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Style I S S U E

SEPTEMBER 2015


AUG UST 2015


Edge sofa by Lars Wendelbo, Wendelbo Møbel Design. From stock beginning at $1998

sophisticated simplicity

Hug chair by 365 North / Henrik Pedersen for Wendelbo Møbel Design. From stock as shown at $988.

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A Higher Level of Sophistication and Knowledge

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Four Seasons Sophistication, $2,995,000

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Peaceful setting 2 acres on Barton Creek, $1,100,000

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Paula Pierce

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M O T O R I Z A T I O N

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A U T O M A T I O N

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CELEBRATING 70 YEARS OF STYLE AUSTIN, TX www.juliangold.com (512) 473-2493


D E S I G N PO R T R A I T.

Tufty-Time, seat system designed by Patricia Urquiola. www.bebitalia.com

Austin Showroom 115 W 8TH Street Austin Tx 78701 - 512.480.0436 Dallas Showroom 1617 Hi Line Drive, Suite 100, Dallas Texas 75207 - 214.748.9838 www.scottcooner.com


CE LEBRATING

70 YEARS OF STYLE

AUSTIN, TX www.juliangold.com (512) 473-2493


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SEPTEMBER

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46

78

74

T R IBE Z A

64

46

90

O N T H E C OV E R : PHOTOG R APHY BY S TE VEN VISN E AU | Styling by Marlene Goodfleisch | Assistant Stylist Molly Harris | Hair & Makeup by Shae Foster & Ivy Warner of Naava Salon | Shot on location at Sawyer & Co.

features

D E PA RTM E NT S

Style Stars 46

COMMUNIT Y

STYLE

Social Hour

20

Profile in Style

Exposed

32

Dressed for Anything 64

TRIBEZA Talk

Style Pick

42

Street Style

108

The National Shoe of Texas 74

ARTS

Boutique Guide

102

Style Week No. 12 78

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

34

Music Pick

DINING

35

Artist Spotlight

Dining Pick

36

Handmade in Fort Lonesome 58

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96

98

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ILLUSTRATION BY AVALON MCKENZIE; AJ BINGHAM PHOTO BY ALISON NARRO; KATIE KIME PHOTO BY ALISON NARRO; STYLE WEEK PHOTO BY JESSICA PAGES; DRESSED FOR ANYTHING PHOTO BY STEVEN VISNEAU; EMILY WALDMANN PHOTO BY CHELSEA LAINE FRANCIS.

Contents


Editor's Letter

I

have a habit that very much annoys my loved ones and friends alike. In public, I love to watch the people around me. I like to see what people are wearing and how they are wearing it. I enjoy watching people interact with one another. And, yes, I even enjoy eavesdropping. (Luckily, I am not alone in this. My dear friend Caroline and I have been known to share entire meals without really speaking, just listening to the people at the table next to us.) Is it rude? Maybe. But I find people endlessly fascinating which is why I went into this profession in the first place.

Our model, Bridget Brown, gets comfortable on the set of our fall fashion shoot, “Ready for Anything” (page 64). For this piece, TRIBEZA shot on location at retro-cool restaurant Sawyer and Co. in East Austin.

As Grace Coddington, Vogue’s revered creative director, wrote in her delightful memoir, Grace, “Always keep your eyes open. Keep watching. Because whatever you see can inspire you.” I kept that quotation in mind as we crafted this month’s Style Issue. The people of Austin give no shortage of inspiration. From the cowboy looks you’ll see every night of the week at the Broken Spoke to lawn party chic found at any one of Austin’s outdoor summer events to the fashion-forward looks found in our locally-owned boutiques, all of it has a home in Austin — and on the pages of TRIBEZA. If you have any doubt about the breadth of style in our fair city, look no further than our Style Stars (page 46). Beautifully captured by photographer Alison Narro, these five Austinites represent a range of ages, professions and personal styles, and yet they coexist beautifully.

K AT I E F R I E L @katiefriel

14 SEPTEMBER 2015

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PHOTOG R A PHY BY S TE V EN V ISN E AU

We’re looking forward to further examining this idea of style during TRIBEZA’s 12th annual Style Week. Presented by designer Katie Kime, this year’s Style Week features our most exciting events ever, including an exclusive dinner with the city’s buzziest chefs and hottest designers, a special brunch at Justine’s with co-host Outdoor Voices, an art pop-up inspired by Waller Creek and, of course, our annual fashion show (page 78).


Disc OVER A s h LE y’ s F uLLy cusTOm i ZE D & iNNOVAT i V E A ppROAch TO sE LLiNg AusTiN’s Fi NE s T h Om Es

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A U S T I N A R T S + C U LT U R E

EDITOR

Katie Friel

ART DIRECTOR

Ashley Horsley

PUBLISHER

George Elliman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Ashley Beall

ASSISTANT EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

COLUMNIST

SALES & OPERATIONS MANAGER

Sofia Sokolove

Kristin Armstrong

WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Dan Gentile Sallie Lewis Caitlin Ryan Karen Spezia Sam Sumpter PHOTOGRAPHERS

Miguel Angel Daniel Brock Chelsea Laine Francis Jody Horton Nicole Mlakar Alison Narro Jessica Pages John Pesina Alysha Rainwaters Steven Visneau

Lexi Ross

Derek Van Wagner PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres MAILING ADDRESS 706a west 34th street austin, texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 www.tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2015 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited.

ILLUSTRATORS

Joy Gallagher Avalon McKenzie

Subscribe to TRIBEZA!

VISIT TRIBEZA .COM FOR DETAIL S


Photos by: David Heisler Photography

Coming October to Lamar Union | 1100 South Lamar, Suite 1130, Austin, TX 78704 512.840.1931 | kikinass.com 20% o on orders and free shipping until our store opening. use code: PREKIKI

kiki nass


social hour

AUSTIN

Social Hour

2

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7

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SUAVS Shoes Kick-Off Party

3

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Malverde opened its doors on July 22 in honor of SUAVS, a new shoe line based in Austin. La Condesa margaritas and appetizers rounded out the fashion forward evening.

4

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Admirals Club of Austin 2015 Debutante Court

The Frank Erwin Center played host to the Admirals Club of Austin 54th royal court on August 1. Young women from across Texas were presented at the Scottish-themed affair called, “A Knight to Remember.� The night before, attendees were treated to a special cocktail hour at the Four Season.

SUAVS: 1. Monxi Garza & Lauren Neal 2. Erin Bradley, Lauren Martin & Kaleigh Wiese 3. Helen Jade & Mary Do 4. Adriana Morfitt & Roberta Lzquierdos 5. Ben Winder & Laura Gassaway Admirals Club: 6. Beth & Marshall Durrett 7. John Walker & Madeline Wynne 8. Louisa, Susannah & Mary Frances Schorlemer 9. Mark & Clary Auler 10. Emily & Ellen Bivins

20 SEPTEMBER 2015

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI) & J O H N P E S I N A


Furniture that transforms rooms — and sparks conversations.

Come Visit Us. Shop our showroom tucked away just one mile east of South Congress at 2090 Woodward Street. Or visit us online to see what’s new, find inspiration and browse our digital catalog. Exclusively in Austin. FOURHANDSHOME.COM


social hour

AUSTIN

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Pay it Forward with Daniel Curtis

Austin’s best chefs joined together at the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center for the fifth annual Pay it Forward with Daniel Curtis. Guests enjoyed bites from such celebrated chefs as David Bull, Bryce Gilmore, Zack Northcutt, Callie Speer and Abby Yates. Proceeds went directly to the Lone Star Paralysis Fund in honor of Daniel Curtis, who suffered a life-altering spinal cord injury in 2011.

5

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Texas Book Festival Launch Party

On July 16, Austin’s literati gathered at the home of Bill and Catherine Miller to celebrate the launch of the 2015 Texas Book Festival. Now in its 20th year, the Texas Book Festival is expecting its biggest fest yet when book lovers from across the world descend upon our fair city for the October celebration.

Pay It Forward: 1. Curtis Merring & Collette Hill 2. Mike & Cristina Haynes 3. Rebecca Linville & Grant Giles 4. Natalie Stanley, Caroline Cody & Amber Taylor 5. Constance Dykhuizen & Phillip Orchard Texas Book Festival: 6. Gigi Edwards Bryant, Gary Bledsoe, Lois Kim & Bill Miller 7. Ethan Lanford, Philipp Meyer & Sara Ortiz 8. Suzie Chase Brown, Jun Wimberley Hurt, Sam Hurt & Sheri Gallo

22 SEPTEMBER 2015

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J O H N P E S I N A & B O B DA EM M R I C H


social hour

AUSTIN

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Breed & Co. VIP Grand Re-Opening Celebration

5

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Austin’s favorite general store celebrated its grand re-opening on August 12. Guests enjoyed light bites and cocktails while getting a sneak peek at Breed & Co.’s new stunning renovations.

9

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The Orchard Grand Opening

The Orchard by MX3 Homes opened the doors of its Webberville Road model home on July 9 to give people the opportunity to sneak a peek at the modern farmhouse design. Guests dined on local fare while celebrating this new East Austin development set to open in fall 2015.

Breed & Co.: 1. Brian David Johnson & Monica Faucheaux Haskett 2. Sandra Hernandez & Guest 3. Larissa Garza & Janis Runyan 4. Steve Veregge & Dave Barker 5. David Harris & Ali Hay The Orchard: 6. Matilda de Marcet & Jovhanna May 7. Jorge Marcet & Philip Curcuru 8. Sal Martinez & Tania Michael 9. Christina McKenzie & Jonathan McEowen 10. Mary Escamilla & Christy Curcuru

24 SEPTEMBER 2015

tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI)


WHAT CAN AN ETHAN ALLEN DESIGNER DO FOR YOU? OUR DESIGNERS CAN HELP YOU AS MUCH OR AS LITTLE AS YOU LIKE, A N D T H E I R S E R V I C E S A R E A LW AY S C O M P L I M E N TA R Y.

ENJOY SPECIAL FALL SAVINGS OF 15% THROUGHOUT THE DESIGN CENTER.

SINCE 1932 LOCALLY OWNED BY FOUR GENERATIONS OF THE CHESNICK FAMILY. AUSTIN 2817 WEST ANDERSON LANE (BETWEEN MO-PAC AND BURNET ROAD) 512.615.9990 Sale going on for a limited time only. Some exclusions apply. Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com for details. ©2015 Ethan Allen Global, Inc.


social hour

AUSTIN

1

3

2

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Wally Workman 35th Anniversary Party

It’s been 35 years since the beloved Wally Workman Gallery opened its doors on West Sixth Street, and the gallery celebrated in the month of August with a very special show exemplifying the depth and breadth of the talent Wally Workman represents. On August 15, art lovers descended on the gallery to enjoy an exclusive preview happy hour.

4

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White Linen Night

Downtown Austin’s 2nd Street District hosted its third annual White Linen Night on August 1. Dressed in their best white outfits, attendees enjoyed in-store events at local shops, the unveiling of a special mural, wine and food pairings and a VIP after party. Proceeds benefitted Urban Roots, a local nonprofit that teaches young people the benefits of farming.

Wally Workman: 1. Casey Douglas & Rachel Stephens 2. Adam Mixson & Kim Sullivan 3. Jeanie Haggerty & Haydon Hatcher 4. Jon Barkowsky & Mary Margaret Kennedy 5. Courtney Looney & Kiley Grantges White Linen Night: 6. Kasey Lee & Nina Zoe 7. Katie & Mike Matthaeus 8. Manuel & Cassandra Polidori 9. Amanda Dugan & Alicia Inns 10. Roy & Josie Marshman

26 SEPTEMBER 2015

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J O H N P E S I N A & M I G U EL A N G EL


28 SEPTEMBER 2015

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community

COLUMN

The Pursuit of Style BY K R I S TI N A R M S TRO NG I LLU S TR ATIO N BY JOY G A LL AG H ER

FOR MANY YEARS I believed that style was something I put on.

In college at Miami University, I wore worn-in Levi button-fly 501 jeans, half cowboy boots, T-shirts and blazers with shoulder pads. Early in my career, I was the queen of jewel-toned Ann Taylor suits (also with shoulder pads). I lost my college beer curves and step-aerobicized myself down to a size two. I cut my long hair into a professional bob and wore red lipstick. On weekends I ditched my suits in favor of the live music scene and wore Birkenstocks, cut-offs and cropped tank tops that highlighted my otherwise covert belly button ring. I got married and soon after was wearing maternity clothes, oversized shirts with leggings, and ill-fitting jeans complete with a belly pouch. (Where were those when I needed them back in college, after late night beer and cheese fries’ bloat?) Later on while living in Europe, I dabbled in designer couture. I remember wearing a white Gucci pantsuit to a party in Paris, and it occurred to me that I actually looked like a sophisticated woman — a real grown-up. I got divorced and moved back to the states and gave up my elegant persona, happily dressing more like the nanny than the mom. Now I am all of those women rolled into one. I can wear cut-offs with Chanel. I am Target meets Neiman Marcus meets Free People meets Lululemon meets Nordstrom Rack meets Old Navy meets Amazon Prime. Best of all, I don’t really care. I’m not sure when I gave up fretting about fashion and started just being me, but I did. At a certain point women are emancipated by the realization that beauty is all about confidence and freedom. Real style is effortlessly sexy, comfortable and clean. I don’t want to look for clothes that make my body look good; I prefer to focus my energy on having a body that makes

my clothes look good. Style is not about putting anything “on” as much as it is revealing what already exists. Style is so much deeper than the covering we call clothes. Elegance is more about energy. Moxie matters more than makeup. If we spent as much time thinking about what our style reflects from the inside as how it represents the outside, we would be gorgeous and glamorous in all the ways that count. There is no outfit that makes inner ugliness pretty. There is no lingerie that can make selfish look sexy. There is no surgery that can uplift a sagging spirit. There is no makeup to cover a heart that has grown bitter or cold. There is no jewelry that can make a judgmental woman sparkle. There is no accessory worth as much as a genuine smile. There is no workout regime that yields the attractiveness of softness. There is no mirror that makes a manipulative woman look beautiful. There is nothing about pursuing youth that is as lovely or as timeless as authenticity, intimacy and ease. Today when I think about my style, what I project to my daughters or how I dress for a date with my beloved boyfriend, I think about my style on the inside. I want to be a woman who is generous, kind, empathic, present, authentic, forgiving, honest, confident, playful, open, warm, passionate, wise, fierce, soft, strong, graceful and surrendered. I want love to be what I get up and put on every single day. I want to accessorize with integrity, compassion and joy. I want to spritz myself with freedom and walk out the door radiating the confidence that comes from knowing (and liking) who I am. Finally.

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY J OY G A L L AG H ER For a limite d- e dit i on p r int , c onta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c om .

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EXPOSED

Katie & Chris Allcorn NEIGHBOR’S KITCHEN & YARD, BASTROP When Chris and Katie Allcorn moved from Austin to Bastrop last year, it was because they fell in love — with a building. Feeling a change coming to Austin, the young, entrepreneurial couple packed up and bought an old building in a communal complex tucked off from Bastrop’s main street on the banks of the Colorado River and got to work. In 2014, after three months of 12-hour work days, plus help from good friends and plenty of six-packs of beers, Katie, a former graphic designer and Chris, who preciously worked in commercial real estate, opened Neighbor’s Kitchen & Yard, a restaurant and music venue in downtown Bastrop. Here, TRIBEZA talks with them about their Texas-meets-Mississippi style, leaving the Capital City and why Bastrop needs some live music love. S. SOKOLOVE

32 SEPTEMBER 2015

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community

TEXAS ANTIQUEING “So my friend Lauren [Duffy] Stone is an interior designer, and she kind of has the same funky vibe that I have. We went around small town Texas and gathered a bunch of stuff – small metal tables and all that. We are drawn to places that have been marinating for a long time, things that you cant really fabricate or recreate … she kind of helped us do that without it looking too tried. And keeping it simple.” –Katie

PROFILE

THAT SMALL-TOWN VIBE “We were outsiders coming in opening this restaurant. So we got whooped at first. But when our [2-month-old] daughter got sick, that was the biggest wake-up call as to what type of community we’re in. There was probably a thousand people praying for us … it was just cool. Really cool, you could feel it.” –Chris

WHAT INSPIRES YOUR STYLE? WHY LEAVE AUSTIN? “ We were kind of over the way Austin was growing. The way we would have liked it to see it grow would be to build up those institutional places like Broken Spoke and Scoot Inn and places that have been there forever and kind of build around them instead of pushing them out.” – Katie

BRINGING THE TUNES “West of Austin you have Nutty Brown, The Backyard, Foodies and South of Austin you have New Braunfuels, Gruene Hall, all of that. But east there’s nothing, there’s no live music venue, and that’s what we’re trying to do. That’s what this is — that stage, this yard.” –Chris

Catch Austin-based band THE JUKE JOINT PROPHETS at Neighbor's Kitchen

& Yard on Friday, September 11th. The Allcorns are hoping to make their spot a true destination music venue. P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J E S S I C A PAG E S

“Our style is kind of Texas meets Mississippi in 1940. If we see something on the side of the road, we always stop. Especially if it’s open. Like a bar? An old bar? I’m going in. We wanted to kind of make it feel like that.” -Chris

ON BEING SCARED We were sitting on the porch one day like, “We own a restaurant, how did that happen?’” It was literally the last industry I could ever imagine myself in. It sounded horrible to me. [Making the move from Austin] was very scary. We had no idea what we were doing. We even bought a book, Danny Meyer’s Setting the Table. I don’t think we even finished the book. Its still in my truck right now, just sitting there. –Chris

When they were building the restaurant, nothing was better than bringing a SIX-PACK to the river at the end of the day. The river and restaurant views are a big draw, says Chris.

Going into the business with no restaurant experience, the Allcorns did all they could to prepare, including buying famous New York City restaurateur Danny Meyer’s book SETTING THE TABLE: The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business.

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SEPTEMBER CALENDARS arts & entertainment

Entertainment Calendar Music THE NIGHTOWLS

September 3, 8pm Stubb’s Indoors

THE TALLEST MAN ON EARTH

September 13, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater

September 3, 8pm Shady Grove MIKE FLANIGIN, BILLY GIBBONS, KAT EDMONSON

September 6, 8pm Stateside at The Paramount WALKER LUKENS

ANNIVERSARY TOUR

September 16, 6:30pm Mohawk

STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES

September 17, 8pm Stateside at The Paramount DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

September 10, 8pm Shady Grove

September 22, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater

MODERN MEDICINE

JIMMY LAFAVE

September 11, 9pm Mohawk

JERRY JEFF WALKER

September 12, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater

34 SEPTEMBER 2015

September 29, 6pm Stubb’s Outdoors

Film

THE GET UP KIDS 20TH

GINA CHAVEZ

tribeza.com

September 24, 8pm Shady Grove AUSTIN OPERA’S SEASON OPENING GALA CONCERT

Saturday September 26, 6pm The Long Center

BALLET FOLKLORICO DE

WILCO

GONE WITH THE WIND

September 5, 7pm Stateside at The Paramount UNBRANDED AUSTIN PREMIERE

September 17, 7:30pm Stateside at The Paramount FOOD & FILM: THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES FEAST WITH VICTORIA PRICE

September 28, 7pm Stateside at The Paramount

Theatre BALLET AUSTIN’S HAMLET

September 4 — 6 The Long Center

MEXICO

September 13, 7pm The Long Center BLUE LAPIS LIGHT: EDGE OF GRACE

September 16 — 27 The Long Center SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE

September 24 — 27 The Long Center EVITA

September 30, 7:30pm ZACH Theatre

Comedy

THROWING SHADE

September 25, 7pm Stateside at The Paramount

Children WINNIE THE POOH

September 18 — 20 ZACH Theatre

Other UTOPIAFEST

September 4 — 6 Utopia, Texas POST SECRET’S FRANK WARREN

September 10, 7:30pm The Long Center

CHRIS HARDWICK: THE FUNCOMFORTABLE TOUR

LONE STAR LE MANS

September 19, 7pm Stateside at The Paramount

September 17 – 19 Circuit of the Americas

BILL BURR

IMAGINARIAUM

September 21, 7pm Bass Concert Hall

September 25 JW Marriott


arts & entertainment

CALENDARS

AUSTIN SHADEWORKS

We Deliver Results. MUSIC PICK

UTOPiAfest SEPTEMBER 4-6

T

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ravis Sutherland has managed to do the impossible: create and run a music festival that, as it gains momentum and popularity, has still managed to stay small and affordable and maintain its magic. “As much as I love the big fests, once you have a certain amount of people in a single place, it presents problems,” Sutherland explains. “Long lines, claustrophobia, not being able to dance … those are the things we’re trying to eliminate. We want to keep it as quality of an experience as possible for everyone involved.” Sutherland is originally from Utopia, Texas, and started the fest with two goals in mind: to bring live music to his hometown and to allow other people the opportunity to experience the incredible landscape. This Labor Day weekend marks the seventh annual UTOPiAfest, which takes place on Four Sisters Ranch and, as always, will feature the unique elements that differentiate it from other festivals. Expect free camping; a BYOB (and bring-your-own-food) policy; no music overlap or crowds; extraordinary scenery; and a truly fun, relaxed and communal vibe. “I just want to keep it small and simple and keep the focus on the music,” Sutherland says. “That’s always the philosophy. We want it all to be about seeing amazing music and being in the most beautiful place you can imagine with awesome people.” This year’s lineup includes Explosions in the Sky, Wild Child, Charles Bradley and many more. Grab your tickets at Utopiafest.com. S. SUMPTER tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

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arts & entertainment

CALENDARS

Arts Calendar SEPTEMBER 4 BIG MEDIUM

Free Day of Yoga SEPTEMBER 7

D

espite the countless amazing perks of living in Austin, there are some aspects of the city that can truly test your patience (just try driving on I-35 at rush hour.) The best way to alleviate that stress? Well, that would be a little downward dog. “Yoga is about slowing down and being present,” says Collette Hill, a yoga instructor who’s been teaching in Austin since 2011. “[It’s about] doing things in a way that’s mindful, connected, so you know how to create that pause button in your actions and take a moment to breathe before you react.” Austin has countless establishments and events through which aspiring yogis can get started, and Free Day of Yoga — which has occurred annually in Austin since 1999 and has spread as far as the Netherlands and Guam — presents the perfect opportunity for people to find the studios, styles and teachers that are right for them. On a deeper level, the day also has the potential to make our city a more connected, peaceful place.“There’s a really strong community here with amazing teachers [and] beautiful, welcoming studios,” says Hill, who currently teaches at Blue Honey, Wanderlust, Castle Hill and Sukha. “There’s a real positive energy, and together we can move that kindness and compassion out of the studio and into the world.” And, hopefully, onto the interstate. Discover your new favorite studio and get more info at Freedayofyoga.com. S. SUMPTER

36 SEPTEMBER 2015

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SEPTEMBER 5

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN — JONES CENTER AND VISUAL CENTER

Strange Pilgrims Opening Reception 6-9pm Through January 21

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

Mallory Page: Solo Show Opening Reception 6-8pm Through September 26 SEPTEMBER 10

WOMEN AND THEIR WORK

Red Dot Art Spree 6-10pm SEPTEMBER 13

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

SoundSpace: Deep Listening 2pm SEPTEMBER 18 GRAYDUCK GALLERY

Predators, Prey, and Pixels Opening Reception 7-10pm Through October 18 SEPTEMBER 26TH ART ON 5TH

John Morse: Bits and Pieces Opening Reception 7-10pm Through October 31st

ONGOING BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Impressionism and the Caribbean Through September 8

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm Through November 15 LBJ PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Beatles! Through January 10, 2016 BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Donald Moffett Through February 28, 2016

I M AG E COU RTE SY OF FREE DAY OF YOGA

EVENT PICK

Erin Curtis: A Narrow Escape from History Opening Reception 8-10pm Through September 26

SEPTEMBER 25


Roger Hiorns, A retrospective view of the pathway, 2008. Foam, compressor, and polyester tanks. Dimensions variable. Artwork © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London. Courtesy the artist; Luhring Augustine, New York; Corvi-Mora, London; and Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam. Image courtesy Atelier Calder, Saché, France. Photograph by Guillaume Blanc, Atelier Calder.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2015 – JANUARY 24, 2016

Strange Pilgrims

Works by fourteen internationally recognized artists across three sites.

Jones Center 700 Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701 thecontemporaryaustin.org

Betty and Edward Marcus Sculpture Park / Laguna Gloria 3809 West 35th Street Austin, Texas 78703

Visual Arts Center / The University of Texas at Austin 2301 San Jacinto Boulevard Austin, Texas 78712

Strange Pilgrims is organized by The Contemporary Austin. Special venue support and artist-in-residence partnership has been provided through the Visual Arts Center in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Texas at Austin. Strange Pilgrims Exhibition Support: The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, AXA Art Americas Corporation, Suzanne Deal Booth, Lannan Foundation, The Moody Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Texas Monthly, Vision Fund Leaders and Contributors. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts, and by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Art Works.


Preview benefiting

October 1–4, 2015

George R. Brown Convention Center Houston, TX txcontemporary.com Image: Lisa Ludwig, Untitled, 2014. Cast bronze, unique 34” x 31” x 8 3/4”


BOOTS & PEARLS Polo | Fashion | Cars | Food

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2015 AUSTIN TEXAS

USE TICKET CODE: TRIBEZA


arts & entertainment

ART SPACES

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA

3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

ART PICK

Austin Museum Day SEPTEMBER 20

W

hile Austin’s music scene typically steals the spotlight, what’s just as impressive is our city’s visual arts community. Austin Museum Day gives locals the chance to dive into that world and explore a few of the city’s cultural gems — all without spending a dime. “The overall goal is to extend outreach and provide the opportunity for the general public to come out and experience these places for the first time,” says Austin Museum Day committee member Rebecca Marino. “There are some pretty amazing institutions, and people have no idea.” The free, city-wide event is put on by the Austin Museum Partnership and takes place every September. There are around 40 establishments involved this year, and while not all are art museums, a good portion of the participants — including the Blanton Museum of Art, the Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Pump Project, where Marino serves as gallery director — are indeed art-focused, and according to Marino, Austin Museum Day serves as an excellent way to bridge the existing gap between the art scene and the rest of the city. “It’s an exciting time to be a part of the art community,” Marino says. “There’s a lot of momentum and a lot happening. It’s important to support that creativity that people move to Austin for and keep it alive.” Find more information and a list of participating museums at austinmuseums. org/museumday. S. SUMPTER

40 SEPTEMBER 2015

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org

BULLOCK MUSEUM

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–6, Su 12–6 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM

802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM

1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER

300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org

MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM

419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM

409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THE THINKERY

1830 Simond Ave (512) 469 6200 Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM

605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

I M AG E COU RTE SY OF AUS TIN M USEU M DAY

Museums


Galleries ART AT THE DEN

317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH

3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTPOST:

THE CENTER FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION

4704 E. Cesar Chavez St. artpostaustin.com

ARTWORKS GALLERY

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

AUSTIN GALLERIES

5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appt. only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM

5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT CANOPY

916 Springdale Rd, Bldg 2 #101 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAPITAL FINE ART

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

CO-LAB PROJECTS: N SPACE

(512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY

2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

905 Congress Ave. at Nelsen Partners (512) 300 8217 Hours: W 5:30-8 co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON

702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu-Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

DAVIS GALLERY

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3 galleryshoalcreek.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER

GRAYDUCK GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO

3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appointment only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS

913 E. Cesar Chavez St.

2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA

227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007

Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY

360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W-Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY

1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY

507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org MONDO GALLERY

4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2439 Hours: Tu-Sa 12- 6 mondotees.com NJ WEAVER

4620 E. Cesar Chavez, Bldg. B (512) 663 6690 By appointment only njweaver.com PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

SPACE 12

Fredericksburg

3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

AGAVE GALLERY

208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY

1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL

234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com

STUDIO 10

1011 West Lynn Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 (512) 236 1333 studiotenarts.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY

TINY PARK GALLERY

1101 Navasota St. #2 (512) 809 3242 Hours: Sa 12-5 and by appt. 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY

VISUAL ARTS CENTER

2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org

209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

YARD DOG

1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

INSIGHT GALLERY

214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com

TESTSITE

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org

314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com

230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK

425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

41


TRIBEZ A TALK

LUXE LIVING

A N I N S I D E R ' S G U I D E TO A U S T I N ' S H I D D E N G E M S . BY N ICO L E B ECKL E Y

T H E S E B O OT S W ER E (N OT ) M A D E FO R WA L K I N G

On any given Friday or Saturday night, finding an open parking

At the intersection of form and fantasy sits one of Alexander Mc-

spot downtown can be more than a challenge. Looking to ease

Queen’s rare creations — the Armadillo Boot. Named after the

the difficulty of finding a parking space, San Francisco-based

emblematic Texas mammal, McQueen’s shoe is a far cry from any traditional Texas boot. At 11.8 inches high, the claw-like structure presents the wearer as a ballerina en pointe. (It was most notably worn by Lady Gaga in her “Bad Romance” video.) While only 21 pairs were originally made, three more were specially created and

THE END TO PARKING WOES Luxe has rolled out its service for Austin. Currently available for downtown and Rainey Street, the Luxe app sends a Luxe valet directly to you and then parks your car in a nearby garage or parking lot. When the trip is complete, cars are returned at the owner’s request in 15 minutes, and overnight parking is available for a fee. If you want a bit more service, the

sold at auction this July, with the proceeds going to Unicef. For

app can also get your car washed, vacuumed and refueled. For

more information, visit onlineonly.christies.com/s/handbags-and-

more information, visit luxe.com

accessories/lots/158

42 SEPTEMBER 2015

tribeza.com

AR M ADIL LO BOOT PHOTO COU RTE SY OF CH RIS TIE' S | LUXE PHOTO COU RTE SY OF LUXE


IF THE S HOE FITS “I’ve always loved art and fashion. When I was little, I would make little pencil bags for my friends out of scrap fabric that I found around my home,” designer Monxi Garza says. After studying fashion in Monterrey, Mexico and Madrid, Spain, Garza came to Austin with the idea to launch SUAVS, a breathable shoe geared toward a walking lifestyle that takes the wearer from gym to work to a night out. Currently available in four color options, Garza designed the shoe to slip easily on and off with an Air Mesh exterior that allows for ventilation. “I feel like SUAVS and Austin are a great match because it’s a stylish shoe and it’s modern and minimalist, but at the same time it’s really comfortable to wear,” says Garza. For more information, visit suavshoes.com

DISTILLED VINTAGE

“Our mom has always sold antiques, so we kind of grew up doing flea markets and estate sales all the time with her,” Catelyn Silapachai says. Traveling with their mother to Europe to source antiques, Silapachai and her brother Clif Claycomb groomed an interest in finding unique and oneof-a-kind goods. After spending some time living in Madrid, Silapachai and Claycomb each moved to Austin and together developed The Distillery, an online shop for vintage and handmade jewelry, accessories, and home goods. “Austin’s the most open to vintage city that I’ve ever lived in or visited,” Silapachai says. “People are definitely rewarded for having interesting vintage pieces here.” The current trend includes modernist, mid-century gold and brass jewelry, some of which will be on display at Black Lagoon Gallery on September 10 during The Distillery’s Fine Goods pop-up shop. For more information, visit thedistillerymarket.com SUAVS PHOTO COU RTE SY OF SUAVS | DIS TIL L ED VINTAG E PHOTOS BY CH EL SE A L AIN E FR ANCIS

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

43


The Health Club for All Seasons


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FOR THESE FIVE LOCALS, STYLE IS ABOUT MORE T H A N W H AT

Style Stars 46

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

THEY WEAR


Photographer Nick Simonite has spent the past few months traveling around Texas taking photographs for the state’s tourism board.

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

47


cation degree to use teaching elementary school. But in 1980, nine years after the couple moved north, the Texas State Directory came back up for sale, and the Sayers’ decided to purchase it. “It was a way to get us back to Austin,” explains Sayers. “Everyone [in our family] lives in or near Austin.” The couple worked together until 1985 when Scotty left to pursue another career. “When my husband went on, I kept up with the book. It became my baby,” says Sayers. And so with each election and legislative session that came and went, Sayers worked to gather information, sending requests for information to

Julie Sayers

every single elected official in the state of Texas. “I solicit every person that is in this book,” says Sayers. “People in this book, if you mention my name, they would say, ‘Yeah, I hear from her every year. Don’t know her, and I never met her but [I hear from her].’”

PUBLISHER

Y

handwrites letters to elected officials, opting instead for e-mail. And though the book is still published (and popular), Sayers says she’s growing the Directo-

ou may not know the name Ju-

ry’s online presence. Throughout her years as president and publisher, Sayers

lie Sayers, but for the past 34

has maintained a thoughtful vision for her business that, in turn, has made

years she has played an instru-

the Directory indispensible.

mental role in Texas politics.

It’s a business that has evolved as Sayers has, one that has allowed her to spend

Since 1980, Sayers has served

time with her daughters and two grandchildren (they all live within a mile of each

as president and publisher of the Texas State Di-

another in West Austin). “I get up, go to work. I’m in a great time of life,” says Say-

rectory, an almanac cataloging every elected official

ers. “Once you’re over sixty, you don’t have to compete, you’ve

in Texas from the local to the federal level. Along

got it down. It’s a wonderful time.”

“ I T H I N K YO U

with their photographs, the Texas State Directory

When it comes to her success, Sayers credits an attitude

gives political affiliation, personal and contact in-

of gratitude and openness. “I say every day gets better –

NEED TO BE OPEN

formation, and a host of other details unavailable

there is usually a surprise somewhere and usually a good

YO U N E E D TO B E

anywhere else. For legislators and lobbyists, the Di-

one,” says Sayers, adding later, “I think you need to be open

rectory is commonly referred to as “the Bible,” and

you need to be the moment – I believe that totally. And be

THE MOMENT – I

the information inside has led to wheelin’, dealin’

open to new things. If you box yourself in, you never have

and real legislation being passed.

the chance for people to enter.”

Though her stepfather published newspapers

B E L I E V E T H AT TOTA L LY.”

The Directory has indeed offered Sayers a front-row seat to

in West Texas (he also briefly owned — then sold

Texas politics for nearly four decades, to be among politicians but not of them.

— the Directory when Sayers was in high school),

Though Sayers says she finds politics interesting (she reads two newspapers ev-

publishing was never her dream. A native Austini-

ery morning), she prefers to count politicians as friends, not colleagues. In the

te, Sayers met her future husband, Scotty, when

office she shares with her husband, it’s not unusual for the governor to pop in

the two were attending Austin High School. The

one day and a pro golfer the next. Because of that, Sayers says she has made it a

couple attended UT together, and following grad-

habit to always look her best. “My mother was kind of bohemian, but I always

uation, got married and moved to Dallas.

thought she had great style. She was always dressed nice, and I always try to

While living in the Big D, Sayers put her edu-

48

Today, the Texas State Directory operates a bit differently. Sayers no longer

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

look my best.” Says Sayers, “It’s better to be overdressed than underdressed.”


Top by Tangerine, available at The Garden Room. Skirt by Rebecca Taylor. Shoes by Sam Edelstein. Necklace by Chanel. Rings and bracelet by Phil Shaw, Goldsmith.


Suit by Jack Victor available at Capra & Cavelli. Watch by Android. Button down available at Nordstrom Rack.

50

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


experience. I was looking to get away … I needed to grow up a little bit.” The skills he had picked up as “a military kid” were such that Bingham felt comfortable with pretty much anyone, in almost any situation. That, coupled with his love of history, made law school seem like a natural path.

A.J. Bingham C O N S U LT A N T

H

Following Wake Forest, Bingham decided to go to law school in Kansas. During his final year, Bingham had a revelation: he didn’t want to be an attorney. “I was looking for alternative paths so I could still use my education, but more aligned with my personality,” explains Bingham. “I thought about being an agent or lobbying — and I thought lobbying was the better route. I didn’t want to go to D.C., so I started networking to get back to Austin.” He spent two legislative sessions working unpaid in the Texas State Capitol and living at home with parents. When the legislature wasn’t

ere’s the thing about AJ Bing-

in session, Bingham worked as

ham: He always looks good.

a job coach for Goodwill, help-

Whether at a charity event (he’s

ing young men and women find

on the board of several) or stop-

job placement. It was rewarding

ping into the Quickie Pickie af-

work, but he wanted back in the

ter a Saturday morning at the gym, Bingham

Capitol, among the lobbyists

always looks simultaneously put together and

and lawmakers. Following his

at ease with his surroundings. “I’d rather be

second unpaid session as a staff-

overdressed for an event than underdressed,”

er, Bingham was offered a full-

he says, echoing fellow style star Julie Sayers.

time job for an Austin-based

As a kid, Bingham moved around a lot. The

“BEING A CITIZEN IS BEING INVOLVED. AT LEAST VOTE. VOTE!”

lobbying firm.

son of an Air Force officer, Bingham was born

Today, Bingham is working in the private sector and continuing to vol-

in New Mexico and spent much of childhood

unteer for everything from the Young Men’s Business League to Caritas

in Germany. In 1991, his father was stationed

to the Black Chamber of Commerce. “I realize I’m at a point in my life

at Bergstrom Air Force Base and in 1992

where I just have the time do it,” says Bingham of his philanthropy. “Be-

when the base closed, the Binghams settled

ing a citizen is being involved. At least vote. Vote!”

in South Austin. After graduating from LBJ

Whether he is on the floor of the Capitol or at a charity happy hour,

High School, Bingham landed at North Car-

Bingham remains effortlessly stylish. “It’s presentation right? Before you

olina’s Wake Forest University. “It was a good

know anything about me, you see me.” tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

51


ent landed him advertising work with companies like Uber, Capital One and Absolut and he was counting some of the biggest tastemakers in Austin among his clients and collaborators (Bunkhouse, Preacher and Guerilla Suit, just to name a few). “I’m super fortunate to be working with them,” says Simonite. “Just by working with them I get more credit than I probably deserve because

Nick Simonite

those are the people are really influencing Austin and, on a greater level, other areas.” Earlier this year, the state tourism board approached Simonite about shooting a campaign.

PHOTOGRAPHER

C

ertain things are written in the stars. For San Antonio native Nick Simonite, the son of a photography profes-

job and spend the next several months traveling across Texas taking photographs. He jumped at the chance. “The

last

couple

sor and brother to celebrated cinematographer Peter Si-

months have been trav-

monite and New York-based artist/photographer Frances-

elling which [has been]

ca Simonite, it seems only natural that he should take up

a pleasure and joy,”

W O U L D B E TA K I N G P I C-

the family business. But in speaking with Simonite, it is clear that becoming

says Simonite, who has

TURES FOR A LIVING,

a photographer wasn’t something he fell into — it was his calling.

crisscrossed all of Texas

BUT IT SEEMED LIKE THE

“I kinda grew up around it. We had a dark room in the house growing

taking exquisite photo-

up,” Simonite explains over coffee at Figure 8. Though he tinkered around

graphs of our beloved

with photography in high school, Simonite still started his freshman year at

state.

Southwestern University unsure of what he wanted to major in.

me? Just take a peek at

Towards the end of school, Simonite took an internship with the

52

He was told that would require him to quit his

(Don’t

believe

“ I N E V E R I M AG I N E D I

THING I WOULD MOST L I K E T O D O.”

his Instagram.)

Austin American-Statesman that led to a post-graduation job with the

Now that it’s fall, the campaign is winding

Statesman’s sister publication, the Waco Tribune-Herald. “I never imag-

down and Simonite is looking towards to future.

ined I would be taking pictures for a living, but it seemed like the thing I

When asked about his next step, he muses, “I

would most like to do,” says Simonite.

could never get hired again after this or I could

After a year in Waco, Simonite says he was ready to move to Austin and

get more work,” before quickly adding, “Hopeful-

be closer to family. He took a 9-to-5 job with The Austin Business Journal

ly, I’ll get more work from this.” We’re betting on

and began freelancing in his spare time. Before long, his reputation and tal-

the latter.

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Shirt by S.K.U. Jeans by Nudie Jeans. Boots by Helm Boots, Muller Black Butcher Boot, $485, Helmboots.com.


Dress by Alexis, and photographed in front of pieces from Katie Kime’s collection, available at katiekime.com.


prenticed with upholsters and interior designers, took sewing lessons, learned how to make Lucite, sourced fabric and textiles, and taught herself the basics of graphic design and product photography. What she couldn’t learn from apprenticing, she tried to teach herself through books. “I would pore over books literally [asking myself], ‘How do you do this?’” In 2008, after three years in Atlanta, Kime decided to make the move to Austin. “I just fell in love

Katie Kime DESIGNER

W

hen

with Austin the way everyone else does,” she says. “The fact that it’s a creative, cool town was the icing on the cake.” The designer says it was her college best friend — an Austin native — and a well-timed Wall Street Journal article touting the city as a future design hub that finally convinced her to make the move. If Atlanta was where Kime received a crash course in how to run a business, Austin is where she developed her brand. For the first five years, Kime found her-

designer/lifestyle

self taking creative jobs wherever she could. She landed small interior design proj-

guru Katie Kime began

ects and even a gig where she designed both the invitations and the bridesmaid

college at Duke Univer-

dresses for a Michigan wedding.

sity her freshman year,

While she was working for others, Kime continued to refine her own line, mak-

the religion and visual

ing things that interested her whether it was a line of monogrammed stationary

arts double major wasn’t exactly sure what she

or a birdcage chair. In October 2013,

wanted to do. “I was always really creative, mak-

Kime launched her e-commerce site,

ing things from a really young age, like seven,” says

katiekime.com. Less than two years

the North Carolina native. “I just never thought of

later, Kime decided to open a brick-

it as a job.”

and-mortar shop in her adopted

Throughout college, Kime found herself mak-

hometown. “I’ve envisioned having a

ing custom stationary for friends or popping into

store in Austin since I moved here,”

local thrift stores in search of vintage furniture to

she says. In September, Katie Kime

reupholster. During her senior year, a friend by the

will open its first storefront at 500

name of Debbie Krzyzewski (daughter of Duke

N. Lamar Blvd. Suite 150, just down

basketball’s legendary Coach K) helped Kime or-

the street from the brand new interior

ganize a trunk show. Kime says it was the first time

design showroom JAMES by Meredith

she saw all of her smaller creative projects together

Ellis and the soon-to-open Supply.

“I WOULD PORE OV E R B O O K S L I TE R A L LY [ A S K I N G M Y S E L F ] , ‘ H OW D O YO U D O T H I S ? ’ ”

in a cohesive collection. “The trunk show, seeing it

September is poised to be a busy month for the lifestyle guru. In addition

all together and seeing them make sense, I decid-

to opening her first brick-and-mortar, Kime is getting married and her com-

ed from them on that I was going to do this. Like

pany is making its first-ever public relations push (which includes Katie Kime

all 22-year-olds, I was audacious,” she adds with

presenting TRIBEZA’s 12th annual Style Week, September 24 - October 1).

a laugh.

Though others might scoff at such an ambitious undertaking, Kime laughs

After graduation, Kime left Durham for Atlanta where she gained a whole new education. She ap-

it off. “The timing of the launch and the brick-and-mortar happened to be perfect.” Kime adds with a laugh, “October will probably be boring.” tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

55


manufacturer in Dallas (for whom the Ellen Dress is named) and began searching for fabrics that were humanely made and could keep their shape with a wash-and-wear lifestyle. For the designer, keeping her clothing thoughtfully-sourced was a critical tenant of the SBJ Austin business model. “It’s just a part of my life, living sustainably. Our house is a

Mallary Carroll

five-star green build. And the whole movement of sustainable living and living kind and giving back and being grateful, I think of all those things go hand in hand.”

DESIGNER, SBJ AUSTIN

W

the latest trend, Carroll’s staple pieces like the hen Mallary Carroll decided to launch her own

Ellen Dress (the one that sold out in By George

clothing line, she knew she wanted to “comb the

in less than a day)

belly of the goat.” Working as a buyer and man-

and the Oxford Dress

ager for a high-end cashmere shop in Nantuck-

(a classic button down

“ I T H I N K T H AT ’ S

et, Massachusetts, Carroll began working with

look) feel timeless. “I

Johnstons of Elgin, a Scottish cashmere manufacturer known not only

think that’s the beauty

T H E B E AU T Y O F

for softly combing the belly of goats in order to get hair for their famed

of what this is; it’s age-

cashmere, but also for outfitting their employees with proper benefits.

less and you can make

AG E L E S S A N D YO U

That sort of thoughtful treatment of both people and animals appealed to

this your own,” she says.

CAN MAKE IT

Carroll when she launched her own line, SBJ Austin, in 2010.

As for the future,

W H AT T H I S I S ; I T ’ S

YO U R OW N .”

Well, to be fair, she didn’t exactly have a full line when Carroll first

Carroll will be taking

approached By George about selling SBJ. After a meeting with the

SBJ to New York City

posh boutique, By George agreed to carry Carroll’s entire stock of SBJ

and Los Angeles over the next few months in or-

which, at the time, consisted of only 11 dresses. Within a day, they

der to get in front of other buyers. And though

had sold out. “It’s still the most popular dress,” Carroll laughs. It

she’s excited about the prospect of SBJ growing,

was also a turning point for the mother of two. “It was pretty quick,”

Carroll says she is grateful to have launched SBJ

says Carroll of the move from one dress to a full line that includes

in Austin. “When you come to this city, you feel

shirts, dresses, jewelry and, beginning in 2016, shoes.

[love],” she says. “Local means something here

Following her success selling at By George, Carroll found a

56

It is a movement that has resonated with her customer base, too. Rather than bend to

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

more than anywhere else I’ve ever been.”


Top by SBJ Austin available at sbjaustin.com. Pants by SBJ Austin available at By George. Jewelry by SBJ Austin available at sbjaustin.com.


B Y C A I T L I N RYA N | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J E S S I C A PAG E S

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DISENCHANTED WITH T O DAY ’ S H I G H - S P E E D M A N U FA C T U R I N G P R A C T I C E S , K AT H I E S E V E R D EC I D E D TO SLOW DOWN. tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

59


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Sever converted her South Austin home’s garage into the Fort Lonesome workshop.

K

athie Sever jokes that

matic way,” she says. “I thought it was so fas-

she’s taken “slow fash-

cinating — the rituals involved in terms of the

ion” to a whole new

way that the way you wore your hat, cuffed your

level with Fort Lone-

pants, tucked in your shirt. It was such an in-

some, a custom west-

teresting dichotomy to me, considering the fact

ern wear and chain stitch embroidery compa-

that the rest of the life on the ranch included a

ny. To create a single, custom piece for a client,

lot of danger, a lot of risk, and a lot of freedom …

she spends hours upon hours behind a chain

it fit together really nicely.”

stitch machine. But that’s the intention of Fort

She brought this acute cultural awareness

Lonesome to, as Sever explains, “generate a bit

with her to Austin when she started her first

more of a consciousness around how people in-

business, a children’s clothing line called Ra-

teract with the things that they choose to have in

monster, in 2000. Though it saw great success

their environment.”

and a loyal clientele, she eventually became

The decision to diverge from the traditionally

disenchanted with the modern manufactur-

fast-paced fashion industry doesn’t fall far from

ing process in which “cheap, fast and easy” al-

the Fort Lonesome aesthetic, one that can only

ways seemed to win out. It was on the heels of

be described as “outlaw.” Sever’s embroidery is

that frustration that she sourced some chain

deeply rooted in Western heritage, harkening

stitching machines and began seriously ex-

back to colorful designs from famed rodeo tai-

ploring the older, time-intensive manufactur-

lors like Nudie Cohn who dressed the likes of

ing technique.

John Wayne, Gene Autry and George Jones. “I

“These machines, to me, felt like the perfect

think a lot of people in the United States have al-

response [to mass production],” Sever says of

ways romanticized everything about ‘The West,’’’

founding Fort Lonesome. “They are so sen-

she says. “I can’t think of any type of style that is

sitive to the technician that you can’t make

that enduring and that pervasive.”

two things that look exactly the same. It’s

Originally from California, Sever’s reverence

kind of like using an Etch-a-Sketch or driving

for cowboy culture formally gelled once she

something with a steering wheel in that your

moved to Montana to live on a ranch. “That’s

personality, your energy, your handwriting is

chines Patsy, Clementine,

where I got a fully fleshed out picture of how

transferred when you’re doing this embroidery.”

Tanya, Dolly and Pearl.

[Western wear] actually exists in a more prag-

When Sever meets with a customer regarding

Sever has fondly named her chain stitching ma-

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

61


a potential commission, she sees it as her job to “interpret their narrative into their garments and textiles that they have around them.” It usually starts with a candid conversation, an agreed upon color scheme, and a black and white sketch. After that, it’s in Sever’s hands. “The process of embroidery can be such a fast-changing experience,” she says of her fluid working style. The words she uses in assessing someone’s sartorial vibe range from “vintage” to “cosmic” and “subtle with modern edge.” Considering the amount of time invested in each piece of art Sever creates, a jacket back-piece starts at $300 while pricing for an entire custom garment beA jacket patch could take anywhere from three to eight hours of uninterrupted work.

gins at $450. The result is a one-of-a-kind heirloom-worthy piece. She now counts bona fide celebrities like Richard Linklater, Jimmy Kimmel and Bill Murray among her clients, and has done work in conjunction with Levi’s for Sufjan Stevens, First Aid Kit and Leon Bridges. One of her personal favorites, though, is country artist Nikki Lane out of Tennessee. “She’s part of this scene in Nashville right now that’s trying to shift the country music industry back to something that’s a little more outlaw,” she says of Lane’s “sexy, sassy” spirit and striking on stage persona. “When I am tired and frustrated or feel overworked and I get to dig into something for Nikki. It’s like taking a vacation.” “Clothing has always been a funny way of telling a story,” Sever reflects, “so why would you want to tell any story other besides your own? The machines and the garments and the aesthetic all kind of coalesce. They’re all about individualism. That ties into our thing at Fort Lonesome.”

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Additional Fort Lonesome stitchers are Dana Falconberry (a local musician), Christina Hurt Smith and Amrit Khlasa. Sever’s studio manager is Susan Alexander-Wilson.

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

63


P HOTO G R A P H Y BY ST E VE N V ISNEAU / ST Y LIN G BY MARLEN E G O O DFLEISC H / ASSISTAN T ST Y LIST MO LLY HARRIS / HAIR & MAK EU P BY SHAE FOST ER & IV Y WA R NE R O F N AAVA SALO N / MO DEL B RIDG ET O F WALLFLOW ER MG M T / SHOT O N LO C AT IO N AT SAW Y ER & CO.

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


FALL IS THE BUSIEST SEASON OF THE YEAR FOR AUSTINITES. WHETHER IT’S A MORNING SPENT AT THE RACETRACK FOR FORMULA 1, DINNER AT A HOT NEW RESTAURANT, OR A WEEKEND GETAWAY TO PALM SPRINGS, THESE LAYERED LOOKS MAKE SURE YOU’RE READY FOR ANYTHING.

COAT BY ISAB E L MAR AN T, $875; SH O E S BY MAR N I, $92 0 ; B OTH AVA I L A BLE AT BY GEO RGE. DRES S BY SH A KUH AC H I, $2 42 , AVA I LA BLE AT H OI D E N SUPPLY CO MPANY.

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

65


H AT BY LAC K O F CO LO R , $125; SC A RF BY AGE O F R E ASO N , $ 99; S H O E S BY IN T E N T IO N ALLY BLA NK, $ 228 ; SUN GLASSE S BY R AEN, $ 135; BAC K PAC K BY M AC K AGE, $559; A L L AVAILAB LE AT HO ID E N S UPPLY CO M PA N Y. R IN G BY PILLVR, $ 175; AVA I L A BLE AT PILLVR .CO M. DRES S BY C RI P PE N , $465; AVAILA BLE AT C RI P P E N- LA .CO M.

66

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


JUMPS UIT BY TINA & JO, $ 180; JAC KE T BY LOV E R S & F R IE N DS , $1 8 0; B OT H AVAILAB LE AT COV E B O UT IQ UE. S HOES BY M IISTA, $205; H O IDE N SUP P LY CO M PAN Y

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

67


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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


TO P BY J UST F E M ALE, $1 08 ; PAN TS BY AM USE SO C IE T Y ‘AT W O O D PAN T ’ $69 ; N EC KLAC E BY SO KO, ‘ T W O WAY C H O KE R’ $70; ALL AVAILAB LE AT H O IDE N SUP P LY CO M PAN Y.


TO P BY ANTI K B ATI K, $ 398 ; AVA I LAB LE AT COVE B OU TI QU E. S H ORTS BY J U ST FE M A L E, $ 98 ; AVA I L A B L E AT HO IDEN S U P P LY COM PA NY. JAC K ET BY L E VI ’S VI NTAG E ( S TY LIST ’ S OW N ) . S H OE S BY CH I E, $ 395 ; HAN DB AG BY CH LOE, $ 1,95 0; B OTH AVAILAB LE AT BY G EORG E.

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tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

71


HAN D B AG BY C E LINE, $ 2,200; AVAILAB LE AT BY GEORGE. SC AR F BY AGE O F R EA SON, $ 99; AVAILAB LE AT H O IDEN S UPPLY CO MPAN Y. SUN GLASS ES BY RAY BAN (E D ITO R’S OWN).

72

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


TOP BY SUNO, $495 ; PA NTS BY SUNO, $595 ; SH O E S BY CEL I NE, $680, AVA I LA B LE AT BY G EO RG E. tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

73


B Y DA N G E N T I L E I L LU S T R AT I O N B Y AVA LO N M C K E N Z I E

THE COWBOY BOOT MAY BE SYNONYMOUS WITH TEXAS, BUT THE HISTORY CAN BE TRACED AROUND THE WORLD.

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tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

75


T

H E CO W B OY B O OT WA S N ’ T B O R N I N T E X A S, B U T A S T H E

enter the picture. Historian Tyler Beard’s

S AY I N G G O E S, I T

The Art of the Boot says cowboy culture be-

G OT H E R E A S Q U I C K LY A S IT CO UL D. DE TA I L S O F T HE JOU R N E Y A RE DU S T Y AT B ES T,

Hun accounts are true, means the cowboy boot already had roughly thirteen centuries to develop a rep for rugged individualism. Beard credits a young Kansas livestock trader’s generous cattle driving salaries for bring-

T RACIN G E A RLY V ER S I O N S O F

ing the first cowboys to the Chisholm Trail.

CONQ UE RO RS L I K E AT T I L A T H E H UN A N D G EN G HI S K HA N .

Forty dollars per head meant real money at the end of the 700-mile trek to Abilene, Kansas — and much of that money was spent on nice pair of new boots. The first model of choice for these foot-

IT MA K E S F O R A N O R I G I N

wear pioneers was based on the Wellington

S TO RY T H AT ’ S A S G R A N D I OS E

boot. Named after the general who defeat-

AND A M BIG UO US A S T EX A S ITSEL F, BUT T H E S HO RT VERSIO N IS T H AT F O R A S LO N G A S

ed Napoleon at Waterloo, the knee-length height protected riders calves, rounded toes slid easily into stirrups, and one-inch heels secured the rider’s feet in a manner similar to today’s clip-in bike pedals. Early on, the

ME N H AV E BE E N MO U N T I N G

utilitarian nature meant a lack of decorative

H ORS E S, T H E Y ’ V E N EED ED

elements, but soon boot makers learned that

SH OES S T URDY EN O U G H TO CO M E A LO N G F OR T HE R I D E. SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

T H E W E L L I N G TO N

gan developing in Texas in 1867, which if the

WITH SO M E H IS TO R I A N S

T H E H E E L S TO L EG EN DA RY

76

The facts become clearer when Longhorns

stitching actually toughened the leather. It also didn’t hurt that Texans like to show off. So soon enough the Wellington evolved

THE CHISHOLM TRAIL


“THESE BOOTS WERE MADE BEFORE LASERS, BEFORE COMPUTERS. REAL PEOPLE CUT THE LEATHERS AND DID THE STITCHING.” - ULLI JOHNSTON

B O OT T E R M S 1 . P U L L S T R A P/ M U L E E A R 2 . CO L L A R 3 . I N L AY 4 . S T I TC H PAT T E R N

into something with a little more swag-

gers, she divines a perfect fitting pair out of

ger. Taking cues from more ornamented

her stock of nearly 800 vintage choices. How

Hessian boots seen during the Civil War,

she channels the spirits of the Chisholm Trail

a boot maker in Coffeyville, Kansas creat-

is unclear even to her, but it isn’t part of some

ed his own hybrid style that incorporated

smoke and mirrors Western wear fad.

contrasting leather colors and an option-

“These boots were made before lasers, be-

al five-point star on the front of the

fore computers. Real people cut the leath-

boot. It was one of the earli-

ers and did the stitching,” says Johnston.

est incarnations of a toe

“They’re not mass-produced.” The precision

bug, the type of elabo-

of hand-stitching and the comfort, fit and

rate stitching likely to catch a

durability of expert leatherwork can’t be

dance partner’s eye on the dance floor of

understated, but these marks of the human

the White Horse.

hand are as symbolic as they are functional.

Flash forward to 2015 and the $15 mail or-

More than any other type of footwear,

der boots worn by the earliest Texans are long

a good cowboy boot has both a maker and

gone. The same level of hand craftsmanship

a past. That connection is what draws jet

and personalized details still exist thanks to

setters to pay thousands of dollars for ex-

obscure artisans and the higher-end lines at

otic leathers, turns tourist curiosity into

legacy companies like Justin and Lucchese,

bank-breaking impulse buys, and makes

5 . VA M P

but nowadays an entry level pair should run

two-steppin’ at the Broken Spoke such a

6 . TO E B U G / W R I N K L E S T I TC H

you at least $200 according to Ulli Johnston,

special event. It’s how one type of shoe can

7. TO E

also known as the famed “Boot Whisperer of

pair just as well with trailheads as they do

Wimberley.”

sidewalks, with pearl snaps as designer suits,

8. HEEL 9. CO U N T E R 10. PIPING 11. SHAFT

Available by appointment only, Johnston

with backyard barbecues as charity galas.

hosts customers at the Wild West Store,

And it’s why even though Texas has ridden

where with a quick view of the customer’s

boldly into the new millennium, we’ll never

naked foot and a literal wiggling of her fin-

hang up our boots. tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

77


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA PAGES & NICOLE MLAKAR

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79


launched in

orate with as our presenting sponsor in Katie Kime.

2003, it was intentionally named Style Week, rather

The Duke University grad and up-and-coming design

than Fashion Week, because the hope was to cele-

star opens her first storefront this month here in Aus-

brate more than just fashion. So this year, we re-

tin. Her offerings include whimsical and stylish home

turned to its roots and created an exciting line up of

accessories, furniture, clothes and more. Join us this

events about art, design, food…and of course a lot of

month for a Style Week No. 12 and a lineup of events

fashion, too. We found the perfect partner to collab-

like never before.

WHEN

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

TRIBEZA

STYLE

WEEK


Chefs and designers will partner together for this inventive meal.

Between the dynamic group of

Fern Santini will work with Murph Willcott

interior designers and makers

of Texas French Bread; Joel Mozersky with

who call Austin home and

Rene Ortiz of Launderette; Tracey Overbeck

the

exciting

furniture

shops and showrooms open-

SEPTEMBER 24TH 7:30PM FA I R M A R K E T 1 1 0 0 E . F I F T H S T.

Stead with Sterling Ridings of Uchiko; and Katie Kime with James Robert of Fixe.

ing, our creative community

Floral designers David Kurio, Posey Events

is in the midst of a renais-

and Transplants Floral will be creating special

sance. So we decided to kick

installations for each table. Before dinner be-

off this year’s Style Week with

gins, attendees can enjoy a special display from

an event celebrating Austin

Jaguar Land Rover Austin, and take in an in-

design. We invited top interior designers

stallation created by the talented architect and

Mark Ashby, Fern Santini, Joel Mozersky,

Dick Clark Architecture alum, Matt Garcia of

Tracey Overbeck Stead and Style Week’s pre-

Matt Garcia Design. Guests will enjoy wine

senting sponsor Katie Kime to create stunning

pairings by The Austin Winery and cocktails

tablescapes that will be paired with the culinary

served from Katie Kime-designed bar carts by

stylings of top chefs for an inventive 100 person

bartenders clad in the latest fall looks from By

dinner party. Together, each chef/designer pair

George. Tickets to this one of a kind event are

will create completely unique experiences un-

$150 and include the special chefs’ dinner, and

der one roof. Mark Ashby will be collaborating

drinks courtesy of Shiner, Deep Eddy Vodka

on a table with Larry McGuire of Jeffrey’s;

and Cointreau. tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

81


Justine’s will open its doors early for this very special brunch.

BR U N C H

SPONSORED BY OUTDOOR VOICES SEPTEMBER 26TH, 11AM JUSTINE’S BRASSERIE 4 7 1 0 E . F I F T H S T.

Austin’s eternally cool nighttime spot, Justine’s Brasserie, will open early for this year’s Style Brunch sponsored by Outdoor Voices, the recreation apparel brand that everyone is talking about. Fashionistas in attendance can partake in cocktails from Deep Eddy Vodka and Cointreau, beer from Shiner, and a bloody mary bar courtesy of Barbecue Wife Bloody Mary Mix. Feast on brunch fare like quiche, Assiette de Fromage, Salade Verte, Confit de Pommes de Terre, topped off with an array of delicious desserts. A fun group of creative Austin women will play host while guests will have the chance to check out all the latest fall looks from Outdoor Voices. Brunch tickets are $60 and include all food and specialty cocktails. HOST COMMITTEE P E P P E R A M M A N N , A M Y B Y R D, C R I S T I N A FAC U N D O, K AT I E F R I E L , L A U R E N G R E E N B E R G , E L I Z A B E T H M O L L E N , M A R N I E O’ D O N N E L L , J AC K I E R A N G E L , C H A R I S S E S AY E R S , C A M I L L E S T Y L E S , A L E X WINKELMAN, ANE URQUIOLA.

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


WA L L E R ART P O P- U P SPONSORED BY C H AOT I C M O O N S T U D I OS SEPTEMBER 29TH, 7PM PREACHER GALLERY 1 1 9 W. E I G H T H S T.

Giving back has always been an important part of Style Week’s mission, so we created a new event called the Waller Art Pop-Up to benefit the Waller Creek Conservancy. We are honored to work with such an amazing group of artists, and each of them is donating an original piece to the show inspired by Waller Creek. Outside, guests can enjoy a special display from Jaguar Land Rover Austin before heading inside to Preacher. In the studio, Chaotic Moon Studios will be showcasing interactive projection art. The show will open with a cocktail reception featuring cocktails by Cointreau, Deep Eddy Vodka and brews by Shiner. Featured artists in the show are

ART IS TS TA K IN G PA RT

Fieldings Baxter, Mia Baxter, Chris Bilheimer, Marty Butler, Rich Cali, Mia Carameros, David Clark, Kelly Colchin, Casey Dunn, Ann Edgerton, Alyson Fox, Chelsea Fullerton,

NICK SIMONITE

Joy Gallagher, Matt Genitempo, Cody Haltom, The Early Hours, LAND, Kate LeSueur,

Photographer

Avalon McKenzie, Aaron Michalovic, Wynn Myers, Matt Rainwaters, Jack Sanders, Nick

AVALON MCKENZIE

Illustrator/Designer

Simonite, Kelti Smith, Joe Swec, Peggy Weiss and Keith Davis Young. Tickets to the event are $10 and include food and drinks. tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

83


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F O R T I C K E T S V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


OCTOBER 1ST V I P 7 P M | FA S H I O N S H O W 8 P M B R A ZOS H A L L 2 0 4 E . F O U R T H S T.

See the hottest looks from Austin’s

This year’s Fashion Show heads downtown to Brazos

finest boutiques.

Hall for an evening featuring the season’s hottest looks. The evening will begin with a VIP rooftop party sponsored by Engel & Volkers Austin and SWBC Mortgage. VIP guests will enjoy tastings from Chinatown and Fork & Vine, and drinks courtesy of Cointreau, Deep Eddy Vodka and Shiner. The high-wattage runway show produced by Erika Stojeba of ES Productions will feature the best looks from hot local boutiques like FOUND, The Garden Room, Katie Kime, Kiki Nass, Raven + Lily, RedBird Boutique, Service Menswear and more. Guests will have the chance to get up close and personal to models sporting avant-garde looks from the talented and creative stylists of Propaganda Hair Group. New shoe line, SUAVS, will have a pop-up shop showcasing their latest kicks, Jaguar Land Rover Austin will be showcasing their premier luxury cars, and the Hill Country Galleria will have a special gift awaiting guests in each seat. VIP first and second row tickets are $150, VIP reserved seated tickets are $75 and general admission tickets are $40. tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

85


C H AOT I C M O O N S T U D I O S • E N G E L & VO L K E R S A U S T I N • E S P R O D U C T I O N S • F E V E R-T R E E • H I L L CO U N T RY G A L L E R I A M AT T G A R C I A D E S I G N • O U T D O O R V O I C E S • P R O PA G A N DA H A I R G R O U P • S W B C M O R TG A G E • S U AV S • T H E A U S T I N W I N E R Y


ON VIEW THROUGH NOVEMBER 29 21st and Guadalupe Streets Free admission, donations welcome www.hrc.utexas.edu/visit 512-471-8944


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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


PROFILE IN

style

Emily Waldmann F R O M S E AT T L E TO T H E S A I N T C E C I L I A , T H I S W A S H I N G TO N N AT I V E B R I N G S H E R E F F O R T L E S S LY C O O L S T Y L E TO E V E R Y T H I N G S H E D O E S . Emily Waldmann sits on a dark

are offset by brushstrokes of color, from the living room’s clemen-

tufted sofa at the Hotel Saint Cecilia. Outfitted in a white dress

tine-colored sofa to the scarlet rug beneath the dining room table

with black booties, her cropped blonde hair is pinned revealing

and the kitchen shelves mixed with copper mugs, silver flutes and

dimpled cheeks and bright blue eyes. Before moving to Austin

glasses wrapped in gold. “The hunt is half the fun,” she said of her

in 2012 and becoming the famed hotel’s special events director,

affinity for collecting things.

ON A HOT AUGUST AFTERNOON,

Waldmann lived in Seattle and worked in hospitality and events.

Here and there, parallels between her home and the hotel re-

“I love making people happy,” she said of her job, which in-

veal themselves, from the bathroom penny tile to caches of vin-

cludes planning everything from weddings to SXSW parties. No

tage vinyl. “You take pieces of the things you’re constantly sur-

matter the occasion, events at the Saint Cecilia are always inti-

rounded with,” she said.

mate and memorable thanks to the hotel’s lush surroundings and

And like the Saint Cecilia, Waldmann’s house inspires curiosity

Waldmann’s knack for creating personal yet elegant affairs. The

through its wide-ranging, mix-matched décor, be it an old Army cot,

self-proclaimed, “people pleaser” enjoys discovering her clients’

a bookshelf organized by bind colors, or a wall hanging of clustered

wishes and incorporating special details whenever possible, such

butterflies found in Thailand. Hanging over her bed is a 1950s naval

as wrapping a bride’s bouquet in a family handkerchief.

map of Puget Sound, the faint lines of which remind one of the rings

Much like the Saint Cecilia, Waldmann’s style is eclectic and effort-

and whorls used to age trees. All these collected treasures evoke a

less, but where the hotel is rich in color, she leans monochromatic. “Ev-

sense of whimsy in Waldmann, whose style has been shaped by the

erything I wear is black, white or grey,” she said of her neutral closet.

people and places she’s met thus far on her journey from north to

At Waldmann’s home in East Austin, clean lines and white walls P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C H EL S E A L A I N E F R A N C I S

south, from Seattle to the Hotel Saint Cecilia. S. LEWIS tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

91


PROFILE IN

style

2.

1.

3. 1. Outdoor spaces are important to Waldmann, who has decorated both her front porch and back patio with vintage furniture, tea lights and plenty of plants. 2. A touch of greenery adds fresh color to a wall of collected prints, photographs and maps. 3. Soft-hued throw pillows jazz up a found army cot that flanks the front doorway.

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


4.

6.

7.

5. 4. On a patterned rug, Waldmann's dog, Cholula — aka "Lu" — charms. 5. Natural light floods the stained pine dining table made by a friend of Waldmann's. 6. Clustered candles and a vintage poster offset the smooth, soothing lines of grey marble in the kitchen. 7. Butterflies from a trip to Thailand and a 1950s map of Puget Sound add character to a simple, light-filled bedroom. P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C H EL S E A L A I N E F R A N C I S

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Tuesday, November 17, 2015 Hyatt Regency Austin CelebraTiNg exCelleNCe iN our soCial seCTor Join hundreds of community leaders and friends for an evening in celebration of the people and organizations who make our city a place where everyone can prosper!

hoNoriNg exTraorDiNary leaDers Help us honor the 2015 Libby Malone Community Leaders of the Year:

Jeff and Deanna serra 2015 Nonprofit Excellence Award winners will be announced at Party for Good in the following categories: Nonprofit Executive of the Year • Excellence in Impact Excellence in Innovation • Excellence in Collaboration

reserve your seat at

greenlights.org Made possible in part by


NOT TO BE MISSED

WWG Mallory Page Wally W orkm an Gall ery

1202 w. 6th st. austin, texas 78703 wallyworkman.com 512.472.7428 Palest French Blue (detail), acr ylic on canvas, 58 x 60 inches


style

PICK

JAMES

The colorful fabric room is designed as a working room, featuring full-size fabric samples, a worktable and an iPad loaded with the complete catalog of designs from all of JAMES’ vendors.

In the garden room at JAMES, visitors will find a made-to-order skirted table in Jennifer Shorto’s “Etoiles,” and the “Elsie” lantern from Coleen & Company lighting. Ellis plans for the furnishings, art and objects at JAMES to rotate, meaning each visit will bring a new experience.

M ER ED I T H EL L I S B R I N G S C A S UA L LY EL EG A N T S O U T H ER N S T Y L E TO W E S T S I X T H S T R EE T

I

believe in living with things that mean something to you,” interior and create something,” she says of the move. “I knew when I came back designer Meredith Ellis explains while sitting on a lovely — and sur- that I would someday bring the things I loved here.” prisingly comfortable — pink custom English roll arm sofa inside the Now, luckily for us, the things she loves are thoughtfully housed at dark blue “living room” of her brand new showroom JAMES. Housed in a JAMES, where a mix of antique and modern pieces, fabrics, area rugs, 1,400-square-foot Craftsman bungalow on West Sixth Street, each of the lighting, art, objects and more serve as both a market resource and design fully furnished vignettes in Ellis’s new showroom are a testament to the inspiration. designer’s casually elegant style and design philosophy. In the airy fabric room, beautiful textiles are hooked onto the wall, invitEllis, who grew up in the Hill Country, has been dreaming of her own ing browsing and touching. Organized by vendor, the colorful fabric lines store for 20 years, ever since she spent a summer working at The Home- were previously unavailable in Austin, and include vendors like Pintura stead in Fredericksburg. “My mother was a designer. I fought [being a de- Studio, Kathryn M. Ireland and Tulu Textiles. There’s living room seating signer] for awhile, because you don’t want to do what your mother does, and a large worktable, meant for poring over the full-size fabric samples but then it sort of fell upon me.” After college, Ellis moved to New York, and envisioning the final upholstery. where she quickly got a job with Bunny Williams and realized that designOpen to both professionals and the public, Ellis sees JAMES as more ing was, in fact, her calling. Five years later, she moved to Los Angeles than just a showroom for casual browsing. It’s designed to be user-friendly, to work as a senior designer for Thomas Beeton and later, White House and she hopes it will become both a resource hub for the design communidesigner Michael S. Smith. ty and a place for design lovers to brainstorm and hang out. “Nothing can But the Lone Star State beckoned. There’s a special relationbe too precious — live in it!” says Ellis of her home design 1411 West Sixth St. philosophy. It’s clear she has brought that same attitude to ship Texans have with their homes, explains Ellis, and so she and (512) 236 1006 her husband, Hunter, moved to Austin in 2010. “I wanted to come her warm new showroom. S. SOKOLOVE

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY DA N I EL B RO C K


2406 MANOR RD RAVENANDLILY.COM

PURVEYOR OF BEAUTIFUL WOMENSWEAR AND ACCESSORIES

Amanda Uprichard Diane Von Furstenburg J Brand

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Blaque Label

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Elizabeth and James Kelly Wynne Nicole Miller

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Kori Green Parker

Twelfth Street by Cynthia Vincent

L’Agence

Rachel Zoe Wildfox

501 Oakland Avenue Austin, Texas 78703 • 512.322.9494 • foundaustin.com

ethical fashion

eco-friendly jewelry

artisan made gifts


dining

PICK

Restaurant veterans Lisa and Emmett Fox unveil their most ambitious project yet: Cantine.

Expect new twists on Italian and Mediterranean classics at this South Lamar bistro.

Cantine

F R O M T H E OW N ER S O F A S T I A N D F I N O CO M E S T H EI R M O S T A M B I T I O U S P R OJ EC T Y E T

I

talian food fans, this is your year. In 2015, Austin will welcome at least a half-dozen new Italian restaurants. One to put on your radar is Cantine. Owned by restaurant veterans Lisa and Emmett Fox (Asti, Fino), this is their most ambitious project yet. Carving out a highprofile corner of the new Lamar Union complex, their Michael Hsu-designed eatery is both chic and rustic. Scorched pine paneling — recycled from the 2011 Bastrop fires — lines one wall, while sleek subway tiles line another. Exposed concrete floors flow into muted carpeting. Glossy white lacquered tabletops share the room with polished wooden counters. Before your meal, do like the Italians do and enjoy a pre-dinner aperitivo at the lovely marble bar. There’s an impressive selection of imported liquors and Cantine’s skilled bar staff know what to do with them. When you’re ready to eat, take your pick of tables: low-tops, high-tops, patio seats, a 16-stool community table, or a dazzling corner booth, perfect for people watching. Cantine combines the greatest hits from the

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

Fox’s other restaurants with new twists on Italian and Mediterranean classics. For starters, try the stuffed mushrooms, oozing with cheese, sprinkled with crunchy garlic breadcrumbs and drizzled with truffle oil. Make sure to share one of Cantine’s tasty Neapolitan-style pizzas, or revisit old favorites from the recently shuttered Fino, such as fried goat cheese topped with red onion jam or anchovy-stuffed fried olives. Cantine’s rotisserie turns out some terrific dishes. The harissa-spiced chicken is a whole or half bird bursting with flavor beneath decadently crispy skin. Typically served with roasted potatoes, our server happily accommodated our request for sautéed spinach. There’s also succulent porchetta: pork loin and belly rolled in herbs and spices, and slow-roasted until it develops its trademark crackly skin. Cantine serves it sliced with creamy white beans or on ciabatta as a sandwich. For seafood lovers, branzino is traditionally roasted and presented whole, accompanied by couscous, roasted eggplant, yogurt and cher-

1100 South Lamar Blvd, Suite 2115 | cantineaustin.com

moula herb sauce. There’s a top-of-the-line pasta machine and everything’s homemade, including a toothsome whole wheat rigatoni tossed with rustic lamb ragu and topped with creamy ricotta and a bright mint gremolata. Less successful was the overcooked and lackluster bucatini amatriciana. Don’t overlook the creative side dishes, like a medley of colorful roasted baby carrots, perfumed with harissa and orange, atop a pool of rich lebne yogurt. Save room for dessert. Owner Lisa Fox is a talented pastry chef who entices diners with sweets like classic tiramisu and assortments of exotic homemade cookies. As with all the Fox restaurants, the wine list is wonderfully varied and full of mostly Old World treasures. We enjoyed a crisp Venetian Prosecco, a refreshing Languedoc rosé, an intriguing Abruzzo white blend, and an austere pinot nero from Alto Adige. Having too many new Italian restaurants in Austin is a good problem to have, yet sorting through the options can be a deliciously daunting task. Just be sure that Cantine makes the cut. K. SPEZIA P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J O DY H O RTO N


EVENT

Experience TRACE, showcasing the finest flavors of Central Texas sourced directly from the region’s surrounding farms.

• september 17, 2015 • FAIR MARKET

1100 EAST 5TH STREET, AUSTIN, TX

Sponsors .

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Craft your dinner, your way. Choose by the course...

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200 Lavaca Street | traceaustin.com |

@traceatx


AUSTIN

AT JEFFERSON SQUARE 1601 WEST 38TH STREET AUSTIN, TX 78731 WWW.ZINKCOLLECTION.COM 512.502.5836

ELLEN NOBLE Broker, ABR CRS

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AUSTIN

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JENNIFER JUNE MARTINSON 512.844.1568 jennifer.martinson@gmail.com www.jennifer.highrises.com 600 Congress Avenue, 14th Floor, Austin 78701

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PATTY SANGUILY Realtor速 512.466.4426 psanguily21@gmail.com 600 Congress Avenue, 14th Floor, Austin 78701


FRESH LOCAL

“One of the Best Seafood Restaurants in Austin”

-Zagat Staff

“Best Seafood Restaurants” “10 Diners' Choice Winner” -OpenTable

“Ranked in the 9 Hottest Sushi Restaurants in Austin” -Zagat

HALF PRICED BOTTLES OF WINE ON FRIDAYS SERVING DINNER MON-SAT FINNANDPORTERAUSTIN.COM 500 EAST 4TH ST. | AUSTIN, TX 78701

The voice in your head that says,

“you can’t do this” TAKING TEXAS CHIC TO ANOTHER LEVEL

is a liar. MAJA KERMATH

3300 Bee Caves Dr. Suite 440 512.770.6515 Follow Abbey Rose Boutique on Facebook & Instagram at Abbeyrose512 PILATES + CYCLING

korI80.com


JULIAN GOLD 1214 W Sixth St. #110 Since opening its doors in 1945, Julian Gold has offered a superior level of service and selection of merchandise. Featuring designers and collections from across the world, Julian Gold remains at the forefront of the fashion industry,

KICK PLEAT 918 W. 12th St. You'll be tempted to splurge at this trendy boutique that draws fashionistas worldwide. Kick Pleat is known for stocking fresh, clean, minimalistic staples from the latest emerging designers.

carrying names like Carolina Herrera, Armani, Escada, Etro and more. DANDY'S THE GENTLEMAN'S STORE 411 Brazos St. #110

BEEHIVE 3300 Bee Caves Rd. Suite 400

tury inspired gentlemen's garb. They specialize in 1870s

Buzzing with sunny ‘60s vibes and unexpected details,

through 1930s men's suiting, along with all the accessories

Beehive is more than a store; it’s a vibrant way of life. Fol-

a gentleman requires to be properly outfitted from head to

lowing in the footsteps of the fashion mavens of the mod

toe for both daily endeavors and special occasions.

era, Beehive is all about inspiring confidence through bold colors, contrasting prints, and heart happy statement pieces. Whether you’re on an impromptu travel adventure, or throwing a wild cocktail party, you’re sure to be empowered by the Beehive state of mind.

FEATHERS 1700 S. Congress Ave. Tucked off of South Congress, Feathers features curated vintage fashion for women, as well as artisan jewelry and shoes from Jeffrey Campbell and Dolce Vita.

fab'rik Hill Country Galleria | 12801 Hill Country Blvd. Suite 120 Fab'rik delivers high style without attitude or sticker

THE GARDEN ROOM

FOUND

shock. If you've seen it on the runway or the cover of a mag-

1601 W. 38th St. Suite 5

501 Oakland Ave.

azine, chances are you'll find it at fab'rik, which features

With over 25 years in the business, The Garden Room has

FOUND is a purveyor of beautiful, high-quality clothing and

a bar with waters from around the world, complimentary

grown to be known as the go-to spot for the well-dressed.

accessories. Driven by the belief that a woman should look

beer and wine and friendly service. A great fit for the Aus-

Cultivating a long list of devoted customers, Garden Room

forward to getting dressed, FOUND carries lines meant to

tin fashion scene – laid back for days on the lake or dressier

offers a fine selection of classic clothing with outstanding

inspire. Timeless fashion with an unexpected twist.

when you want to hit the town!

customer service.

102

Dandy's creates stylish, custom made, turn of the cen-

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


MOSS 705 S Lamar Blvd. MOSS is focused on bringing designer consignment to the Austin community, creating a unique and exciting shopping experience. With over 1,200 consigners bringing in new merchandise daily, there is always something new in store. RAVEN + LILY

C. JANE 2346 Guadalupe St. Founded by a mother and daughter duo in 2006, C. Jane embodies laid back Austin style with a cool LA edge. From everyday jeans to must-have accessories, plus flirty tops and dresses for all occasions, this Austin boutique is bound to live up to its name.

2406 Manor Rd. A socially conscious lifestyle brand dedicated to empowering women through design, Raven + Lily sells gifts and accessories handmade by women in need.

KIKI NASS 1100 S. Lamar Blvd. #1130 At Kiki Nass, you will find an exceptional apparel selection, a relaxed atmosphere and unique home and gift items procured on adventures abroad. For any event life serves you — a last minute date or party, a forgotten birthday, or new shoes just because — they’ve got you covered. Opening this fall in Lamar Union, across from Shake Shack.

RARE TRENDS 2211 E 12th St. This charming showroom is the latest addition to the east side. Designers (and sisters) Paola Moore and Marina Silver created their label under the motto, "Women Should Wear Art.” Expect to find a unique blend of avant-garde textiles, structure and, of course, rarity in every collection. OUTDOOR VOICES

BY GEORGE

606 Blanco St.

1400 S Congress Ave. | 524 N. Lamar Blvd.

The buzz surrounding Outdoor Voices beautiful active-

Since 1977, By George has been a mecca for Austinites who

wear is reaching a fevered pitch. The company, based in

love the finest fashion. By George offers contemporary, yet

both Austin and New York, believes that activewear must

classic designs that turn your wardrobe into an exhilarat-

not only perform, but look good and fit well, too.

ing experience to wear now, and for years to come.

COVE

STAG

1318 S. Congress Ave.

1423 S. Congress Ave

Cove is a travel-inspired retreat, evoking a unique lifestyle

STAG is a modern day general store, blending the best of

from a selection of brands, textures and rich colors hand-

many unique elements and ideas into an emporium of es-

picked from journeys and experiences. Look for a permanent

sentials for the modern gentleman.

South Congress shop this fall.

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

103


MONA LISA'S CLOSET 3703 Kerbey Ln Mona Lisa's Closet is a new boutique gallery bringing high-quality fashions and jewelry from many talented and accomplished American artists. Located in the heart of Austin on Kerbey Lane, Mona Lisa's Closet offers one-ofa-kind treasures in a jewel box setting.

SASSEN BOUTIQUE + HAIR SALON Hill Country Galleria | 12912 Hill Country Blvd. Suite F150

POSH BOUTIQUE

Sassen Boutique & Hair Salon is a unique shop, of-

4211 S. Lamar Blvd.

fering not only clothes and accessories but also a

Posh Boutique specializes in prom, homecoming, pag-

hair salon and airbrush tanning. With a large selec-

eant, bridal, bridesmaid, quinceanera, cocktail, casual

tion of Sassen’s selection coming directly from the West Coast, shopping at this gem means knowing no one will be showing up at the party in your same

Hill Country Galleria | 12912 Hill Country Blvd. Suite F-145

plete your look for affordable prices. Visit Posh for the

outfit. Owner Katie Sassen has been a hairstylist for

LURE by Young & Fabulous features athletic wear,

perfect dress or ensemble for any occasion.

25 years, and has spent a decade as a stylist.

swimwear, evening wear and contemporary tops and bottoms. Located in the Hill Country Galleria,

104

wear and formal dresses. Posh not only carries a variety

LURE BY YOUNG & FABULOUS

SUNROOM

LURE by Y&F specializes in fashion lines from de-

2324 S. Lamar Blvd.

signers that can’t otherwise be found in the Austin

Sunroom is a small boutique focused on bringing estab-

market. LURE not only wants their customers to

lished designers and brands into the Austin marketplace.

look fabulous, but feel fabulous. A commitment to

They stock a tightly edited collection of women's clothing,

customer service coupled with a dedicated sales staff

jewelry and accessory lines, as well as menswear, home

with a deep and personal knowledge of fashion sets

goods and sundries.

this boutique apart from others in its class.

SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

of dresses, they also offer an array of products to com-

VALENTINE’S TOO 3801 N. Capital of Texas Hwy. | Suite G-180 An anchor in the rolling hills of Westlake, Valentine’s Too has been providing a highly edited and carefully curated selection of every season's most cutting-edge clothing, shoes and accessories since opening in 1999.


OLIVE 1200 E. 11th St. #101 Olive features a stock of artful independent design with everyday dressing in mind. This artful thread is carried through to a selection of small-batch apothecary, home goods and accessories.

ABBEY ROSE BOUTIQUE

HEMLINE

3300 Bee Cave Rd. Suite 440

233 W. Second St.

Abbey Rose is a new women's clothing and acces-

The owner of Hemline, Brigitte Holthausen, was born

sory boutique located in Westlake Hills. This shop

in Brazil but took a decisive step towards realizing her

brings Texas chic to a whole new level, providing

dreams by moving to New Orleans at age 16. Realiz-

clothing, jewelry, shoes, and more to women of all

ing her talent to pull together an exotic assortment of

generations.

RUNWAY SEVEN

products, Brigitte started selling sandals and jewelry at the Historic French Market. Since 1993, Hemline

Hill Country Galleria | 12912 Hill Country Blvd. Suite G-145

has expanded throughout the Southeast. Hemline Aus-

A passion for shopping and a dedication to customer

tin carries over 200 lines of bohemian-infused contem-

SERVICE MENSWEAR

service is what you’ll find when you walk in the doors

porary women's clothing, shoes and accessories.

1400 S. Congress Ave.

of the Hill Country Galleria Runway Seven location.

Service Menswear is a slick men's clothing shop offering a

By featuring premier national and international de-

REDBIRD BOUTIQUE

selection of apparel, shoes, swimwear and accessories. The

signers, and then mixing in a few accessories and

3663 Bee Cave Rd.

principle prerequisite for inclusion in the store's product

shoes, Runway Seven will help you create a look that

A beautiful shop in the heart of Westlake, Red Bird Bou-

mix is that each item must be of good value, whether inex-

is all your own from head to toe.

tique offers styles from casual to elegant with warm and

pensive or luxurious.

personalized service, helping to create the look you want.

tribeza.com SEPTEMBER 2015

105


style

STREET FA SHION

MIMI FAUCETT & CORY TRAHAN

KIM WEST in a dress by Philip Lim.

LANA CARLSON in her husband's Wrangler shirt. TOBIN LEVY in a dress from By George.

BROOKS MORRISON in a necklace from Santa Monica Flea Market and a top from JM Dry Goods.

W H AT AU S T I N I S W E A R I N G T O. . .

Launderette

There is no doubt that Launderette is the summer’s hottest restaurant. Chefs Rene Ortiz and Laura Sawicki have crafted an experience that has everyone flocking to this Holly neighborhood haunt. CALLIE JENSCHKE in a necklace from Round Top

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y A LY S H A R A I N W AT E R S

KRISTEN GISH in an Osman Tunic.

EYTAN BOS ORENT in a shirt from J. Crew.

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SEPTEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Shown: The debonnaire Ro TM easy chair, designed by Jaime Hayon.

PERHAPS YOU

WOULD LOOK GOOD IN A SMOKING

JACKET.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


September Style Issue 2015  

As Grace Coddington, Vogue’s revered creative director, wrote in her delightful memoir, Grace, “Always keep your eyes open. Keep watching. B...

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