TRIBEZA October 2021 Architecture Issue

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CONTENTS

OCTOBER DEPARTMENTS

Tribeza Talk p. 20 Social Hour p.  24 Kristin’s Column p.  26 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p.  60 Karen’s Pick p.  104 Dining Guide p.  106 FEATURES

Rooms with a View p. 38 Sinner and Saint p.  54 Future Present p.  74 Austin Eye View – Landscape Architects p.  86

THIS PAGE Rooms with a View Photo by Eric Schlegel ON THE COVER Bercy Chen’s Casa Marrakech house Photo by Andrea Calo

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Nicole Kessler –

Broker Associate 512.657.3939 nicolekessler.com

SPECIALIZING IN E XC LU S IVE P R I VAT E L I ST I N G S From Austin to the Texas Hill Country


4509 Bunny Run, Unit 6 - SOLD Westlake | www.BunnyRunAtx.com

4801 Pecan Chase - SOLD Spanish Oaks | www.PecanChase.com

1500 Dillman Street - PENDING Tarrytown | www.DillmanAtx.com

Backbone Ridge Ranch - 100 Acres Wimberley | www.BackboneRidgeRanch.com

1106 Blackacre Trail - PRIVATE LISTING Westlake Hills | www.BlackacreTrail.com

4319 Rum Runner Road - COMING SOON Lake Travis | www.RumRunnerAtx.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate, but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.


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esper, Pearlstone Partners and ATCO Properties & Management newest project, is a 41-story residential high-rise located at

84 East Avenue in Austin’s dynamic Rainey Street Historic District. The co-developer’s recently completed demolition of the existing structures and have begun construction. The residential condominium tower is situated on 0.41 acres and will offer 284 homes at an average size of 975 square feet and starting in the $500’s. Anticipated common amenities include a rooftop community clubhouse, sky-deck pool, cabana, outdoor kitchen, fireplace and lounge; a resident fitness studio, featuring private spin and yoga studios; a sky dog park, lawn and dog-washing station; a community courtyard and gathering table; and a coworking space on the ground floor. The rear lobby will feature a public art gallery and mural showcasing works by local artists, with direct pedestrian access to Rainey Street and its many inviting shops, eclectic variety of restaurants and cafes, live music venues and other entertainment options.

www.VesperATX.com


Vesper, a new 41-story residential high-rise, joins the Rainey Street District The word ‘vesper’ means ‘evening star’ or ‘evening prayer,’ and

Ann and Roy Butler Hike-and-Bike Trail, which stretches more than 12

was selected for how it aligns with the vibe and concept of the

miles around Austin’s venerable Lady Bird Lake. With close proximity

project than its literal meaning. Vesper will be authentic Austin,

to major employers—including Google, Facebook, Atlassian, Indeed

embracing the city’s unique artisan culture. It will convey a sense

Tower, Oracle and many independent start-up firms, as well as to

of unpretentious luxury, like a craft cocktail lounge, with a high-

UT-Austin and the State Capitol Complex—Vesper will offer an

desert, Marfa feel and nods to the Rainey Street nightlife mingled

ideal live-work-play lifestyle.

throughout the building. Vesper is being marketed exclusively by Prospect Real Estate. Vesper will be less than a mile from the Austin Convention Center,

Construction is underway with units delivering in 2024.

a mile and a half from the Texas State Capitol, two miles from The

For more information, visit

University of Texas at Austin, and just steps away from the coveted

www.VesperATX.com




SPINELLI RESIDENTIAL GROUP (512) 901-9606 | SRGaustin.com clientservices@SRGaustin.com


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With endless views of the Austin Hill Country, and just 20 minutes from downtown Austin, Omni Barton Creek Resort & Spa makes it easy to get back out and play. From four championship golf courses to fine dining at Blind Salamander Kitchen & Bar and the world-class Mokara Spa, your playlist is endless. Learn more at OmniHotels.com/BartonCreek


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NYONE THAT KNOWS ME, KNOWS THAT MY FEAR OF

heights is very real. I’m not a fan of flying, cringe in glass elevators and shutter at the thought of skydiving. I prefer my feet firmly planted on the ground. In this year’s annual architecture issue, we’re reaching new heights. Literally. Introducing Cypress Valley in “Rooms with a View” — treehouses as magical and romantic as “reality” gets. The Yoki, Lofthaven, Juniper and Willow treehouses immediately transport you back to childhood, rekindling your sense of adventure in an enchanting world where you sleep in the trees. And from an ecology perspective, treehouses have a very light footprint. Amy Beilharz, co-founder of Cypress Valley explains, “They don’t provide impervious cover, which is important, so that we don’t cover our world with too much asphalt. Instead, we’re trying to use the structures nature has provided, which I think is the draw for people. It brings out their playfulness, their childlike nature.” Romance and adventure, in an eco-friendly environment high in the sky? I think my fear of heights has found its one and only exception. Moving from reliving the past to predicting the future, three UT architecture students are hard at work redefining the capital city’s architectural

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landscape in “Future Present.” Last year, in their Advanced Design Studio class, Bella Chou, Will Hachtman and Coleman Brink caught the eye of their professor, and won the UT School of Architecture Design Excellence Award. “The idea was to think about what the UT campus might be like in 25 to 50 years, and how we might integrate new technologies, like drone technologies and robotic technologies,” says Professor Kory Bieg. The pandemic-weary student trio has designed a futuristic, dystopian and eerily prescient setting with images to spark your imagination. This issue also features “Sinner and Saint” — a project from Austin’s acclaimed Bunkhouse in collaboration with renowned architecture firm Lake | Flato — bringing ’70s vibes to SoCo with Hotel Magdalena. We also spotlight three residences from Bercy Chen, CG&S Design Build and Matt Fajkus Architecture with styles that include “Desert Serenity,” “Midcentury Made Modern” and “Home on the Range.” You won’t want to miss these awe-inspiring projects!

Carrie Crowe Executive Editor

P H OTO B Y B R I T TA N Y DAW N S H O R T AT H OT E L M AG DA L E N A

EDITOR’S LETTER



20 AUSTIN CUR ATED O C T O B E R 2 02 1

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Carrie Crowe

ART DIRECTION

October Custom Publishing DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

David Clough

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen O. Spezia WRITERS

Holly Cowart Darcie Duttweiler Veronica Meewes Laurel Miller Tolly Moseley Bryan Parker Meher Qazilbash

PUBLISHER

Mark Fisher

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Julia Grisemer

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Paul Krushin

ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Dylan Sack

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman – CEO Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

EDITORIAL INTERN

Meher Qazilbash COPY EDITOR

Ashley Brown

PHOTOGR APHERS

Andrea Calo Holly Cowart Ryan Davis Casey Dunn Leonid Furmansky Jonathan Garza Brittany Dawn Short CONTRIBUTING ARTIST

Shaylin Wallace

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2021 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

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YEARS

N O. 2 3 6


Carl Shurr

YOU R LOCAL & GLOBAL REAL ESTATE A DVISOR

There’s no better time to sell, and there’s no better agent to guide you through. Carl and his team strive to go above and beyond to meet their clients’ needs by partnering with the only true, worldwide luxury real estate network to provide the best exposure for his listings. His connections in the industry and insight into the market are invaluable assets in today’s ultracompetitive real estate marketplace. Carl is the partner you need whether you’re buying or selling a luxury property. Curating the most qualified buyers with highly targeted marketing, accessing off-market properties not available to the general public, and always keeping attention to detail at the highest level is paramount in the market today, and that’s what Carl and his team provide. GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISOR 512.944.5977 CARL@CARLSHURR.COM CARLSHURR.COM

Use this link to sign up for The Shurr Report: monthly emailed Austin market updates.


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CREATING COMMUNITY ONE CLOSING AT A TIME EXCELLENCE IS THE HEAR T OF HE RI TAGE | THREE OF F I CE S TO SERVE YOU TARRYTOWN

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ROLLINGWOOD

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DOWNTOWN



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Anyone that’s owned a home knows it’s an investment, and the backyard should be no different. Large or little, the seeds you plant now can bloom into a fully realized personal oasis with room for adventure, style, relaxation and fun. From unconventional kitchen equipment to game-changing accessories for sustainable living, we’ve gathered a list of fabulous ideas from local brands to help make the best of your outdoor space — rain or shine.

The Khazana Acapulco Chairs Dubbed “the perfect outdoor chair,” the Acapulco line from Design Tree Studio comes in an assortment of vibrant colors and shapes (including a rocking chair version!) to match any backyard aesthetic. The retro looks are created with traditional Mayan weaving techniques and can be found at The Khazana, a family-owned furniture store with two showrooms in Austin filled with distinct home goods inspired by travel. thekhazana.net

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Studio Builders Backyard Studios Work from home became a way of life for many Austinites over the last year and a half. Studio Builders have made it easy for homeowners to create a dedicated space for their professions and pastimes right in their own backyard. No longer an unappealing or ignored storage shack in the corner of the lawn, these light-filled, elegant sheds are made at 16x8 feet with plenty of room for productivity and creativity to thrive, complete with electricity and internet access. There’s also availability for custom builds after a free collaborative consultation with the Studio Builders team. studio.builders


T R I B E Z A TA L K

Bold MFG & Supply Fire Pits Cooler weather means more opportunities to warm up with friends and family by the fire, and Bold MFG & Supply brings the heat with its modern fire pits that are as decorative as they are functional. Led by owner Jonathan Duke, a team of dedicated builders and artists craft the Austin-inspired pits from raw, unfinished steel, which over time naturally rusts to a lovely dark brown patina. You can also purchase a fully assembled Ash top cover or just the brackets for a more budget-friendly, DIY option using the wood of your choice. boldmfg.com

Faraday’s Kitchen Store Outdoor Pizza Ovens As one of the best and largest kitchen supply stores in Austin, Faraday’s boasts an incredible assortment of cooking supplies and specialty equipment and hosts regular culinary workshops. If you’re looking for an exciting addition to your outdoor kitchen that goes beyond the average grill, consider a gas or wood-fired pizza oven to perfect your pie-making skills. There’s never a bad time to have a homemade slice and, trust me, your friends will be just as grateful. faradayskitchenstore.com

Ecotopes XOYL Composters Composting involves recycling organic matter like food and garden waste and turning it into fertilizer that helps soil thrive — but it can also be a bit of a mess. However, the ecological experts at Ecotopes have just the fix: a single-bin XOYL composter. The brand is the brainchild of former UT Landscape Architecture student and award-winning designer, Steve Shelton, and the steel bins are welded by hand right here in Austin for a local touch that will jump start anyone’s journey to a greener lifestyle. ecotopes.com

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Roost & Root Chicken Coops Among the range of new hobbies people are adding to their repertoire, raising chickens has become an increasingly popular way of updating one’s urban lifestyle with an agrarian twist. Founded by Dyan Twining and her husband Montie in Dripping Springs, Roost & Root has been helping folks “find their inner farmer” since 2014 with well-crafted coops that are both pleasing to look at and highly protective against the elements. If this has piqued your interest in the past, know there are numerous benefits to owning chickens, from easy access to organic eggs, living more sustainably, creating fun family activities and more. Not to mention, the City of Austin has a Home Composting Rebate Program that gives Austinites $75 for their chicken coop after attending a free chicken keeping class! roostandroot.com

Garden Seventeen Fountains Looking to fill your life with a little more zen? So is Garden Seventeen, a newer greenhouse and garden destination from the team behind Native Edge Landscape. Although the expansive Central Austin location holds an impressive selection of plant life and gardening supplies, we’re loving the statuary and stone fountains that bring a peaceful ambiance and artistic flair to your landscape, like this earth-toned short sphere fountain. gardenseventeen.square.site

Texas Tiny Pools Pools Texas Tiny Pools is making dreams come true with its concrete pools that are custom designed for every lawn, big or small. Not only a beautiful place to cool off, these are much more cost effective, environmentally conscious and lower maintenance than other traditionally sized pools. Customers can choose to include a sliding deck or make their pools heated for a hot tub vibe that can be enjoyed all year round. The company currently serves the Austin Metro area, with new projects available for construction early 2022. tinypools.com

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G A R D E N S E V E N T E E N P H OTO I S CO U R T E S Y O F G A R D E N S E V E N T E E N . T E X A S T I N Y P O O L S P H OTO B Y C AT E B L AC K P H OTO G R A P H Y

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A-OK Playgrounds Piccadilly Playhouses Turn your backyard into a wonderland with these picturesque and lifelike playhouses, finely detailed from the Dutch door and aluminum-framed windows down to the interior loft. Family-owned and operated, A-OK ensures quality and safety are at the forefront of each structure, while the delightful miniature homes easily double as a storage space when not in use. With endless options for customization, check out their vast assortment of designs online and let your child’s imagination run wild without going too far from home. aokplaygrounds.com

Shading Texas Patio Shades & Retractable Awnings Everyone knows how essential a patio can be, from sipping coffee in the morning to viewing stunning sunsets in the afternoon. However, the Texas sun isn’t always so kind, and unpredictable weather can make it difficult to kick back and relax. Queue Shading Texas, which has been outfitting homes with patio screens and retractable awnings for years from Austin to San Antonio. Made from specially woven fabric, these eye-catching covers will let you enjoy the view mosquito-free and even add a little privacy from nearby neighbors. shadingtexas.com

Thompson + Hanson Gardening Tools & Accessories The specialists at landscape architecture firm Thompson + Hanson know the intrinsic value of incorporating nature into our residential spaces and everyday lives, offering clients a mixture of landscape design, garden and consultation services. Along with a charming Austin nursery in Kerbey Lane Village — aptly named Garden House — their online shop also delivers a gorgeous selection of home goods that evoke a “relaxed yet refined” ambiance, from antique decorations to must-have garden tools that will upgrade anyone’s green thumb. thompsonhanson.com

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Social

HOUR Beloved East Austin venues, Hotel Vegas and The Volstead Lounge, celebrated 10 and a half years with a free anniversary party on August 5, followed by a weekend of shows. Party-goers enjoyed cocktails and bites from the Vegas Concessions food truck along with Leftside Vintage vendors and a variety of performances from live music to comedy.

MUSEUM OF ICE CREAM PREVIEW PARTY

The Museum of Ice Cream’s first Texas location debuted on August 21 at the Domain. Guests experienced the internationally-acclaimed exhibits with sweet treats, drinks and local entertainment before receiving a firsthand look at the 12 reimagined and never-before-seen installations dedicated to all-things ice cream.

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PORSCHE AUSTIN GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION On August 26, Porsche Austin hosted its Grand Opening Celebration and ribbon cutting event. Over 1,000 attendees admired the brand new state-of-the-art facility and iconic cars while Porsche’s executive team shared exciting words about the storefront’s future in Austin. Guests were also treated to tasty hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and gift bags to commemorate the day. HOTEL VEGAS + VOLSTEAD 10.5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY 1. Mormon Ahmad & Alexandra Arteaga 2. Fatima Sadaqat & Joseph Fabian 3. Ashley Gregg, Courtney Goforth & Jess Odom 4. Gus Baldwin 5. Lily Keepers & Jordan Pape 6. Shaun Dickerson, Riley Sklar & Rankin Fetzer MUSEUM OF ICE CREAM PREVIEW PARTY 7. Manish Vora with MOIC team 9. Justin Rezvani & Guest 10. Jordan Roemmele, Nirav Nirvaan & Adrian Grenier PORSCHE AUSTIN GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION 11. Eva Horton & Neal Golden 12. Samone Boyd & Jordan Walden 13. Miranda Simons & Jacob Rogers 14. James & Cheryl Kim 15. Ellie Blankenship, Tito Villegas & Michel Asperas 16. Sydney Alexander, Melinda Shermerhorn & Christina Hinojosa

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H OT E L V E G G A S + VO L S T E A D P H OTO S B Y R O G E R H O . M U S E U M O F I C E C R E A M P H OTO S B Y L I L I J A M A I L . P O R S C H E A U S T I N P H OTO S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A .

HOTEL VEGAS + VOLSTEAD 10.5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY


BUY • SELL • DESIGN Real Estate + Interior Design

“Home sales with a creative approach”

Ensuring clients receive clarity, guidance and expertise every step of a real estate transition.

Komal.Sheth@compass.com

512-423-0981 •

spacesdesigned.com


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Crossing Over By Kristin Armstrong Artwork by Shaylin Wallace Portrait by Laura Doss

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HERE ARE DREAMS, PLANS, RENDERINGS, MEETINGS AND approval processes when we choose to build or remodel a home, yet most of us go about the architecture of our lives with much less deliberate intention. We fill our hours, which become our days, which turn into our years (much by default), doing the next thing or doing things the way we’ve always done them. It’s why careers stall, relationships wither away, beloved hobbies are forgotten, health and vitality wane and bucket lists turn into f *cket lists. Passion that is not stoked becomes burnout. When we are busy thoughtlessly filling time, life can become strangely empty. We may look up and be surprised by what we see, or blindsided by what isn’t there. I have been approaching the threshold of the second half of my life with great interest, reading books, taking notes, journaling, meditating and asking questions of people I admire who have already (brilliantly, intentionally) started a thriving Part Two. I’m learning so much. I probably should have started this quest at the quarter mark, but I didn’t know what I didn’t know. Perhaps it has taken me until now to form some better questions. A few common themes have bubbled to the surface of my inquiry. One is that pain is a catalyst. People who have walked through the fire of adversity are honed and transformed in a way that comfort can never replicate. The other component of that catalyst, perhaps the even more important part, is that people who navigate a painful season and figure out how to keep their hearts open are the most interesting, gorgeous, desirable people of all. The greatest tragedy or trauma is never your tragedy or your trauma, it’s what you do with your heart afterwards. Most people close. Some stay open, no matter what. It’s a choice, often made thousands of times a day. Another theme is energy. We tend to think our treasures are time, relationships, health, success or possessions — and in some ways they are. But, at a deeper level, it’s all about energy, which is the essence of time, relationships, health, success and possessions. Our energy is our priceless resource, because what we choose to focus on is what expands. Where we put our attention is what becomes. People who know this are very wise with their energy. They meditate to expand and direct it, they focus it deliberately to create, they choose it by taking responsibility for what they think about

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and decide in advance how they want to feel. They realize that no one can hijack their energy without their consent, so they live in absolute peace and freedom. Sign. Me. Up. Another theme is fear. Most of the time, fear isn’t real. Fear is primal and real when it’s our amygdala warning us of imminent threat. It is very helpful when we need to avoid the dark alley with the serial killer hiding behind the trash bin. Most of the time our amygdala is more like the car alarm going off needlessly in broad daylight in the H-E-B parking lot. For some people, it goes off so often they tune it out, and live with the inflammatory hum of constant, underlying stress. There are so many things we don’t say, try, or allow ourselves to feel because we are afraid of failure. Thrivers in Part Two have made the decision to choose love instead of living in fear. They call failures “lessons” and refuse to regret unmade leaps. Recently I was discussing courage with Amber, my energy-healer-Reiki-goddess-friend. I shared my hesitation in reaching for something I really, really want. She said, “Kristin, remember, you cannot cross a chasm in two leaps.” Finally, there is the theme of story, specifically the idea that how we tell our story actually becomes our story. This may sum up all of the above … open-heartedness, energy, and choosing love over fear. We can narrate our lives from the perspective of a victim or a badass. We can choose words that convey expansion, learning, compassion, abundance, redemption and empowerment. Or we can tell a small, sad, cautionary tale of loss, regret, mistakes, limitation, blame and abandonment. Now that I am acutely aware of this (because I listen to people tell me their stories all day long — we all do actually, whether we do it for a living or not), I will sometimes even stop myself mid-sentence when I’m talking to someone and do an extemporaneous rewrite. Actually, what I meant to say was that I … I don’t even want a page of my second half to be turned before the ink dries unless I love my narrative. I close this column as the last whisper of my 40s bids me farewell. And mark my words, I will fare well. I will choose what gets left back in Part One, and what gets to cross over with me into Part Two. I will keep the doors to my heart brazenly flung wide open, perhaps even take them off the hinges altogether. I will hone my energy and direct it with precision at what I want to think about, and how I want to feel. I will write my life story as a voluminous, epic adventure. From this moment until I cross my final chasm, I will get a running start and leap into the waiting arms of Love.


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LOCKET X COLOR


European Villa in Seven Oaks

5 BD | 6.5 BA | $4,500,000 Pool & Spa | Sport Court | Gym 9120Brookhurst.com

Dara Luxury Group Dara Allen Director, Luxury Estates 512.296.7090 | Dara@DaraAllen.com The Dara Luxury Group is a real estate group affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Make Yourself at Home THESE FOUR INTERIOR DESIGNERS WILL SHOW YOU HOW By Veronica Meewes Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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OR THE LAST YEAR AND A HALF, OUR CONCEPT OF HOME HAS evolved drastically. For most of us, it became a refuge — the only safe space we could count on in a wildly unpredictable world. For many, home also became a place of work, as people quickly adapted their surroundings to meet their changing lifestyles. But no matter your line of work or living situation, one thing is true for all of us: we sure spend a lot more time in our own space these days. “I really do think people spending more time at home this past year because of COVID made everybody realize how our surroundings shape so much of who we are,” says interior designer Maureen Stevens. But aesthetics aside, functionality is just as important to interior design, and it can truly be life changing. “Every single facet of design impacts the way one lives,” says Stevens. “Incorrect space planning can create chaos in a family’s day-to-day life, awful lighting choices can affect productivity and mood, and perfectly placed accessories and personal mementos can bring so much joy into a person’s life.” Stevens diverted from her field of physical therapy in 2013 when she felt a calling to do something more creatively fulfilling. After building up her portfolio one space at a time, she now designs everything from residences and offices, to boutique hotels and shortterm rentals. She describes her style — which features dramatic wallpaper prints, commanding wall colors and elegant textures — as “muted maximalism and

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Maureen Stevens

AESTH ETICS AS I D E, FU NCTIO NALITY IS J UST AS I M PO RTANT TO I NTERIO R D ES IGN, AN D IT CAN TRU LY B E LI FE CHAN GI N G


updated classic,” noting that the added time at home during the pandemic also seemed to inspire her clients to become more adventurous and bold in their design choices. “I think COVID shifted the point of view on the importance of homes, both in beauty and functionality,” says designer Stephanie Webb of Good Eye Concepts, an Austin-based interior design studio. Webb’s interior design career began with an MFA from the University of North Texas. “I have always thought of your home as an extension of your personal style, as relevant as we consider someone’s fashions.” Webb began renovating homes eight years ago, breathing new life into existing properties by making modifications to update functionality while honoring architectural integrity. She began taking on multi-family “flip” projects, learning more about the construction process. But when the pandemic forced her to slow down and think about where she really wanted her path to lead, she decided to focus on something she’d been quietly chasing the entire time, starting with her art background.

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Emily Seeds

Webb launched Good Eye Concepts in 2020 and she now leads a team of three women and a strong support team of subcontractors, taking on both residential and commercial clients. Rather than adhering to a specific style, the Good Eye team is guided by three design principle questions: Is it functional? Is it beautiful? And does it elevate and balance the space? The realization that design can improve productivity might account for Emily Seeds’ leap in sales during the pandemic. Last spring, she says business for Emily Seeds Interior Designs halted to an abrupt standstill, but by the end of the quarantine, business had already doubled. Seeds started off in fashion design, buying for a department store in Houston. She became fascinated by the way fashion designers replicate their creations into living space and decor, and found herself making the transition into interiors as well.

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“My approach is to play with proportions, textures or elements I find in the architecture of the home,” describes Seeds. “My job is to communicate through fixtures, tile and fabric, and my aim is to be thoughtful about how to tell my client’s story through materials and how they want to live in their home. I want my clients’ spaces to look like they live there. So no project looks alike or follows a formula.” Ruby Cloutier, the founder of Vazzo Spaces, also entered the industry through fashion design, first working in retail at local Austin boutiques, and then as a stylist for Burberry. She realized how drawn she was to interiors after staging her own home when getting ready to sell it. She began taking on other staging clients, a practice which had her turning around designs at a very fast pace for clients.


I AM A FI RM B ELI EVER THAT FU NCTIO N AN D B EAUTY EN HAN CE OU R ENVI RO N M ENTS AN D CAN ALTER YOU R M OO D, I N CREAS E PRO DUCTIVITY AN D REDUCE STRESS After collecting her own staging inventory and widening her client database, she opened her own interior design studio in 2018. While she describes her style as vintage, masculine and European, each space is customized according to her client’s needs and desires, and she takes pleasure in dedicating hours of research to source each piece she incorporates. “I am a firm believer that function and beauty enhance our environments and can alter your mood, increase productivity and reduce stress,” says Cloutier. Her business also soared during lockdown and hasn’t slowed down since. “Business tripled in the past two years, and I’m excited to see how it continues to grow in 2022.” With so many people working remotely and avoiding public gatherings during the pandemic, clothing sales naturally went down, but online sales were soaring. So it makes sense that homeowners would turn a discerning eye to their all-too-familiar surroundings. But perhaps the monotony of lockdown awakened us to something we should always cherish: our divine home space. “Having a more beautiful and organized aspect of any part of our lives is a blessing,” says Webb. “Why should your home, arguably most people’s largest financial commitment, be any different?”

Ruby Cloutier

maureenstevens.com goodeyeconcepts.com emilyseedsinteriors.com vazzo.space tribeza.com

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Drinking by Design URBANSPACE OPENS ITS FIRST HOSPITALIT Y CONCEPT WITH RETRO ITALIAN VIBES By Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Leonid Furmansky

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R I N C I PA L D E S I G N E R O F U R BA N S PAC E R E A L E S TATE + Interiors Merrill Alley didn’t think that Urbanspace CEO Kevin Burns would go for the cabernet and emerald green tiles she wanted to use in the bathrooms of their first hospitality concept, Codependent Cocktails + Coffee. The 1970s-inspired tiles were a little bit funky and could be positioned in a pattern to spell out a “C” and an “O.” “He hates the color purple!” Alley laughs remembering bringing the tiles to Burns. Eventually those tiles, which line the single-occupancy restrooms at the back of the cocktail bar/coffee shop, would motivate the rest of the space’s vibe and color palette and later serve as inspiration for the logo’s typeface.


“They spoke to this classic Italian vibe, with all of the marbles they use throughout their interiors, and they just set the tone in a really fun way. The color palette influenced and informed the whole space.” Located at the bottom of The Independent Residences and adjacent to Urbanspace’s retail and design showroom, Codependent is a coffee shop by day and a cocktail bar at night. During the daytime hours, the light and airy space feels like a f loating treehouse with the natural elements of Shoal Creek on full display. But, by night, a disco ball drops down from the ceiling, and the sexiness of the dark leather bar stools and seductive paintings — not to mention the establishment’s strict “no screens” rule after 6 p.m. — ushers in a totally different mood. “We wanted to create a place that would be able to transition with the urban Austinite —from their first cup of cold brew in the morning to an afternoon business meeting, to their essential happy hour go-to — while still feeling like your neighborhood spot where you want to start your night out or have a nightcap,” Burns says.

TH EY S PO KE TO TH IS CLASS IC ITALIAN VI B E, WITH ALL O F TH E MARB LES TH EY US E TH ROUGHOUT TH EI R I NTERIO RS ...

Opening during the COVID pandemic did have its upsides. The team balanced the space with pockets of seating that make each spot feel private and unique. There’s a comfy couch in the back corner situated next to a giant Studio 54-esque painting of two scantily clad women. Overlooking the creek is a plush green banquette. And, of course, no food outlet in Austin would be complete without a patio, and Codependent offers several nooks and crannies to hole up in to enjoy a Greater Goods Coffee Roasters cup of joe while answering emails or sipping an aperitivo with friends during happy hour. “It’s an amenity for the building and the community. We wanted a space where people could go multiple times a week — or even in a day,” Laura Burns says. The best byproduct from enjoying a delicious coffee in a beautiful space created by an interior design firm? Pretty much every piece can be ordered next door. From the gorgeous Double Zero Barstools by Moroso lining the sleek bar to the patio Nautica Swing Chairs by Expormim welcoming guests at the front entrance, the pieces that inform Codependent’s aesthetic could also make their way into your home. “Our intention is that you can live into these pieces. Design doesn’t have to be unapproachable or unattainable. It’s a great way to show off pieces from designers we love and celebrate,” Alley explains. Up next for the Urbanspace team are the upcoming Bacalar and its taco to-go window at 44 East Ave. Residences on Rainey Street (set to open fall 2022) and the recently announced 55-story Modern Austin Residences located at 610 Davis St., which will house a similar concept to Codependent and likely break ground later next year. codependentatx.com

Codependent opened quietly in September 2020, and while its opening didn’t make a huge splash considering its pandemic timeline, there was a lot of thought and care that went into the design of the space, as well as the food and beverage menus. Nic Yanes of Juniper and Uncle Nicky’s was no stranger to the Italian concept and crafted the breakfast and snack menus, while Bar Manager Isaac Ramon curated the tongue-in-cheek cocktail menu (see “Better with the Lights On” or the “Side Piece”), and General Manager Lindsay Drew fashioned the mostly European wine program. Urbanspace COO Laura Burns explains the space was carefully calculated to be completely cohesive and offer a comfortable retro Italian café vibe, from the décor to the cocktails. It’s what they call “drinking by design.” “The design was the driving force of everything — the branding, the logo, the drink menu. Everything is Italian inspired. We wanted people to know it’s a design-driven bar, but you’re also going to get amazing drinks here. It’s a highly curated space with amazing ambience.” tribeza.com

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Iconic Tarrytown Estate

Tarrytown 2401 Enfield Road $5,999,999 7 Beds 8.5 Baths

5735 SF

.46 Acres

Sitting centerstage and surrounded by mature Live Oak trees, this 1940’s iconic Tarrytown estate features 6 bedrooms, 7.5 bathrooms as well as a 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom poolside guest casita with private entrance. The property is situated on nearly a 1/2 acre of lush green (level) yard along with multiple patios, children’s playhouse, sport court and a heated lap pool and spa. The covered outdoor dining/grill area and covered outdoor living space with cozy fireplace completes it, making this the ideal home for entertaining and enjoyment year round. www.2401EnfieldRoad.com

Lisa Matulis-Thomajan 512.739.2460 lisa@thomajanladnergroup.com

Jennifer Ladner 512.827.9255 jennifer@thomajanladnergroup.com

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Compass is a licensed real estate broker. All material is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description or measurements (including square footage). This is not intended to solicit property already listed. No financial or legal advice provided. Equal Housing Opportunity.

OCTOBER 2021 | tribeza.com


Helping Local Businesses Thrive THE RECENTLY-L AUNCHED WEBSITE IS MAKING IT E ASIER THAN EVER FOR SHOPPERS TO KEEP THEIR MONEY IN THE AUSTIN ECONOMY By Meher Qazilbash

P H OTO S CO U R T E S Y O F G R E E N B E LT O U T D O O R S , C U V E E CO F F E E A N D A M A N DA D E E R J E W E L R Y

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N THE CURRENT WORLD WHERE GIANT COMPANIES OFFER QUICK ways to do shopping online, local businesses tend to be left behind. While people want to shop at their local stores, it just isn’t as easy. Or so they thought. Nearby ATX is the revolutionary website that is challenging this notion and bringing the convenience we associate with big name brands like Amazon to local Austin shops. Nearby ATX works by accumulating a diverse selection of inventories from different Austin-based businesses to create one hyperlocal marketplace. Since launching this summer, the site now sells products from over 40 Austin-based shops and makers with more joining every week. Whether you want coffee from Cuvee Coffee Bar, camping supplies from Greenbelt Outdoors or artwork from an independent artist, you can add anything and everything you want to your shopping cart and get your items delivered to your door together. For those who live outside of Austin, Nearby ATX can also ship orders nationwide. Here’s how the delivery is carried out: Each morning Nearby ATX runs a pickup route to collect all orders from the various shops represented on their site. Once items are picked up, they are brought back to the Nearby ATX Fulfillment Center so orders can be consolidated and packed up. By the afternoon, deliveries are sent right to the doors of shoppers. Orders from outside Austin will be sent for shipping. The instant nature of the Nearby ATX process makes it so Austinites can fully rely on local businesses for their needed goods and not look to megastores as the quicker or easier option. Growing the roster of Nearby ATX is not difficult either. Whether a business wants to be added, or if an Austinite wants to nominate their favorite

business, a simple form can be filled out on nearbyatx.com to get results fast. Eventually the vision is to expand to the point that every shop in Austin is a part of the site. Nearby ATX will especially be working to add as many shops as possible before the holiday season, giving consumers a wide range of options for gifts this year with a special touch of Austin. The drive behind creating Nearby ATX came from the desire to support the community while also recognizing why consumers tend to shop from huge companies. Nearby ATX representative Brett Rounsaville shared the importance of supporting local shops, stating “It’s the mom and pop shops that keep Austin vibrant! Keeping our local stores in business benefits everyone. What would SoCo be without Allen’s Boots, Limbo Jewelry, Monkey See, Monkey Do, Big Top, Lucy in the Disguise? They all make Austin unique! But beyond that, the shop owners know both their customers and their products in a way that giant online retailers never will and that all translates into better service. These local retailers know what the Austin community wants — because they are a part of the community themselves!” More than adding a convenient way to shop, Nearby ATX is setting out to keep alive the spirit of Austin at a time when, more and more, the new is replacing the old. nearbyatx.com tribeza.com

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B Y T O L LY M O S E L E Y PHOTOS BY JACK HOLLINGSWORTH , ER ICH SCHLEGEL , K E V I N S T E E L E A N D S H A N NON VA N DI V I E R

For about five years now, I’ve wanted a treehouse to call my own. Not a tiny house. Not a weirdly gendered “she shed.” A treehouse, where I can be on eye level with birds, where I can reach out and touch a branch, where I can read or nap or unspool the contents of my mind, all while perched in the sky. It’s a want, not a need — but don’t get it twisted. It’s a strong want. Architecture goes through phases, and you, like me, have probably gotten seduced by trends. Do you follow Cabin Porn on Instagram? You do now! How about glamping? Does a part of you secretly want luxuriously thick canvas walls on all of your tents? Me too. It’s fun to watch these pretty novelties, but to be honest, I’ve been wondering for a while now when treehouses would have their day. Then I visited Cypress Valley in Spicewood and realized that day was already here.

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Bridges wrapping around The Nest, one of Cypress Valley’s first treehouses tribeza.com

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says Amy Beilharz, co-founder of Cypress Valley and Artistree, the company that designs said treehouses. What started as the first zipline company in the continental U.S., Cypress Valley has now evolved into a hospitality space, where bathhouses float above the ground and guests get married in the trees. Turns out, I could do a lot more in a treehouse than take a nap. “From an ecology perspective, treehouses have a very light footprint,” Amy tells me. “They don’t provide impervious cover, which is important, so that we don’t cover our world with too much asphalt. Instead, we’re trying to use the structures nature has provided, which I think is the draw for people. It brings out their playfulness, their childlike nature.” Reader, I fact-checked it, and indeed, you’re going to feel like a kid again at Cypress Valley. At least, I did.

“Ooh ooh, can I see that one?!” I squealed to my guide, kindly zipping me around on a golf cart. I pointed to a large, multilevel structure, the kind of thing Jules Verne may have designed. A little Hill Country, a little steampunk. “This is The Nest,” says Alicia Miranda, my guide for the day, and Cypress Valley’s Office Manager. “Families love this one, because you can fit a lot of people here. Plus, it’s just really fun.” It’s undeniably, outrageously fun: there are enclosed lookout rooms dotting the trees, winding staircases that climb ever higher, circular bedrooms overlooking a creek ravine. Did I mention a kitchenette? Yeah. You can make a meal for yourself, suspended several meters in the sky. There were even cute little bookshelves and a lounge area — everything you’d need for a group of four to six. It was at this point I started mentally planning my destination birthday, assigning beds to my family and friends at The Nest.

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But I wasn’t quite prepared for the treehouse A licia showed me next: The Yoki — a luxury, modern suite accessible only by suspension bridge. “This is our newest treehouse,” Alicia explains. I opened the door to a floating, upscale bungalow — exactly like something you’d see in the New York Times’ Style section. All angles and spaciousness, platform king bed, an open-style living room and curved outdoor deck. If you’ve ever wondered whether treehouses could accommodate a refrigerator, they can! The Yoki evokes a Japanese-style penthouse, complete with running water and AC. Except, it’s in a tree. Forget AI, this is the future I’m hoping for. “Let me show you the bathhouse,” Alicia suggests, and we walk back over the suspension bridge to an Onsen-style soaking tub, nestled in a concrete room with huge picture windows — the tub itself big enough for two people at least. What I’m saying is, it’s a good honeymoon option. At this point, you might be wondering how much it costs to stay at Cypress Valley. Prices run $200 to $675 a night to stay in one of their treehouses, scattered throughout the 103-acre ranch. But guests can also come for events, which brings me to the crown jewel of Cypress Valley: a wedding and event platform, suspended between two 500-yearold cypress trees. Top: Small loft inside Yoki, which also features a king-size bed and private balcony Middle: A view of Yoki — Cypress Valley’s luxury-modern treehouse Bottom: Juniper — a single-room suspended above the creek


The Nest at Cypress Valley — a multi-level group suite, complete with two bedrooms, kitchen, and lookout towers Left Inset: Lofthaven — an aerial yurt suspended in a cypress tree with waterfall soaking tub

“It really is magical,” says Amy, who tells me that the platform itself can hold 20 guests. It’s f lanked by a limestone amphitheater, where additional guests can watch a ceremony or a concert, the latter of which Cypress Valley has been booking more of lately. I don’t blame them: the platform looks over a spring-fed creek ravine, a striking backdrop for any band. I think about coming back here for such a show or wedding, underneath a night sky combed through with stars, crickets and cicadas singing under our feet. Maybe it’s time to renew my vows. We visit more treehouses, like The Lofthaven — an aerial

yurt wrapped around an old growth cypress tree, with a bathhouse perched on a ravine, and a waterfall bathtub whose stones cascade down one floor to the next. It all seems so unlikely, these little wonders tucked into treetops; even the more modest spaces, like the single-room, solar-powered Willow and Juniper houses, don’t quite tell you the feats of engineering that they are. Rather, their design relies on biomimicry, a practice of letting nature tell you how to build. “My passion is creating win-win situations, where we can help people reconnect with nature, while doing something good for the planet,” Amy tells me. And it’s clear that she and her family — her son Will helped spearhead Cypress Valley into what it is today — have done exactly that. This is a place, she tells me, where they don’t have to tell guests to put away their phones or devices. It just naturally happens, as people slow down, acclimate to a more relaxed pace, nourished by birdsong and wind in the leaves. Something about that doesn’t surprise me. cypressvalley.com

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The Architect of Chocolate NICOLE PATEL OF DELYSIA CHOCOL ATIER IS CHANGING THE DESIGN OF CHOCOL ATES ONE TRUFFLE AT A TIME By Darcie Duttweiler Portrait by Wendi Poole Photo courtesy of Delysia Chocolatier

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ICOLE PATEL WAS PREPARING FOR THE BIRTH OF HER FIRST CHILD and cross-stitching Winnie the Pooh items for his nursery while watching cooking shows. One episode happened to be about chocolate truffles, and the then-engineer thought it would be easier to make holiday gifts instead of shopping. “I liked the technical side of it — the challenge of if the chocolate is not just tempered and the ratio of cream to the chocolate and the other ingredients wasn’t perfect, then the chocolate wasn’t going to set,” Patel remembers. “It really played into my engineering mindset.” Patel sent her husband to work with what she describes as “the ugliest chocolate truffles and the ugliest packaging ever,” but the holiday gifts were a major hit, so she kept making them. It wasn’t until two years later during a trip to Becker Vineyards,


where she had the idea to infuse truffles with Hill Country wine, that she thought chocolate might be more than just a hobby. After partnering with Salt Lick and incorporating their dry rubs and barbecue sauces into truffles, Patel quit her engineering job and turned to chocolate full time. And once she did that, she fully embraced future experimentation. “I think it just became a creative outlet of seeing what unique ingredients we could infuse and blend into chocolate,” she says. Throughout the 13 years in business, Delysia Chocolatier has created some decidedly interesting flavors, including Southern collard greens with bacon, pepperoni, fried chicken and even crickets. “It tastes like peanuts!” Patel laughs. It’s not all about inventive flavors, though. Patel lovingly handcrafts each choc-

TH E CO M PLEXITY O F CHOCO LATE GETS M ISS ED I F YOU CH EW AN D SWALLOW IT QU ICKLY olate. She creates the ingredients to go inside every truffle and works with artists to design the sometimes whimsical graphics that adorn the top of every piece. Then, it takes roughly seven to 10 days to create the chocolates. There’s a melter on site to bring together all the sugar molecules. She’ll make the outer shells, place the seasonal ingredients inside, spoon the ganache and then place the top. Everything is done by hand all the way down to tying white bows on red boxes. It should also be noted that Patel herself doesn’t actually eat chocolate anymore after discovering it was the source of her migraines, so while she’ll taste the ingredients inside the truffles, she relies on her husband and two sons to help her make sure everything is well-balanced and pairs perfectly with the chocolate. “I develop all of our recipes by smelling all the ingredients and paying attention to all the aromas they present,” she says. Smelling the chocolate is an important step in tasting chocolate, Patel explains, and a step that should never be skipped. During tastings, she walks customers through the proper way of trying artisanal chocolate. Patel recommends every customer should be “in the right frame of mind” and not rush through it. First of all, smell the chocolate truffle and see what aromas jump out. Next, take a small bite and listen to the snap it makes. Third, and this is the most important part, don’t chew the chocolate. Let it sit on your tongue and melt. Treat it like a fine glass of wine to sip and savor.

“The complexity of chocolate gets missed if you chew and swallow it quickly. If you don’t give the chocolate the opportunity to melt and present the flavors to you, you’re missing out on that experience,” she says. Delysia’s award-winning truff les have garnered attention all over the world, including nabbing titles from International Chocolate Salon, Taste TV, London Chocolate Festival and International Chocolate Awards, amongst others. The high-quality chocolate is sourced from beans grown in Ghana that are then processed in Germany. In addition to white, milk and dark chocolates, Patel also utilizes ruby and gold chocolate, both of which have entirely unique tastes. Ruby chocolate has a sweetened raspberry milk quality, while gold chocolate has a rich caramel palate. Pro tip: Delysia’s gold Thanksgiving turkeys are definitely not to be missed and make thoughtful hostess gifts. For Patel, sharing the stories and themes of her chocolate collections is her favorite part of Delysia. Every box of chocolate is dedicated to a specific theme and is made to be a conversation starter, which is why they make such wonderful presents. “Chocolate is a great gift, but it can be a gift for any reason, whether it’s a gift for yourself, because you had a great day or a horrible day, or a gift for a friend or family member for a special celebration. There’s always a reason to indulge,” Patel explains. “Chocolate is such a great medium to transport us to a different place, whether it’s to a memory from our childhood through flavors like peanut butter and jelly and ice cream flavored chocolates or something celebratory and exciting, like a champagne-infused chocolate. It’s not just a box of chocolate — there’s a story. It’s an experience.” delysia.com

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Custom Cribs LE ARN WHAT TO E XPECT WHEN BUILDING A BESPOKE HOME WITH URBAN HOME BUILDERS By Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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ARY ZYGMONT KNEW HE WANTED TO BE a builder at a young age. The grandson of a mill manager, he has been comfortable around tools his whole life, but it wasn’t until he got into skateboarding and decided to build a quarter pipe that he realized he could truly build what he was visualizing and maybe turn it into a career. Now, the owner and superintendent of Urban Home Builders has been visualizing dream homes and building custom abodes in the Austin area for more than 20 years. While he originally had a team to craft a couple dozen homes a year, the self-admitted Type-A builder would rather devote all of his time and attention to a single client’s home to ensure it is absolutely perfect — and on budget — while giving the client the best experience possible. It means Zygmont on a construction site six days a week. He wouldn’t have it any other way. “I commit all of myself to build the quality of homes that I want,” he confesses. “I like trying to bring perfection out of chaos.” It’s no secret the Austin real estate market is truly insane these days. But if you’re patient and have a couple of million dollars and a plot of land, it’s not as hard as you might think to build a custom home. Zygmont says it’s all about picking the right builder, who will then steer you to the perfect architect, engineer and designer. As Zygmont says, “The architect writes the recipe, and the interior designer sets the table, but the builder is the chef.”

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So what exactly does a builder do, and what is the process of constructing your perfect home in Austin? First up is determining that you truly want a custom home and all the decisions that go into making that dream a reality. Zygmont recommends people understand how much communication is involved, especially in the first six months. You’ll then need to determine a budget and where this house is going to live — if it’s a teardown project or a new build on a plot of land. Next up is choosing a builder. It’s important to vibe well with your builder, as you’re going to be forced to connect with them for at least two years, if not longer. Zygmont will take on clients he thinks are good fits since he’s going to be advocating for them six days a week. “They need to feel like I’m going to care about them and their money,” he says. Once you have a builder in place, they’ll help you find a perfect architect and engineer (and a designer if needed) in your price range. While waiting for the land to be surveyed, Zygmont will talk to his clients about styles and create a vision board. He’ll walk through everything his clients want, from big picture items all the way down to drawers and light fixtures, to determine what the best custom home will be for them and their family. All of that is sent to the architect, who will draft everything up and send the plans to an engineer. Zygmont says then, while the engineer is making sure your house stays up during a natural disaster, he sends his clients out to vendors (or to their interior designer) to pick out everything they need for their new home, including countertops and appliances, all while staying within their budget. At this point, the engineer will come back and determine what needs to be changed in order to have the City of Austin approve the plans. The permitting process takes at least three months. “There are so many battles going on behind the scenes that the client doesn’t even want to see,” Zygmont advises. But at this point it’s been roughly a year, and now it’s time to actually build. When asked what clients should know prior to starting the process of a custom home, he responds, “I wish clients realized that the perfect project is where everything is picked before construction starts — the sink,

the stove, the light fixtures, the bulbs — everything. If all of that is selected, it makes construction efficient and fast.” The site is then prepared, and everything is checked to make sure it’s in compliance with all the city departments, including gas, electrical and sewage. The foundation crew can finally come in, and it’s time to assemble the home. Zygmont says currently homes are taking anywhere from 10 to 12 months to finish during COVID delays. Then, during that process, Zygmont is on site, making sure his client’s budget and timeline are being perfectly met up until it’s time to hand over the keys. For him, all the work is worth it for the moment his clients first feel at home in the structure. “The couple will walk in, and it will just click. What was this expensive untenable object on paper is now their home. They will look over at each other, and you can see it in their eyes. He’s picturing Super Bowl parties, and she’s thinking about Thanksgiving dinners. They’ve worked so hard, and now all of their dreams are going to come true.” urbanhomebuilders.com tribeza.com

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Celeb rate Ever y Day

E xc l u s i ve l y a t Ko r m a n • C a ro l i n a B u cc i • E F Co l l e c t i o n P i cc h i o t t i • S i n g l e Sto n e • Te m p l e St Cl a i r •


Nothing compares. We leverage our brand’s heritage and sophistication. Connect with affluent consumers who share our vision. Go above and beyond to meet clients’ needs. Offer the only true, worldwide luxury real estate network. Partner with leading media to obtain the best exposure. Provide unparalleled reach to qualified buyers and sellers. Showcase every listing with the highest quality production. Utilize the latest technology for even greater impact. Deliver a singular client experience.

Service that's as elevated as your standards.


YOU R AUSTI N LUXURY H O M E EX PERT

Kumara Wilcoxon With over 19 years of experience, Kumara Wilcoxon is the face of Austin's luxury real estate market, with unparalleled passion and commitment to the Austin Lifestyle. As the #1 producer company-wide for Kuper Sotheby’s International Realty for five consecutive years, Kumara has sold over $1B throughout her career. Consistently honored among Austin’s select multimillion dollar producers, she was ranked #1 by Austin Business Journal for Residential Real Estate Agents in 2020 and is a distinguished member of both Austin’s Elite 25 and Luxury League. Her connections to the top 1% of the industry affords her access to the most coveted properties, many of which are never listed in the highly competitive Austin luxury market. BROKER ASSOCIATE | 512.423.5035 | KUMARA@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM | KUMARAWILCOXON.COM


Successfully navigating a home purchase or sale in Austin requires a REALTOR® partner with market expertise and strong local connections. Connelly is a lifelong Austinite, a graduate of Westlake High School and UT Austin with an MBA, and robust marketing experience. Providing white-glove service that is built on integrity, innovation, and knowledge of the market, Connelly truly loves helping her clients buy and sell homes in Austin, Texas.

REALTOR® 512.633.3066 CONNELLY@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

YOUR AUST IN EXPERT

Connelly Breeland


YOU R GLO BAL REAL ESTAT E A DVISO R

Kat Brooks

When it comes to navigating home buying or selling, Kat provides a full-service concierge approach and will do whatever possible to ensure a positive experience for her clients. Kat has found great success and personal fulfillment in helping others find a piece of the good life here in Austin. Her comprehensive knowledge of the Austin area real estate market ensures her clients are at ease while buying or selling their home. Kat serves the greater Austin area and specializes in luxury properties located in Barton Creek, Westlake, Spanish Oaks, Lake Travis, Crestview, Tarrytown and Bryker Woods.

GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISOR 512.656.2722 | KAT.BROOKS@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

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For Lander Peerman, helping her clients buy or sell their dream home is an incredibly rewarding process. From firsttime homebuyers to seasoned investors and everything in between, there isn’t a real estate challenge that Lander won’t dive into with determination and passion. Additionally, Lander’s love for design is apparent when you walk through any of her listings. Her wealth of knowledge and expertise in central Austin neighborhoods makes her an extremely savvy resource for clients moving to Austin for the first time. Combine that with her professional connections across the US, including luxury markets in Dallas and Aspen, and Lander becomes a unique and invaluable asset for all her clients.

YOUR LUXURY REALTOR® 512.517.2514 LANDER.PEERMAN@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

YOUR LUXURY HO M E EX PE RT

Lander Peerman

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YOU R R E AL ESTAT E EX PERT

Hillary Deck Hillary has been in real estate for more than a decade, serving both Austin and the Chicago market. “I have the advantage of starting my real estate career in the much larger, and challenging market of Chicago. Through that, and my previous experience as a mortgage consultant in Los Angeles, I have become a seasoned negotiator who thinks outside the box and develops personalized strategies for my clients to achieve their goals,” Hillary says. Claire Money and Austyn Scott have joined Hillary’s team to provide the highest level of service to their clients. Their solution-oriented approach, knowledge of the city, and market set them apart from the competition and enhances the client experience. If you are interested in buying or selling real estate in Austin, give us a call.

REALTOR® | 512.468.6214 | HILLARY.DECK@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

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Lindsay came to Austin in 2002 and like most people, Lindsay fell in love with the city and decided to call Austin her home. Lindsay specializes in Central Austin but works throughout the central Texas region. She forms lasting and trusting relationships by taking the time to know her clients on a personal level. Lindsay knows how important a real estate transaction can be for her clients and prides herself on understanding their needs from the beginning. She carefully listens to the needs and concerns of her clients then maps out a plan that will execute a diligent, efficient, and successful outcome. Outgoing, organized, and dedicated to her clients, Lindsay will go above and beyond to ensure each step of the process is correct.

REALTOR® 512.636.7969 LINDSAY.DILLARD@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

YOUR HO M E EXPERT

Lindsay Dillard tribeza.com

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Terrace Suite features iconic black and white photography from Scott Newton

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and

Bunkhouse Group brings ‘70s vibes to SoCo with Hotel Magdalena

ven if you don’t know of the Bunkhouse Group, you know its hotels. Hotel Saint Cecilia. Hotel San José. The remodel and management of Austin Motel and Carpenter Hotel. El Cosmico in Marfa. Hotel Havana in San Antonio. Hotel San Cristóbal Baja in Todos Santos, Mexico. While each of these properties has its own identity, there’s still the Bunkhouse stamp. Cool vibes, comfy robes, minimalistic designs and intoxicating scents permeate each hotel, welcoming guests to relax and stay a while. So, it comes as no surprise that the year-old Hotel Magdalena, neighboring Saint Cecilia on Academy Drive, oozes similar milieu throughout each of its 89 rooms, lush courtyard, inviting lobby and airy restaurant, Summer House on Music Lane. Built on the site of the former Austin Opry House, owned by Willie Nelson, the hotel embraces its 1970s history in almost every facet of the design, including the architecture of Lake|Flato Architects, landscaping from Ten Eyck

Landscape Architects and interior design from Bunkhouse. “1970s Austin is interesting because of the richness of the music scene and the lore of the time — it was the era that created the Austin we know today,” says Tenaya Hills, Bunkhouse’s Vice President of Design + Development. “The story of the hotel is the story of Austin, of live music, the outdoors, and relishing the hot summers in our beloved rivers and creeks. That naturally acted as a springboard for the design elements of the hotel — the pool being our own little swimming hole, the buildings around it inspired by Austin’s lake houses in the 1950s, which then informed the materials and furniture systems we designed for the guestrooms.” Walking around Hotel Magdalena — named for Mary Magdalene, who was both a sinner and a saint — you can’t help but feel like you’re in a relaxing oasis away from the bustling city. Guests enter through a downstairs lobby that quickly sets

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the ’70s theme with a curved wall decked out with vertical tambour wood boards, orange tufted sofas and a brightly-colored ceramic wall hanging by Michelle Quan. Heading upstairs to check in at the main lobby, Patchouli Forest incense warms the space, while eclectic Graham Harmon paintings, vintage couches and a custom Murano glass disc chandelier liven up the retro lake house feel. “Creating a sense of place is always important to us in our projects,” Hills says. After checking in, guests head out into the courtyard to a verdant lawn, sunken rain gar“Creating a sense of place dens, native greenery and a trickling waterfall is always impor tant to us over limestones. To the left is the emerald tiled, open-kitchen eatery Summer House, and to the in our projec ts” right an elevator to guest rooms. Once on your floor, there are open breezeways with Cane Line rockers dotting the community spaces. Several rooms have patios or private balconies, but all rooms have fully operational windows and doors to embrace the elements. “In the past people have thought about hotels as a place where they go into their rooms, close their blinds and lock themselves away. We worked to flip that concept to bring people outdoors into a vibrant, shared experience with a sense of community that so many are looking for right now,” explains Sophia Top: Bridal room Razzaque, Associate at Lake|Flato Architects. features country Inside the guest rooms, colorful Spanish tiles — either in red, blue, yellow or wedding beads green — inform the color scheme, from the custom walnut wood and laminate hanging above the comfy bed inlay desks to Christian Rathbone throw pillows (and even vintage phones). Right: Magdalena sign Moroso couches and chairs beg to be lounged on, and every room is adorned from neon designer Evan Voyles with a black and white Scott Newton photo, typically of Wille Nelson but sometimes of Ann Richards or Dolly Parton, to “give energy to the space,” according Opposite Page to Hills. Of course, it wouldn’t be a Bunkhouse hotel without cozy, custom Top Left: Barton Springs inspired pool robes and scrumptious bath amenities (this time from Sangre de Fruta). above Magdalena’s While the rooms are indeed inviting, the 900-square-foot sunken swimrolling outdoor landscape ming pool beckons. The hotel’s pool is decidedly the pièce de résistance within Top Right: Gorgeous the 14-acre-property. Crafted to evoke the feel of Barton Springs (without green decor in Summer the perpetually freezing temp), the sloped Astroturf knoll beside the linear House at Music Lane Bottom Left: Exterior 80-foot swimming hole sends memories of drum circles dancing in your head. design features Adjacent is the terracotta and terrazzo pool bar, where speckled pink chairs beautiful breezeways Bottom Right: Kitschy adorn a wooden patio with stamped concrete tile walls, and frozen cocktails decor at the pool bar swirl inside margarita machines, making it an optimal place to perch after an afternoon of swimming.

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Hotel Magdalena is not all style without substance, though — or sustainability, for that matter. It is the first mass timber hotel constructed in North America, which essentially means that the buildings were assembled in pieces. This renewable resource is visible in the hotel room ceiling design and the exterior walkways. The use of this system was reported to produce a 38 percent reduction in global warming potential when compared to using all concrete. “The prominent use of wood as the primary structural and finish material invites guests to connect with the landscape and reduces the project’s overall carbon footprint,” Razzaque explains. “The mass timber wood structure was selected to honor the history of the site where the 1950s Austin Terrace Motel had been constructed of exposed heavy timber beams and columns in the mid-century modern aesthetic. The design team sought to reference the site’s history and materiality to create warm, inviting structures for guests to experience Hotel Magdalena as an oasis within one of Austin’s most beloved neighborhoods.” hotelmagdalena.com


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ART PICK

Blue Lapis Light: Edge of Grace OCTOBER 13–17 & 20–24, BLUE L APIS LIGHT STUDIO By Holly Cowart Photos by Earl Mcgehee

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VERY ONCE IN A BLUE MOON, SOMETHING special happens in the sky over Austin: Aerial dancers from Blue Lapis Light take to the city’s most iconic structures to create mesmerizing acts that blend organic movement with urban landscape. Founded in 2005 by Artistic Director Sally Jacques, the nonprofit teaches aerial classes to all ages, works with outreach programs like Youth Taking Flight and hosts site-specific performances at historic and unique destinations, including the Seaholm Power Plant and the Long Center. However this year they’re staying close to home, welcoming guests to their three-acre property in South Austin for another exquisite production. Titled Edge of Grace, the troupe will synchronistically glide across multi-level scaffolding accompanied by light and sound, finding ways to connect throughout the difficult terrain. Offering moments of both awe and awareness, the movements transcend theater to form a timely message reflective of our shared human experience and the power of compassion. “Edge of Grace is about exploring spaces between edges, seeking a way to move in and around challenging surfaces,” explains Jacques. “Similarly to life, when unexpected and unfamiliar events occur, we find ways to navigate through them seeking spiritual guidance and support.” The shows will take place at 8 p.m. on October 13–17 and 20–24 at Blue Lapis Light Studio, with face masks required and limited seating of 175 guests per night. Proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test within 3 days of attendance will also be needed upon arrival. bluelapislight.org

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SPECIALIZING IN THE BEST TEXAS ARTISTS 30 MINUTES NORTH OF DOWNTOWN AUSTIN

EASY PARKING IN FRONT OF GALLERY OPEN 10AM - 5PM CONTACT: (512)-551-9774 TAGROUNDROCK.COM 1706 N. MAYS ST, ROUND ROCK, TX 78664

Texas artist Xiang Zhang, “Welcoming Committee,” 2005, Oil on linen, 40” x 64”


C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Entertainment MUSIC AUSTIN CITY LIMITS FESTIVAL October 1 – 3 & 8 – 10 Zilker Park POPPY October 5 Emo’s Austin PHOEBE BRIDGERS October 8 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater ROCK ‘N’ RESTOCK: QUIET COMPANY October 8 Circle C Community Center WAV VES October 8 Mohawk FLO RIDA October 8 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park REMI WOLF October 8 Scoot Inn WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY October 8 & 9 Whitewater Amphitheater WIDESPREAD PANIC October 8 – 10 ACL Live ALISON WONDERLAND October 9 Emo’s Austin BAND OF HORSES October 9 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater BLUE ÖYSTER CULT October 9 Haute Spot

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CLASSICAL SOUND October 10 Tiemann Art Gallery

ASO: OTHERWORLDLY October 15 & 16 Long Center

ALICE COOPER October 19 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

PAUL WALL & FRIENDS October 23 The Parish

MADEON October 10 Emo’s Austin

TOMAR & THE FCS October 15 & 16 C-Boy’s Heart & Soul

LAINE HARDY October 21 Haute Spot

STYX October 23 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre

EMOTIONAL ORANGES October 12 Come & Take It Live

DRIPPING SPRINGS SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL October 15 – 17 Downtown Dripping Springs

NEEDTOBREATHE October 21 Moody Amphitheater

HALLOWEEN CHILDREN’S CONCERT October 24 Long Center

COLLIE BUDDZ October 13 Haute Spot LEDISI October 13 Paramount Theatre

CANDLEBOX W/ THE DEAD DEADS October 16 Haute Spot

JUDAS PRIEST October 13 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

NF W/ MICHL October 16 Germania Insurance Amphitheater

SLEIGH BELLS October 13 Mohawk

MAVIS STAPLES October 16 Paramount Theatre

HELLOGOODBYE October 13 The Parish

LUDACRIS October 16 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre

UTOPIAFEST October 14 – 16 Burnet, TX

NORTHSIDE ROCKS: DONOVAN KEITH October 16 Domain NORTHSIDE Lawn

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL October 15 Moody Amphitheater JPEGMAFIA October 15 Emo’s Austin THE EXPENDABLES & BALLYHOO! October 15 Haute Spot CHEAP TRICK October 15 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre MATT KEARNEY October 15 ACL Live

TESTAMENT October 16 Emo’s Austin ALEC BENJAMIN October 17 Emo’s Austin BAD RELIGION & ALKALINE TRIO October 19 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater X AMBASSADORS October 19 Emo’s Austin

THE PSYCHEDELIC FURS October 21 Emo’s Austin

THE BEACH BOYS October 24 Bass Concert Hall

LOS LOBOS October 21 & 22 Antone’s Nightclub

A DAY TO REMEMBER October 24 Whitewater Amphitheater

OLD SETTLER’S MUSIC FESTIVAL October 21 – 24 Tilmon, TX

ISAIAH RASHAD October 25 Emo’s Austin

NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND October 22 Haute Spot CHRIS YOUNG October 22 Whitewater Amphitheater SOCCER MOMMY October 22 Emo’s Austin LORD HURON October 23 Moody Amphitheater NORTHSIDE ROCKS: THE PETERSON BROTHERS October 23 Domain NORTHSIDE Lawn ASO: BACK TO THE FUTURE October 23 Long Center MT. JOY October 23 ACL Live

ROCK ‘N’ RESTOCK: DEADEYE October 25 Circle C Community Center AUSTIN CITY LIMITS HALL OF FAME INDUCTION & CELEBRATION October 28 ACL Live KNOTFEST ROADSHOW 2021 October 28 Germania Insurance Amphitheater LEVITATION FESTIVAL October 28 – 31 Various Locations TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE October 29 ACL Live TRACY LAWRENCE & MARK CHESNUTT October 29 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park


NORTHSIDE ROCKS: DOSSEY October 30 Domain NORTHSIDE Lawn

SOUND UNSEEN FESTIVAL October 27 – 31 AFS Cinema

DAMIEN ESCOBAR October 30 One World Theatre

MIDNIGHT COWBOY October 29 AFS Cinema

IHEARTCOUNTRY FESTIVAL October 30 & 31 Frank Erwin Center ANGELS & AIRWAVES October 31 ACL Live

FILM HIGH NOON W/ CHARLES RAMÍREZBERG October 10 AFS Cinema DOC DAYS FESTIVAL October 15 – 17 AFS Cinema BATTLE OF THE SKETCHES October 16 – 17 Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Mueller

T E X A S B O O K F E S T I VA L , P H OTO B Y B O B DA E M M R I C H

HOCUS POCUS October 20 Central Machine Works

THEATER INTO THE WOODS Through November 7 ZACH Theatre EDGE OF GRACE October 13 – 17 & 20 – 24 Blue Lapis Light THE LARAMIE PROJECT October 21 Ground Floor Theatre FORKLIFT DANCEWORKS 20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION October 28 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum BALLET HISPÁNICO October 30 Bass Concert Hall

COMEDY

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL October 21 – 28 Various Locations

MIKE BIRBIGLIA October 8 & 9 Paramount Theatre

AUSTIN UNDER THE STARS FILM FESTIVAL October 24 Lone Star Court

CRAIG CONANT October 8 & 9 Vulcan Gas Company

A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET October 27 Central Machine Works

FELIPE ESPARZA October 10 Paramount Theatre NICK KROLL October 14 – 16 Stateside at the Paramount

SHENG WANG October 14 – 16 Creek and the Cave #IMOMSOHARD October 15 Bass Concert Hall JOHNNY PEMBERTON October 21 – 23 Creek and the Cave

TEXAS CONFERENCE FOR WOMEN October 7 Virtual

ROUND TOP FALL ANTIQUE WEEK October 25 – 30 Big Red Barn Event Center

USMNT VS JAMAICA WORLD CUP QUALIFIER October 7 Q2 Stadium

TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL October 25 – 31 Downtown Austin + Virtual

JIM JEFFRIES October 22 Bass Concert Hall

AUSTIN OKTOBERFEST October 9 Scholz Garten

SHAYNE SMITH October 22 & 23 Vulcan Gas Company

DESERT DOOR: WILD October 15 & 16 Spoke Hollow

O. HENRY PUNOFF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS October 23 O. Henry Museum

AIA HOMES TOUR October 15 – 18 Various Locations + Virtual

JUSTIN MARTINDALE October 28 & 29 Creek and the Cave TONY BAKER October 29 & 30 Vulcan Gas Company

OTHER PUMPKIN NIGHTS Through October 31 Pioneer Farms AUSTIN RESTAURANT WEEKS October 1 – 10 Various Locations TEXAS WINE MONTH PASSPORT October 1 – 31 Various Locations FORTLANDIA October 2 – January 30 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

AUSTIN RECORD CONVENTION October 16 & 17 Palmer Events Center MODERN TIMES: BUILDING ANTEBELLUM NEW ORLEANS October 17 Neill-Cochran House Museum FORMULA 1 ARAMCO US GRAND PRIX October 22 – 24 Circuit of the Americas

MASTERCHEF LIVE! October 26 Long Center FIELD GUIDE FESTIVAL October 29 & 30 Rain Lily Farm & Fiesta Gardens VIVA LA VIDA 2021 October 30 Mexic-Arte Museum

PUPTOPIA FESTIVAL October 23 Mueller Lake Park

TEXAS TEEN BOOK FESTIVAL October 30 – 31 Downtown Austin + Virtual

TEXAS HEMP HARVEST FESTIVAL October 23 Carson Creek Ranch

DOOMY FOLKS MUSIC & HORROR FESTIVAL October 30 & 31 Far Out Lounge & Stage

LUMINARIUM October 23 Kingsbury Commons

VIVAN LOS MUERTOS FESTIVAL October 31 Waterloo Park

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C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Art SPACES

Arts RED DOT 2021 EXHIBITION Through October 12 Women & Their Work

EDWARD LANE MCCARTNEY October 7 – November 6 Camiba Gallery

FOUND/FORGOTTEN BY TAYLOR BAILEY Through October 15 Contracommon

ARIEL JACKSON October 14 – February 18 Art Galleries at Black Studies

JADE WALKER: REWEAVE 2021 Through October 24 Elisabet Ney Museum

THE CATHEDRAL ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION October 16 The Cathedral ATX

THE AUSTIN INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR Through October 24 West Chelsea Contemporary

LANCE LETSCHER: INTAGLIO October 16 – November 27 Flatbed Center for Contemporary Printmaking

MARTY LEWIS: THE OTHER SIDE OF YESTERDAY Through October 30 Julia C. Butridge Gallery

JULIE PELAEZ October 23 – November 28 Art for the People Gallery

VERONICA CECI: KEEPING HOUSE Through October 30 Julia C. Butridge Gallery

REHAB EL SADEK: PATTERN LANGUAGE October 23 – December 16 Women & Their Work

BENNÉ ROCKETT Through November 4 Lydia Street Gallery

ART FROM THE STREETS SHOW & SALE October 28 & 29 6100 Airport Blvd.

DEBORAH VANKO Through November 4 Lydia Street Gallery

VIVA LA VIDA 2021 October 30 Mexic-Arte Museum

LARRY GOODE: PROPPING UP HEAVEN Through November 7 Link & Pin Gallery

POP CRÍTICO/ POLITICAL POP: EXPRESSIVE FIGURATION IN THE AMERICAS, 1960S-1980S October 31 – January 16 Blanton Museum of Art

JOSEPH HAMMER October 2 – 30 Davis Gallery PRISCILLA ROBINSON: A PIECE OF THE SKY October 2 – 31 Wally Workman Gallery KURT HERRMANN October 2 – November 7 Yard Dog Art Gallery

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BORDER VISION: LUIS JIMÉNEZ’S SOUTHWEST October 31 – January 16 Blanton Museum of Art

MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 5482 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 974 1625 Hours: W–Su 12–5 austintexas.gov/department/ elisabet-ney-museum FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 463 7948 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–W 10–6, Th 10–9, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 W. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 974 1398 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. (512) 469 6200 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

GALLERIES ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: M–F 10–6, Su 10-2 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: Tu–Th 11–6, F-Su 11–7 artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTUS CO. 10000 Research Blvd., Ste. 118 (512) 761 6484 Hours: M–Su 12–6 artusco.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–F 10–5, Sa 10–4 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ARTSPACE 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 763 0646 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com


AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org

CAMIBA GALLERY 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CENTRAL LIBRARY GALLERY 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 974 7400 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F-Sa 10-6, Su 12-6 library.austintexas.gov/ central/gallery CHRISTIAN-GREEN GALLERY 201 E. 21st St. (512) 471 0254 Hours: T & Th, 1-3 galleriesatut.org CLOUD TREE STUDIOS & GALLERY 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 797 8852 By appointment only cloudtreestudiosandgallery.com CO-LAB PROJECTS 5419 Glissman Rd. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

CONTRACOMMON 12912 Hill Country Blvd. #F-140 Hours: M–F By appointment only Sa–Su 12-6 contracommon.org

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FLATBED CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING 3701 Drossett Dr. (512) 477 9328 Hours: W–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 flatbedpress.com FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com ICOSA COLLECTIVE 916 Springdale Rd. #102 (512) 920 2062 Hours: F–Sa 12–6 icosacollective.com IVESTER CONTEMPORARY 916 Springdale Rd. Bldg 2, ste. 107 (737) 209 0379 Hours: Tu–F 10-6, Sa 10-4 ivestercontemporary.com

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Th–Sa 1–5 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com LYDIA STREET GALLERY 1200 E. 11th St. #109 (512) 524 1051 Hours: Sa–Su 12–5, By appointment M–F lydiastreetgallery.com MARTHA’S CONTEMPORARY 4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 695 1437 Hours: W-Su 12-7 facebook.com/ marthascontemporary MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 507 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2447 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondoshop.com

TIEMANN ART GALLERY 1706 N. Mays St., Round Rock (512) 551 9774 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 tagroundrock.com

NEBULA GALLERY 217 W. 2nd St. (512) 239 9317 Hours: Tu–W 1–6, Th–F 1–7, Sa 12–7, Sun 12–6 thenebulagallery.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 utvac.org

NORTHERN-SOUTHERN 1902 E. 12th St. Hours: Sa 3–6:30 northern-southern.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 974 1300 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PRIZER GALLERY 2023 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 575 3559 Hours: Sa 12–5 prizerartsandletters.org ROADHOUSE RELICS 1720 S. 1st St. (512) 442 6366 roadhouserelics.com SOCO MODERN ART GALLERY 2900 S. Congress Ave. #100 (512) 409 9943 Hours: M By appointment only Tu–Su 11-7 socomodern.com

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WEST CHELSEA CONTEMPORARY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Su 12–6, By appointment 10–12 wcc.art WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1311 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org WONDERSPACES AUSTIN 1205 Sheldon Cove, Ste. 2-A Hours: W–Th 3–10, F 4–11, Sa 10–11, Su 10–8 austin.wonderspaces.com YARD DOG 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 912 1613 Hours: F–Sa 1–5, yarddog.com

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Kara Pendl / Porcelain, Stoneware Clay and Glaze / Within 6”x16”x16”

Art/Gal MIA ABIGAIL BA X TER’S COLLECTIVE OF ARTISTS USE THEIR WORK TO TELL THE CULTUR AL NARR ATIVE OF LOCAL COMPANIES By Laurel Miller Photos by Impressive Spaces Photography

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HEN MET/GAL WAS FOUNDED IN 1988, the art advisory firm’s primary account was American Campus Communities. At the time, the corporate world was entrenched in “cubicle culture,” and brand messaging was more about snappy slogans (“Just Do It!”) than storytelling. Today, met/gal is responsible for commissioning, curating and placing everything from paintings, murals and textiles to woodcuts, sculpture and handcrafted tiles in some of the nation’s premier commercial and high-end residential properties, including Austin Realty and Q2. Current owner Mia Abigail Baxter purchased met/gal in 2010. Having shifted her career focus from law school to design, she’d returned home to Austin while waiting for the new semester to start at New York School of Interior Design. She took a part-time administrative position at met/gal (then Metropolitan Gallery), but when her employer decided to sell, Baxter jumped at the opportunity, with encouragement from her family. Baxter comes from a long line of lawyers and entrepreneurial artists. After purchasing met/gal, she immediately began widening the client base to include the commercial market sector along with high-end residential.

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Mary Wendel / Spray Paint on Metal Christy Stallop / Acrylic on Panel / 36”x36” each


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”x2

1” e

a ch

“Previously, the company had only existed as a logo,” says Baxter. “I knew we needed to share our passion for art and what the met/gal partnership could bring to the architecture and design community.” What’s immediately apparent in talking to Baxter is that met/gal goes far beyond just hang/ er ing pictures on walls. B ai Pap ley S n o t chmidt / Prin “We provide turnkey service, from sourcing and commissioning artists to framing and installation, but the art itself is there to tell a story, the cultural narrative of a brand,” she says. To achieve that, approximately 90% of the works are commissioned pieces created by 20 to 25 artists per project. The work, says Baxter, needs to go beyond mere aesthetic. “It’s our mission to create meaningful and intentional collections while also providing a platform for artist growth.”

TH ERE’S CU LTU R AL CU RREN CY LEFT O N TH E TAB LE WH EN CLI ENTS DO N ’T TAKE ADVANTAGE O F S HARI NG TH E STO RY Mary Wendel / Acrylic on Mason / Brick and Drywall

LK James / Print on Paper / Various sizes Adrian Landon Brooks / Acrylic on Drywall

Met/gal works with artists globally, but Baxter finds gratification in tapping diverse local talent. The company’s active artist research led to the discovery of well-known Austin artists like Sophie Roach, Josef Kristofoletti, Santiago Escobedo and Christina Moser. Increasingly, met/gal has seen interior design firms intentionally wanting collaborations with local artists, which delights Baxter. As an advisory firm, she and her team strive to show the humanity behind their artists, so they’re not reduced to “paintings on a wall,” says Baxter. “There’s cultural currency left on the table when clients don’t take advantage of sharing the story,” she adds. To help with that narrative, met/gal has worked with clients like Google in documenting artists’ collections through a virtual QR code tour. “Creating simple programs our clients can use in the promotion of the artists they’ve invested in makes the whole intention of buying local sincere,” says Baxter. “It’s more than just the one-time purchase — it’s a form of advocacy for that entire community.” metgal.art tribeza.com

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Medici Coffee Roasting Facility Showcases Runa Workshop’s Conceptual Design THE E XPANSIVE E AST AUSTIN SPACE EMPHASIZES NATUR AL MATERIALS AND MODERN LINES By Bryan C. Parker Photos by Leonid Furmansky

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HERE’S BEAUTY IN THE SIMPLICITY OF A CUP OF COFFEE — hot water filtered through roasted, ground beans. And yet, making a great cup of coffee is surprisingly complex, from the duration of the roast, to the source of the beans, to the process of filtration. Likewise, Runa Workshop’s design for Medici’s 4,800-square-foot roasting facility and coffee shop in East Austin embraces simplicity with clean lines, espresso-black and milk-white walls and natural blonde wood accents, while simultaneously boasting rich and nuanced design features.

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Medici’s heavy, dark wooden doors open to a view of the barista station, where espresso is crafted into delicious beverages, like cortados and macchiatos. “When you walk in, your first interaction is seeing the artistry,” says Runa Workshop Founding Principal Aaron Vollmer. Ash-gray brick rises out of the floor to form the bar, providing a grounding texture to the room. Elegant steel pendant lights draw the eye upward to the expansive ceilings. Stylish café seating and a few comfortable armchairs offer welcoming


areas for lounging. At the back of the space, a large glass wall reveals the industrial roasting machinery that supplies Medici’s seven locations and wholesale coffee line. The striking design for the dual-purpose space is the result of robust conversations with Medici owners Michael and Alison Vaclav and a strong conceptual focus. “Every project has a story,” says Jean-Pierre Trou, another of Runa Workshop’s founding principals. The firm pins down a defining idea in a few brief words, and any added element must support the concept. But Trou says this maxim also works inversely — every element must also be so integral that removing it would result in the concept’s collapse. According to Trou, the guiding principle for Medici’s new facility was simple: “Artfully crafted and true to its nature.” All of the materials used in the project are presented in their natural form. “The metal is metal, the wood is wood, the brick is brick — there’s no faux,” says Trou. “There’s an honest approach to each element.” Plans for the space began with input from Runa Workshop’s entire team of half a dozen or so employees, but principals Trou and Vollmer, along with Senior Designer Madison Rau comprised the core team that guided the project. This careful, conceptual approach is a constant for Runa Workshop. However, Medici’s roasting facility posed new challenges the firm had never faced. Due to the particular equipment required for roasting, the architects

TH E M ETAL IS M ETAL, TH E WOO D IS WOO D, TH E B RICK IS B RICK — TH ERE’S N O FAUX had to consider ventilation for high heat, clearances for dangerous equipment and restrictive code requirements. All of this had to be executed in a space where the facility wasn’t simply hidden in the back, but emerged as a visible focal point of the design. Vollmer and Trou tackled this by doing extensive research and relying on Michael’s deep knowledge of similar facilities around the country. The final result yields a visual synergy to the space’s twin purposes. The glass wall that separates the roasting environment and coffee shop all but eliminates any barrier between the purveyors who produce the coffee and the patrons who consume it. Customers

experience a proximity to the process that embodies the simple honesty of the project’s core concept. Medici is the cornerstone that greets the public at Springdale General, a development that houses 15 different buildings, including shared workspaces and test kitchens, across 10 acres. Also an anchor for the Medici brand, the new facility is the company’s eighth cafe, and the fifth that Runa Workshop has helped design. Vollmer and Trou began working with Medici’s ownership a decade ago, just after founding Runa Workshop. Trou says the longevity of that relationship has allowed designs from their partnership to mature and provided time to test and grow ideas. Vollmer adds that each successful project increases the trust between the owners and the firm. The Vaclavs live nearby and even had their children leave their handprints in the foundation of the building, giving it a special connection to their family. Trou and Vollmer both like being involved with projects at this personal scale, working closely with clients to help them realize their passions. “We’re not here for the projects; we’re here for the relationships,” Trou says. “We just really want to work with cool people who dig good design.” mediciroasting.com tribeza.com

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Midcentury Made Modern PRESERVING THE PAST WHILE INNOVATING FOR THE PRESENT By Veronica Meewes Photos by Ryan Davis

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HILE MANY ARGUE THAT THINGS WERE JUST MADE better back in the day, sometimes a vintage design can be better in theory than in practice. The owners of this West Austin home, nicknamed the Tarrytown Color Pop, loved the mid-century look of the 1952 house, but found they needed to make some changes in order to better accommodate their lives. Among those changes, they wanted a more spacious, updated interior layout, different color schemes and improvement of the quality of sound and air transmission from exterior to interior. “Our clients loved the home and lot they purchased and the neighborhood they purchased in, but the layout of the home itself did not work for


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their family-centric lifestyle,” explains Design Manager and Senior Project Designer Sara Hadden of CG&S, a family-run construction business started in 1957 and rebranded as CG&S Design-Build in 2018. Hadden began the renovation of the exterior of the home from an energy-efficient point of view, replacing all the windows with energy-efficient, double-pane glass, and reinsulating the entire exterior envelope, including the roof.

TRU E TO ITS N ICKNAM E, TH ERE ARE PLAYFU L CO LO RS I NCO RPO R ATED ALL TH ROUGHOUT TH E HOUS E On the interior, Hadden and her team opened up the kitchen to the living room, dining room and family room, creating an open-plan public zone. The house now features f loor-to-ceiling windows offering a continuous view out to the backyard and new outdoor living area by the pool. Separate bedrooms make for quiet zones for sleeping and working from home, and there are also designated areas for crafting and gaming, plus a mudroom, plenty of storage space and a laundry room adjacent to the bedrooms. And, true to its nickname, there are playful colors incorporated all throughout the house. In the kitchen, canary yellow and robin’s egg blue accent walls pop against pure white hex tile, while each bathroom features a unique and vibrant wallpaper print. On the exterior, more muted colors, new encaustic cement tile and a wide solid-wood door give the entire residence a facelift while maintaining its midcentury charm. “Our clients love their home, and appreciate that they can live and work in the home in the way they had envisioned,” says Hadden. cgsdb.com

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RISING UT ARCHITECTS SAY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INNOVATIVE THINKING ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN BY BRYAN C. PARKER IMAGES BY BELLA CHOU, WILL HACHTMAN AND COLEMAN BRINK PORTRAITS BY HOLLY COWART

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he pairing of UT’s outstanding architecture school and the ever-evolving, youthful city of Austin creates a harmonious balance. Some of the school’s most promising students — such as Bella Chou, Will Hachtman and Coleman Brink — are already at work redefining the capital city’s architectural landscape. Last year, this trio teamed up for a project in their Advanced Design Studio class and won the UT School of Architecture Design Excellence Award, an accolade earned by the votes of first their peers and later a panel of jurors. “The idea was to think about what the campus might be like in 25 to 50 years, and how we might integrate new technologies, like drone technologies and robotic technologies,” says Professor Kory Bieg. The building that Chou, Hachtman and Brink designed envisioned a futuristic, dystopian and eerily prescient setting for an educational setting, in which students would be confined to tiny rooms — “learning pods,” according to Hachtman — disconnected from social interaction with teachers or other students. “We were taking this project to the extreme for a reason,” Chou says. “We know that this is a possible future, and we’re addressing how discomforting it could be.” Think of it as a hyper-talented group of pandemic-weary college students waving a red flag about what the future might hold. The creation was made possible in part by using advanced modeling tools and programs. “The team started the project by looking at artificial intelligence and machine learning, using the computer to help generate space, aesthetics, materiality, all the things that go into architecture, seeing if the computer could take on some of the tasks a designer usually does,” says Bieg. Despite the trio’s unsettling view of future college life, the cutting-edge tools they used portend a future that makes work faster and less labor-intensive for the next era of architects. Brink previously worked with such innovative technologies in an internship at Morphosis, a renowned firm in Los Angeles. When not playing doomsday prophets, all three of these talented young minds are already at work shaping the architecture of our future for the better. Hachtman has begun a job with Hunt Architecture, working on all stages of projects from the finishing touches onsite to the first drafts of plans based on land codes. The firm works primarily on residential and small commercial projects. Hachtman dreams of one day creating a creative workspace that brings together minds from across disciplines to foster innovation. “Austin’s got the young, optimistic, hopeful vibe still, where planning and change are still achievable goals, compared to other cities,” Hachtman says. “Health, green spaces, community spaces, spaces we can inhabit that aren’t so mundane and oppressive are things that Austin can achieve.”

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AUSTIN’S GOT THE YOUNG, OPTIMISTIC, HOPEFUL VIBE STILL, WHERE PLANNING AND CHANGE ARE STILL ACHIEVABLE GOALS, COMPARED TO OTHER CITIES


Meanwhile, Chou, currently working with award-winning Austin firm Murray Legge Architecture, says UT prepared her to sway trends within the current world of architecture by challenging her internal biases as a designer. “The great thing about these conversations is that people are more aware that architecture and other disciplines in general need to be more inclusive,” she says. After substitute teaching for a year between undergrad and her master’s program at UT, she says it would be rewarding to one day design a school that responds acutely to the needs of learners. With Austin’s rapid and unabated growth, the city could certainly provide that opportunity. Whatever path she takes, her hope for the future is to make design more accessible and to explore “a deeper, more nuanced understanding of architecture’s role within the fabric of societal power structures.” For now, Brink is working on an internship in New York, designing luxury residential spaces in the Hamptons. As for long term plans, he’s inspired by the work of Icon, a company founded in Austin that developed a 3-D printing technology to quickly and affordably produce housing for the homeless in East Austin. Icon will soon begin work on a 3-D printed building planned to house astronauts for long-term missions on Mars. It seems the sky being the limit is passé for architects of the future. Bieg, who describes these three students as “some of the best we’ve had in a while,” says they stand out in part because of their prowess with emerging technologies and their diversified skill sets. He explains that the resources of UT’s School of Architecture allow students to engage with new tools — robotic arms and large 3-D printers, for example — that are redefining what’s possible. His hope is that these students take their understanding of these new resources into more traditional firms and challenge them to incorporate them into their approach to architecture. soa.utexas.edu

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Home on the Range THESE AUSTIN HOMEOWNERS TRY A DIFFERENT SORT OF HOUSE FLIPPING By Veronica Meewes Photos by Casey Dunn

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RCH ITECTS MATT FAJKUS AN D SARAH Johnson faced a unique challenge when renovating this house, originally built as part of a 1980s Home Owners Association development. The dwelling, which they call the Inverse House, sits on the 14th hole of Austin Country Club’s golf course, so the goal was to invert the relationship between public and private. In doing so, the kitchen, dining room and living spaces are elevated to the second floor, while the private family spaces are tucked below it. And in lieu of looking out onto a private backyard, the house opens up to the public golf course, with large windows framing unobstructed views of green rolling hills.

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“The view to the east over the golf course was an important starting point, but the main goal was to design comfortable and functional spaces,” explains Fajkus, the principal architect behind Matt Fajkus Architecture, which focuses on sustainable residential design. “This required creative ways to capture daylight from above through skylights, from the side through a new pocket courtyard and with expansive openings to the east, over the golf course.” By implementing an open floor plan and lots of bold, clean lines, the formerly shadowy and segmented interior was transformed into a roomy, sunlit space while adhering to the HOA guidelines requiring opaque stone side walls. Fajkus and Johnson chose to pull the interior functions of the home away from the exterior walls to create both circulation space and light wells. And plenty of patio space — including a pool surrounded by built-in succulent planters — creates indoor-outdoor connections and many opportunities for gathering. “Every custom residence design and construction process has challenges, since we’re effectively

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creating a one-off prototype that has never been done before,” says Fajkus. “However, we collaborated very well with Melde Construction Company and Lindsey Hanna Design to creatively solve every challenge, from the building assembly process to coordinating material finish selections.” The Inverse House brings the outside in with its implementation of natural materials showcased through minimal design: Texas limestone walls, white oak flooring, stained maple cabinetry, plaster shower walls and unfinished brass fixtures contrast while complementing modern steel railings, metal panels and glass. “The clients, Leah and Chris Petri, have said that they are so enamored with the final products, they wake up every day and have to pinch themselves for being so lucky to live in the house,” says Fajkus. mfarchitecture.com

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Desert Serenity E AST AUSTIN MEETS NORTH AFRICA IN THIS MODERN MOROCCAN-INSPIRED DWELLING By Veronica Meewes Photos by Andrea Calo

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S AUSTIN CONTINUES TO BECOME MORE POPULATED AND lively, homeowners are seeking solace in the center of the urban oasis. The designers behind the aptly named Casa Marrakech use artful Moorish sensibilities to create a feeling of tuckedaway tranquility in the middle of a quickly growing East Austin neighborhood. The entire property features a two-story structure, single story casita and carport bounding the rear alley and opening up into a courtyard. In order to maximize the space around a tree in the center of the lot, the walled riads of Morocco were discussed early in the design stage.

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“The clients are staunch aficionados of modernism,” explains architect Thomas Bercy, one half of Bercy Chen Studio, an architecture and urban planning practice with design-build capabilities headquartered with offices in Austin, Taipei and Mexico City. “They were attracted to a minimalistic aesthetic but were intrigued by more exotic cultural precedents. Their love of travel became a source of inspiration for the project.” Bercy followed ancient Moorish architectural principles of privacy, flowing water and habitable flat roofs plus design elements like a mashrabiya latticework privacy screen and clean-cut geometric lines intended to modernize and simplify the ensemble. A swimming pool animates the courtyard with trickling sounds and dancing light reflections, and the xeroscaped front yard and courtyard employ draught-resistant plant life one could just as easily find in northern Africa or Central Texas. The interior similarly exudes pristine minimalism, with streamlined fixtures, wide windows letting in plenty of natural light, and a limited material palette. Soothing white oak and white epoxy flooring,

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as well as marble tiling and backsplash, provide a canvas to display the homeowner’s colorful art pieces and furniture. And an open floor plan and low, open staircase make the entire space seem even airier than 1,800 square feet. “Minimalism requires a precision of execution of the construction that can be more challenging than conventional projects,” says Bercy. “That said, the fact that the clients were familiar with construction and real estate made the process very smooth.” bcarc.com


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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

STUDIO BALCONES studiobalcones.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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ounded in 2009, Studio Balcones strives to design landscapes that inspire connections between people, nature and urban life. Principal Ilse Frank studied architecture as an undergraduate before realizing she cared more about the fabric of nature and surrounding structures, which inspired her to shift into landscape architecture and urban design. Co-principal Jennifer Orr diverged from her path to becoming a lawyer and found her way back to the earth, bringing with her a strong design background, extensive plant knowledge and a deep understanding of ecological systems. When the two Austinites met each other in grad school, they decided to join forces and return to their home city to found Studio Balcones, now a nineperson-strong team collaborating on residential projects and commercial developments, as well as institutional and civil projects. How would you describe the studio’s design style?

“Fluid — we work within the environmental context of each project, while imbuing them with the current needs for climate change response and the creative techniques that make each space special and enduring.” When you take on a new landscaping project, what’s your process from start to finish? “All projects begin with site analysis where

we study the site’s topography, water flows, vegetation and soils, as well as how the site is being used, its history and proposed future uses. Each project type then has its own unique demands that inform the design process, be it code requirements, sustainability goals or client desires. Ultimately, all of our projects go through

our studio’s creative process and quality control, assuring that they are all unique yet soundly designed.” Why is landscape architecture so important to a project? “Landscape architecture bridges boundaries and

melds each site within the regional context. It provides experiences within nature and allows individuals to physically connect. Just like a painting has a foreground, middle ground, and background, landscape architecture sets up the framework for physically experiencing and visually taking in a site.” How have you watched the industry change or evolve, particularly in the past year? “The design community is moving rapidly, es-

pecially given the current housing shortage, but especially in a growing community like Austin. For worse, we have been seeing escalating construction costs. For better, we are seeing a greater appreciation for outdoor spaces and rising investment in them, as well as an uptick of affordable housing units being developed.” What makes Austin stand apart from other cities? “We are rooted in this place. Austin has always

been special, and everyone seems to see that now. Jennifer and I are focused upon restoring degraded sites and preserving connections to nature that have always been part of Austin culture.”

but one that is also in tune with the native plant and materials palette.” How would you describe Austin to someone from out of town? “We both grew up in Austin, and as our city is

constantly evolving, so is our answer. At present, we would say that our town has become a city, but still has a way to go in terms of growing up. Our city’s land development code is in dire need of being updated to address issues of inequity, affordability, density and environmental preservation. On the plus side, our city’s growth has brought investment in several fantastic parks and spurred investment into a future expanded public transit system.” Describe your perfect Austin day — what would you eat, drink, do and see? “No one should miss taking a dip in Barton

Springs or a hike on the Barton Creek Greenbelt. Jennifer and I both love a good breakfast taco, but might not agree on which is best. In my opinion, the migas taco from Veracruz All Natural is the best while Jennifer is a Julios fan (in Hyde Park). From there, we’d suggest seeking out the best margarita. We agree on Guerro’s house margarita. As far as music, we both prefer smaller crowds, and recommend Music in the Garden at the Zilker Botanical Garden.”

What are your favorite landscaping trends right now? “We endeavor to be timeless and contextual,

ensuring each design works in tune with its environment. We personally favor a modern aesthetic, giving rise to an immersive experience,

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS w w w.teneyckla.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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hristine Ten Eyck originally launched Ten Eyck Landscape Architects (TELA) in Phoenix in 1997 before moving the business to Austin in 2007. The studio leads design innovation with a focus on place-based landscape architecture that addresses pressing global issues such as drought, climate change and aging infrastructure. The twelve-person team — which includes registered architects, landscape designers, landscape architects, architects and ecologists — works closely with engineers, ecologists and clients. From planning to construction, the team draws upon its extensive knowledge and experience to generate socially, financially, structurally and environmentally sustainable environments that intend to stimulate the senses and unify communities. How would you describe the studio’s design style?

“We focus on creating enduring design by using long-lasting regional hardscape materials and native plants that speak to the culture and personalities of our clients. We are dedicated to creating restorative outdoor environments that are infused with natural beauty, provide habitat, purify air and water, encourage social interaction and foster human healing. Our designs prioritize native plant communities, water harvesting technologies and durable materials, artfully expressed through form, color and texture.” When you take on a new project, what’s your process from start to finish? “We work on a variety of scales all over the

southwest and Mexico, from campus transformation master plans, like the University of Texas

at El Paso Campus and Tec de Monterey, to civic spaces like the San Antonio Botanical Garden, the Pearl Brewery or Kingsbury Commons at Pease Park, to camps and ranches. No matter the scale, we begin every project with a thorough site analysis to understand its existing conditions including watersheds, native ecology, cultural history, transportation adjacencies and development constraints. We listen and learn about our clients and their desires. We work closely with architects, engineers and ecologists on a project team to develop contract documents from concept design through construction. We are actively involved in the construction process to help navigate any unforeseen issues and ensure the finished project is built according to the plans.” Why is landscape architecture so important to a project? “Landscape architecture is vital to the success of

any project. We connect all the pieces together. We identify important environmental features and vegetation for saving, ground the architecture within its surroundings with grading and plantings, reconcile drainage and erosion issues, utilize green stormwater infrastructure to alleviate pressure on our municipal utilities, propose solutions that have a positive impact on local ecosystems, and provide the people who use the space a safe, welcoming and beautiful experience.”

that is limited because of our climate, Austinites are eager to embrace drought-tolerant plant design and the native species that you don’t see anywhere else.” What are your favorite and least favorite landscaping trends right now? “Getting back to nature, human comfort ele-

ments like fire and water, bird watching and zen meditation gardens. As a result of climate change awareness, people are more interested in planting native plants that help bolster our local ecology, are more resilient and use native materials that speak to the local sense of place. Least favorite trends: fake grass, use of plastic play elements, residential owners chopping down native oak forests on weekends and replacing with palms, bamboo, olives and short-lived Mexican palo verdes.” How would you describe Austin to someone from out of town? “A lively, fun city which is growing quickly and

hopefully will preserve its precious remaining historic architecture, beautiful woodlands, creeks and green space.”

What makes Austin stand apart from other cities? “Austinites have always had an appreciation

for our city’s and region’s natural beauty that is unique from anywhere else in the country. Being a city with a climate that allows for outdoor activities almost 12 months out of the year means a blurring between interior spaces and the landscape. And while we may have a plant palette

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

WORD + CARR DESIGN GROUP wordandcarr.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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or their work at Word + Carr Design Group, Principals Mark Word and Sarah Carr and their 15-person team draw on a wide range of experience and training in disciplines including horticulture, architecture, landscape architecture and studio art. They believe plants and the unfolding presence of the seasons are a means to witnessing beauty and finding joy in the natural world around us. In addition to commercial and residential projects, Word + Carr offers horticulturist-informed garden services ranging from design to installation to maintenance of existing and developing gardens.

What makes Austin stand apart from other cities? “Our geology is fantastically variable, and so the

character of the land and the built environment change as you move around town. The sort of garden you can have in East Austin’s soil can be radically different from what you’d do in Westlake.” What are your favorite and least favorite landscaping trends right now? “We’ve always had a lot of love for our outdoor

How would you describe the studio’s design style? “We’re always looking for the best marriage of

spaces here in Austin, but now it seems like they are getting a wider role. It’s been great to see increased demand for more outside gathering and dining spaces, open-air classrooms, etc. It’s also wonderful to have so many conversations about fresh air and inviting the breeze back into buildings. Unfortunately, we’re still seeing the evidence of the big freeze this February — that’s got to be an all-time least favorite.”

beauty and utility within a site’s particular context. If we’ve done our job really well, it should be tricky to tell where exactly we intervened.”

Describe your perfect Austin day— what would you eat, drink, do and see?

Why is landscape architecture so important to a project? “Landscape architecture connects new projects

back to the bigger picture, not just in terms of circulation or street presence, but also identity, community and natural cycles.”

“Start with a bracing morning swim at Barton Springs, take a picnic lunch to the new Waterloo Park, and maybe wander up to the Blanton Museum of Art. Then tacos, cocktails and a nap under a big oak tree.”

How have you watched the industry change or evolve, particularly in the past year? “We’ve all had to become more agile and inven-

tive to adapt to multiple uncertainties. From availability of materials, to big swings in costs, to rethinking what plant palettes are truly going to be appropriate in the next decade as our climate shifts, we are all thinking on our feet.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

SHADEMAKER STUDIO shademakerstudio.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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fter 24 years of observing professional landscape architecture’s role as a consultant, Shaney Clemmons founded Shademaker Studio in 2017. These days, the team of five work internationally from an East Austin studio, and they consider themselves stewards of the land with a shared passion for connecting people to nature while always remaining mindful of the impact of their footprint. Their collective knowledge of placemaking, landscape detailing, local ecology and planting, grading and code requirements (such as protected trees, impervious cover and licensing agreements) allow them to resolve site issues as they arise, streamlining the design process and saving both time and money. How would you describe the studio’s design style? “Shademaker Studio’s design style is tailored

for the client. Our collaborative design process allows us to weave the client’s goals, architectural aesthetics and our own ideas into a project that fits the site.” When you take on a new landscaping project, what’s your process from start to finish? “We try to create landscapes that unearth the

character of a given site and meet the needs of those who inhabit it. Our process from start to finish is grounded in a collaborative design process that involves investigatory site visits, conversation, hand-sketching and site-specific problem solving. That allows the land itself and the personal stories of our clients to be expressed in our design and create the tailored style we are known for.”

Why is landscape architecture so important to a project? “Landscape architecture is more than aesthetics.

It is more than solving drainage problems and more than creating privacy. As professionals, it is our duty to understand site systems as a whole, to create designs that are artful and responsive to climate change, water consumption and habitat diversity. Our designs are the inheritance of the next generation. We must always be critical of our design ideas through that filter.” How have you watched the industry change or evolve, particularly in the past year? “We are excited to see the profession advocating

for change in Texas. Locally, landscape advocacy efforts range from collaboration with city agencies on environmental code development to projects like the I-35 Capitol Express Project. It is also thrilling to see Austin invest in open space like the recently completed Waterloo Park and future parks like John Trevino Jr. Metropolitan Park and Drake Bridge Commons.” What makes Austin stand apart from other cities? “The people of Austin are design savvy, and they

incentive that would promote biodiversity. The program is designed to reward our clients for supporting climate-resilient design by creating urban wildlife corridors in their yards. We discount our planting design services by 15% when our client takes the pledge. We would love our fellow landscape architects to jump on the bandwagon and make ‘Hedges, not fences’ a new Austin motto!” How would you describe Austin to someone from out of town? “If we had been asked this question ten years ago,

we would have said that Austin is a university town with amazing live music entertainment, beautiful parks and fun-loving, friendly people. Today we see Austin as much more than that. Austin has become a multicultural city with amazing business potential, a hub for entrepreneurs and the creative class — which shows in the caliber of public works and open spaces available to all city residents. We think Austin is a wonderful place, but we must engage with its exponential pace of development and make sure that the soul of Austin — the magic that brought us all here together — is celebrated in each and every project that we undertake.”

support the design community by allowing us to thrive in our creative process. Austin is home to a significant number of world-class landscape architects. With that title comes the responsibility of our practice to educate and to shift design trends to promote climate-resilient design solutions.” What are your favorite and least favorite landscaping trends right now? “Monoculture plantings (planting a single species

tree or shrub) have never been sustainable, but have always been trendy. As a call to action, our studio created a ‘Hedge Pledge’ to create an

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Three things to know when building a custom home

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What’s the third most important thing to do when building a custom home?

Stay on time and on budget. Every custom home we have built in the last 22 years has been on time and on budget. We have perfected processes to stay the course, keeping you informed every step of the way. You shop at our vendors and get our builder prices, with no markup. We share other cost and time-saving tips that come from our years of experience. Visit UrbanHomeBuilders.com or call 512-916-8700 to learn more.

URBAN HOME BUILDERS

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The Design Guide Building a home can be a headache, but it doesn’t have to be. The process requires an extraordinary amount of time, money and decisions, but with the right partners, a remodel or build can be a smooth process with a happy ending. A trusted design team that understands your vision can bring your dream home to life — with your sanity intact! The following experts in architecture, design and construction are a great resource to help you along every step of your journey to achieving that dream. Just tell them TRIBEZA sent you.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Dalgleish Construction Company Building the finest homes in Texas when details matter. An enjoyable pursuit of excellence for over 40 years.

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Mark Ashby Design & Shiflet Richardson Architects

Mark Ashby Design and Shiflet Richardson Architects always create a timeless yet modern aesthetic together. Their projects feature some of the most knowledgeable craftsmen in Austin and beyond. Both award-winning firms are leaders on the design scene, and have been featured together in national publications such as Elle Décor and Robb Report. Shiflet Richardson Architects is a talented firm of passionate architects that focuses on creating homes that are functional, beautiful and of-their-place, while reflecting each unique client’s personality and taste. Mark Ashby Design is synonymous with exceptional creative vision. They have a deep reverence for history and architectural context, with a timeless aesthetic and meticulous attention to detail. Their trusted designers offer full-scope service, from unique interior concepts, to art curation and turnkey installation. The Mark Ashby Design and Shiflet Richardson Architects collaborative dynamic has led to some of Austin’s most distinctive, iconic homes.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Olson Defendorf Custom Homes For 14 years, Olson Defendorf Custom Homes has been known for building architect-designed, one-of-a-kind custom homes in Austin and surrounding areas. Its homes have won awards with the American Society of Interior Designers and MAX awards from the Home Builders Association of Greater Austin, and they are a multiyear winner for Best of Houzz. NEW HOMES - REMODELS - POOLS

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Meredith Owen Interiors “We believe a well-designed space can transform your life.” - Meredith Owen Austin-based interior design firm, Meredith Owen Interiors, focuses on high-end residential projects, including new construction, renovations and interior/exterior furnishings. Meredith and her award-winning design team work diligently to create a custom design experience tailored to each client. Her team believes that your home should not only function flawlessly but also reflect the people who dwell inside.

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Elite Austin Elite Austin specializes in all things furniture, for rent or purchase. Since 2008, Elite Austin has grown to a talented team of 15 furniture experts, offering Home Staging focused on marketing and optimizing the sale of real estate, Furniture Rental that transforms personal interiors into designer residences, and Interior Design services for clients needing quality furniture fast. Elite Austin creates beautiful spaces without long lead times, and the process is all about the furniture, concierge-style service and you. From their professional design team to in-house logistics crew, Elite Austin seamlessly handles all aspects of their clients’ furniture needs from design and space planning, to delivery, installation and pickup. With an always evolving warehouse of designer-curated furniture, décor, artwork and rugs, they provide central Texas clientele with high-quality, unique and stunning living spaces that exude style and sophistication. Elite Austin is the design partner you have been searching for.

eliteaustin.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Graceful Spaces Organizing Graceful Spaces is passionate about creating beautiful spaces, but more than the aesthetics, we love building systems and solutions that support our clients’ lifestyles and allow them to achieve their goals. Together, we’ll set you up for long-term success and inspire simplicity throughout your home. We help you establish rhythms and routines that will empower you to take control of your time rather than react to the demands of life. In addition to whole-home organizing, our team is equipped to handle custom projects, including new build consultations and design work, ensuring every square foot of the home is used to its maximum potential. Graceful Spaces is home organization reinvented!

graceful-spaces.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The Southern Loom

P H OTO B Y L A U R A M O R S M A N

The Southern Loom fuels Laura Branson’s passion in finding beautiful vintage and antique rugs with unique colors and designs. Her rugs are sourced through international relationships and fairly priced so that everyone can have a beautiful vintage piece in their home design. Every rug is carefully chosen and joyfully added to The Southern Loom collection by Laura.

thesouthernloom.com

Urbane Design Urbane Design is a full-service interior design firm specializing in new home construction and remodeling. We believe that confidence begins with a well-designed, carefully planned home. When you inhabit spaces that are designed for how you live your life, a certain ease is introduced to your day-to-day. You feel happy, content and inspired — which helps you be your best self outside of the home, too. We take painstaking efforts to understand your lifestyle — Do you have pets? Children? Do you like to entertain? — so that we can design a space that is both visually stunning and functional.

urbanedesignstudios.com

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Good Eye Concepts Good Eye Concepts is passionate about all aspects of the process from concept to completion, providing project management and personal guidance to each of their clients. Whether it’s acquiring a new space, renovating a beloved property, or designing and staging interiors, they put the same intention and enthusiasm into each phase of your project. By establishing a fluid relationship and flow of communication between designer, contractors and client, Good Eye is honored to earn and exceed expectations.

goodeyeconcepts.com

P H OTO B Y J A K E H O LT

Kelle Contine Interior Design Kelle Contine Interior Design is a boutique, full-service Interior Design studio, specializing in residential and commercial interiors in Austin and across the country. With attention to detail and a holistic design approach, KCID collaborates with clients alongside the finest architects, builders and industry professionals to create functional and beautiful interiors.

kellecontine.com

3 Fold Design Studio Combining their collective expertise in architecture and interior design, Page and Allison offer award-winning full residential design services. From new construction to larger remodels, they focus on finding creative, innovative solutions in a client-focused process that brings spaces to life.

3folddesignstudio.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Favorite Pizza NEW YORK METS-THEMED PIZ Z A JOINT OPENS IN FORMER WEST SIX TH LIQUOR STORE LOCATION By Karen O. Spezia Photos by Holly Cowart

I

MHO, THERE ARE FEW THINGS SADDER THAN A LIQUOR STORE shuttering. But what if it reopened as a pizzeria? Would that remove the sting? You betcha. And that’s exactly what happened on Sixth Street, where a historic package shop recently reemerged as a terrific new pizza joint. Like a Phoenix rising from the ashes, Favorite Pizza recently opened in the same historic building that housed Favorite Liquor & Wine for the past 80 years. Family-owned and operated since 1939, Favorite Liquors sprang up during an Austin post-prohibition boom that spawned over 25 liquor stores in a two-mile radius. Sadly, it closed in 2019. If you never patronized — or even noticed — Favorite Liquors during its eight-decade run, it’s understandable. Although located on a bustling corner of West Sixth and West Avenue, its diminutive size made it easy to overlook while driving to nearby Whole Foods or barhopping among its neighboring nightclubs. But with its tantalizing new tenant, the tiny building will undoubtedly start to command the attention of passers-by, not only with the delicious aromas wafting from its pizza ovens, but also with its whimsical, eye-catching renovation.

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Inspired by New York’s ubiquitous neighborhood pizzerias, Favorite looks like a 1980s time warp with Formica countertops, checkerboard linoleum floors, wood paneling and faux Tiffany chandeliers à la old school Pizza Hut. Even the sound system is vintage, with a 40-year-old Marantz amplifier and JBL speakers cranking out tunes both old and new. Somehow, the cozy restaurant manages to cram in multiple pizza ovens, a full kitchen and bar, a take-out counter, five bar stools, plus rail seating for a half dozen overlooking buzzing Sixth Street. In keeping with the New York theme, there is Mets baseball memorabilia everywhere, including pennants, signed team photos, baseball-shaped candy in the gumball machine and MLB games on the bar’s TV. The Mets team colors are featured inside and out, including the patio’s blue picnic tables shaded by orange umbrellas, resting on artificial turf. The unisex ‘Switch Hitter’ restroom is a hoot, outfitted with glittery walls illuminated by a spinning, mirrored disco ball. While the atmosphere’s a blast, the food’s even better — this is some very good pizza. Thin crust with big, foldable slices. Favorite’s New York style pies come in both classic and specialty flavors that are sold whole or by the slice. The benchmark of any good pizza is classic cheese, and Favorite’s hits it out of the park. The dough, sauce and cheese strike the perfect bal-

ance of flavors and texture. But its specialty flavors are also worth exploring. The Mosquito Bite features spicy Calabrese pork sausage, Fresno peppers and hot honey, while the Bolognese has savory meat sauce topped with fresh ricotta. Clark’s Clam is a nod to New Haven, with chopped clams, Parmesan cream and grated Pecorino. And the sublime Summer Love was a sleeper hit: a white pie topped with shaved garden-fresh squash, green onions, anchovies and fresh mozzarella. In addition to pizza, Favorite offers two types of subs: Mookie’s Meatballs, named after Mets legend Mookie Wilson, and The HoJo, after player Howard Johnson, stuffed with cold cuts, provolone and veggies. Both are served on sesame hoagie buns baked by nearby sister restaurant, Swedish Hill Bakery. There are also a couple of tasty salads: a fully loaded Italian chopped salad and an excellent Caesar studded with crunchy, spicy breadcrumbs. For dessert, there are seasonal gelato flavors and tiramisu from adjacent sibling restaurant, Sammie’s. Like any good pizza joint that used to be a liquor store, Favorite boasts a full bar with excellent cocktails. The frozen drinks are outstanding, especially the addictive Aperol Spritz blended with red Aperol bitters and sparkling wine. The wine list is creative and playful, from trendy natural wines to bottles of Chianti served in nostalgic straw baskets. And of course, there’s plenty of beer, served in frosty pitchers, pints or cans. For teetotalers, there are Original New York Seltzers in classic flavors like vanilla cream and black cherry. Open since August, Favorite Pizza is the newest jewel in MML Hospitality’s very large crown (Jeffrey’s, Clark’s, Perla’s, et al) — and perhaps my new front-runner in its portfolio. Its delicious food and kitschy retro vibe just makes me happy. What could’ve been a tragic demise of a beloved Austin landmark has instead become a delightful, delicious reincarnation. favoritepizzaaustin.com tribeza.com

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24 DINER

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

This intimate restaurant serves up mouth-watering pizzas,

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order up

consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The fa-

the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

mous Neapolitan technique is executed by the Stefano Ferrara

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

wood-burning ovens, which runs at more than 900 degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage

34TH STREET CAFE

of cheese on this menu!

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups,

CAFÉ NO SÉ

salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the chicken piccata.

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

The low-key setting makes it great for weeknight dinners and

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor and a

weekend indulgences.

range of seasonal foods to make it the best place for weekend

ARLO GREY 111 E Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 478 2991 Arlo Grey is the debut restaurant from “Top Chef ” 10 winner and “Fast Foodies’’ star Kristen Kish. Found inside the LINE

brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

CICLO 98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300

Hotel, the picturesque lakeside spot has received praise for its

Ciclo is a modern Texas kitchen featuring locally inspired

intentional design and elegant, French-and-Italian-inflected

flavors and ingredients with a Latin influence, all brought

take on Texas ingredients.

to life through a unique collaboration between Chef de Cuisine James Flowers and world-re- nowned restaurateur, Richard

ASTI TRATTORIA

Sandoval. Ciclo’s name reflects its focus on menu offerings

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

that change seasonally from ceviches, crudos and grilled and

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes

smoked meats to inventive cocktails.

ELDORADO CAFE

3300 W. Anderson Lane | (512) 420 2222 eldoradocafeatx.com Eldorado Cafe exemplifies old school Austin, resonating the beat of the early 90’s, sending out hot plates of the most decadently delicious and sometimes healthy eating you will find in Austin. Mexican style comfort food with a deep honor towards the historical eateries that have made Austin great. Come see us.

EASY TIGER 3508 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 964 8229

along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

6406 N I-35 Frontage Rd., Ste. 1100 | (512) 494 4151

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

1501 E. 7th St. | (512) 839 8523

BARLEY SWINE

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and oyster

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service make it a re-

delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden down-

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourag-

freshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry McGuire

stairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel.

es sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingre-

brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood restaurant.

Complete your snack with beer, cheese and an array of dipping

meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

sauces.

dients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

COMEDOR 501 Colorado St. | (512) 499 0977

ÉPICERIE

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

Hiding in plain sight on one of downtown’s busiest street

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

3663 Bee Cave Rd. | (512) 306 1668

corners, Comedor is a restaurant full of surprises. Lauded

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibili-

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

chef Philip Speer delivers a menu that is equally clever and

ties by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a

unexpected, with contemporary cuisine riffs on Mexican

brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

culinary traditions.

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FONDA SAN MIGUEL

HANK’S

2330 W. N Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

At Fonda San Miguel, authentic interior Mex-

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing

ican food is lovingly served inside a colorful

waitstaff and a kid-friendly patio all work

hacienda-style restaurant. The art-adorned

together to make Hank’s a favorite neighbor-

walls and indoor, plant-filled courtyard

hood joint. With happy hour every day from

provide a pleasant escape in North Austin.

3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing be-

Visit the Sunday brunch for a new menu with

tween their frosé and frozen paloma.

the most delicious interior Mexican brunch cuisine.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North

porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates

Loop area serving unique dishes. Chefs-own-

and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by

ers Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley serve

chef Sonya Cote.

thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early

HOPFIELDS

on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s

and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s

provides modern spins on American classics.

famed steak frites and moules frites.

Dig into a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme cocktail.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

GRIZZELDA’S

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

Restaurants

This charming East Austin spot lies some-

in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite

where between traditional Tex-Mex and

has maintained the execution, top-notch

regional Mexican recipes, each fused with a

service, and luxurious but welcoming atmo-

range of flavors and styles. The attention to

sphere that makes it an Austin staple.

detail in each dish shines and the tortillas are made in-house daily.

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JOSEPHINE HOUSE

JUNIPER

LENOIR

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

2400 E Cesar Chavez St #304 | (512) 220 9421

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and

Uchi Alumni Chef Nicholas Yanes fuses central Texas influenc-

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix fixe

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Jo-

es and local farm produce with Italian fare. Start with puffy

meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes locally

sephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

potatoes and the Chef ’s Brand New Cadillac Negroni.

sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal spe-

Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

cialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy

JUSTINE’S BRASSERIE

hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions

4710 E. 5th St. | (512) 385 2900

in the world.

JUNE’S ALL DAY

Justine’s is a quaint French brasserie deep in East Austin.

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

Don’t let the short drive deter you — the experience of eating

LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious

traditional French plates among exquisite works of art and

1203 W. 6th St. | (512) 474 5107

cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. Inspired

decorative string lights makes for one idyllic evening with a

Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Chef Ling and

by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars,

significant other.

her team create sophisticated Chinese dishes that draw enthusi-

June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering.

astic crowds day and night. Make sure to stop by during week-

KEMURI TATSU-YA

end brunch to taste the full mouthwatering dim sum menu.

2713 E. 2nd St. | (512) 803 2224 Kemuri Tatsu-Ya is a Japanese-Texan mash-up that injects se-

LICHA’S CANTINA

riously good food with a sense of humor. The East Austin joint

1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960

features Asian-inspired smoked meats and seafood, along with

Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the

yakitori, ramen, and izakaya classics meant for sharing. Drinks

interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large

are also an integral part of the meal, so come thirsty.

range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will

LA BARBECUE

get you ready for a night out on the town.

22401 E Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN + WINE BAR

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

LORO

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up clas-

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and Aaron

sic barbecue with free beer and live music.

Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space, designed

LAS PALOMAS

by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and open,

4800 Burnet Road | (512) 458 1100 gustoitaliankitchen.com

3201 Bee Cave Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889

and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant

out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green

Nestled in the Rosedale neighborhood of north-

and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophisti-

curry or those potent boozy slushies.

central Austin, Gusto captures the warm,

cated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh

comforting, every-day flavors of Italian cuisine.

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

MATTIE’S

Dishes range from house-made antipasti to hand-

811 W. Live Oak St. | (512) 444 1888

formed pizzas, salads, panini, fresh pasta, entrees

Mattie’s is a glorious urban paradise offering upscale American

featuring Texas farm raised meats, and scratch

classics. While the cocktails are top-notch and the cuisine is

desserts. Craft cocktails, beer on tap, and boutique

nothing short of outstanding, Mattie’s ambiance and atmo-

wines.

sphere are unmatched.

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ODD DUCK

POOL BURGER

1201 S Lamar Blvd | (512) 433 6521

2315 Lake Austin Blvd. | (512) 334 9747

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck is

Tiki meets Texas in this neighborhood burger bar. Located

the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect

behind Deep Eddy Cabaret, crunchy crinkle-cut fries and juicy

seasonal fare and drinks with a strong Texas influence sourced

burgers are served from the window of a 1968 Airstream Land

locally whenever possible.

Yacht.

PARKSIDE

RED ASH ITALIA

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

303 Colorado St. #200 | (512) 379 2906

Patrons flock to this downtown hideaway for its wide selection

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality

of oysters and other modern-American specialties. The 6th

food and enticing ambiance. This Italian steakhouse is led

Street locale is filled with industrial details and plenty of natu-

by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit

ral light, so it’s no wonder that reservations are often necessary

back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

ROSEWOOD GULF COAST CHOP HOUSE QI AUSTIN

1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205

835 W 6th St. #114 | (512) 474 2777

Housed in a historic East Side cottage, this spot is quickly be-

Created by visionary chef Ling Qi Wu, also the owner of the

coming a staple. Chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding homage

esteemed Lin Asian Bar, Qi Austin dazzles with its top-notch

to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf

Chinese cuisine and vibrant artwork. Located in Shoal Creek

Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers.

Walk, Qi Austin is a restaurant that pleases the eye as well as the stomach.

WATERLOO ICE HOUSE Escarpment Boulevard: 9600 Escarpment Blvd | (512) 301 1007

to get a table in the inviting space.

SUERTE 1800 E. 6th St. | (512) 953 0092

Burnet Road: 8600 Burnet Rd | (512) 458 6544 360 & 2222: 6203 N Capital of Texas Hwy | (512) 418 9700 Southpark Meadows: 9600 S IH 35 Frontage Rd | (512) 292 7900 waterlooicehouse.com

Waterloo Ice House is an Austin original restaurant, serving up scratch-made breakfast, lunch, and dinner options as well as Insta-worthy drinks for friends, families, and couples alike since 1976. Come see how we keep Austin’s good vibes

THE PEACHED TORTILLA

Helmed by executive chef Fermín Núñez, Suerte was inspired

5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439

by extensive travels through Central Mexico. Artisanal masa

This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with

is the highlight, made from local heirloom corn and used in

friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably

distinctive dishes rarely found on Austin menus. Order the de-

THAI FRESH

priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world

lectable Suadero Tacos, perfect for sharing with friends.

909 W. Mary St. | (512) 494 6436

alive at one of our four locations nearest you.

A restaurant, cooking school and market all in one place.

with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

TEXAS FRENCH BREAD

When you’re done dining on traditional Thai favorites, stop by

PICNIK

2900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 499 0544

the adjoining coffee bar for freshly brewed joe, homemade ice

4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644

For decades, TFB has been a go-to destination for high-quality

cream and an array of baked goods.

1700 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 293-6118

European-style breads, pastries and seasonally inspired bistro

A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary

meals. Whether grabbing a coffee and pastry on the fly, having

TINY BOXWOODS

restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives

casual business lunches with colleagues or enjoying the charm-

1503 W. 35th St. | (512) 220 0698

out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly

ing patio for an alfresco dinner, this neighborhood spot is an

This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and delicious

options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients.

Austin favorite.

food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood. Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon Provencal salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

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AD INDEX

3 Fold Design Studio...................................... 103

Heritage Title Company.. ................................. 18

Shiflet Richardson Architects..........................97

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Cobalt Companies.. ............................................3

Kelle Contine Interior Design........................ 103

Sparrow Interiors & Gifts................................ 59

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Compass - Dara Allen......................................29

Korman Jewelers .. ...................................... 13, 46

Spinelli Residential Group at Keller Williams

compass.com/agents/dara-allen

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Portfolio Real Estate .......................................10

Compass - Komal Sheth ..................................25

Kuper Sotheby’s - Carl Shurr .......................... 15

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compass.com/agents/komal-sheth/

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Storybuilt......................................................... 64

Compass -Thomajan & Ladner Group. . ...........36

Kuper Sotheby’s International Realty ....... 47-53

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Tiemann Art Gallery....................................... 59

Compass - Nicole Kessler.............................. 4-5

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Urban Home Builders . . ................................... 94

Compass - The West Team ........................... BC

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Urbane Design Studio.................................... 102

Dalgleish Construction Company ................. 96

Mark Ashby Design..........................................97

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dalgleish.net

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Urbanspace Real Estate & Interiors.................. 8

Delysia Chocolatier. . ........................................ 16

Mark Thomas Hair Studio .............................. 59

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Waterloo Ice House. . ...................................... 110

Douglas Elliman Real Estate ..................... IFC-1

Meredith Owen Interiors.. ............................... 99

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West Chelsea Contemporary. . ......................... 17

Eldorado Cafe................................................106

Olson | Defendorf Custom Homes .. .............. 98

wcc.art

edloradocafeatx.com

odcustomhomes.com

Wilson & Goldrick .......................................... 65

Elite Austin.................................................... 100

Omni Hotels & Resorts ................................... 11

wilsongoldrick.com

eliteaustin.com

omnihotels.com

Good Eye Concepts....................................... 103

Prospect Real Estate ..................................... 6-7

goodeyeconcepts.com

prospectrealestate.com

Graceful Spaces Organizing.......................... 101

Ron King Salon.................................................. 9

graceful-spaces.com

ronkingbeauty.com

Gusto Italian Kitchen + Wine Bar..................108

The Royal Turkey . . .......................................... 107

gustoitaliankitchen.com

theroyalturkey.com

tribeza.com

| OCTOBER 2021

111


W H AT ’ S N E W O N

TRIBEZA.COM LOOK ALIVE

REEL IT IN

From big buzz to world premieres, discover the lineup of can’t-miss movies headed to the Austin Film Festival this October. tribeza.com/austin-film-festival-2021-lineup

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Get the inside story on Austin’s craft ice scene and take your cocktails to the next level. tribeza.com/kindred-spirits-craft-ice

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featuring origional artwork from Western Pop Art Icon

BILLY SCHENCK October 2021 214 West Main St.

| Fredericksburg, Texas | 830 9 . 97 9 . 920 | insightgallery.com


Doing real estate The West Team Way

Tara West The West Team tara.west@compass.com 512.632.3110 | thewestteam.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. Photos may be virtually staged or digitally enhanced and may not reflect actual property conditions.


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