & Their

beautiful, different or fun. Chinese margaritas not included.

Work. $250

28 FEBRUARY 2017 |

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Working Dog Soap

ELLIE MAY

springdalefarms.com Ellie May is the farm dog who inspired this Working Dog soap, though I’m sure despite her impressive resume, your own unemployed slacker dog would benefit from a good scrub. It’s made with Texas Coffee Trader's coffee, oats, lavender, lemongrass and cedarwood for natural flea repellant and pleasant fragrance. The coffee is sourced locally, with all herbs and produce grown there at the farm — just like for all Springdale Handmade products. Their products are available at Springdale Farm, Wednesdays and Saturdays 9am to 1pm. Check the website for a list of retailers that carry their products. $7.50

Le Stormtrooper Screen Print Onesie

MITTEN & MOUSTACHE’S CHILDREN’S CLOTHING Mittenandmoustache.com

Full disclosure – this item hits Beard Care Kit

a sweet spot for me as a lifelong

Thebeardedbastard.com I’ll be honest; any company with

inhabitant of France. Photos

the motto “Stay Bearded, Stay

months wearing a “Future Jedi

Bastard” can open my wallet and

Master” onesie. But this item

take my money. While I’m currently

from Mitten and Moustache

beardless, I’d guess that one in

knocks it out of the park!

three Austinites either has, or

Besides, parents of newborns

personally admires, a beard. Now,

have no joy in their lives — why

the Bearded Bastard has you covered

not jolt them out of their sleep-

(HAR!) with beard care products.

deprived stupor with hip,

This Valentine’s Day grooming kit,

pleasing baby clothes?

THE BEARDED BASTARD

available for custom engraving,

Star Wars fan and a former exist of my firstborn at three

Vintage concert posters,

includes beard oil, beard balm and

Japanese manga, and Austin

mustache wax, all made by hand

itself inspire Mitten &

in Austin. The Bearded Bastard

Moustache’s children’s clothing.

has also included their boar hair

Founders Claire Ashton and

bristle beard brush, a Kent pocket

Michael Slocum “hope to

comb, and a pair of micro-serrated

outfit little people with giant

beard scissors for controlling wild

personalities in comfortable,

whiskers. $100

curious clothing.” $29 tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

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L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E “Grackles Fighting” Drawing

KRISTEN VAN PATTEN kristenvanpatten.com

Local artist Kristen Van Patten is onto something with this series of drawings and paintings of grackles fighting. No one likes grackles. They’re screechy, foodthieving hellbeasts that shit on your car and swarm at dusk like the coming apocalypse. And yet, these pieces show an aspect of Austin that we’ve all experienced. Grackles as a common bond, if

Canned Cocktails

MIGHTY SWELL mightlyswell.com

you will. Kristen includes his

The folks at locally

poem “The Grackle” in one of the

founded Mighty Swell say

drawings, ending with the lines, “I

their canned, sparkling

cannot help but deem the grackle/

cocktails are perfect for

An ornithological debacle.”

the beach or the golf

Perfection. $85 for an original,

course. But a friend of

$20 for a limited edition print.

mine got my attention when she said, “They’re perfect for taking along to food trailers.” THAT sounds like fun. Skip the

Nail Mirror

RACHEL HORN DESIGN

fancy restaurant and plan

rachelhorn.com

a Valentine’s excursion,

Inspired by a French piece found in a

offering these cocktails as

little shop in Mexico, this gorgeous nail

an alternative to beer.

mirror is hand-wrought iron. Each nail

Mighty Swell cocktails

is also hand-wrought, making each piece

are made with fruit-

unique. It’s available in two sizes with a

based wine, infused

silver leaf, gold leaf, or solid black finish.

with real fruit juice and

Rachel Horn spent her childhood

pure cane sugar, and

in San Miguel de Allende, and has a deep

then carbonated. They’re

knowledge of colonial design, Mexican

available in peach,

culture and how to integrate both with

grapefruit and lemon

American and international sensibilities.

flavor, and you can find

If you buy this mirror for your

them at supermarkets,

Valentine, you will be tempted to declare

beer/liquor/wine stores

that this gift “nails it.” At the risk of being

and some convenience

dumped, resist. $665

stores. $9/6-pack

30 FEBRUARY 2017 |

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Pink Leather Clutch Purse

STEF

shopstef.com This STEF clutch purse is at the opposite end of the spectrum from the relationship-ending dustbusteras-Valentine’s-gift. It’s luxurious and feminine, and it’s even pink for the occasion. This one-of-a-kind handmade clutch features custom-made brass hardware by Atlanta-based jewelry designer, Rebecca Holt Jewelry. Made from high quality leather, it was tanned using natural vegetable tannins and oils, making it an eco-friendly alternative to most chemically processed leathers. Stephanie Montes is the founder and designer of STEF (Sustainable Threads Ethical Fashion). $138 Copper Ice Bucket

SERTODO COPPER, JONATHAN BEALL Sertodo.com

Everyone and his brother is selling copper Moscow mule mug sets these days — and yes, Jonathan Beall, craftsman and founder of Sertodo Copper, will sell you some as well. But don’t miss all the other gorgeous pieces he makes in his East Austin shop, from platters and serving bowls to pitchers, cups and plates. Many items can be custom engraved, and all are pure copper from 100% recycled material. Take this beautiful ice bucket, for example. If I were giving this as a gift, I’d fill it with ice and start chilling down at least two bottles of champagne, but that’s me. Pick your poison. $250

Custom Tours of Austin

ACCESS ATX TOURS accessatx.com

Tours, blech. Boring tourist stuff, right? Wrong — enter Access ATX, whose tours and adventures range from a BBQ & Brewery Adventure and the Food Truck Crawl to Scandalous Austin, a combo of haunted hangouts and craft cocktails. These people are no fuddy-duddies: no tour buses, no nametags. All tours are private, customizable to your group. Access ATX also creates full custom tours where you pick the destination and activity: honky-tonk two-stepping or skeet shooting and horseback riding at a ranch. For Valentine’s Day, though, I’d skip the option that includes kayaking on the lake. The kayak rental guy once told me that he refers to the twoperson canoe as “the divorce boat.” Tour prices start between $75 and $95 per person. (512) 999-TOUR (8687) tribeza.com

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

undebating. These steps — identifying starting points, suspending assumptions, listening

Can They Undivide-us? M E E T T H E AUS T I N-B A SE D S O CI A L V E N T U R E DE T E R M I N E D TO BU I L D B R I D G E S OF U N DE R S TA N DI NG TO R E PL ACE WA L L S OF DIS COR D.

and empathizing, dialoguing to solutions and unpacking beliefs and facts — can transform businesses, communities and individuals, says Jetter. MU/ DAI, a design firm, and Emerge Dialogue loved the concept so much they’ve jumped on board as major contributors and partners. Listening to Jetter and Cooper discuss

by Brittani Sonnenberg Photography by Buster Jetter

“W  

the vision for undivide-us, their enthusiasm is infectious. It’s not just the elegance of their rhetoric (“It’s not about us, it just takes us”; “Why is it so important to be right versus

hy is it so fun to be right?” asks

happen in the middle, once people feel free

doing the right thing?”). It’s that such thinking

Katherine Schulz, in her 2010 book

to move beyond their positions. That’s when the

quenches a thirst I didn’t even know I had.

“Being Wrong.” “As pleasures go,

great ideas begin to flow.”

Driving home from my first conversation with

[being right] is, after all, a second-order one

Jetter and Cooper know their subject

at best … And yet, the thrill of being right is

matter first hand. Back in 2008, a consulting

of areas in my life that could seriously use some

undeniable, universal, and (perhaps most oddly)

trip Cooper took to Ethiopia revolutionized his

undebating. And the two are quick to

almost entirely undiscriminating. We can’t

concept of conflict resolution. “The Ethiopian

point out ways that their personal lives have

enjoy kissing just anyone, but we can relish

staff were split in two,” he says. “We didn’t

been transformed by these principles.

being right about almost anything.”

know where the problem lay. When we spoke to

The hunger to be right fuels bitter debates

Cooper and Jetter, I found myself thinking

“Years ago, an investor in my company

everyone, it turned out to be a divide between

approached me and said, ‘Brian, do you know

about movies at dinner parties, directions to

the Christians and Muslims, and it came down

you have a big need to be right?’” says Cooper.

Omaha on long car drives, and policy visions

to a single person, who was full of fear. He’d

“Since then, I’ve been much more aware of that

between political candidates. Being right leaves

told himself a story, and he firmly believed

attitude, and I’ve tried to be much more open.”

someone else wrong. And that dark chasm

in it.” Once they’d established enough trust

Jetter says her family often uses the “undebate”

between correct and incorrect, victor and

among the team to get to the bottom of the

method, and her 11-year-old daughter, Amelie,

loser, painfully divides party guests, married

miscommunication, Jetter explains, they could

came home from school recently to announce

couples and the allegedly “United” States. Enter

begin bridging the divide.

that she’d brought undebating into her fifth

undivide-us, a new venture by Kellie Jetter

In the wake of the recent election cycle,

grade classroom, with some stunning results.

and Brian Cooper, who want to turn the whole

Jetter and Cooper, who both have backgrounds

Frustration mounted when an impasse arose

system on its head. Debating the issues isn’t

in spiritual psychology, in addition to significant

during a website design assignment. Amelie

going to get us anywhere, they say. We should try

experience with corporate consulting and

introduced the concept, both sides heard each

“undebating” them.

entrepreneurship, began talking about a way

other, the project proceeded and received an

Undebate, a new verb the two coined, has

to transcend the entrenched positions they saw

A+. Her teacher was so impressed she has since

the potential to radically transform businesses

all around them. Their conversation expanded

used their project as a model in other classes.

and communities — and might even save some

to include dialogue experts, such as Elizabeth

marriages along the way. It’s also the foundation

Debold and Thomas Steininger, co-founders of

of what happens when you let down barriers,

of their venture. “Undebating isn’t about giving

“One World in Dialogue,” and local psychologist

trust your teammates, and open yourself

in, or even about compromise,” explains Jetter. “It

and mediator Karl Slaikeu. Both helped Jetter

to new input. The underlying philosophies of

relies on co-creation, and the notion that most

and Cooper formulate the core methodology of

undivide-us aren’t new. They’ve long been

32 FEBRUARY 2017 |

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Like Amelie’s story, there are many examples


“WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT TO BE RIGHT VERSUS DOING THE RIGHT THING?"

embraced by fields as wide-ranging as conflict resolution (“getting to yes”) and improv comedy (“yes-anding your partner”). But the enormous platform that Jetter and Cooper seek to offer these approaches with undivide-us is unprecedented, as is the company’s solutionoriented emphasis. “Most of the work that’s been done in dialogue studies has been academic,” says Jetter. “We want to make this available to everyone.” They are in the process of developing strategic partnerships with brands and foundations, creating an original TV series (“Undebatable”) that will model the process, and nurturing a growing grassroots community. “We’re on the lookout for anyone — both businesses and individuals — who want to play a role in bridging divides,” says Jetter. So the next time you find yourself in a pointless argument with your partner about politics, or where to find the best taco in town, why not undebate it? Sure, it feels good to be right. But who knows? Reaching right together might be what you really crave. tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

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T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

A Heaping Helping

Tribeza TALK

14. 21. 38 million. Each day 14

brand-new, 135,000-square-

semis and trucks deliver food

foot facility, equipped with a

throughout the 21 counties that

commercial kitchen. Last October

the Central Texas Food Bank

they launched a meal prep program,

serves with 38 million pounds

saving fresh produce from the

of food distributed last year.

landfill by turning it into frozen

In June 2016 they opened their

meals. Volunteers can sign up to help chef Kim Granato cook meals in their state-of-the-art facility

A N I NSI DE R ' S GU I DE TO AUS T I N ' S H I DDE N G E M S .

CENTRALTEXASFOODBANK.ORG

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34 FEBRUARY 2017 |

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LIT LOVERS UNITE What do you do when the political climate leaves you at a loss for words? If you’re writer Michael Noll, you organize fellow literature lovers. In January, Noll launched Books are Not a Luxury, a site promoting great books from a variety

CURATING Community

An exclusive dinner from a celebrated local chef. An

of writers. “My fear was that

intimate concert in a private living room. A wine

the book market was going

tasting focused on mindfulness. These are the kinds

to become more challenging

of events that Foster ATX trades in. Launched in

for certain kinds of writers,

May 2016, Foster ATX is the brainchild of Sara Barge,

writers of color, LGBTQIA

Shelby Goodwin and Stephanie Gutierrez – three

writers, writers with

college friends who wanted to focus on creating

disabilities,” Noll explains.

intentional experiences. After graduating from the

The big goal: to encourage

University of Georgia, the trio took a trip to Europe.

readers to use their buying

“What excited us most was the passion and the culture

power during a certain time

around food and music and the way that people

period to get books noticed

came together in an authentic way,” Gutierrez shared.

and to tell publishers “if you

The three moved to Austin in February 2016 and

publish them, we’ll buy them.”

started curating events with musicians and chefs.

This month the site features

Tickets to their music events are $12-$20, and food

Austin author Antonio Ruiz

gatherings are $35-$80. “What makes Austin so special

Camacho’s award winning

is that everyone here is really trying to help each

story collection that chronicles

other out,” noted Gutierrez. “When we all succeed it

a wealthy family’s exile

creates a thriving community, so it’s cool to see.”

from Mexico, “Barefoot Dogs.”

FOSTERATX.COM

BOOKSARENOTALUXURY.COM

tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

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T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Amplify Austin + Great Ideas If there’s a cause you’re passionate about — education, animals, the arts — there’s likely a local nonprofit,

UNSPOKEN WORDS

or two, to match it. On March 2, you can Amplify Austin, finding your favorite cause from more than 600 participating nonprofits, and click to

If you’ve been to Mortified, BedPost Confessions,

give on the amplifyatx.org website.

or Backyard Story Night, chances are you’ve seen

Invest in your favorite charities

SOULumination interpreters at work. While the

and help Austin meet it’s goal of $9

group formally came together about a year ago, its members have been providing live American Sign Language interpreting at local events for years. “The

For Wolfe, who studied interpreting in college, these events offer the opportunity to share and

deaf community here is huge,” Mandi Wolfe, one of

portray people’s stories. “It’s a way that we can give

the group’s founders, explains, citing programs at

back to our community that also fulfills us and

Austin Community College and the Texas School for

does something [that’s] bigger than just us, so

the Deaf. “Our community has grown so much, we

it’s nice,” Wolfe shared. Catch SOULumination at

went from having one or two deaf people to having 10

Mortified February 10 and 11.

to 14 deaf audience members at every show.”

FB.COM/SOULUMINATIONINTERPRETING

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million-plus in 24 hours. Want to go further? Mark your calendar for May 15 to witness Philanthropitch, the nonprofit pitch contest that gives funds to innovative organizations with big missions. Pitch applications open this month. AMPLIFYATX.ILIVEHEREIGIVEHERE.ORG PHILANTHROPITCH.ORG


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Arts +

HAPPENINGS W H E R E T O G O A N D W H AT TO D O Each Monday night, saxophonist and bandleader Elias Haslanger gathers some of Austin's most proficient players at the Gallery. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF TODD V. WOLFSON

A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T C A L E N DA R

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MUSIC PICK

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ARTS PICK

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tribeza.com FEBRUARY 2017 44 39 E V E N| T PICK


C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC RICK ASTLEY February 2 Emo's DEJOHNETTE-COLTRANEGARRISON February 3 McCullough Theatre ANGEL OLSEN February 6 & 7 Mohawk Austin

STING February 19 ACL Live

SARA WATKINS February 9 Atone's

VIVE L'ESPAGNE February 24 & 25 The Long Center

FROM THE TOP February 26 The Long Center BJ THOMAS February 26 One World Theatre

BONEY JAMES February 10 One World Theatre DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL February 10 Emo's Austin YOUNG THE GIANT February 10 & 11 Stubb's BBQ PROJECT ARTS AUSTIN February 11 Galvanize TOBY MAC February 12 H-E-B Center at Cedar Creek JUICY J February 12 Emo's Austin

FILM THE LAST EMPORER, HOSTED BY RICHARD LINKLATER February 2 Stateside at the Paramount

tribeza.com

DONIZETTI'S THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT February 2 & 5 The Long Center BLOOMSDAY February 2–5 Austin Playhouse HOT BELLY February 3 – 19 Austin Public DANCING WITH THE STARS February 7 Bass Concert Hall MALAPSO DANCE COMPANY February 9 Bass Concert Hall BELLE REDUX February 10–12 The Long Center

DINOSAUR 13 February 5 Texas Spirit Theatre

THE UGLY DUCKLING February 12 Paramount Theatre

DAVID ZELLNER PRESENTS THE LITTLEST HOBO February 6 Austin Public

MOMENTUM February 15–26 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

LOVE AFFAIR, OR THE CASE OF THE MISSING SWITCH BOARD OPERATOR February 15 Perry-Castañeda Library

AFI February 14 Emo's Austin

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR February 26 Paramount Theatre

THEATER

AMOS LEE February 29 The Long Center

FEEL THE LOVE EXPO February 8 Emo's Autin

40 FEBRUARY 2017 |

PAT GREEN February 18 ACL Live

INTO THE WOODS February 23 Tobin Center for the Performing Arts THE GREAT SOCIETY Through March 5 ZACH Theatre

COMEDY BRYAN CALLEN February 1–4 Cap City Comedy Club KATHY GRIFFIN February 4 The Long Center THE DINNER DETECTIVE February 4–14 The New Movement WE RUN THIS February 7 ColdTowne Center JEFF DYE February 8–11 Cap City Comedy Club KATHLEEN MADIGAN February 11 Paramount Theatre MARTHA KELLY February 15–18 Cap City Comedy Club BRIDGET EVERETT February 16 Stateside at the Paramount

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES February 17–26 TexARTS Kam & James Morris Theatre

GREG FITZSIMMONS February 22–25 Cap City Comedy Club

ONCE THE MUSICAL February 18 & 19 The Long Center

BILLY CRYSTAL February 27 The Long Center


CHILDREN PAJAMA STORYTIME February 6 Carver Branch Libary ELEPHANT AND PIGGIE: WE ARE IN A PLAY February 17–April 30 ZACH Theatre PIXAR IN CONCERT February 17 The Long Center DR. SEUSS'S BIRTHDAY BASH February 25 Lakeshore Learning Store NURTURE MY CHILD CAMP FAIR February 26 Norris Conference Center

OTHER

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F TO D D V. W O L F S O N

JEANNE ROBERTSON February 3 The Long Center

2017 AUSTIN RV EXPO February 16–19 Austin Convention Center TUSCANY FOR TWO February 18 Omni Barton Creek Resort & Spa AUSTIN MARATHON & HALF MARATHON February 19 Downton Austin JUGGLEFEST February 24-26 Texas School for the Deaf CARNIVALE BRASILEIRO February 25 Palmer Events Center HEMP LIFE FESTIVAL February 25 Palm Park AUSTIN OYSTER FESTIVAL February 25 French Legation Museum

MUSIC PICK

KEEPING THE FAITH By Derek Van Wagner

Church on Monday with Elias Haslanger and featuring Dr. James Polk | Continental Gallery F E B R UA RY 13, 8 : 3 0 P. M .

When was the last time you saw some quality music on a Monday night? Hell, when is the last time you did anything enjoyable on a Monday night? Fortunately for you, 2017 is a brand new year and anything is possible. Church on Monday is one of the longest musical residencies in Austin, and with good reason. Saxophonist and bandleader Elias Haslanger gathers the most proficient players in town and puts them in an intimate venue.

PURCHASES LIVES February 11–July 19 Bullock State History Museum

One of my favorite members is the man sitting behind the B3 organ,

FOAM WONDERLAND February 11 Travis County Expo Center

State University to teach future musicians.

CUPID'S UNDIE RUN February 11 The Scoot Inn

with everything from fusion to funk and blues to jazz. To find the Gallery,

YOGA IN THE GALLERIES February 16 Blanton Museum of Art

Dr. James Polk. He played in some of the first integrated bands in the late 1950s. After a stint in the Ray Charles Orchestra, he returned to Texas Each week Haslanger brings new tunes to the table and his seasoned bandmates devour them. The five-piece band fills the rafters of the Gallery hang a left at the Continental Club, spot the glass door next to Southside Tattoo, climb the stairs and follow your ear. A word to the wise: there's a small capacity and a loyal congregation, so show up early. And bring some bills for the collection plate because this church doesn't run on faith alone! tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

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A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts

ART PICK

MULTIDIMENSIONAL: FARRAH FAWCETT’S LITTLE-KNOWN SCULPTING CAREER By Brittani Sonnenberg

“Mentoring a Muse” | Umlauf Sculpture Garden F E B R UA RY 16 – AU G U S T 20, 6 05 R O B E R T E . L E E R OA D

During her lifetime, Farrah Fawcett was perhaps most famous for her figure, but a new exhibition at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden, “Mentoring a Muse,” reveals another side of the actress: as a figurative sculptress. Fawcett studied art at the University of Texas from 1965-1968, where she met Charles Umlauf, who exerted a profound influence over her sculpting style. Fawcett, in turn, became a muse for Umlauf. In Hollywood, Fawcett continued to sculpt, and the two remained in close contact and collected each other’s work. The Umlauf ’s exhibition features 30 objects from Fawcett’s personal art collection, which was bequeathed to the Blanton when Fawcett passed away in 2009. “Every single object was a surprise, partly because we knew so little about Farrah’s own artmaking,” said Katie Robinson Edwards, curator at the Umlauf. “I was astonished at how skilled Farrah was in the 1960s and impressed that she kept it up her entire life.” It’s an important reminder that at least one of Charlie’s Angels had a vibrant inner world that Charlie, and the rest of America, knew nothing about. Who knows? Maybe Britney Spears has a studio of impressionist oil paintings hidden away that would rival Monet’s water lilies. UMLAUFSCULPTURE.ORG

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BIRDS, BEES, FLOWER AND TREES February 2–March 1 Old Bakery & Emporium Art Gallery

SPOKEN WORD POETRY WITH EBONY STEWART February 18 Windsor Park Library

JEN GARRIDO: SOLO SHOW February 4–25 Wally Workman Gallery

ELVIA PERRIN: WORKS ON PAPER Through February 18 Wally Workman Gallery

2017 BLANTON GALA February 11 Blanton Museum of Art

KAREN KUNC + MONIKA MELER Through February 18 Gallery S

STORIES TO TELL February 6–July 16 Harry Ransom Center

METALLIC + RUST Through February 18 Davis Gallery

IN THE ABSENCE OF IDEAL CONDITIONS Though February 11 ICOSA Collective Gallery

2017 THE PEOPLE'S GALLERIES February 24 Austin City Hall

SPANISH AMMERICAS GALLERY February 12 Blanton Museum of Art MONIKA SOSNOWSKA: CURATOR TALK February 14–February 18 The Contemporary Austin MENTORING A MUSE February 15 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum PERSPECTIVES: SONYA CLARK February 16 Blanton Museum of Art

FORT GUERIN February 28 Yard Dog Art LIZ RODDA: SOLO SHOW Through March 2 Women & Their Work JAY BOLOTIN: THE BOOK OF ONLY ENOCH Through March 11 Flatebed Press PAT MUSICK RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION Through June 2017 The Sculpture Ranch


Je n Gar r ido

WWG

Wally Wor k m an G al l e ry

1202 West Sixth Street Austin, Texas 78703 (512) 472.7428 Tues - Sat 10am - 5pm wallyworkman.com image: Wildflower Study 17 (detail), mixed media, 15 x 11 inches

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A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES MUSEUMS THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

MOUNTAIN MOVIES TO BEAT THE LACK-OF-WINTER BLUES By Anne Bruno

The Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour Paramount Theatre | F E B R UA RY 26, 6 P. M . Let's face it: winter in Austin can hardly be counted on to provide consistently cold weather, much less actual white, fluffy matter falling silently from the sky. For those who relish a taste of “real” winter, a trip to the Canadian Rocky Mountains could stem some serious lack-of-winter blues. If plans for a northern excursion aren't on

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour. Showcasing the best in mountain filmmaking,

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com

the tour's stop in Austin brings the famed outdoors enthusiast festival to the Paramount

ELISABET NEY MUSEUM

Theatre. Get your mountain groove going with this screening of short films from around

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney

your immediate horizon, however, relax and let the mountains come to you. On February 26, Whole Earth Provisions will once again bring Canada to Austin via the

the world featuring adventurers and their mountain activities — think climbing, skiing, biking and kayaking — ranging from the sublimely peaceful to extreme varieties. For the sixth year, proceeds from the event will support Texas State Parks. So when you follow your vicarious adventures with real-life ones a little closer to home, you'll have done your part to make Texas' best spaces accessible to all. Now's your chance to pull on those fun, fur-trimmed winter boots you've worn only twice; after all, you're headed to the mountains. WHOLEEARTHPROVISION.COM/BANFF

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FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-Fri 10-4, Sa-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


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A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T | M U S E U M S & G A L L E R I E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress (512) 708 4678 Hours: M-F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S. Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART AT THE DEN 317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By Appt. Only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com

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BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO 3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appt. only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

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FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

ROI JAMES

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W-Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu-Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG AGAVE GALLERY 208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY 209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE 230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK 425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com


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City Shapers

BY ANNE BRUNO, MP MUELLER & BRITTANI SONNENBERG PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT CONANT, ROBERT GOMEZ, JESSICA PAGES & HAYDEN SPEARS

THERE’S A TANGLED GLORY TO ENGLISH GARDENS. The spilling lavender, shocks of rosemary and sprawling peonies seem to revel in their unattendedness. But behind the

scenes is a patient, nurturing gardener, giving each plant room to grow, devoting hours each day in the dirt to coax life, and joy, out of stubborn ground. Austin, while decidedly not British, has something of the English garden in its deepest nature. From a distance, the city’s thriving creative culture, growing nonprofit and philanthropic presence, and innovative approaches to everything from healthcare to affordable housing looks like it bloomed on its own. But if you take a closer look, you’ll glimpse Austin’s quiet, behind-the-scenes gardeners"—"its city shapers"—"whose aims are not to create a sterile topiary but an irrepressible burst of colors. They’re the ones rising at dawn, working through the night and allowing themselves to stay tender and open to the garden’s evolving needs. They learned, long ago, that devoting themselves to the garden, tending to community, was to devote themselves to their own growth, too. We’re lucky enough to spend our days in the garden. But learning their stories, and what first urged them to dig, and plant some seeds, might inspire you to pick up a shovel yourself, and discover what you were put here to plant.

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Chelsea Collier

/ SMART CITIES AMBASSADOR

What is a smart city? Like whispers in an art gallery alcove, we’ve heard the term wafting about. But not until our conversation with Chelsea Collier, did we feel like we could talk smart cities at a cocktail party without slurring words — not from inebriation but to keep others from guessing our spitballing on the topic might be more spit than ball. Collier has a background and love of futuristic tech, policy, citizen engagement and social impact. She found and declared the smart cities cause after spending time in China this past fall as an Eisenhower Fellow, immersed in the topic. It’s all about how technology can be applied to a city to ultimately make it more efficient and connected for citizens and residents. At its heart, smart cities focus on gathering and sharing data in real time to yield better services, like sensors, beacons and cameras on streets to improve timing of traffic signals. And there’s the BigBelly project in development, solar powered trash bins with built-in sensors that let municipalities know when trash truly needs to be collected. This will save valuable resources and be gentler on our roads and environment. Composed and speaking in perfect, illuminating and yet, unrehearsed sentences, Collier is the penultimate ambassador for a movement without an established home court. She is involved in a conference called Smart Cities Connect, and writes a blog dedicated to the topic, Digi.City. The blog showcases leaders in the space and a great resource for bringing people together for the cause. As it’s still nascent, there is no central government or private sector group “in charge” yet. But according to Collier, both the public and private sectors are working furiously together on this initiative. “The motivation is to become very efficient with resources,” Collier explained. “Cities are being asked to do more with fewer resources.” But it takes great resources to get there. Like putting policies and investment in place to build bigger, fatter, faster pipes (think 5G), to transmit all the data needed to make these applications run. “There are currently an average of eight connected devices for every one person,” Collier shared. “By 2025 there will be 50 billion connected devices in the world. The beautiful part is that technology can implement solutions around really big challenges. But, you can’t just flip a switch and overnight you have a smart city… it takes a really intentional strategy.” And Collier will likely be in the smart city center, helping that strategy gel. “At the end of the day, I love creating platforms that bring together passionate, committed people who want to change the world.” tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

49


Suzi Sosa

/ VERB MATCHMAKER-IN-CHIEF

Anyone familiar with the movie “Fiddler on the Roof” will recall the village matchmaker Yente. She arranged marriages between two people for mutual good. Suzi Sosa is Yente’s younger, modern-day, business-world equivalent. Sosa is a co-founder of Verb, a company that focuses on growing greater good by matching businesses to social impact companies. She and Verb co-founder, Austin business heavyweight Tom Meredith, have forged alliances with household-name corporations — like Dell, Nike, Met Life and IBM — to provide valuable mentorship. At a recent visit at Verb’s East Austin offices, Sosa preached the company’s beliefs with her soft-spoken cadence. “The biggest problems in the world will be solved by partnerships with big global brands, social entrepreneurs and the social sector. On the big brands’ side, more than 50% of the workforce now are millennials, and they are demanding a different work environment. They expect professional development, leadership opportunities and they want to feel like they are making a difference.” Verb brings these brands and their millennial employees together with social entrepreneurs all over the world. Since 2013, they’ve matched companies with 10,000 social entrepreneurs from 100 counties. “It’s win/win … employees get to know about startups, how to pitch ideas and social impact. On the other side, the entrepreneurs learn about financial planning, how to put together a great pitch deck, and project management.” Research has shown that companies with a purpose outperform those who lack one. But defining and baking in a purpose to a company’s culture is a time-consuming process that may get pushed to the back of the line as companies grow. Verb offers corporations a kind of plug and play purpose. And Verb supports social impact entrepreneurs with competitions that help them get prize money, media attention and mentors. The ideas launched with Verb’s support thrill Sosa. Her eyes light up when she describes the portable sleeping bag incubator students from Stanford created. Now used by midwives in Africa and India, it rolls up to fit in a purse and is saving babies’ lives. Or Tevido, an Austin company that does 3-D printing of human tissue, creating nipples for women who have had mastectomies. Another winner is Jerry the Bear, an interactive device that helps children learn how to manage their diabetes, which has garnered national awards for health innovation. Sosa says her draw to public service started early on. “I always asked myself when I was very young, ‘How can I make a difference in my short life?’” While she has many years ahead, we think she can pretty much check that box.

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Dan & Lisa Graham

/ DREAMERS, DOERS, SOCIAL IMPACTERS

There’s an old auto repair shop just hightailing it distance from the historic Oak-

a couple of ancient examples of nonprofits who have tapped other sources for

wood Cemetery in East Austin. Owen’s Garage used to keep cars road-worthy.

funding, like Goodwill and Girl Scout [cookies],” Dan explained. They just helped

These days, it’s the locus of Notley Ventures, a social impact company. Step inside

fund College Forward, a company that provides education mentoring services to

and you can hear the engines of nonprofits and commerce running hard at their

low-income students. “They thought about ‘who is our service benefitting, who

unique intersection.

are the stakeholders?’” Dan shared. The answer was universities who spend a lot

Notley Ventures was started in 2015 by Dan and Lisa Graham. Dan, a native

of money making sure their students graduate. So College Forward revamped

Austinite, founded the successful online company, Build-a-Sign, and a handful of

their business model, asking colleges if they could bring their services to them

other businesses. Lisa has a background in management consulting and public pol-

and get paid for doing so. Today, 60% of College Forward’s annual budget comes

icy. When Build-A-Sign had an investment event two years ago, the couple ran, not

from earned revenue.

walked, to plow their new resources into Notley. The company invests in entities,

What’s up next for the couple? The companies Notley invests in are required

both for profit and nonprofit"—"they currently have 50 in their portfolio"—"who have

them to set goals for impact. The Grahams have some goals of their own in that

a goal of community impact.

department. At the top of the list is to have Austin identified as a social innovation

“There’s that expression, where your specific skill set, your passion and a need

capital. Like a good business plan, Dan’s got action items to go with that goal. He

intersect, that’s where you should spend your time, and that applies to us,” Dan ex-

and Lisa are building a campus called the Center for Social Innovation that will

plained. “On the spectrum of for-profit and nonprofit, there is a drifting to the middle

have everything a social innovation ecosystem needs. Slated to complete in a year,

and a lot of interesting work to be done. Like helping nonprofits think about sustain-

the 165,000 square-foot center in East Austin will have co-working, investor, educa-

ability and scalability, being more entrepreneurial. And helping for-profits think

tion, event and outdoor community collaboration spaces. With its own coffee shop

about impact and integrate giving back into their business models.”

and bar, there’s no need for off site gatherings. And, most certainly, no shortage of

Weaning nonprofits from relying on donors is one of their goals. “There are

good things to toast. tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

51


Wes Hurt

/ TRUTH TELLER, CLEAN ELIXIR BOTTLER

There's brutal honesty, and then there's Wes Hurt. The founder of Clean Cause, maker of organic energy drinks and premium bottled waters, is also a recovering addict. Hurt employs extreme transparency as a strategy for staying clean. “For me, it's a way of living every day (some days minute-by-minute) that has accountability built into it.” Take a look at Hurt's Facebook posts and you'll see what he means. Hurt said stories of addiction and painful consequences are not that unusual. His version includes multiple stints in rehab and one in a psych ward, jail time and being fired as CEO from his own company (the uber-successful Hey Cupcake!) His addiction took hostage of every meaningful relationship in his life, including his marriage, and the loss of trust is a rusty residual. “I want more of everything,” Hurt said emphatically. “Whatever it is. It's who I was then and I know it's still who I am now. The truth is, if I could,” he added laughing, “I'd celebrate being clean by going on the biggest binge of my life! That extreme part about me, and most addicts who'll tell you honestly, doesn't change. Period.” What has changed are the life-affirming actions he's taken and what he's wanting more of. He started Clean Cause as a way to generate funds to cover rent in sobriety homes for people fresh out of rehab. The idea is to give someone who's ready to get sober a real chance at building a recovery system and securing employment, two keys to long-term success. His rationale for his business is as practical as he is extreme. “It's this simple: there are basically only two ways I can choose to go,” Hurt said. “This is the one I'm picking. I really will say anything I have to, to get an addict or alcoholic to try just one day of being sober, then try one more day, each day after that.” Hurt said that sustainable change, for him, comes through some kind of intense drama, a spiritual intersection. “I find I'm purified through every experience I get to have with the people we're trying to help.” That means those trying to get clean, as well as the people who care about them. Clean Cause, he explained, is as much for people who suffer fierce collateral damage from their proximity to an addict. “People reach out to someone they love slowly kill themselves. Being able to take some tangible action"—"just spending a few bucks on an energy drink"—"can help. It feels like hope,” he shared. “And trust me, it may be self-serving, but giving hope is amazingly addictive.”

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P H OTO G R A P H BY JAMES B RUCE

us all the time about the unbearable powerlessness they feel watching


Lolis Garcia Baab

/ GIRL POWER POWERHOUSE

Lolis Garcia Baab is known for her enthusiastic and direct communication style.

player, while attending UT Austin, Garcia Baab brings an almost supernatural level

When it comes to issues such as girl power, she revs up quickly, with the ease of

of energy and tangible compassion to everything she does. “If I'm struggling with

someone who could lap this track in her sleep, but never, ever on cruise control. “I

something, I'm totally sure there's someone else out there facing the same problem!

believe we have a real leadership crisis in our country and the answer is right in front

If you talk about it, you'll always find others willing to take something on with you

of us: women and girls.”

and create solutions.”

Spend a little time with the former radio talk show host and political veteran, now

Such was the case for Garcia Baab at the time one of her two daughters was being

director of marketing and communications for the Girl Scouts of Central Texas, and

bullied at school. That problem, and Garcia Baab's desire to start a wider dialogue

you'll be ready to jump on the vehicle Baab's been driving for years. Unleashing the

about it, led to strategies that would ultimately go way beyond empowering just her

untapped potential in every girl, she asserts, has the power to transform not only our

own daughters. Diving into the complexities of how girls feel about themselves in the

country, but also our world.

especially vulnerable preteen and teenage years, Garcia Baab reached out to anyone

“It's a fact,” she says. “Look at how a country treats (and values) its women and

she could learn from and partner with. That included the Dove Self-Esteem Project.

girls and you'll see a direct correlation to that country's level of development"—"for

The response? So overwhelmingly positive that in 2008, she started the We Are Girls

better or worse."

conference. It has since grown into an annual statewide event led by likeminded

A native of Mexico City who met her husband, Mike Baab, a former NFL football

women, dedicated to giving girls the tools they need to believe in themselves"—"body, mind and soul. “Give girls these tools and you're setting them on a course for success where everyone benefits. The women these girls grow into are capable of not only fulfilling their own potential, but of leading other people, organizations and governments, in doing the same.” As to her own path, Garcia Baab laughs and reflects, "I haven't had any kind of master plan, but I pursue opportunities that speak to me. Most important," Garcia Baab says emphatically, “you have to pick something and go, start doing!”

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| FEBRUARY 2017

53


Beto Lopez & Stacey Chang DESIGN EVANGELISTS, HEALTHCARE SYSTEM MAGICIANS

When Beto Lopez and Stacey Chang, executive director and managing director of the Dell Medical School Design Institute for Health, sat down with a team of architects to plan the new outpatient center, the duo’s unorthodox approach swiftly became apparent. “The architects showed us their suggestion for a waiting room,” says Chang. “And we said, ‘But isn’t a waiting room a failure of the process?’” In other words, a truly redesigned outpatient center shouldn’t need a waiting room. “It doesn’t matter how many fish tanks or TVs you throw in there,” says Chang. Sick people don’t want to be entertained sitting next to other sick people. They want to see their doctors. “At that point,” chimes in Lopez, “the architects closed their books. And that’s when the real discussion began.” Lopez and Chang came to Austin by way of IDEO, a Silicon Valley design firm notorious for inventing the computer mouse. They’re both thrilled at the chance to apply their design skills to community health in Austin. “It’s the most meaningful work I’ve ever done,” says Lopez. “We’re surrounded by a mission-driven cohort,” adds Chang. Their to-do list? Make the health ecosystem more productive, offer new capabilities, and provide utility of design in a space that hasn’t benefited from it. Undergirding each task is a commitment to “human-centered design,” which starts from a place of deep empathy — not just with individual design elements, but in reshaping the system’s entire culture. This requires aligning practitioners around the people they serve, says Lopez. “There’s nothing like hearing someone’s story to drive empathy.” And that’s where the two began, when they first arrived in Austin last year: gathering stories. They spoke to a bus driver who suffered from back pain after 8-hour shifts, and who witnessed her riders’ daily aches. They talked to a 30-year veteran of the music scene who was often homeless. A single mother challenged by the social service system. A lawyer who had no idea how to handle hospital discharge papers. “From their stories, we looked at what gaps emerged,” says Chang. “What were they hoping for? We need to stop designing from a place of arrogance, and make it an act of humility. All too often the current health system stands in the way of humanity.”

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55


Jack Martin and Patsy Woods Martin

/ "YOU HAD ME AT PHILANTHROPY," PARTNERS IN PURPOSE

Jack and Patsy Woods Martin aren’t just two of Austin’s biggest philanthropists;

“roll-up-your-sleeves” attitudes they gleaned from their families’ farming backgrounds.

they’ve changed the very nature of philanthropy in Austin. But when asked about

“Philanthropy is often stereotyped as a lot of rich people in tuxes giving money to

their efforts, they make it sound as natural and understated as their love of their

each other’s charities,” said Jack. “That’s not what we’re about. Patsy founded I Live

North Texas ranch land, where both have sunk deep roots.

Here, I Give Here (an organization that puts on Amplify Austin Day) to get money to

“I was raised to take care of what provides for you,” said Patsy.

people who simply needed help in Austin. Her vision has been the foundation of our

Jack concurred: “In my family, you worked from sunup to sundown, and you left

philanthropy work. I just follow along.”

the land better than you found it. It went with a basic set of values: Be honest. Keep your word. Don’t overcomplicate things. We carry those roots.”

“I’m going to push back on that a little,” Patsy interrupted, smiling. “It’s been a real partnership. I got the idea for I Live Here, I Give Here when I was working at United

Today, Jack serves as the global executive chairman and chief executive officer

Way, and Public Strategies (Jack’s former firm) was an equal pro-bono partner in re-

of the global public relations firm Hill+Knowlton. Patsy is the executive director of

search and PR.” She laughs. “Remember when I asked for TV spots for my birthday?”

Annie’s List, an organization that supports pro-choice women running for public office in Texas. Listing their volunteer and board work for other local and national charities

A lot of wives would ask for spa certificates. Patsy wanted TV spots to promote the fledgling nonprofit. A lot of husbands might say no. Jack said yes.

and organizations would take up the rest of this article’s word count. This February, the

Patsy credits thirty years in Austin, too, with inspiring their work. “This place

couple will be honored by the Association of Fundraising Professionals as Outstand-

has been good to us and to our kids. If we can give a little bit of that back, it’s in-

ing Philanthropists. And the two approach their civic leadership roles with the same

credibly gratifying.”

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John Henneberger

/ SERVANT LEADER

By the time John Henneberger turned 10, he had lived in a dozen places across the United States, thanks to his father's military career. But it wasn’t until Henneberger was a UT student in the 70s that he discovered true community in the central Austin neighborhood of Clarksville. “There was a richness there that I had never seen before,” he says. “Neighbors deeply supported one another.” The then-largely African-American neighborhood was also a stark display of systemic prejudice and enforced poverty. “The western and northern edges of Clarksville were upper class. But when you got to 10th Street, the streets weren’t paved. You could literally cross the street to see physical manifestations of inequality.” For Henneberger, co-director of Texas Housers, it was clear that Clarksville wasn’t a “black problem,” but a “white problem.” He struggled to find a role that would suit his outsider status in helping the community. He found his answer when he met a group of strong female leaders who became his mentors. “I could support them by researching information to give context to their causes. They would send me down to city hall, to find out why their streets hadn’t been paved. I wasn’t a spokesperson or a leader; I was able to find them sources of money or outline steps of a legal process. I felt useful, and the work was immensely satisfying.” Advocating for low-income communities in the face of powerful business, political and cultural opposition can be daunting and exhausting work. But Henneberger seems energized by the challenges. “Humans are natural problem solvers,” he says. “It’s what fulfills us, whether we’re creating businesses, engaging politically, or shaping a child’s life.” In Henneberger’s case, it’s redesigning hurricane relief systems in the Rio Grande Valley. Or advocating for fair housing and environmental justice in Corpus Christi. Or fighting “source of income” discrimination in Austin. This advocacy has guided Henneberger’s work for more than forty years. His ongoing efforts were recognized with a Macarthur Genius Grant in 2014. Henneberger insists that standing up for community doesn’t take much, and that it’s an organic desire we all have. “You can’t buy community the way you would a car,” he shared. “You don’t have to go to every barbecue or neighborhood association meeting. But you can get to know people, and decide together how you want to shape where you live.” After all, Austin’s weirdness isn’t just about tattoos or backyard chickens. To Henneberger, the city's beautiful weirdness thrives on diversity and acceptance, and it deserves to be cultivated and protected, like any other kind of wilderness.

tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

57


Shuronda Robinson

/ SERVICE SUPERSTAR,

COMMUNITY ACTIVIST

Shuronda Robinson displays a megawatt smile and an affinity for using the words inspiration, beauty and truth when talking about family and issues close to her heart, like the real meaning of democracy. A restless optimist, passionate advocate and insightful strategist who's “comfortable in the middle of conflict and confusion,” this second-generation entrepreneur seeks to make the biggest difference by making a way for others. Robinson, a mother of three boys, comes by her aptitude for words and inclination to community service naturally. Her late father published an African-American weekly newspaper in Houston, was a volunteer baseball and football coach and served as a union organizer. Her mother, an educator, still acts as the paper’s publisher today. Graduating from Houston's magnet high school for communications, Robinson first came to Austin to attend UT. Since 1995 she's run her own consulting firm, Adisa Communications (named Small Business of the Year in 2015 by the Greater Black Austin Chamber of Commerce). Robinson didn't consider herself an activist when she first arrived in Austin. While at UT she witnessed blatant acts of injustice among the student body and found herself saying “what needed to be said and doing what needed to be done.” While at UT, she met Marian Wright Edelman and served on the national board of the Children's Defense Fund's Black Community Crusade for Children. "We were young people serving young people; that period in college is when I really learned the meaning of servant leadership." Robinson's record of involvement with groups including Austin Foundation for Architecture, Boys & Girls Clubs, YMCA, ZACH Theatre, Six Square, Texas Coalition of Black Democrats and Capital Area Progressive Democrats, to name just a handful, is diverse, but reveals the common thread of her abiding passions for the arts, children and advocacy. Her mother's attitude that “service is the rent we pay for living on this earth” is something Robinson obviously inherited. “Growing up, I honestly didn't know there was any other choice but to speak up and do your part"—"how else could any kind of community hold together? If something needs to be done, you do it and if there's not already a way, you make one. The easy paths,” she adds, laughing wryly, “have already been taken. I like a challenge.” Does this change-making optimist with the killer smile ever get discouraged, like the rest of us? “Every day! But I remember the tale about the good wolf and the bad wolf inside each of us"—"I keep feeding the good one and that gets me moving in the right direction again.”

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Karen and Ray Brimble

/ COMMUNITY BUILDERS, IMPACT MAKERS

Given Karen and Ray Brimble's influence and history of involvement in some of the

into philanthropy.”

most important initiatives around Austin, the word power couple comes to mind. But

Karen, a prolific community volunteer since the time the couple's two children

in truth, the joint and individual efforts of this very authentic duo reflect an ambition

started school, has been involved with National Charity League, Austin; A Legacy of

entirely different from power"—"impact couple is more like it.

Giving; Round Rock Health Clinic; Girlstart and Avance. In addition, Karen's had a

An entrepreneur with global expertise, Ray started his first company at age 22. He’s a strategic thinker with an honest, informal style. He counts the boards of I Live

hand in the phenomenal growth of the Texas Book Festival, having been on its board for the past 10 years. She currently serves as its chair.

Here, I Give Here, Interfaith Action of Central Texas and Conspirare as past volun-

Typically poised and quietly insightful, but as she described the impact of Mindy

teer experience; he currently serves on the KIPP Austin Public Schools and the Muel-

Kaling's appearance at 2016’s Texas Teen Book Festival, she exudes an awe matched

ler Foundation boards, and as an advisory board chair for the McCombs School of

by Kaling's teenaged fans.

Business' Center for International Business Education and Research.

The Brimbles have an abiding passion for Austin and the willingness and energy

His teaching skills from his time as an adjunct professor are evident as he en-

to continue making it, as Ray says, “a world-class city.” The family's One Skye Foun-

thusiastically explains the concept of impact investing, something he believes is

dation has been a major supporter of the Barton Springs Conservancy; the Springs is

expanding the vision of philanthropy for the better. “Investing in for-profits set up

a place of fond memories for each generation of their family.

to do social good has everything to do with long-term sustainability; it creates oppor-

“We're incredibly lucky to live here. It's important to both protect and project

tunities not readily available to traditional non-profits. That's especially important to

what's best about Austin"—"its collective curiosity, collaborative nature and creative

millennials, and will be vital in bringing the next generation of community builders

ideas"—"out into the world,” Ray says. “It feels great to be able to be a part of it.” tribeza.com

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ENVISIONING COMMUNITY SIX SQUARE OFFERS AUSTIN A NEW GLIMPSE OF ITS PAST

BY BRITTANI SONNENBERG PHOTOGRAPHY BY DWAYNE HILLS AND TYESCHEA WEST

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HEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU FELT TRULY SEEN?

Not just noticed, or stared down, or coolly regarded, but seen. When it happens, your body knows it: everything relaxes inside. All the posturing, the explaining, the impressing, melts to a still pool of being beheld. It’s rare, even from our closest friends, family members, lovers. Seeing takes energy and emotion. And perhaps the most challenging aspect of seeing, which is essential for community, is summoning the courage to really take in one another: who we are, where we’ve come from, what sorrows we bear, what hopes we stubbornly claim. What do you see when you see Central East Austin? The construction sites are obvious, but the history of the former houses, and the families that lived in them, is not. To see a neighborhood, or a person, requires another sense: hearing. And before we can truly see East Austin, we need to listen to its story.

Harrison Eppright, a Six Square tour guide, outside the Anthony and Louise Viaer Alumni Hall at Huston-—-Tillotson University.

In 1928, the City of Austin set in motion a Master Housing Plan that forced its black residents into a six-square mile area just east of what is now I-35. If this happened to you today, you might get an email announcing the policy, then a series of eviction letters in the mail. If you stayed put, your services would get shut off: electricity, trash, water. You might come home from work to find your house in flames. The city’s policy formalized a system of terror that African Americans in the South had been subject to since the end of the Civil War: a punishment for their freedom. Hyde Park, built about ten years after Reconstruction, was advertised as a neighborhood that was “free from nuisances and an objectionable class of people.” In other words, where white residents wouldn’t have to see fellow Austinites of color. The forced relocation of Austin’s black community to the east side of the city, through intimidation and official policy, took about two generations to achieve. In those six square miles, despite the city’s persistent widespread economic, social, and political prejudice, a neighborhood grew and flourished, built from residents supporting one another against incredible odds. In the churches and schools, in the beauty and barbershops of the Six Square district, you were seen by your community. tribeza.com

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From left to right: “Rhapsody,” a mosiac on East 11th St; the former residence of Thurgood Marshall on San Bernard St; Downs Field, where Negro Baseball League games were played; Quickie Pickie: A 25-year-old convenience store, recently revitalized, on East 11st St.

Fast-forward to the last decade. As Austin’s housing costs have skyrocketed, persistent income inequalities along racial lines have forced many of its black residents out of the city. This is due, in part, to discriminatory midcentury mortgage policies, which excluded loans on houses in “redlined” areas, such as the Six Square district, making it impossible for black families living there to accumulate wealth the way most Americans could. Meanwhile, the massive reshaping of a neighborhood, which took the 1928 Master Plan two generations to achieve, has taken gentrification just one generation. The legacy of Austin’s African-American cultural heritage district is in danger of disappearing: one family, one store, one unrecognized historical monument at a time. BUT NOT UNDER SIX SQUARE’S WATCH.

Six Square, a nonprofit formed in late 2013, is an attempt to help heal Aus-

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tin’s “atmosphere of racial acrimony,” as former city manager Toby Futrell put it in 2005. That year, the City of Austin asked the African-American community to help brainstorm solutions. (Seventy-seven years after the city government told the same community it could no longer choose where to live.) Today, Six Square’s offices are housed in a charming yellow house on San Bernard Street. “When I was a boy, if you lived on San Bernard it was a sign that you had arrived,” Harrison Eppright, a Six Square tour docent, tells me, on a recent afternoon tour. Eppright, born and raised in East Austin, is the kind of guy you want on your weeknight trivia team, or if the Internet crashes and we lose Wikipedia. Eppright knows everything. He favors wide-brimmed straw hats and fuschia polo shirts (but not boaters or white attire after Labor Day). He can rattle off facts about the Constitution, Reconstruction, and


“WHEN I WAS A BOY, IF YOU LIVED ON SAN BERNARD IT WAS A SIGN THAT YOU HAD ARRIVED.”

midcentury city politics. And, thankfully, he’s open to sharing his memories of what Six Square once was. “That was the home of S.C. Marshall,” he says, pointing to a gracious residence across the street. “He was prominent in the Masons. Beautiful, temple-style building. Today Hazel Coffmann and her son Grant Coffmann live there.” He pauses before a boarded-up house, with an unkempt yard. “We hope this house will be restored. Back when Heman Sweatt sued the University of Texas for not letting him register for law school, the NAACP sent a lawyer down to hear his case, and the lawyer stayed in this house. The case was appealed all the way to the Supreme Court. In 1950 the Court ruled that UT’s law school had to admit black students. This was the beginning of the desegregation of major colleges and universities throughout the South. And guess who that lawyer was? Thurgood Marshall.”

Eppright is open about racial tensions that existed within the black community, too: “My father was a light-skinned black man. Kind of a golden brown. My mom is dark-skinned. My dad's older brother had dark skin, but he had, as we used to say, “that good hair”: wavy. He had some animosity towards Dad because of it. Dad was light-skinned but had hair like mine. My uncle married a light-skinned woman. Dad married a darker skinned woman, and Uncle Bill said, in front of Dad and my mother, ‘Sam, I thought we both agreed that we wouldn't marry dark-skinned women.’ Terrible. That was in 1951 or 1952.” We wind up the tour at the Carver Museum, where Eppright reflects on the rapid changes in the neighborhood. “I have mixed feelings about gentrification,” he says. “On the one hand, I'm glad that attention is being paid to East Austin, but on the other hand at what price? Figuratively, literally, and racially — at what price?” tribeza.com

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“I GO AND SIT IN PEOPLE’S KITCHENS. I DO MY BEST TO MAKE THEM A PART OF THE WORK WE ARE DOING.”

A few days later, I meet Donald King, Six Square’s program director. King is warm and loquacious, with a strong East Coast accent: he moved from Providence, Rhode Island, last year. “Our fight is not necessarily combating gentrification,” he tells me. “We’re not waving that banner. East Austin has changed. Our job is to look at what it once was and to tell that story. And hopefully be a voice in shaping what East Austin will become in the future.” These days, King says, a lot of his work happens in kitchens. “I go and sit in people’s kitchens. I do my best to make them a part of the work we are doing. We’re not saviors. We believe in many voices: community members, leaders of organizations, artists. Stakeholders and academics. People who have history in East Austin. We are doing our best every day to convene that community. That’s the work that no one sees, and that’s the work in my

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career that I have found to be the most effective and worthwhile.” It all comes back to trust, King says. And trauma. Austin lost the trust of its black community in the wake of the apartheid-like conditions it created: “The trauma of the 1928 Master Plan, when services were shut off and black families were told they had to move, is so deep that it can’t be repaired by just talk. The extreme brutality of that action needs to be reversed by some extreme economic policy.” The best American cities derive their energy from diversity, argues King. “The [health of Austin’s African American community] is important for the quality of life of all Austinites. If you look at all the great port cities like New Orleans and New York, with all their challenges, it’s the diversity, and the inclusion of all the voices that reside there, [that make them great]. It needs to happen in terms of commerce and politics and


From left to right: Donald King, Six Square's program director; Bethany Cemetery on Springdale Rd.; Victory Grill, a legendary music venue where famous acts like B. B. King and W. C. Clark once performed, on East 11th St.

institutions of power. So that the thrust of your city is reflective of all the different voices and cultures.” “All neighborhoods and communities go through cyclical change,” Shuronda Robinson, Six Square’s former interim director, explains over the phone. “The question is: when do you start the clock?” Robinson, who arrived in Austin in the late eighties, says that she sees Six Square as an opportunity to “pass on to her sons a piece of who they are, through art, through culture. We need to claim what we have offered, and continue to speak to what we offer. What we remember, we repeat.”

These lyrics to “The Root,” a song by one of Austin’s emerging hip hop bands, Magna Carda, speak directly to Six Square’s mission: to honor the city’s deep and widespread roots. Last September, less than a mile from the Six Square district, during the University of Texas’ first international black studies conference, the celebrated activist and academic Angela Davis gave a keynote speech. “Freedom is not a thing,” she told a packed auditorium. “Not an object. Not a commodity. If it’s anything at all, it’s a constant collective yearning.” And yearning to see, as Six Square teaches us, is the beautiful, bracing beginning of vision.

Where you from / Who you know / How you know ’em / Where you goin’ What's life [like] coming from / the bottom of the root? Tryin’ to rise up and grow to something from my truth. tribeza.com

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Model CITIZENS BY M P MUELLER

PHOTOGRAPHY & ART DIRECTION BY PHILIP EDSEL

STYLING BY JANE BLACK HAIR & MAKEUP BY PEPPER PASTOR

nyone who’s planned a party beyond the college kegger, knows there’s a lot more involved than calling a caterer and making sure the cocktail napkins are fanned just so. Patrons pony up some nice ca-ching for Austin’s galas and luncheons, and event-goers’ expectations, along with money, are raised. But there are some stalwart women in Austin who, time and again, lead the charge of the volunteer fundraising brigade. They’ve borrowed the mythos of baseball lore, “Build it and they will come,” and applied it to the ballroom with seeming ease. Their personal calendars are often hijacked from the time that first committee folder is labeled to when rentals are safely returned and proceeds are in the bank. Collectively, the eight women on the following pages have raised tens of millions of dollars for Austin area charities. Yep, they look feminine and glamorous, but underneath? All muscle and determination when it comes to getting behind causes they are passionate about. They have opened their homes and devoted countless hours to volunteering with nonprofits. They’ve created signature events for people where thousands gather, have fun, toast good deeds and like-minded people get to find each other. They get bouquets of flowers and kind words from the dais at their functions. But we wanted to give them a big thank you here, too. Meet our Sheroes, some of Austin’s biggest hearted fun(d)raisers.

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Alaïa from ByGeorge jacket ($3,132); Torne from ByGeorge blouse ($575); Row from ByGeorge pants ($1,995); Aquazzura from ByGeorge booties ($1,580); Liza Beth Jewelry necklace ($1,355); Modern Moghul rings ($2,800, $3,500).

MARY HERR TALLY

Career Arts Fundraiser, retired

Husband Rusty Tally, sons Micah, Blake and Layne “My first [volunteerism] mentor was my mom, who treated her volunteer work like a day job, always on the phone and dragging me to meetings. When she passed, I was in my 20s; seeing the church rows overflowing is an image I’ll not forget. If done with an open heart, your work in the community will truly feed your spirit 100 times more than you will ever give.” Her causes: Seton Breast Cancer Center Celebration of Life luncheon, Austin Pets Alive Tailwaggers, ZACH Unplugged, ZACH Red Hot & Soul galas, Emancipet Anniversary luncheons, Nobelity Project, Dancing with the Stars Austin galas for the Center for Child Protection, Marathon Kids concert, Palmer Drug Abuse Program Dinner Concert, Toast of the Town parties host.

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KATHY TERRY

Co-owner of P. Terry’s Burger Stands Husband, Patrick; children Kate and Caroline “During my early pre-teen years, my father was homeless, living in his laundry business. When we wanted to go out to eat, we would barter with his customers. So I learned at a very early age that sometimes our journey in life doesn’t always lead us in the path we dreamed or even wanted. And, it was my father who always told me the best gift you can give someone is your time.” Her causes: The SAFE Alliance Board and Development Council, Austin Children’s Shelter Gala and Touch-a-Truck, HeartGift board and Ambassador, Legacy of Giving board, Dell Children’s Medical Center Global Outreach program, residence host for patients and their families for HeartGift and Dell Children’s Medical Center, I Live Here, I Give Here See Jane Give, P. Terry’s Giving Back Days.

Olivi from The Garden Room dress ($1,495); Christian Louboutin from Neiman Marcus shoes ($1,195); Modern Moghul earrings ($2,500), cuff ($8,000); Mizano Collections cuff (price upon request).

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Houston architect Carlos Jimenez designed Chloe from ByGeorge this ($1,995); ranch house with big blouse Loewe windows that frame from ByGeorge pants the grand ($1,390); Alaïalandscape. from ByGeorge shoes ($895); Modern Moghul earrings ($6,500), ring ($3,800).

FAYRUZ BENYOUSEF

Philanthropy advisor and strategist, Fayruz Benyousef Consulting

Husband Malek Ben-Musa; daughter Yara “I’ve looked up to many strong women in our community over the years. Among them are Amber Carden and Mariben Ramsey with whom I’ve worked closely over the past five years on several projects. They are dedicated and graceful with every cause they engage in and give selflessly of their time, experience and resources.” Her causes: Man and Woman of the Year for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Corazon Awards for Con Mi Madre, Texas Lyceum Human Trafficking Meeting, Hand to Hold Baby Shower Luncheon, The Women’s Fund of Central Texas at the Austin Community Foundation, Association of Fundraising Professionals Austin Chapter Philanthropy Day Luncheons, Sustainable Food Center Farm to Plate, Libyan Hearts.


SHERRI WEST wife, mother, grandmother

Husband ,Travis; children Tyler, Jackson and Georgia & granddaughter Tatum “I find inspiration in my mother-in-law Alice West and her commitment to Hospice Austin and always putting others first. Working with Ronda Gray and seeing her dedication to the Austin Children’s Shelter set the bar for me. Since our introduction in 2012, my go-to for all things events, gala and fundraising is my dear friend, Armando Zambrano.”

Alexis from Neiman Marcus dress ($750); Oscar de la Renta from Julian Gold ($690); Modern Moghul earrings ($5,900), bracelets ($6,000 to $8,800), ring ($3,000).

Her causes: Andy Roddick Foundation board member, Rawson Saunders School galas, Austin Film Society/ Texas Film Awards Gala, Dell Children’s Medical Center Give Hope Concert, Hospice of Austin Beauty Unveiled, Dell Children’s Gala, Dell Children’s Trust, Dell Children’s Council, Austin Children’s Shelter’s Women of Hope, Austin Children’s Shelter Board of Directors, Austin Children’s Shelters galas.


TERRI BROUSSARD WILLIAMS VP of Government Relations, American Heart Association Husband, Lemuel Williams, Jr. “Because of volunteerism, my name was given to the American Israel Education Foundation to be a part of an African American leaders delegation who visited Israel in January 2016. I’ve always known that it only takes one person to change the world, but that trip shifted my perspective on life more than I can explain.” Her causes: I Live Here, I Give Here See Jane Give, Austin Area Urban League 40th Anniversary event, The Junior League of Austin Capital Campaign & 80th Anniversary Party, Austin Under 40, American Red Cross Luminaria, Leadership Austin Best Party Ever events.

Estilo Jumpsuit ($495); Guiseppe Zanoti Design from Neiman Marcus shoes ($1,995); Liza Beth Jewelry necklaces (price upon request, $1,225); Modern Moghul earrings ($2,500), bracelets ($10,000, $4,800); Miranza Collections chain link bracelet (price upon request). tribeza.com

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MARIA GROTEN Co-Owner, Love Cycling Studio

Husband, Eric Groten; children Ruel, Emma, Grayson & Lily “Richard Hartgrove told me several years ago that he was putting me in charge of the silent auction at ZACH’s Red, Hot & Soul Gala. He believed in me and I will always credit him with getting me started in fundraising. He may have regretted it because every time I chaired an event after that, he was always at the top of my list of people to ask for a donation!” Her causes: Seton Breast Cancer Celebration of Life Luncheon, Texas Film Hall of Fame, Austin Ballet Fete, ZACH Red Hot & Soul galas, ZACH Unplugged events, Dancing with the Stars Austin galas for the Center for Child Protection, Marathon Kids concert, Nobelity Project events.

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Alexander McQueen from Neiman Marcus dress ($2,395); Christian Louboutin shoes ($1,195); Modern Moghul necklace ($24,000), earrings ($2,800), bracelet ($6,800), ring ($2,800).


LAURA CRADDICK

Philanthropist and owner of Craddick PR

Husband, Tom; children Tripp and Claire “My father dedicated his life to helping others. He made partner at a law firm early in his career, but chose to be a non-profit lawyer. He couldn’t be more happier or more fulfilled.” Her causes: Texas Women for the Arts event, Dell Children’s Council, Dell Children’s Gala, Dell Children’s Kendra Scott for Kids, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Key to the Cure event, Elizabeth Ann Seton board and galas, Seton Breast Cancer Center Celebration of Life luncheon, HeartGift Ambassador, Austin Children’s Museum (Thinkery) fundraising events.

Alexis from Neiman Marcus dress ($695); Salvatore Ferragamo from Julian Gold ($1,150); Miranza Collections earrings (price upon request); RSK Collections bracelet (price upon request).


Ciara Boni from Neiman Marcus dress ($1,090); Guiseppe Zanotti from Neiman Marcus shoes ($1,595); Modern Moghul earrings ($5,600), bracelets ($6,000, $7,500, $5,600). 74 FEBRUARY 2017 | tribeza.com


CARLA MCDONALD

Founder & editor-in-chief of the Salonniere award-winning entertaining website Husband, Jack; children Ava and Devin “I’ve been fortunate in my adult life but, like many of us, I had my share of challenges growing up. Because of that, empowering people in the community!—!particularly those whose path in life hasn’t been paved for them!—!holds real meaning for me.” Her causes: Austin Film Society Texas Film Hall of Fame Awards, Ballet Austin Fete and board, The Arthouse Texas Prize, American Youthworks fundraisers, Seton Breast Care Center luncheons and cocktail parties, KIPP Austin, ZACH Theatre’s Arts in Schools, Red, Hot & Soul Gala and board member. Hand to Hold, Dress for Success, Founder, Fashion Mentors Program at UT, board service for the Arthouse/Austin Museum of Art, Good Shepherd Episcopal School, and The Long Center for Performing Arts.

Many thanks to Sean Milberger and his wonderful team at Austin's Park N Pizza for generously hosting this TRIBEZ A photo shoot.

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Mary Garwood Yancy, PhD in the serene surroundings of her counseling office.

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FEELING RESIDUAL

DIS-EASE OVER ELECTION 2016? YOU’VE GOT COMPANY. AN AUSTIN PSYCHOLOGIST’S PERSPECTIVE ON “POST-ELECTION ADJUSTMENT DISORDER” BY MARY GARWOOD YANCY, PHD PHOTOGRAPH BY JESSICA PAGES

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alk to most any mental health provider these last few months, and you’ll get an earful on the psychological impact of the 2016 election. For many, distress has been percolating since primary season, with its often surreal reality-TV atmosphere. We’ve seen politicians and media modeling the same behaviors we discourage in our toddlers — name-calling, mocking, boasting, lying. Many of us — myself included — binged on sensational news. No surprise that my clients came in stirred up about the latest election coverage. Sometimes it provided a good laugh. Incredulous, a client might start with “Can you even f-ing believe what that guy said in last night’s debate?” or “What the hell was she thinking?” Or a curious client would ask what diagnosis

could possibly explain a candidate’s behaviors. But more often, people found it disturbing, anxiety-provoking, even traumatic. And we couldn't easily get away, because the 24/7 news cycle was saturated in election coverage. It didn't surprise me to read that over half of American adults carried significant stress from the election (according to a recent American Psychological Association survey). And party affiliation didn't matter — stress findings were much the same whether Republican or Democrat. With the rulebook largely abandoned this election cycle, many were threatened by an atmosphere that seemed unpredictable and out of their control. Clearly we therapists grapple with our own election distress, personal and professional. In “normal” times, politics doesn't take up much space in tribeza.com

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WHAT COMES OUT IN MY OFFICE IS A PRETTY GOOD REFLECTION OF WHAT’S GOING ON AROUND US. talk therapy, but politics-heavy sessions have us navigating new territory. I find myself trying to find footing in the balance between ethical and professional norms — to be fully receptive to clients whose beliefs differ from mine without imposing my personal views. With our political climate making big contributions to emotional and life problems, it’s also testing my notions of clinical neutrality. What comes out in my office is a pretty good reflection of what’s going on around us. In the days post-election, I had clients who struggled to get out of bed and go to work. People reported feeling physically ill or numb, angry, having panic-like symptoms and catastrophic thoughts, no motivation. And I also saw those who seemed to take it in stride, or felt relatively hopeful. As the initial intensity subsides, fallout continues in different forms. This election has been personal, and I see people actively avoiding family or friends on the other political pole. Clients, more often women, continue to be triggered by disparaging election dialogue, and process painful memories of feeling belittled or harassed. Parents worry that their children see misogynistic behaviors modeled and normalized. And among my young adult clients, I’ve observed a troubling mix of anger and anxiety about their future, and the future of the environment. Without a doubt, ideological topics are more likely to surface in my office, and colleagues report the same. The range is wide — immigration, abortion, LGBTQ rights, healthcare and climate change to name a few. This barrage of politically generated stressors has the effect of amping up the sympathetic nervous system, leaving us in a constant state of hypervigilance. It’s not only bad for our chemistry, it’s exhausting. Alienation, anger, worry and sadness are common fodder for talk therapy — what’s unusual is how much is traced to the political milieu. These situational, stress-induced symptoms mirror a diagnosis familiar in my field, adjustment disorder. But instead of a “typical” adjustment disorder — often something personal like a romantic breakup, a big move or job loss — here it’s a more collective experience. For therapist and client alike, recognizing this adjustment process as something like Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s stages of grief — denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance — can give us patience and understanding with ourselves and those around us. One of my favorite prescriptions is a daily dose of the serenity prayer.

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SOOTHING STRATEGIES FOR POLITICAL OVERLOAD

The good news is that this, too, shall pass, and in the meantime there are things you can do to feel better. For those feeling overwhelmed, here are some ideas to help you through the rough spots.

Cut down on news media; experiment with a temporary limit, say 30 minutes a day. Fill that new-found time with creativity, exercise or nature. Walk the trail, visit the Castle Hill graffiti park, try a new recipe, journal, or try a meditation phone app like Headspace or Mindful.

Be aware of how and where you’re talking politics, and our human tendency toward confirmation bias. One wise woman shared her method of discussing potentially divisive topics like healthcare by breaking them into smaller elements, where you’re more likely to find some commonality.

Focus more on your immediate world and specific areas where you can make a difference. Consider advocating for an issue or joining a local group with opportunities for civic involvement.

Take a daily dose of gratitude by shifting some of the negative attention to “catching the positive,” heightening your awareness of the things going right in our country and the world.

Keep a healthy skepticism about what you hear and read by doing your own fact-checking. To stay informed, seek sources you consider relatively credible, and read more, watch less.

Be curious about how different political views develop (consider “The Political Brain” by Drew Westen or “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion,” by Jonathan Haidt). With “ubiquitous nervousness,” as Buddhist author Pema Chodron describes, our natural inclination is to harden our opinions, make our world smaller and blame others. Resolution lies in staying open and vulnerable with our discomfort, keeping a flexible mind to develop a “compassionate confidence.”


Designer and Owner Bibiana Dykema is an architect and serves on the University of Texas School of Architecture Advisory Council AVAILABLE AT JULIAN GOLD AUSTIN 1214 W 6th ST #110, AUSTIN, TX 78703 OR CALL MODERN MOGHUL AT 361239-8799

How did actor Robert De Niro prepare for his role in Taxi Driver ? This story—and many more—is on view at the Harry Ransom Center. THROUGH JULY 16 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu FREE ADMISSION


www.eswealth.com | 512.250.2277 Jenny Fleming, CPA

Sara Seely, CFA


Life + STYLE H O W W E L I V E R I G H T N OW Gorgeous goods that give back at Raven + Lily's new Domain Northside store. PHOTOGRAPH BY HAYDEN SPEARS

ST YLE PICKS

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STYLE PICKS | LIFE + STYLE

Higher Love SHOPPING R E TA I L T H E R A P Y YOU WON ' T R E G R E T

by Anne Bruno Photography by Hayden Spears

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make us happy. Found nowhere on Maslow's hierarchy of needs,

head, satisfying shopping experience has to be when you know something

it's that zing when you try on a blouse and see how the color

you buy might actually make a difference in someone else’s life. There's a

makes your eyes look brighter, or the way the delicate print on a dress not

new wave of brands and retailers inviting shoppers to double down on that

only hides a midsection pooch, but actually reveals a waist you weren't

feeling. We visited with two retailers in our backyard whose goods and

sure still existed.

sales enhance much more than your wardrobe and home. They are literally

here's a veritable walk-in-closet-full of ways that shopping can

To be sure, the thrill of shopping isn't limited to buying a dress or shoes. I vividly remember one summer in fourth grade hitting every

But the absolute most wonderful, cartoon-hearts-floating-over-your-

changing lives with their social impact. Austin is home base to Raven + Lily, purveyor of handmade clothing,

furniture store in Houston. I was accompanying my mother on her quest

jewelry and home goods and a brand leading the edge of this new wave. On

for the perfect living room sofa. When the new couch arrived and our

the day I meet its founder and CEO, Kirsten Dickerson, she walks through

neighbor, a decorator, came over to eye the prize, my mother beamed

the company's kasbah-meets modern, Michael Hsu-designed store in the

with joy at her friend's shared excitement: “Oh, Pat, just look how it says

Domain Northside balancing a giant stack of envelopes. "Investor thank you

'Hello!' to the color in the carpet!“ (A multi-level shag, as I recall.)

notes," she says brightly. “There's a lot more to write than there used to be!”

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A certified B-Benefit Corporation, Raven + Lily was started by the Baylor grad for the express purpose of alleviating poverty among

"IT'S NOT JUST THE PERSON CREATING

marginalized women. The elite certification (along with membership in the Fair Trade Federation and the Ethical Fashion Forum) means the company meets rigorous social and environmental accountability and

WHAT YOU BUY WHO

transparency standards far exceeding a typical business. Dickerson's

BENEFITS #—#TO GIVE

enterprise has created employment for 1,500 women across 10 countries

ANOTHER HUMAN BEING A PATH OUT OF POVERTY IS A PRETTY POWERFUL FEELING."

(including the U.S.) and the 19 artisan groups she partners with can count on a safe workplace; sustainable, regular income and access to healthcare and education. All of which add up to a real shot at breaking the cycle of poverty. Growing up in an affluent Houston suburb, Dickerson planned to become a teacher. She had no concept of real poverty or anything like the issues faced by the talented women she now works so closely with. But that was before a pivotal life event changed her course. “It wasn't until a huge upheaval in my family, about the time I was going to college, that I knew real struggle. I went from being sure exactly what my life at Baylor would be like, to worrying if my sister and I would have a roof over our heads.” The gratitude and grace Dickerson experienced during that time fuel her way of looking at the world today, where every life has value and unique purpose. "It was a period of incredible change. Many times my roommates would leave something on my empty shelf in the pantry, which meant I'd have enough to eat that day. I was able to stay in school because of a scholarship that came just as I thought I'd never find a way.” Dickerson also did a lot of volunteering during this period, and became close with several people who were homeless. “None of them were really any different than I was,” she realized, “we're all alike when you get past what's on the outside.” The empowerment of women that Dickerson is fostering with Raven + Lily goes both ways she feels. “We, as consumers, have so much power with the decisions we make every time we buy something. How you shop does matter and you can feel it. It's not just the person creating what you buy who benefits — to give another human being a path out of poverty is a pretty powerful feeling.” Creating her brand and its products (which can now be found in over 300 locations) was never part of Dickerson’s grand plan. She took risks, she says, because she had to, and stuck with her faith. It had proven that if she kept following the direction of her heart, she'd always keep moving forward. tribeza.com

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STYLE PICKS | LIFE + STYLE

W

alk into the cocoon of color on Kerbey Lane that is Vineyard Marketplace, (a space shared with local fave music shop Drumz), and it feels like

coming home in a magical dream to a spot you wish you'd never left. Vibrant and cozy, textures and pattern abound from the handmade clothes, toys, leather bags and table linens that fill shelves and racks, to the sculptural recycled glass light fixture hanging from the ceiling. Meticulously detailed upholstered furniture that looks straight out of London's finest design houses nestles into every corner of the shop, and chunky Merino wool hats and vests practically beg to be touched. As with Dickerson, Diana Wiley, founder of True Vineyard Ministries (TVM), laughs at the notion of ever having her own grand plan. Wiley, who had an interior design business and successful career in corporate sales before starting the nonprofit, found herself acting on what seemed like an unthinkable notion in church one day. “I was at my son's church in San Marcos when someone from a hospital in Mozambique was speaking about the horrible conditions they were working under. I'd never been to Africa and wasn't familiar with the area, but I knew I could find a way to do something to help.” That first trip to Mozambique would ultimately set Wiley on the path to Musanze, Rwanda, now the site of TVM's flagship program, Homespun Hope, and Wiley's home away from home. The violence of Rwanda's 1994 genocide left not only a completely non-

“As a rape survivor myself, I could relate, in many ways, to some of

functioning infrastructure, but also a traumatized population of women.

their experiences. Also, I'd lost a brother to HIV/AIDS many years ago

Half a million women were victims of a systematic campaign of rape;

and saw firsthand the immense challenges of dealing with the illness, plus

nearly 70% of those have had to live with the brutally intended long-term

the stigma that went along with it.”

consequences — rampant HIV/AIDS. Purposeful work brings dignity, as well as income. Wiley's program

Wiley and her modest-sized staff are justifiably proud to have met the stringent membership standards of the Fair Trade Federation. Knowing

uses job-based solutions toward the goal of helping the 600,000 widows

that every woman who comes to work in the program has suffered varying

who remain in Rwanda lift themselves and their children out of poverty.

degrees of trauma, homelessness and other stressors of poverty, Wiley

Handspun Hope's signature product is organic, hand spun and

is even prouder to offer the widows and their children living with HIV/

dyed Merino yarn made from the collective's own carefully tended flock

AIDS "... something rare in Rwanda, which is personalized one-on-one

of sheep, with the dyes coming mostly from local plants. Wiley's goal

counseling services needed to support the spirit." Recently, they added

of creating a competitive edge in marketing the high quality yarns is

a training program for lay counselors allowing them to bring on more help

meeting success, attracting the likes of Kate Spade's family of companies

in their holistic approach. “Helping these unbelievably resilient women

and Indego Africa.

find a way to peace, as well as employment, means everything to us.”

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WIN HER HEART WITH

DIAMONDS AND

PEARLS THIS VALENTINE’S DAY

Shop our cutting-edge apparel, unique accessories and gifts, as well as, our fabulous jewels! 6317 Bee Cave Road #210 Austin, TX 78746

luxroxboutique.com


Food +

THOUGHT A G LO B A L PERSPECTIVE ON O U R LO C A L D I N I N G S C E N E The British-inspired greenhouse, one of the elegant spots within Eberly. PHOTOGRAPH BY REAGEN TAYLOR

K AREN'S PICK

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

EBERLY CON T E M P OR A RY A M E R IC A N CU ISI N E I N A S T U N N I NG COL L E C T ION OF H IS TOR IC A L LYS T Y L E D SPACE S .

by Karen Spezia Photography by Reagen Taylor

I

f you’ve noticed an excess of empty tables and vacant barstools around Austin lately, it’s not because everyone’s honoring their get-fit

new Year’s resolution; it’s because everyone’s at Eberly. Like bees to honey, this new dining and drinking hotspot has been attracting impressive crowds since its October debut. Almost nightly, the sprawling 15,000-square-foot wonderland is buzzing with happy patrons who’ve come to eat, drink and socialize. Designers Michael Dickson (ICON Design + Build) and Mickie Spencer (Swan Dive, Hillside Farmacy, Sawyer & Co, East Side Showroom) have transformed the former warehouse into separate yet adjoining spaces: an elegant dining room, historic bar, skylit study, outdoor patio and rooftop terrace. The rambling layout represents different transitions during the day, where guests can work or read in the study, enjoy happy hour in the tavern, and finish the day with dinner in the dining room. In other words, Eberly invites you to linger, with all your entertainment under one enormous roof. Although new and fresh, Eberly is steeped in history. It’s named after Angelina Eberly, the legendary firebrand who defended Austin in 1842 by firing a cannon at President Sam Houston and his Texas Rangers. The bar is equally historic: a massive 150-year-old mahogany beauty formerly housed in New York’s Cedar Tavern, a hangout for artists like Jackson

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Eberly offers colorful cuisine with a sense of sophistication.


Pollock, Jack Kerouac, Willem de Kooning and Bob Dylan. A decade ago, the bar closed and was purchased by Austin locals and Stubb’s co-founders Eddy Patterson and John Scott, who carefully relocated it to Austin. Tucked in the back of the building, the Cedar Tavern offers craft cocktails and a dedicated bar menu featuring burgers and pizza. Bridging the tavern and dining room is the study, a stunning vaulted room inspired by circa-1800s British greenhouses and lined with vintage books and current periodicals. It serves as a dining room in the evenings, and will eventually double as a daytime coffee shop and co-working space. When the weather’s fine, there’s a ground floor patio and a rooftop terrace overlooking downtown Austin. Buzzing with energy, Eberly’s dining room is a sophisticated mix of Victorian and mid-century modern, inspired by 1960s furniture designer Kent Coffey and executed by Austin sculptor Paul Oglesby, who created the tables and dazzling tile floors. The menu features contemporary American cuisine and globally-influenced desserts. Appetizers are outstanding, like spicy moist cornbread topped with sweet lump crab or the platter of garden-fresh crudités served with smoky pimento cheese and crispy flatbread. For entrees, there’s Creole-style redfish, or grilled quail and venison in huckleberry sauce. Several couples nearby happily shared the popular Pot of Goodness, a steamer pot overflowing with fresh seafood and shellfish. Duck fat fries arrive hot and crisp, served in their own cast-iron kettle. Don’t skip dessert, like dense dark chocolate budino or ethereal Basque cake. Eberly’s vibe screams for a cocktail and the Final Ward is a lip-smacking concoction of rye, cherry liquor, chartreuse and lemon. Our knowledgeable server helped us pair some delightful wines by the glass with each course.

A PPET IZER S A R E OU TSTA N DING , LIK E SPICY MOIST COR N BR E A D TOPPED W IT H SW EET LUMP CR A B OR T HE PL AT T ER OF GA R DEN-FR ESH CRU DIT ÉS

Eberly is a sassy, stylish destination that provides an entertaining evening of good food, drink and people watching. If you’re looking for a place that’s truly unique, with a sense of occasion, just follow the crowds to Eberly.

SERV ED W IT H SMOK Y PIMEN TO CHEESE A N D CR ISPY FL AT BR E A D.

E B E R LY 6 1 5 S O U T H L A M A R B LV D . (512) 916-9000 E B E R LY A U S T I N . C O M

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D I N N E R C O N V E R S AT I O N | F O O D + T H O U G H T

We Belong Together (At Least This Year) NA M E S A N D FACE S M AY CH A NG E , BU T T H E CI RCL E R E M A I NS U N B ROK E N AT AYAVA HOUSE

Martha Lynn Coon at one of AYAVA House's revolvingfamily suppers.

D  

uring my college years in rural Tennessee, a friend introduced me to the second volume of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s classic album, “May the Circle be Unbroken.” In an introduction to one of

the tracks, Emmylou Harris talks about an experience she had years before, “sitting around in a living room with a bunch of people and singing and playing, and it was like a spiritual experience, it was wonderful ... I think over the years we've all gotten a little too technical, a little too hung up on getting things perfect. We've lost the living room. The living room

by Martha Lynn Coon Photograph by Casey Chapman Ross

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has gone out of the music, but today I feel like we got it back."

This sums up community life at AYAVA House, only our jam sessions revolve around good, old-fashioned conversation. We are a program of


Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, which has been fashioning its own intentional community smack dab in the center of Austin since 1902. Our weekly gatherings and Sunday supper tradition let us all bring conversation back into the living room. Our community is young adults in Austin, hailing from all over the country, for a year of service, both national service corps and faith-based. Together, we learn how to slow down and build community in this fast-paced, digital age. Not everyone who comes our way is expressly religious, but most are spiritual seekers in some way, shape or form. That means each year ushers in a new family, with new personalities, strengths, challenges, humor and, like all families, a healthy dose of dysfunction. It’s a strange family, based on so much transience, but perhaps this transient quality is what makes the time together feel so real and so necessary. Our modern life is lived in motion, and a program like ours requires these young adults to hit the pause button on their frenetic, media-laden lives a few times each week. The hope is that enough small pauses will add up to a year of real discernment, reflection and growth. We take turns cooking and also help generate the lion’s share of content and reflection. Every year we have ideas that are slightly off-the-wall and often incredibly awesome. We also have guests from the seminary and the community. They up the ante with their brilliance, wit, vulnerability and commitment to the larger home we call Austin. There’s the Old Testament professor who ate tacos with us, then proceeded to blow everyone’s mind as she shared things that both inspired and confounded her from the ancient text — topics ranging from the role of women to accounts of genocide. And the Comparative Religion professor who inspired us after the 2016 election when we were all in search of guiding light. We learned about how his own journey led him from boat-building in Maine to a failed stint as a chaplain before evolving into his current role as a teacher. For people who consider the ‘90s legitimately “vintage,” it’s powerful to hear another person talk about surviving their own young adulthood during the era of Civil Rights, Vietnam and second-wave feminism. Another night that stands out was a birthday celebration for a community member on a retreat in Utopia, Texas. We listened to a lot of Beyoncé-and ate a cake covered with mermaids, while the birthday girl wore a fantastic handmade Wonder Woman ensemble. How or why any of those choices had a thematic through-line, except total

IT’S A STRANGE FAMILY, BASED ON SO MUCH TRANSIENCE, BUT PERHAPS THIS TR ANSIENT QUALITY IS WHAT MAKES THE TIME TOGETHER FEEL SO REAL AND SO NECESSARY.

fabulousness, I still don’t quite grasp. The thing I remember most is how happy she looked in every picture, and what a fantastic woman she is now. Deep down I hope our year of Sundays contributed to that in some small way. Oddly, one of the Sundays that stands out most in my memory is one of the few I missed over the past six years. One Sunday morning in December of 2012, I received the painful news that my best friend of almost twenty years died suddenly in her sleep, just three months short of her 35th birthday. Completely bereft, I phoned my boss to see if he would join the group in my absence. That night stands in such relief not because of my absence, but because of their presence. I drew strength knowing that every person there, though not with me, was for me, and that the legacy of those we love is best kept alive by how we live and love each other. It seems like this is the real magic of our commitment to gather: the knowledge that the slow cultivation of togetherness, once achieved, remains with us even when apart. I guess whether it’s the music or the conversation we’re trying to bring back to the living room, our intentions are the same. Creating a circle, and hoping that the center will hold. Martha Lynn Coon is a writer, blogger, wife and mother of two. She works on the staff of Austin Seminary, talking to anyone who will sit still about vocation and purpose, and happily managing the whirlwind that is AYAVA House. tribeza.com

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BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE & BEER GARDEN 79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656 Banger’s brings the German biergarten tradition to Rainey Street with an array of artisan sausages and more than 100 beers on tap. To get the full Banger’s experience, go for their weekend brunch and indulge in the Banger’s Benny, the beer garden’s take on eggs Benedict.

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road ,Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally-sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

34TH STREET CATERING

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000 | 34thstreetcafe.com

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas,

One of the best and most creative full service

incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel

catering companies in Austin. Acclaimed Chef

budino) and locally-sourced, seasonally inspired

Paul Petersen brings his culinary experience

chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails,

and high standards to catering company and

local beers on tap and boutique wines from around

to your event! Call them to save the date

the world.

and they'll start planning any occasion! We’re coming to the Party!

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

24 DINER

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400 Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

Not your typical Chile Relleno! At Fonda San Miguel, this one of four handmade

BRIBERY BAKERY

ASTI TRATTORIA

preparations begins with a Chile Ancho (rather

2013 Wells Branch Pkwy. #109 | (512) 531 9832

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

than poblano), which is filled with chicken,

1900 Simond Ave. #300 | (512) 297 2720

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian

olives, capers and almonds in a light cilantro

Pastry Chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confec-

cream sauce. Delicioso!

tions. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space

dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey and goat cheese panna cotta.

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where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine and coffee.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CENTRAL STANDARD

CHEZ NOUS

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 0823

510 Neches St. | (512) 473 2413

Between their full dinner menu, impressive raw bar and craft

Now an iconic Austin staple, Chez Nous creates authentic

cocktail offerings, Central Standard at the South Congress

French cuisine just a few yards away from bustling 6th

Hotel is the perfect place to spend a night on the town.

Street. Genuine, simple and delectable, it is hard not to leave

CHINATOWN

this bistro feeling completely satisfied.

3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

107 W. 5th St. | (512) 343 9307

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in town. Fast

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and oyster

service in the dining room and delivery is available.

menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service make it a re-

This restaurant boasts an extensive and diverse dim sum

freshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry McGuire

menu for customers to munch on!

brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood restaurant.

CONTIGO 2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

LAS PALOMAS

Chef Andrew Wiseheart serves ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant take on bar fare at this east side gem. Take your

3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

pick from the exquisite and bold cocktail menu and grab a

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

spot on the expansive outdoor patio.

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed

315 Congress Ave, Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh

Belly up to the counter at this 25-seat space for an intimate

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas! BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029 Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain

dining experience that’s modern yet approachable.

MANUEL'S

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

This unique eatery gives three, five and seven-course tasting menus in an immersive setting.

COUNTER CULTURE 2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamon serrano.

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for

An East Austin haven for vegans and vegetarians, Counter

The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some sangria and

high-quality regional Mexican food, fresh pressed

Culture provides internationally inspired vegan options with

enjoy the bites.

cocktails, margaritas and tequilas. Try the Chile

organic and local food. Daily specials are shared through

CANTEEN

Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat

their constantly updated Twitter feed.

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. Suite 2115 | (512) 628 0348

scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s

DRINK.WELL.

Owned by restaurant veterans Lisa and Emmett Fox,

famous mole. Located downtown at the corner

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

Cantine produces new twists on Italian and Mediterranean

of 3rd and Congress Avenue, and in the Arboretum

Located in the North Loop district, Michael and Jessica

classics. Along with the slew of culinary temptations,

on Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour

Sanders bring craft cocktails and American pub fare to

the restaurant also has an impressive selection of imported

deals in town.

drink.well. with a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try

liquor and a skilled bar staff.

include fried chickpeas and house-made Twinkies. tribeza.com

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EAST SIDE KING

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

HOME SLICE PIZZA

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 407 8166

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 101

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

2310 S. Lamar, Suite 101 | (512) 383 8382

Small, neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice

Winner of the James Beard Award and Top Chef, Paul Qui

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hop-

offers out-of-this-world pan-Asian food from across town

locally-sourced food with an international twist at reason-

ping convenience and stocked with classics like the

trailers with fellow chefs Moto Utsunomiya and Ek Timrek.

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for dollar oysters.

Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam,

Try their legendary fried Brussels Sprouts!

FREEDMEN’S

topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

EASY TIGER

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

HOPFIELDS

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

the desserts and even their cocktail offerings. Pitmaster

patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local

and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue

options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restau-

brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with

on a charming outdoor patio.

rant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

GERALDINE’S

ITALIC

EL ALMA

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin

cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady Bird

from Pastry Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoy-

Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy

ing delicious specialized drinks outside for their everyday

Executive Chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from

JEFFREY’S

3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

bar manager Jen Keyser.

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but welcoming

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides mod-

atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and sweet

ern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mortadella

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry thyme cocktail.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

HILLSIDE FARMACY

Rustic, continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

EPICERIE

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the east side.

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on their patio

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

sensibilities by Thomas Keller-trained Chef Sarah

whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

LA BARBECUE

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays!

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

L’ESTELLE HOUSE

REBEL PIZZA BAR

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN

88 1/2 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588

7858 Shoal Creek Blvd. | (512) 457 5757

222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430

This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional French

Along with its unique street art interiors, Rebel Pizza Bar

Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True

and Southern cuisine. Think late night Parisian-style burgers

delivers updated takes on bar classics including hot wings and

Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-con-

with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for Sunday brunch.

waff le fries. But the pizza is the real star of this cozy restau-

scious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant,

L’OCA D’ORO

rant, like the Get Up Stand Up pie that packs a powerhouse of

located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers

flavors that will leave you jostling for the last slice.

a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

Located in the Mueller development, Chef Fiore Tedesco

SALTY SOW

UCHIKO

delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including

The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and former home

impressive cocktails, wine and a great craft beer selection.

a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu,

of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-

and Nicholas Yanes. Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

night noshing.

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki!

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensibility

SNOOZE

VINAIGRETTE

to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitchen and

3800 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 428 8444

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791

at the counter.

This Denver originator serves up brunch classics with a

This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one

NAU’S ENFIELD DRUG

creative twist seven days a week, with two locations on either

of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting

end of Lamar. With friendly service in an updated diner

ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold and most impor-

atmosphere, Snooze is sure to start your day off right.

tantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

fountain within an antiquated drug store gives guests an

SWIFT’S ATTIC

WINEBELLY

unmatched experience founded on tradition. The food is

315 Congress Ave. | (512) 482 8842

6705 Hwy 290 # 503 | (512) 584 808

simple and classic, rivaled only by the scrumptious shakes

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s Attic draws from

3016 Guadalupe St. Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193

and hand mixed old-fashioned sodas.

global inspirations and serves up inventive cocktails in a

Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine

OLAMAIE

historic downtown building.

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

TAKOBA

and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro main-

Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek

1411 E. 7th St. | (512) 628 4466

creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with

Takoba delivers bold, authentic f lavors with ingredients

WU CHOW

delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts.

imported straight from Mexico. Head over to East 7th Street

500 W. 5th St. #168 | (512) 476 2469

The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy

for tortas, tacos, margaritas and micheladas.

From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding

goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and

THE PEACHED TORTILLA

Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 215 8972

1115 West Lynn St. | (512) 476 1221 An Austin institution since 1951, this all-American soda

order the biscuits (they’re worth every delectable bite).

5520 Burnet Rd. #100 | (512) 330 4439

PIEOUS

This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with

12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041

friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably

Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer,

priced, you’ll find culinary inf luences from around the

Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combination

world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

tains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors.

sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss their weekend dim sum menu.

of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket pizza is a crowd favorite and a must-try. tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2017

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A L O O K B E H I N D 7 …7

Under the canopy of an old live oak, Shuronda Robinson, (profiled in our City Shapers story in this issue), reads “Where the Sidewalk Ends,” one of her favorite books to kids from from the Boys and Girls Club of Austin.

We can all use some SHEL now. “I will not play at tug o' war. I'd rather play at hug o' war, Where everyone hugs Instead of tugs, And rolls on the rug, Where everyone kisses, And everyone grins, And everyone cuddles, And everyone wins.” Shel Silverstein, Where the Sidewalk Ends

96 FEBRUARY 2017 |

tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H B Y J E S S I C A PAG E S

Where everyone giggles



February 2017