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O N T H E C OV E R : C E D A R S H A K E C O T TA G E | P H O T O B Y C A S E Y D U N N

features

D E PA RTM E NT S

Upside to Downsizing 54

COMMUNIT Y

Social Hour

22

My Life in Photos

Exposed

34

A Place to Call Their Own 72

TRIBEZA Talk

Style Pick

48

Street Style

132

In a Field in East Austin 78

ARTS

Sponsored Architect Guide

106

Two is Better Than One 86

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

38

Music Pick

DINING

39

Artist Spotlight

Dining Pick

122

44

Dining Guide

126

My Best Work 62

Ranch House Reimagined 96

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: UNIT D PHOTO BY DANIEL CAVAZOS; TWO IS BETTER THAN ONE PHOTO BY NICOLE MLAKAR; DANIEL WOODROFFE PHOTO BY BILL SALLANS; CEDAR SHAKE COTTAGE PHOTO BY WHIT PRESTONALTER STUDIO HOME PHOTO BY CASEY DUNN; FONDA SAN MIGUEL MENU.

Contents


Editor's Letter

W

hen I first came to Austin, I was 22 years old and celebrating my college graduation with a road trip across the country. My best friend and I stumbled into town after four days in New Orleans, blowing past Baton Rouge and Houston in order to revel in a week’s worth of live music, tacos and cowboys.

Like many newcomers, my first evening in Austin culminated with a late night performance at the Continental Club. I don’t remember who played, but I remember feeling at home with a band onstage and people dancing across the floor. We took a cab back to the hostel, and as we drove, I remember looking out the window and thinking how I had never been to a place that looked quite like Austin. The aesthetic of the architecture, mid-century modern, Spanish Colonial, and turn-of-the-century Victorians all seamlessly blending together, was inspiring.

Photographer Casey Dunn's cover image of the Cedar Shake Cottage. Read the full story on page 54.

Today, a decade after that first ride home from the Continental Club, I still feel inspired. Though it can seem that the skyline is in a constant state of flux, and the construction crane is now the official bird of Austin, there is a community of wonderfully creative and innovative architects, builders, craftsmen and designers who work to ensure that the next generation will still feel that sense of awe.

K AT I E F R I E L @katiefriel

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PHOTOG R A PH BYC A SE Y DU N N

Speaking of awe, I must take a moment to acknowledge cover photographer Casey Dunn. His dreamlike image of the Cedar Shake Cottage marks Dunn's fifth consecutive cover for the TRIBEZA Architecture Issue. Also in this issue, we meet some of the impressive individuals helping shape our city, see beautiful work from the city's top firms, and discuss the importance of design innovation. From some of the most revered firms in the city to the young designers just starting out, this issue examines why now, perhaps more than ever, our city needs talented, thoughtful architects building the Austin of tomorrow.


A U S T I N A R T S + C U LT U R E

EDITOR

Katie Friel

ART DIRECTOR

Ashley Horsley

PUBLISHER

George Elliman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Ashley Beall

ASSISTANT EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

COLUMNIST

SALES & OPERATIONS MANAGER

Sofia Sokolove

Kristin Armstrong

WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Terrence Henry Sallie Lewis Audrey McGlinchy Karen Spezia Sam Sumpter PHOTOGRAPHERS

Miguel Angel Kenny Braun Daniel Cavazos Casey Dunn Sarah Frankie Linder Nicole Mlakar John Pesina Whit Preston Erika Rich Bill Sallans Spencer Selvidge

Lexi Ross

Derek Van Wagner INTERNS

James Ruiz Tiffani Linh Le PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres MAILING ADDRESS 706a west 34th street austin, texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 www.tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing

ILLUSTRATORS

Joy Gallagher

Subscribe to TRIBEZA!

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social hour

AUSTIN

Social Hour

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Big Brothers Big Sisters Ice Ball

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At the 2015 Ice Ball at the Hyatt Regency Austin, guests joined Big Brothers Big Sisters for Austin’s brightest gem of a party, enjoying signature cocktails, delicious hors d’oeuvres and a seated dinner, plus an auction and live music.

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Capital City Black Film Festival Harlem Lights! Reception

The third annual Capital City Black Film Festival kicked off with a special reception, Harlem Lights!, highlighting the history of African-Americans in film. Hosted by film, television and theater veteran Julius Tennon, the lively evening featured rare historical photographs and film clips, local actors and live music.

Ice Ball: 1. David Yeomans & Hannah Kight 2. Henry & Joy Flores 3. Christina Snell & Laura O'Nelia 4. Michael Forte & Will Hurley 5. Rachel Charlesworth & Corey Maynard Capital City Black Film Festival: 6. Kay Williams & Michael Webley 7. Cheryl Ash-Simpson & Winston G. Williams 8. Maria Soccor & Marcos Acevedo 9. Tori & Kevin Allison 10. Timeca Seretti & Keturah Branch

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J O H N P E S I N A


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social hour

AUSTIN

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Forklift Studio54klift Gala

Guests enjoyed the ultimate dance party at this swanky, funky affair at the Scottish Rite Theater. Produced by Allison Orr and benefitting Forklift, the Studio 54klift featured music from DJ Mahealani and Graham Reynolds, cocktails from the Alamo Drafthouse’s Bill Norris and bites from Chef Rene Ortiz of Launderette.

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The Garden Room Happy Hour

Austin’s upscale boutique The Garden Room invited guests to meet renowned clothing designer Blair Stanley over margaritas and delicious bites at an exclusive Fonda San Miguel happy hour.

Forklift: 1. Samantha & Tom Foster 2. William & Angela Marshall 3. Jennifer Wijangco & Shalini Ramanathan 4. Noah Hawley & Stacy Bain 5. Catherine Luna, Allison Orr & Graham Reynolds The Garden Room: 6. Ann Morrison & Patty Hoffpauir 7. Blair Stanley & Suzanne Jones Maas 8. Craig Thibodeau, Lacey Austin & Mark Thomas 9. Dawn Black , Joan Black & Dusty Black 10. George & Paula Fischer

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J O H N P E S I N A & ER I K A R I C H


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social hour

AUSTIN

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ADL Austin’s True Colors: Shake the Hate

The Anti-Defamation League honored two extraordinary community leaders, Jason Berkowitz and Courtney Caplan, at the fourth annual True Colors: Shake the Hate event celebrating Austin diversity at Fair Market. Partygoers enjoyed cocktails, live music from Matchmaker Band and delicious bites from Word of Mouth Catering, with proceeds benefitting The Anti-Defamation League Austin and their educational programming.

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Concordia’s Excellence in Leadership Gala

At Concordia University Texas’s Ninth Annual Excellence in Leadership Gala, Elizabeth Christian and Austin’s former mayor, Bruce Todd, were honored at a black tie affair at the JW Marriott. The evening featured a bourbon and cocktail lounge, a dinner presentation and live music by The Reunion Band.

ADL: 1. Ana Diego & Elsa Morales 2. Joel Levine & Shaina Forman 3. Chris Jones & Justin Snyder 4. Natalie Cofield & Virginia Cumberbatch 5. Lauren Goldstein & Allison Fledstein Concordia University: 6. Bruce Todd & Elizabeth Christian 7. Darin & Kristin Coulter 8. Luis & Vanessa Sandoval 9. Rob & Julie Smith 10. Kristi & David Aronica

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OCTOBER 2015 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI) & J O H N P E S I N A


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social hour

AUSTIN

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WORK 1-year Anniversary Party

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Hoiden Supply Co, Noah Marion Quality Goods and Golden Eagle celebrated a full year at their South Lamar collective, WORK. Hip guests did some shopping while enjoying food, drinks and tunes.

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West by Southwest at The Harry Ransom Center

Guests celebrated the exhibition Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West at the Harry Ransom Center with Freedman’s barbecue sandwiches, drinks courtesy of Austin Wine Merchant and Dripping Springs Vodka, Texas country music and a special after-hours look at the exhibition.

WORK: 1. Nicole Conser & Colin Anawaty 2. David Clark & Josh Row 3. Jennifer Galardi & Kristin Janishefski 4. Lauren Gregorcyk & Luis Eduardo 5. Aaron Calhoun & Megan Sparks Harry Ransom: 6. Anna Berns & Leanne Raesener 7. Sarah Syed & Dylan Davidson 8. Keith Richards & Jonathon Storms 9. Lyndsee Nielson & Kylie McDaniel 10. Cody & Bridgette Gayle Ground

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI) & J O H N P E S I N A


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OCTOBER 2015 tribeza.com


community

COLUMN

The Architecture of Reinvention BY K R I S TI N A R M S TRO NG I LLU S TR ATIO N BY JOY G A LL AG H ER I LOVE A REMODEL. I love the before and after photos of old houses and television programs

on HGTV. I love magazine makeover articles about women who have let themselves go and decide to take themselves back. I love second marriages (that stick). I love second careers and reclaimed identities when the nest empties. I love the reinvention of a grownup going back to school. I love comebacks and transformations, rehab and redemption, and the endless possibility of a do-over-whether it’s a person, a building, a relationship, a decision, a direction, a spiritual path, or a career. I have been in several transition zones in my life. Each time I was utterly terrified, but also electrified with energy. Transition zones become construction zones to growth-minded souls. What looks like ruin becomes renovation, and what looks like the compost of one's life becomes fertilizer for next season’s harvest. What looks like the end is always another beginning, just ask the tadpole or the caterpillar as they learn to hop and fly. Ask the phoenix, as it unfolds its wings from the ashes and emerges — reborn — from the fire. (P.S: If I ever have the urge to get a tattoo, it would be a phoenix.) In the midst of a transition/construction zone it’s easy to lose hope and heart. In the same way that ripping out old cabinets and tile, peeling aged wallpaper and tearing down walls creates debris and dust, the remodeling of a life creates so much mess before the hidden vision begins to appear. There are very few things I love more than to roll up my sleeves and put on my hard-hat and walk with someone into their life renovation. I’m going back to school to become a therapist, but what I would really love to be is a “Transitional Consultant,” if there were such a thing. Maybe I will invent it. I always want to know the bigger picture; Who do you want to be

on the other side of this? Tell me about yourself over there, afterwards. Who are you? What are you like? How do you spend your time? What is your dream? If the shackles of fear fell off, who would you be and what would you do if you were totally unencumbered? What might you need in order to get there? Amazing lives aren’t built by default, they are built with direction, diligence and dedication. Most people (including me, once upon a time) haven’t thought much about renovating their lives, because all their energy is consumed with fearing the wrecking ball and the bulldozers, or bottlenecked by their stubborn resistance to a redo. They wander in circles in a state of stunned inertia, overwhelmed by the mess of it all. Unlike a house where we have an architect and a builder, and are armed with a crew and a plan, we often go empty-handed, empty-hearted and empty-headed into the remodel of our life. It can feel like too much just to get through the day, let alone have a vision about tomorrow. In times like this we all need architects: a therapist, a friend, a mentor, a guide, a guru, or a wise counselor to help us see beyond ourselves and beyond our present circumstances. We need someone to help us decide which walls need to stay put in our remodel, so we don’t lose the stability and charm of our original frame and foundation. We also need to know which walls should come down, so our rooms can open up and life inside can freely flow. With some thoughtful design, we can install more doors and windows to let in the light — and the love. Unlike new construction, the beauty of a remodel is in selecting and retaining the finest and most functional attributes of the old and blending them beautifully with the vision of the new. The result is a place both intimately known and undeniably different. Just the kind of place you would want to call home.

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY J OY G A L L AG H ER For a limite d- e dit i on p r int , c onta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c om .

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EXPOSED

David Heymann MY BEAUTIFUL CITY AUSTIN In every chapter of My Beautiful City Austin, a young architect designs an ideal Austin home. Each time, that perfect house never gets built, as the easily persuaded architect bows to the wishes of his misguided clients instead. “It is fiction,” laughs author David Heymann, a University of Texas at Austin professor and architect who has designed, among other impressive projects, George W. and Laura Bush’s Crawford home. “I wrote it in a way to make the questions just a bit more pressing,” he says of his debut novel. “The sense that it’s actually reporting rather than fiction was really crucial to me.” Here, the architect and amateur birder talks with TRIBEZA about our city’s growing pains, Austin’s non-existent golden age, and why his book is ultimately a love letter to Austin. S. SOKOLOVE

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community

SUBURBAN SPRAWL I wanted to write about a part of Austin that actually kind of falls outside of the normal realm of Austin. There’s a lot of architecture that is visible, but that’s not really the architecture that’s changing the city on a large scale. The large scale changes are houses that are just growing ad infinitum into suburbia. [They] are having — arguably — the most profound impact on environment, on culture of the city, on stuff like why you’re stuck on traffic on Mopac.

ON GROWING THOUGHTFULLY There’s this positivity towards growth in Austin, but it’s kind of mindless. It’s leaving behind certain things, some of which are great to leave behind, but it’s also leaving behind certain things that are worth preserving.

BRINGING THE OUTDOORS INSIDE Unlike any other place I’ve lived [Austin] is the kind of place where I sense there are these experiences that are real — I can swim in [Barton] Springs. Where else can you swim in the Springs? Nowhere! I can walk The Greenbelt, do all of these things that I feel are powerfully, palatably real. Why wouldn’t that extend also to the building that you’re making or to the house that you’re making?

“Jonathan Franzen has made it difficult for us writers who are also birders. Basically you can’t write about birding anymore because of him,” Heymann jokes. He suggests going to the upper Texas Coast in the spring for a true Texan birding experience. P H OTO G R A P H Y BY S A R A H F R A N K I E L I N D ER

PROFILE

AUSTIN’S SO-CALLED GOLDEN AGE There is this [myth] of a “golden Austin,” but it couldn’t possibly have existed, because for every single person, it’s this slightly different version of that [golden age]. Really what they’re sad about is that it’s entering this kind of more difficult period. I’m actually really excited about this more difficult period. It’s a more interesting time, it’s a time when you make decisions that really have long-term, profound consequences. I wanted to kind of write a love letter to our city about how much I like that particular moment.

STOP TRYING TO KEEP IT WEIRD

I think when you’re in a city that has to worry about being weird, then it’s kind of middle-aged. It’s a little over. I’m middle-aged – I totally understand that need to worry about being weird.

WHAT MAKES THE MOST INTERESTING ARCHITECTURE? Interesting architecture happens [by asking], “What are the problems that aren’t being solved yet?” Problems for which there are not answers yet, but which arise from the way the world is changing and changes in things like families or landscapes. The most interesting architecture arises initially as a qualitative problem.

Heymann says his book, which is available at BookPeople, isn’t only for local architects, but also for people across the country who are living in rapidly growing cities.

The house designed for George W. and Laura Bush in Crawford on Prairie Chapel Ranch is the most interesting project Heymann says he has worked on. He designed it to have an intimate and profound relationship with the landscape.

tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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OCTOBER CALENDARS arts & entertainment

Entertainment Calendar Music THE ZOMBIES

October 1, 7pm Stateside at The Paramount THE MYNABIRDS

October 1, 9pm Mohawk

ACL MUSIC FESTIVAL

October 2-4 + 9-11 Zilker Park

SHAKEY GRAVES

October 7, 7pm Stubb’s Outdoors JOE JACKSON

October 12, 8pm Stateside at The Paramount GARBAGE

October 14, 7pm Stubb’s Outdoors DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS

October 15, 8pm Historic Scoot Inn BEN MILLER

October 15, 8pm Mohawk LORETTA LYNN

October 18, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater NATALIE PRASS

October 20, 9:30pm Stubb’s Indoors

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LIONEL RICHIE

October 24, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater RUSTED ROOT & DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND

October 24, 7pm Historic Scoot Inn

ELTON JOHN FORMULA 1 USGP

AVANT CINEMA: HORSE MONEY

October 7, 7:30pm The Marchesa Hall & Theatre FILM & FOOD PARTY

October 28, 7pm The Driskill Hotel

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL

October 29-November 5

October 25 Circuit of The Americas LYLE LOVETT AND JOHN HIATT

October 27, 8pm Stateside at The Paramount DJANGO DJANGO

October 28, 7pm Mohawk TAYLOR DAVIS

October 28, 7:30pm The Long Center

Film FRIGHT NIGHT FEATURING HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH

October 1, 6pm Jo’s Coffee South Congress

ROOFTOP ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN FILM SERIES: THE NEW RIJKSMUSEUM

October 7, 7:30pm Jones Center Roof Deck

Theatre THE QUARRY

September 24-October 24 Hyde Park Theatre EVITA

September 30-November 1 ZACH Theatre IN YOUR SHOES

October 1-11 The Long Center

THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS

October 11 The Long Center

Comedy BIANCA DEL RIO'S ROLODEX OF HATE COMEDY SPECIAL

October 8, 9pm Stateside at The Paramount 2X4

October 9, 7:30pm The Hideout Theatre

GODFREY

October 14-17, showtimes vary Cap City Comedy Club TOM SEGURA

October 19, 8pm Cap City Comedy Club CRISTELA ALONZO

October 29-31, showtimes vary Cap City Comedy Club

Children EARLY LEARNERS WORKSHOP: SOUND SYMPHONY!

October 3, 10:30am The Thinkery

STAND UP FOR SAFE FAMILIES PADDLE PARADE

October 7, 5:30pm Texas Rowing Center

EARLY LEARNERS WORKSHOP: THINGS THAT GLOW

October 17, 10:30am The Thinkery

WINNIE THE POOH

September 18-December 12, showtimes vary ZACH Theatre EARLY LEARNERS WORKSHOP: PUMPKIN PLAY!

October 31, 10:30am The Thinkery

Other CONTROVERSY AND CONVERSATION: SHADOWS OF LIBERTY

October 1, 7pm Austin Public Library — Terrazas Branch CHELSEA CLINTON

October 8, 7pm BookPeople

LA DOLCE VITA

October 15, 7-10pm Laguna Gloria FIRST EDITION LITERARY GALA

October 16 Four Seasons Hotel Austin TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL

October 17-18 Texas State Capitol BAZAAR BRUNCH

October 18 Bouldin Creek Cafe POP AUSTIN’S ILLUMINATION

October 22-25 Fair Market

SAMMY'S HOUSE EAT, DRINK AND BE SCARY BALL

October 24, 6pm The Hyatt Regency

AUSTIN PETS ALIVE! GALA

October 25, 5pm The Hyatt Regency Austin


arts & entertainment

Friday, October 23 6–10 pm Music by Paula Maya & DJ Michael Crockett www.blantonmuseum.org

Sponsor:

Media Sponsor:

CALENDARS

MUSIC PICK

Austin City Limits Fest M A K E S U R E T O C AT C H A S E T F R O M A U S T I N ’ S H O M E TOW N H E R O E S

T

here’s no denying the fact that the Austin City Limits Fest gives you the chance to see some pretty big names (Foo Fighters, Drake, The Strokes), but the festival also provides you the opportunity to support homegrown artists taking the stage for what are likely to be among the most important — and personal — shows of their careers. “I’m born and raised in Austin and I’ve been going to ACL for years as a patron,” says Ryan Harkrider of The Nightowls, whose set last year was cancelled due to rain. “I’ve stood out in the sweat, dust, mud — whatever the case may be — each year and dreamed about [being] onstage. It’s a family…It’s going to be this huge achievement and moment for everyone involved.” Along with The Nightowls, a “very dance-heavy, very high-energy” soul/Motown band, a few of the Austin-based artists making an appearance onstage at this year’s festival include Residual Kid — a self-described “noise punk grunge alternative;” Calliope Musicals; and 18-piece ensemble Mother Falcon, who are actually performing on the kid’s stage alongside family entertainer Tim Kubart. “Kids are the least forgiving audience,” laughs Mother Falcon’s Matt Puckett. “They don’t have a sense of giving you obligatory applause. They either are having fun or they’re not… They’re not going to give you pity laughs, but that’s fun.” And while you’re enjoying local performers at ACL, you’d be advised to heed their festival words of wisdom as well. “You should really see someone you’ve never heard of,” advises Puckett. “You have so much opportunity to see new things, and it’s so much better than Spotify. Watch them play in the heat and sweat. That’s a special moment.” S. SUMPTER tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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arts & entertainment

CALENDARS

Arts Calendar OCTOBER 3 WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

Priscilla Robinson: Edgy Opening Reception 6- 8pm Through October 31 THE CONTEMPORARY

PHOTO MÉTHODE GALLERY

Deux Through October 23, 2015 | 6-8 pm GRAYDUCK GALLERY

Predators, Prey, and Pixels Through October 18

LAGUNA GLORIA

Haunted Garden at the Umlauf O C TO B ER 3 0

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hile October 31st is reserved for traditions like trick-or-treating, the UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum is providing Austinites with the opportunity to celebrate Halloween in a more adult-friendly way via the Haunted Garden, a holiday party happening at the museum on October 30th. This spooktacular event is just one aspect of Last Straw Fest, a week of UMLAUF-hosted fall festivities that includes pumpkin-carving, scarecrow-building and more. The Haunted Garden Party is sure to be the highlight for most, however, and attendees can expect to enjoy bites, music and spirits (of the alcoholic, not haunted, variety) all in an appropriately eerie environment. “There aren’t very many other fall events like this,” says Museum coordinator Noemi Szyller. “We really wanted to create a new tradition, a new event that people come to every year.” And while the goal of the Haunted Garden is, of course, to engage the community, entertain and have some fun, Szyller also has another goal in mind. “The UMLAUF is one of the hidden gems of Austin, in the heart of Austin,” Szyller says. “It’s [about] bringing awareness and showing people who we are…bringing people in and making them fall in love with UMLAUF again.” Tickets—which are $40 each—and more information on the Haunted Garden and Last Straw Fest can be found at laststrawfest.com S. SUMPTER

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OCTOBER 2015 tribeza.com

Roger Hiorns: A Retrospective View of the Pathway

ART ON 5TH

John Morse: Bits and Pieces Through October 31

OCTOBER 17 HARRY RANSOM CENTER

UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN

OCTOBER 24

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Frank Reaugh's Life and Work (Discussion)

UMLAUF Prize 2015: murmurs Through November 8

Endangered Species Art Exhibit

Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm Through November 15

OCTOBER 28-30

LBJ PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY

ART.SCIENCE.GALLERY

HARRY RANSOM CENTER

Gabriel García Márquez: His Life And Legacy OCTOBER 31 BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Perspectives: Ellsworth Kelly panel discussion

ONGOING BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela 1940-78 October 11 through January 17

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Beatles! Through January 10, 2016 THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN — JONES CENTER AND VISUAL CENTER

Strange Pilgrims Through January 21

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Donald Moffett Through February 28, 2016

I M AG E COU RTE SY OF U M L AU F SCU L PTU RE GARDEN

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arts & entertainment

ART SPACES

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA

3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–Su 10-4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

ART PICK

Omission

W

e typically think of art in terms of creation, but in the case of these art installations, the message is transmitted through removal. “The project is called Omission because it’s about taking an open space and removing the space with something that consumes the openness,” artist Juan Carlos Deleon explains. “I like to manipulate the existing environment and see how people respond, reevaluate what it was before, and gain a new appreciation.” For Omission, Deleon, a practicing architect is filling five public spaces with large inflatable orbs. Each installation will be arranged in a different configuration at a different location on a different date, (this month: Longhorn Shores Park and Manchaca Library, on October 10th and 24th respectively) and will be on display very briefly— typically only one day. “I like the spontaneity,” Deleon explains, “the idea of doing something temporary and out of the blue that’s so unexpected.” Omission is one of the 10 projects featured in TEMPO, an annual project organized by the city’s Art in Public Places (AIPP) program to cultivate tourism and raise awareness about temporary and public art in Austin. During its first installation in August, Austinites flocked to the interactive Omission, bouncing off balls and running through the Instagram-worthy exhibit. “There was this kid in the installation trying to tackle [one],” Deleon laughs. “He loved it and the balloon didn’t pop, so that was great.” Find more information on Omission and the other TEMPO works at austintexas.gov/tempo, and find more of Deleon's work at juancarlosdeleon.com S. SUMPTER

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OCTOBER 2015 tribeza.com

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: T-Sa 11-7, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org

BULLOCK MUSEUM

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–6, Su 12–6 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM

802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM

1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER

300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org

MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM

419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM

409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THE THINKERY

1830 Simond Ave (512) 469 6200 Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM

605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

PHOTOG R APHY BY J UAN C ARLOS DEL EON

Museums


Galleries ART AT THE DEN

317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH

3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTPOST:

THE CENTER FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION

4704 E. Cesar Chavez St. artpostaustin.com

ARTWORKS GALLERY

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

AUSTIN GALLERIES

5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appt. only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM

5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT CANOPY

916 Springdale Rd, Bldg 2 #101 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAPITAL FINE ART

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

CO-LAB PROJECTS: N SPACE

(512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY

2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

905 Congress Ave. at Nelsen Partners (512) 300 8217 Hours: W 5:30-8 co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON

702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu-Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

DAVIS GALLERY

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3 galleryshoalcreek.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER

GRAYDUCK GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO

3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appointment only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS

913 E. Cesar Chavez St.

2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA

227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007

Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY

360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W-Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY

1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY

507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org MONDO GALLERY

4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2439 Hours: Tu-Sa 12- 6 mondotees.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12

3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY

1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10

1011 West Lynn Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 (512) 236 1333 studiotenarts.com TINY PARK GALLERY

1101 Navasota St. #2 (512) 809 3242 Hours: Sa 12-5 and by appt. TESTSITE

502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org VISUAL ARTS CENTER

2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG

1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

Fredericksburg AGAVE GALLERY

208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL

234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY

314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY

214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY

209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE

230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK

425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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AUSTIN SHADEWORKS

We Deliver Results.

Proud Underwriters of the AIA Austin Homes Tour

Visit Us at 8868 Research, Suite 101 8868 Research Blvd #101 | 512-472-1768 | austinshadeworks.com


TRIBEZ A TALK

S PA N I S H S T Y L E

A N I N S I D E R ' S G U I D E TO A U S T I N ' S H I D D E N G E M S . BY N ICO L E B ECKL E Y

PUT TING ‘ CO M M U N I T Y F I R S T ! ’ A project of Mobile Loaves and Fishes, Community First! Village offers housing and support for the chronically homeless. “It’s really about dignifying a space for someone,” architect Beau Frail says of the project. As one of the organizers of the Tiny Victories design com-

PREPARE FOR A BULLFIGHT

Drawing on his travels in Spain, Chef Shawn Cirkiel wanted to capture that country’s bright colors and rich textures for his new Airport Boulevard restaurant, Bullfight. “The big thing that we really try to convey in the shaping of the design and the graphics was that it’s not just masculine; it is very feminine and beautiful and artistic,” Cirkiel says. Working with FÖDA Studio, a geometric flamenco dancer emblem was created. “The bullfighting mimics

petition, Frail helped collect more than 50 plans for tiny (144-200

the flamenco dancing and a lot of the same movements and the

square feet) houses to be built at Community First! Village. “We en-

same shapes, they kind of all echo each other,” Cirkiel says. The

couraged people to be experimental and to be creative in their ap-

design ideas carry over into the newly opened space with colorful

proach of designing the micro-home,” he says. Ultimately six designs, including the elongated Porch With A Home by

ceramics from Keith Kreeger and Medieval-inspired lighting fixtures from Warbach Lighting & Design. Working with architect Michael Hsu, Cirkiel, whose other

Page Southerland and the two-story Rooftop Hospitality House by Cody

ventures include Parkside, The Backspace, and Olive & June, says

Gatlin of Fazio Architects, were selected for construction. With all of the de-

it’s his hope for the architecture, design, and food to work together

signers working pro bono, the micro-homes are “a really great reflection of how

to invoke Spain’s spirit. “All I do is read history and eat and drink

the architecture and design community is giving back,” Frail says.

and look at art and magically you end up in Spain,” Cirkiel says. For

The houses are available for public viewing during a homes tour

more information, visit bullfight-austin.com

on October 31. For more information, visit mlf.org/community-first

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COM M U N IT Y FIR S T ! HOM E DE SIG N ED BY PAG E SOUTH ERL AN D PAG E | PHOTOG R APHY BY J E SSIC A M I MS


WORTH BA RKING A BOUT Picture this: a well-kept park where dogs play and exercise while their owners knock back a beer, grab a snack and mingle with fellow canine-lovers. This was Kristen Heaney’s vision for Yard Bar, a 30,000-square-foot dog park and dining space on Burnet Road. Opened in August, the space is housed in a former Putt-Putt facility, repurposing some of the mini-golf course’s features, including the large concrete platforms from the 18th hole, and the 12-foot tall light poles. “I love the way the space feels warm and communal,” Heaney says. Drawing on her experience in the restaurant industry, and as a project manager and designer with Andersson-Wise Architects and Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Heaney wanted to create a space for shared community. “People meet in the dog park and they come over and end up joining each other at tables for dinner and that’s all really fun,” Heaney says. For more information, visit yardbar.com

ARCHITEXT

When was the last time you sent a text message to a tree — and it responded? This spring more than 21,000 text messages were sent to mail boxes, parking meters, fire hydrants and other inanimate objects as part of Hello Lamp Post, an interactive city-wide art and technology project. A collaboration between the City of Austin, Art Alliance Austin, and London’s PAN Studio, the project is now a finalist in the SXSW Eco Place By Design awards, happening October 5-7. One of the project’s drivers, Art in Public Places’ Carrie Brown, shares some suggestions for how to engage with Austin’s architecture:

F E A R FAC TO RY What are you most afraid of? The dark? Small spaces? Spiders? This year’s Scare For a Cure “Dread Asylum” promises to put all your fears under one roof. With a sci-fi tinged story featuring the criminally insane, you’ll wind through some 30 rooms while attempting to keep your sanity intact. Volunteers spend two months constructing the 120,000 square foot space in Manor, Texas, which 125 actors and crew members fill with outrageous characters and special effects. Now in its ninth year, proceeds from the $40 tickets benefit the Breast Cancer Resource Centers of Texas. Opens October 2 and runs through Halloween. For more information, visit scareforacure.org

1. “Get out on foot. Walk around and take a little bit of time to see things outside of the car or off of your bicycle and really get to experience them in the space in which they exist.” 2. “Investigate your neighborhood, your area, or even a new part of town that you’re not familiar with.” 3. “Austin’s Atlas. It’s an artist-designed platform that allows you to engage with the city and find really unique things that maybe you would pass right by if you were just on your way to work or lunch.” For more information, visit hellolamppostaustin.com and austinsatlas.com tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

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Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

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Walk Score Score Park Pitch & Putt E BikeButler

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The Long Center for the Performing Arts

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Blanton Museum of Art

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C 3 air fun—all punctuated by venues for the arts, theater2and live music.

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Located just south of Town Lake at 1st and Riverside Drive, 422 10 At J The Lake is the gateway to the best of Austin. Consecutive parks along Town Lake offer an endless expanse of hiking, biking, paddle boating and fresh air fun—all punctuated by venues for the arts, theater and live music.

422ATTHELAKEAPARTMENTS.COM 422 WEST RIVERSIDE DRIVE | AUSTIN, TEXAS 78704 | T. 855.753.8287


2000 Windy Terrace, Bldg. 6 Austin, TX 78613 512-363-5093 www.4theditiondesign.com


Located on Austin’s east side, the Cedar Shake Cottage is the work of designer and builder Nicole Blair.

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BY T E R R E N C E H E N RY | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY W H I T P R E S TO N

Across the nation, the tiny home movement has never been more popular. Here in Austin, housing has never been more in-demand. One local designer has created an east side cottage that blends the practicality of a tiny home with hip Austin design.

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A

century ago, a (relatively) new Austin beckoned transplants with the promise of abundant, affordable housing. In the 1920s and ‘30s, neighborhoods like Hyde Park that had mostly consisted of large Victorian homes on sprawling lawns, launched a building boom of more modest bungalows on smaller lots that would appeal to a growing middle class. Today, as we enter a new phase of urban housing, some Austinites are literally taking piec-

es of this part of the city’s past and using them to create even smaller, more modest homes, popularly known as “tiny houses.” One such tiny home in East Austin goes by several names — the designer calls it the “Cedar Shake Cottage;” the owner refers to it as the “Hive House” (there’s a beehive around back); while the construction workers, baffled by its angular, at times seemingly random form, affectionately called it the “Drunk House.” The cottage may appear whimsical at first, with a second floor giving the impression it’s trying to break free from the first, but Nicole Blair, owner of Studio 512, a design build firm, says that in reality, the home is the result of a lot of practical decisions and building regulations. Easements, trees, neighboring property and a byzantine city code meant that there would be only a little over 300 square feet to work with for the footprint, but plenty of room for creativity. “A lot of people would say they couldn’t get something into that footprint,” Blair says. The finished product has 565 square feet of roomy, light-filled living space, with an abundance of detail and materials that call back to other times and places. Cedar shingles on the exterior come from the roof of another home that was remodeled 20 years ago. Most of the windows come from a house on the Gulf Coast, where they had been replaced be-

In order for stairs to fit in with city code, the second floor had to be pushed away from the first which gives the space its unique design.

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cause they weren’t hurricane-resistant. And the wood paneling found throughout the home is long leaf pine, reclaimed from the shiplap of an old bungalow in East Austin, a material that literally binds the project to the affordability boom a century ago.


Many of the cottage’s materials were salvaged from other projects. The windows came from a home on the Gulf Coast.

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After moving to Brooklyn for her career, owner and filmmaker Kerthy Fix built the home to serve as an Austin getaway.

“I’ve always tried to make a lot of a small space,” Blair says, noting she looked to Japanese and Dutch spaces for inspiration. And some of the inspiration came from constraint itself. In order for stairs to fit in with city code, the second floor had to be pushed away from the first. As a result the walls leaned just enough to fit in the bedroom and bathroom upstairs. “There aren’t many other directions we could’ve built,” she says. The project came about when owner Kerthy Fix had the tiny house built after she moved to Brooklyn to expand her documentary career. Though she used to live in the larger, main house on the property, she now rents that out and uses the new tiny home as a place to stay when she returns to Austin. “It’s kind of a druken treehouse idea,” says Fix. “It’s an amazing retreat.” The home is proof that tiny doesn’t have to mean a sacrifice in comfort, utility or style. A workspace is built into the second floor loft, with plenty of storage; the kitchen doesn’t skimp on any appliances. Everywhere there are rich, textured materials: cedar, pine, charred wood (from local Delta Millworks), natural stucco and exposed copper plumbing (it doubles as a towel rack). And when Fix needs a little fresh air, there’s an outdoor shower calling. Since the house isn’t the primary house on the lot, like most tiny homes in Austin it’s a secondary (also known as “accessory”) unit. Other tiny homes, specifically those on wheels, are subject to tighter restrictions because of the city’s land development code (and in this respect it’s similar to many others in the country). Tiny homes on wheels, made popular by several reality TV shows, numerous websites and even a film documentary, aren’t allowed in much of the city’s single-family zoned residential areas. In the eyes of city code, wheels makes them no different than an RV, and the city (not to mention a few neighborhood associations) does not want to wake up to a 200-square-foot shack on wheels sitting in every Travis Heights driveway. About a year ago, Austin City Council decided to see what they could do to make it easier to build tiny houses in Austin. The answer they got tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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In addition to an indoor bathroom, the cottage also has a unique feature: an outdoor shower.

back from city staff was, essentially, “Not much.” While there are no minimum size requirements for single-family homes on single-family lots, “to be allowed in a single family home district it has to be on a permanent foundation,” says Greg Dutton with the city’s Planning and Zoning Department. And since much of a home’s value lies in the lot itself, it hasn’t made sense for many Austin homeowners or builders to go small with their primary residence. For secondary units like the Cedar Shake Cottage, however, a tiny house can make sense. But under current code, a larger lot is required, with its own dedicated off-street parking. Efforts to ease those requirements are slowly making their way through the current City Council, but they’ve run into opposition from some of the same aforementioned neighborhood groups. On average, only a few dozen of these secondary “granny flats” are built every year. But while the supposed “tiny house movement” struggles to gain momentum in Austin because of these constraints, there are indications there is a growing appetite for smaller, more affordable ways of living in the city. The next building boom won’t be bungalows on smaller lots, but rather lots of smaller apartments, known as “micro-units,” usually smaller than 400 square feet. One new affordable housing micro-unit complex opened downtown this year, and there are several hundred more in the works. And just outside the city limits in Del Valle, an entire com-

“ I F YO U C A N P L A N T H E

munity of tiny homes (on wheels!) is under way on a 10-acre site near the

S PAC E B E T T E R A N D M A K E I T

Circuit of the Americas. Rents start at $300 a month. make it more efficient, you can spend more on features and materials,”

S P E N D M O R E O N F E AT U R E S

Blair says. “And people are becoming more aware that that’s really valu-

A N D M AT E R I A L S.” 60

Designer Blair sees the appeal. “If you can plan the space better and

M O R E E F F I C I E N T, Y O U C A N

OCTOBER 2015 tribeza.com

- NICOLE BLAIR

able. It’s an art, planning spaces efficiently.” And soon, more Austinites will have a chance to practice it.


The two-level design allows for maximum space with a minimal footprint.

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B Y S O F I A S O KO LO V E | P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y B I L L S A L L A N S


SIX LOCAL ARCHITECTS REVEAL THEIR

WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THOSE FIRST JOBS?

FAVORITE PROJECTS, DISCUSS THE

learned something that pretty much sums up what I would guess most

LESSONS THEY’VE LEARNED AND TELL US WHY AUSTIN ARCHITECTURE IS AT A TURNING POINT. WHILE THERE ARE DOZENS of talented architects chang-

These first two jobs are the ones that humbled me. In both cases, I people eventually realize about their careers, no matter the profession: some days are awesome and fulfilling and feel like a luxury, and some days I am completely out of my comfort zone and I still need to show up every day, work hard, and smile my way through it. CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PHILOSOPHY?

Listen, observe and ask questions. Repeat. Be honest about why you’re doing what you’re doing — is it for you, the designer, or for the client?

ing our city’s skyline, we tapped six who are working to make our city

Does it solve the problem that has been presented to you? Don’t worry

expand in beautiful ways. Whether it’s Emily Little and Paul Clay-

about how it looks. Buildings go through puberty in design, too, and you

ton’s thoughtful redesign of iconic Austin places like Green Pastures

just need to keep pushing through it until you get to the other side.

Restaurant, or landscape architect Daniel Woodroffe transforming the un-

WHERE IS AUSTIN ARCHITECTURE HEADED?

der-performing roofs at 816 Congress Avenue into a sustainable amenity,

A lot of our fate lies in the hands of planners, voters, city leaders and, of

these architects are thoughtfully working to integrate old with new.

course, developers. We need housing, transportation and access to goods and

Here, they tell TRIBEZA about their biggest mistakes, where Austin architecture is headed, and what defines their best work.

services throughout the city that a variety of people can afford and we need a level of density that is just right — not so dense that we lose the intimacy that we love about our city but not so spread out that we sprawl like the many other cities we are trying to avoid becoming. It’s not an easy task, but I know many people who are working diligently to help take Austin in the right di-

K AT I E B I N GHAM

rection and I remain hopeful that we will come out okay on the other side.

MARK ODOM STUDIO Notable projects: Aviator in San Antonio TELL US ABOUT YOUR FIRST REAL JOB:

“The Johanna Duplex and the

LAKEHOUSE AN D BIRDS P HOTO BY DRO R BAL DI NGER

I started working at Chili’s my senior year of high school. I learned so much

Waxahachie Lake House rep-

from waiting tables about communicating, customer service and smiling in

resent well the dynamic nature

really uncomfortable situations after days on end of working double shifts.

of a lot of our work; we aren’t typically afraid of weaving and

My first architecture-related job was a couple of summers into my

crashing forms into one another

undergrad program. I pulled a phone number off a job ad on a bulletin board in Goldsmith Hall at University of Texas at Austin — a local architect wanted to learn a 3-D rendering program. I remember the first day on the job, where we crawled into his attic and I learned how to use a nail gun. After a few weeks of work on the walls, I realized I wouldn’t be teaching him any 3-D rendering techniques, but I would definitely be learning more about working in an un-air-conditioned house during a Texas summer than I ever want to experience again.

to create something beautiful.” “We recently wrapped up construction on Bird’s Barbershops newest location off 183, and have a couple more in the pipeline. They’re great clients who constantly seek new approaches to improving their shops, and who bring an insane level of energy to every meeting.” tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE AUSTIN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE?

In its infancy. Austin is blessed with tremendous natural beauty and sense of place, but the urban environment has traditionally been a rather mediocre “engineered” environment where little emphasis has been placed on design excellence, a sense of local distinctiveness, craft or environmental responsiveness. Above: The roofs at 816 Congress Avenue that serve as a tenant retreat and event space. Right: Royal Blue Grocery parklet.

WHAT HAS CHALLENGED YOU THE MOST?

Founding and building my firm, dwg. The stars didn’t align until the spring of 2010 when the economy was stalled, business was scrappy and projects were lean at best. It turned out to be the most opportune time to launch a new, freshly focused design firm. The whole business community was in “support each other” mode and people desired nimble, young, fresh, out of the box thinkers that could be very creative on a shoestring budget. Our goal was to be patient and grow the firm at a sustainable pace. Living by the cashin, cash-out, balance the books and not being in debt philosophy has taught me to be very cautious about the financial decisions we make as a firm. I have to tip my hat to the entrepreneurs out there that, every day, roll with the punches of being the small fish in a big pond. WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISTAKE YOU’VE MADE?

Biggest mistake at work was not starting dwg. sooner. Honestly.

DA N IEL WO OD ROF F E

URBAN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT | DWG. Notable projects: Royal Blue Grocery parklet, 816 Congress, Lamar Union

DO YOU HAVE A DREAM PROJECT?

Actually yes — it would be the opportunity to use landscape architecture as the driver for a major urban transformation.

WHAT PROJECT ARE YOU PROUDEST OF?

Transforming the roofs at 816 Congress Avenue, a project that turned out to be a pivotal moment for dwg. The project transformed unsightly, inaccessible flat roofs into a series of unique amenity decks and green roofs, and subsequently profitable building assets. The resulting 15th level terrace has become a tenant retreat and event space, offering unprecedented views of the Texas State Capitol. This building, which was designed for another era, is now competing with modern and newly built office space in downtown Austin by providing a one-of-a-kind sustainable amenity. The project is only a block from the office, and I regularly stop by. There is nothing that makes me prouder then seeing it being used and watching it mature and grow.

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The yard at the Denizen Condos


For the past five years, Daniel Woodroffe has been at the helm of his firm, dwg.

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Emily Little and Paul Clayton in their East Austin office.

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PAUL CLAY TON + EMI LY L I T T L E

CLAYTON & LITTLE ARCHITECTS Notable Projects: Jeffrey’s and Josephine House, Pearl Bottling House, Hotel Saint Cecilia WHEN AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE THAT YOU WANTED TO BE AN ARCHITECT?

I grew up exploring how parts fit together as a whole while working alongside my mechanic father. Architecture provided a more artful respite. – Paul My interest grew out of an undergraduate degree in cultural anthropology and the realization that the built environment has a profound impact on our

AVENUE C HOUSE PHOTO BY MOLLY WINTERS; JOSEPHINE HO US E PHOTO BY CASEY DUNN; SOUTHERLEIGH PHOTO BY NICK SIMONITE

individual wellbeing, as well as the health of the planet. –Emily DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE PROJECT THAT YOU’VE EVER WORKED ON?

The most meaningful projects for the firm are public projects that impact people’s everyday lives. These include work at Pease Park, Christopher House, the Texas State Cemetery, B’nai Abraham Synagogue and Mother Neff State Park. We are currently enjoying work on many new hospitality projects around town, some of which reinvigorate the culturally meaningful places that make Austin special, such as The Driskill, Jeffrey’s and Green Pastures. –Paul and Emily

Top: Avenue C House Middle: Josephine House Bottom: Southerleigh at the historic Pearl Brewery site.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISTAKE YOU’VE MADE?

Taking the wrong clients. The excitement at the beginning of a project often veils underlying conflicts that surface later in the project. -Paul Setting unrealistic budgets at the start of a project. After 30 years, I am finally getting a little better at this. –Emily WHERE DO YOU LOOK TO FOR INSPIRATION?

Google makes the world a small place. Inspiration is a click away. – Paul WHAT PROJECT CHALLENGED YOU THE MOST?

THIRST. Working on the team that created the public art installation of a

but it is daunting to embrace the renovation of the 120-year-old historic

38-foot dead tree hovering over Lady Bird Lake for three months, has been

house at Green Pastures, its role as a center of Texas hospitality for almost

the singularly most difficult challenge so far. The permitting hurdles were

70 years, and the successful integration of new buildings on the site. – Paul

extensive and the structural challenges daunting. It took a small army of pro-

and Emily

fessionals of all varieties to bring the effort to reality, and coordinating that team was an incredibly rewarding adventure. – Paul and Emily

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE AUSTIN ARCHITECTURE?

In a word: eclectic. At a glance the built environment seems a bit less refined

TELL US ABOUT THE PROJECT(S) THAT BEST DEFINES YOUR WORK RIGHT NOW?

than some other cities. But if you dig deeper, one can find the comfortable,

Green Pastures Restaurant. We thought there was a heavy mantle of respon-

easy-going character that defines what people love about Austin. – Paul

sibility in dealing with the traditions surrounding our renovation at Jeffrey’s,

and Emily tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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CHR IS SA N D E R S

SANDERS ARCHITECTURE Notable projects: The W Hotel and Residences, The Moody Theater, AWAY Spa at W Austin, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Admissions Kiosk WHERE DO YOU LOOK FOR INSPIRATION? A residential project in Tarrytown.

My travel journals. During graduate school, I traveled for six months

The home, while ideally located,

through South and Southeast Asia. Almost 10 years later, my wife and I lived

was not suited for a growing

in Split, Croatia for three months and later spent the rest of the year trav-

family. The project’s architectural

eling through Eastern Europe and Asia. On those journeys, every day was

objective was to reconfigure

inspiring — keeping these journals on my bedside table allows me to revisit

the space to accommodate the

experiences and moments of discovery.

clients’ style of living.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST UNUSUAL PROJECT?

The admissions kiosk at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is a tiny building that was built off-site and tries hard to do a lot of things: green wall experiment, prairie roof demonstration, collecting and reusing condensate water, generating solar energy and exhibiting the use of sustainable materials, all the while serving its primary function of collecting admissions and orienting visitors to their visit to the Wildflower Center. It was an experiment in design and construction and it continues to be an experiment for collection of data for the botanists at the Wildflower Center. WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISTAKE YOU’VE MADE?

I waited [too long] to go out on my own. Looking back, I had a couple of projects presented to me that offered great opportunities to start my own firm. I hesitated, and missed the chance. Building the foundations of a firm takes time, and sometimes I look back and feel like I could be a bit further along in the process. IS THERE SOMETHING IN TOWN THAT YOU DIDN’T DESIGN, BUT LOVE?

I love the collection of small pavilions built last century in the parks in central Austin. The buildings, many of them built in the depression era, range from the rustic stone or log construction types of Palm Park, Eastwoods Park and Shipe Park to the Mission Revival style shelter at Little Stacy. These modest little buildings and other more familiar structures like the bath hous-

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es at Barton Springs Pool, Deep Eddy, and Northwest Pool were designed from

The architect says the

timeless materials, serve simple functions, and link us to the history of our city.

admissions kiosk at the Lady

WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO LEAVE AS YOUR LEGACY?

Center was the most unusual

I feel like I’m only just getting started.

project he has worked on.

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Bird Johnson Wildflower


The Kerbey Lane house that now serves as the Sander Architecture office has its own storied history. In addition to being a private residence, it was also a wine shop in the 1970s. tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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Francisco Arredonda has worked with nightlife impresario Bridget Dunlap on both Mettle and Container Bar.

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Left: Container Bar on Rainey Street. Below: Mettle on East Calles Street. Right: a residential project.

FRA N C ISCO A RRE D O ND O

NORTH ARROW STUDIO Notable projects: Container Bar, Mettle, Violet Crown Cinema

designed taking into consideration the development changes on Rainey

WHY DID YOU BECOME AN ARCHITECT?

relocate the entire structure when the inevitable day came when we had to

I always wanted to be an architect. I grew up in Mexico City. In a place like

make room for the high-rise buildings on that street. That’s the beauty of it:

that, you are surrounded by beautiful, impressive, tall buildings. I lived in

not only is it unusual and will always attract people, but it will also have a

their shadow, and at some point I wanted to learn more about them.

second life somewhere else in Austin. It’s not every day you can upcycle a bar.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PHILOSOPHY?

DO YOU HAVE A DREAM PROJECT?

My design philosophy is rooted in a respect for collaboration, a humble ap-

There was a time when I thought my dream project would be one with no

preciation of nature, and the realities of construction and hard work.

design restrictions and no budget limitations. I’ve now realized that the

WHAT HOME BUILDING TREND DO YOU WISH WOULD GO AWAY?

dream project is really the type of project where everyone involved on the

Homes treated as an investment. Even spaces that are designed or rede-

team — the client, the designer, the craftsmen and the contractor — all share

signed to turn a profit should be treated with the same respect as forever

the same goals. I find those to be the most enjoyable projects.

spaces. It doesn’t mean the most expensive fixtures or vaulted ceilings, but

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE AUSTIN ARCHITECTURE?

rather retaining quality, craftsmanship and smart design.

We are at a turning point, not only in architecture, but in all aspects of the

WHAT IS YOUR MOST UNUSUAL PROJECT?

city life. It’s an exciting time, and we’ve never had the potential to do great

Container Bar on Rainey Street — there’s nothing like it in Austin or any-

things like we do right now. It’s up to everybody in the community to seize

where else. And the shipping containers are not just for show; the bar was

this opportunity and contribute to the city we love.

Street, and a design was developed that would allow us the opportunity to

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B Y A U D R E Y M C G L I N C H Y | P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S P E N C E R S E LV I D G E

A N A U S T I N F A M I LY C O U N T S N E A R LY E I G H T Y E A R S I N T H E I R H A B I TAT F O R H U M A N I T Y H O M E .

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BUT FOR GARCIA A N D H E R H U S B A N D, A HOME IN AUSTIN H A S A LWAYS B E E N O U T O F R E AC H .

From left to right: Alejandra, Luis, Paola, Marciela and Lillian sit in what used to be a third bedroom. Years ago the family knocked down the wall to widen the living room.

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Luis Garcia worked with his two oldest children, now grown, to paint the red and white stripes in the family’s living room.

H

alf a mile from a pocket

“In the morning, they wake up with their

panded number of counseling courses,” Aus-

of churches in northeast

little faces together,” Garcia, who bought the

tin Habitat interim CEO Ken Corby wrote in

Austin, there is a home

house through Habitat for Humanity seven

an email.

christened with paint.

years ago, said through a translator. Her fami-

Habitat employees stress that their houses

The first place you no-

ly pays $421 a month towards a 30-year mort-

are not giveaways; families pay for the homes

tice it is in Marciela Gar-

gage, a home price the family was unable to

with a low-interest mortgage. To qualify, the

cia’s living room. Here, her husband, Luis,

find through market listings when they start-

family must make less than 60 percent of the

and their two older children have painted

ed searching for a house in 2008.

median family income. (For a household of

red and white stripes along an arch, work-

This year, Habitat celebrates its 30th year

four, that comes out to $45,240.) The house

ing hard to mimic the brick archway from

in Austin. Since opening in 1985, staff and

costs the price of the building materials –

Luis’ mother’s home in central Mexico.

volunteers have built more than 400 homes,

back when the Garcias bought their house,

Past the dining room, the bedroom of Gar-

repaired more than half that number and

this hovered around $100,000. Today a fam-

cia’s nine year old daughter, Alejandra, is fur-

provided financial counseling to more than

ily buying a home through Habitat will pay

ther evidence of the family’s colorful tastes.

10,000 families.

roughly $120,000.

Alejandra and her older sister, Paola, who of-

“Looking forward, our mission implores us

Numbers like these are welcome in a city

ten share the bed, could not agree on a wall

to be at the forefront of Austin’s affordability

where home prices have swollen in the past

color, so they compromised: two peach walls

discussion through denser housing solutions,

few years. According to the Real Estate Cen-

for Paola, two purple ones for Alejandra.

more comprehensive home repairs, and an ex-

ter at Texas A&M University, Austin’s average

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75


The two-toned walls of the girls’ bedroom bleed into their bookshelf, which they’ve covered in peach and purple stripes.

home price reached $331,900 in July, an in-

they can move into their new home. Once

“Changes we made were based on afford-

crease of roughly $100,000 over the last decade.

the hours are complete, the family pays a

ability and how different designs make

But for Garcia and her husband, a home

$1,000 down payment and completes their

more sense,” said Walpole. She added that

in Austin has always been out of reach. When

“lot select” where they choose their future

Habitat will also build metal roofs as op-

they family outgrew their two-bedroom apart-

home’s layout, flooring and countertops.

posed to shingled ones. The material will

ment and began looking for a bigger place,

The Garcias bought what turns out to be

buying a house in Austin meant mortgage

the most popular house size, a one-story

payments around $1,200 – a monthly expense

home with three bedrooms, one full bath-

that would have exhausted more than half of

room and one half bathroom.

the family’s monthly income of $2,000.

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help keep families’ energy bills low, and metal often outlives shingling. For Garcia, her mind is also on longevity. On a recent Wednesday morning, her

But as Habitat begins a new building

one-year-old granddaughter tried desper-

Then the Garcias heard about Habitat

project this fall, this favored stock is get-

ately to steer a plastic toy car through a

homes through one of Luis’ co-workers.

ting a new look. Architect Claire Walpole

gravel walkway in the family’s backyard,

As all interested families do, they attend-

said the homes built as part of a new neigh-

the girl pedaling her legs and rattling the

ed an information session, reviewed their

borhood called Lee Meadows, located off

steering wheel. As Garcia looked on, she

finances with a Habitat counselor and ap-

Montopolis Drive, will be two-storied, and

talked about how she saw her family liv-

plied. After being accepted, families must

offer more full bathrooms. It’s the first in a

ing in their house for several decades. “I

complete 300 hours of what Habitat calls

number of structural adjustments coming

like it,” she said. “It’s simple, but it’s very

“sweat equity,” or volunteer hours before

to Habitat homes.

comfortable.”

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Marciela keeps a garden in the backyard where she grows tomatoes, onions and peppers.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

Since 1985, Austin Habitat for Humanity has provided more than 400 homes to local families. Using a team of more than 8,000 volunteers annually, Habitat for Humanity seeks to provide our thriving city with affordable housing options. To find out more about Habitat for Humanity, including how to volunteer or donate, go to www.austinhabitat.org tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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From left: Igor Siddiqui, Joaquin Mariel, Mariana Cano and Catherine Gavin.

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A QUARRY TURNED LANDFILL TURNED N AT U R E P R E S E R V E I S A B O U T TO U N D E R G O A N O T H E R R A D I C A L T R A N S F O R M AT I O N .

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WINNER “99 WHITE BALLOONS” Invivia, Cambridge, Massachusetts Say the designers: “99 White Balloons is activated by a series of microphones and proximity sensors as well as 396 LED lights that float high above the ground with the balloons. When a person (or deer or other wildlife) approaches the proximity sensor, a stepper motor slowly draws the balloon cable closer to the ground at that anchor tower. As they move away, the balloon cable is released.”

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“[We wanted it to be] very inclusive and multidisciplinary about how landscape and architecture work together.” - Igor Siddiqui

the explosive growth happening

talking about how small scale things can have

around the city, it’s hard to imagine there is any

a big impact,” says Gavin of their initial con-

spot in Austin that feels undiscovered. But in a

versations.

CONSIDERING

field on the east side of town, tucked away off

Over a coffee in November 2013, the trio

Grove Boulevard in the Montopolis neighbor-

began to throw around the idea of hosting a

hood, there is a patch of land that reveals itself

design competition geared towards emerging

like a hidden gem just a few miles from the hustle

architects and designers. “A conversation about

and bustle of downtown.

temporary architecture having a larger impact

Despite its expansive vistas, trickling

had us thinking about what that would mean

streams and exotic wildlife, this area has a

for the city of Austin,” says Siddiqui. “Each of us

storied history buried beneath. In its past in-

from our own professional perspective realized

carnations, the area has been home to both a

that some of the things [we were] doing else-

quarry and an illegal dumping ground. Today

where didn’t exist as opportunities here.” The

the 9.7 acres serves as a nature preserve run by

team wanted to start a conversation that mar-

local nonprofit Ecology Action, complete with

ried architecture with both the cultural and

forest, wetland and grassland environments.

ecological factors that define Austin. “[We

In November, the area officially known as

wanted it to be] very inclusive and multidisci-

Circle Acres will once again be transformed, this

plinary about how landscape and architecture

time into Field Constructs, a series of temporary

work together,” says Siddiqui.

installations that will showcase work from in-

Critical to the competition was landing a

ternational, national and local architects, artists

perfect space, something the FCDC secured

and landscape designers.

when Ecology Action’s former executive di-

The brainchild of Rachel Adams, Catherine

rector Joaquin Mariel offered to host it on

Gavin and Igor Siddiqui, the Field Constructs

Circle Acres, a tract of land the nonprofit had

Design Competition (FCDC) aims to connect

purchased in 2010 and spent years rebuilding

ecological issues with architecture. The team

and maintaining. The location, says Gavin,

met when Gavin, who publishes the esteemed

was a perfect backdrop. “It was originally a

industry publication Texas Architect, asked

place that was used because it’s close to water,

Adams to write a story about Siddiqui, an

then it becomes a quarry, then it becomes a

associate professor at the University of Texas

landfill and now this not-for-profit comes in

at Austin School of Architecture. “We started

to take it over,” she says. tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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WINNER “BLURRED BODIES” Studio Roland Snooks, Melbourne, Australia

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Say the designers: “Blurred Bodies hovers between the natural and the artificial. It shifts between camouflaging with its environment and reveling in its alienation. The project has been designed using behavioral-based algorithms in which a turbulent surface emerges from a swarm of ‘agentBodies.’ This process imbues the project with a natural character, which is balanced against the industrial nature of its fabrication process.”


After finding the perfect locale, the FCDC landed some impressive partners which included Ecology Action, as well as design powerhouse Pentagram, Texas Society of Architects/AIA and UT’s School of Architecture (see sidebar). Armed with the idea, a location, and an identity crafted by Pentagram, FCDC began reaching out to younger architects to submit proposals. “We’ve always conceptualized this project as an opportunity for emerging architects, landscape architects, designers and artists,” says Siddiqui. In November 2014, a year after the idea

WINNER “DUCK BLIND IN PLAIN SITE” Jonathan A. Scelsa, John Paul Rysavy, Jennifer Birkeland, Isaac Stein, Nick Mitchell, and Erin Wythoff, Brooklyn, New York Say the designers: “Duck Blind in Plain Site’s exterior, shrouded in camouflage, seeks to hide within its pastoral setting, while its interior attempts to subvert the exterior’s camouflage with apertures and thresholds showcasing bright chromatic interior claddings. The installation’s contextual tension is heightened through its material composition: a double-sided brick construction featuring high-contrast post-consumer recycled materials as cladding on the interior, and, on the exterior, grass harvested from the seasonal cycle of local ecologies.”

was born over coffee, the competition officially launched. Through social media channels and word of mouth, the idea took off, and the FCDC team, which expected maybe a dozen proposals from local firms, was shocked to receive more than 80 ideas from architects and designers from as far away as Europe and Japan. In June 2015, the jurors announced the four winners: “99 White Balloons” by the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based firm, Invivia; “Blurred Bodies” by the Australian-based Studio Roland Snooks; “Duck Blind in Plain Site” by a team of Brooklyn architects; and Hybroot from Austin’s own OTA+. Next month, Austinites will have a chance to see these ideas come to life when Field Constructs takes over the Circle Acres property. Beginning November 14, the four winning installations will be on display and open to the public through November 22. For Austinites, it’s a chance to not only experience one of the city’s most beautiful unsung outdoor spaces, but to experience innovative design from across the world. tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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THE TEAM RACHEL ADAMS FCDC, co-founder, co-director CATHERINE GAVIN FCDC, co-founder, co-director IGOR SIDDIQUI FCDC, co-founder, co-director DJ STOUT Pentagram, partner MARIANA CANO Pentagram, graphic designer KRISTEN KEISER Pentagram, designer JOAQUIN MARIEL Ecology Action former executive director

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND FULL DETAILS, HEAD TO FIELDCONSTRUCTS.ORG.

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WINNER “HYBROOT” OTA+ (Kory Bieg), Austin, Texas Says the designer: Hybroot reflects the balance between urban fabric and natural landscape indicative of the project site. The form, color and material of the installation mimic the surrounding grasses and tree canopy, while the fabrication, assembly and surface patterning evoke a more synthetic sensibility. At first glance the two are inseparable, but on closer inspection one notices artificial formal compositions, unnatural pixelation of colors, and the artifact of the CNC-lathing process left as surface texture.”

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Jesse, Trinity and baby Leo gather in an alcove off the sleeping porch. Materials like reclaimed cedar fence boards and translucent Polygal bring texture and natural light into the nook.

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BY SALLIE LEWIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICOLE MLAKAR

L I K E T H E Y I N T O A YA N G , T H E S E A U S T I N C O U P L E S P R OV E T H AT B OT H P E R S O N A L L Y A N D P R O F E S S I O N A L L Y, T W O H A R M O N I Z I N G H A LV E S M A K E A VIBRANT WHOLE.

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Around the house, handmade items from friends and family are lovingly displayed. Trinity’s grandmother crocheted the cream colored Afghan blanket, which warms the family couch. Apple green cushions inside the screened porch mirror the home’s lush surroundings.

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The kitchen’s soaring ceilings are a mix of reclaimed wood from Jesse’s projects. Chalkboard art and sun-colored accents add a

For some married couples, mixing personal and professional lives is taboo. For others, however, the opposite is true. Trinity White and Jesse Mischel are a designer-carpenter duo whose respective gifts syncopate and shine

playful touch while the poster overhead was from a gallery Trinity’s father performed in when her family lived in Paris.

all the more when paired together. Their home in East Austin combines Trinity’s efficient, economical design with Jesse’s natural handiwork. Likewise, Edgar and Laurel Prats of PGM Design + Build, find his overarching design expertise is honed by her shrewd financial savvy and interior prowess. The two couples weave a unique tapestry of talent thanks to their distinct eye and ethos, and in both cases, the old adage proves true that two really is better than one.

At Trinity White and Jesse Mischel’s home on East 16th Street, appearances are deceiving. From the curb, a small home sits on a grassy lawn parched from summer’s sauna. At first glance, the scene looks nothing out of the ordinary, that is until glimmers of tin peek through rustling leaves just beyond the house. For Trinity and Jesse, home is here, tucked back amidst the trees. This secluded secondary home, with its canary-colored Hardie board, metal trim and textured wood, is as charming as the couple that occupies it. At just 849 square feet, the two-story house is a model of the

rewards, as it made the pair better communicators and more apprecia-

small, sustainable and affordable projects Trinity is making a name for

tive of their respective passions. “We end up egging each other on,” said

herself designing.

Trinity, whose vision of having bi-fold doors off their kitchen came to

The Tulane-educated designer whose business is eponymously named believes in creating buildings — both commercial and residential — that are productive, compassionate and affordable to the end user. “It can feel generous,” she says of her projects, adding that the challenge is in making small square footage feel big.

fruition thanks to Jesse’s talent. Jesse, who comes from a long line of carpenters, found his niche in the field by perfecting the art of trim work and cabinetry. “There is a romantic aspect to it,” says Jesse of his medium. Soon, he’ll take his carpentry competence to trailers, beginning with a 1972 Airstream.

Every square foot in the couple’s own home, including enclaves like

Whether they’re working together or on independent projects, the cou-

the rooftop sleeping porch, is utilized for comfort, without losing track

ple emanates a mutual respect for their distinct skills. No matter the

of economic sensibility. Sustainable choices reveal themselves subtly

project, it’s clear thus far that the two are focused both collectively and

from the angled, photovoltaic roof to the high windows, large over-

individually on making beautiful and sustainable footprints, regardless

hangs and breezy, southern alignment.

of size. For more information about Trinity’s work visit trinitywhite.

Building a home as newlyweds was challenging but not without its

com, and for Jesse’s work visit jessemischel.com. tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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The sartorially savvy duo stand alongside the tremendous pivot glass front door at their home in The Overlook Estates. The door measures 6-feet wide by 8-feet tall and was made in-house by PGM.

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Local artist Taylor Winn’s abstract paintings add color to the foyer, which is bathed in clean lines and natural light.

Laurel and Edgar Prats know a thing or two about serendipity. The pair met years ago at one of Edgar’s concerts in Guadalajara, Mexico. At the time, Laurel owned a study abroad company and Edgar was a musician. The rest, as they say, is history. “When I saw her walk in it was one of those times where you just knew,” he says. “It was inevitable.” The stylish couple, who have substantial ties to real estate (Laurel is an advisor with Engel & Volkers), say they have found balance in their relationship both personally and professionally since starting PGM Design + Build in 2011. The business developed out of their love of modern architecture and the desire to establish it further within Austin. While the company offers remodeling services in addition to spec home building, the Prats’ largest projects are custom. “We want our spaces to not only be functional and efficient, but a reflection of our clients’ style and way of life,” says Edgar. The process begins with a

A suspended steel stairwell offsets the polished concrete floors used throughout the couple’s home. tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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Left: Franky, the couple’s twotoned English sheepdog, gives a paw in the foyer. Right: The kitchen’s cool color palette is warmed with unexpected accents, like acacia wood beneath the island.

meeting to learn about the client’s living habits. A mood board of

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utilize air currents.

images is created, and after experimenting with layouts, the team

“He thinks about where every single window goes,” says Laurel of

delivers a visual rendering of the home. In the end, each project is

her husband, adding, “Every window is placed for a reason.” That

like art, infused with each client’s unique persona and lifestyle.

level of concentration, intent and purpose is evident throughout

While Laurel manages PGM’s financials and works with clients on

PGM’s projects, yet when the focus blurs the barriers between per-

interior details, Edgar oversees the company’s many in-house ser-

sonal and professional life, the couple happily reminds one another

vices, from scouting land to designing, drafting and constructing.

of their family priorities.

Sustainability and respect for topography are key motifs of

“When things start to get a little crazy we send each other pic-

PGM’s design philosophy, not to mention pivotal factors in deci-

tures of our kids,” said Edgar adding, “It reminds us what’s import-

phering the house’s best alignment. Sun studies are done with ev-

ant and why we’re doing this.” For more information about Laurel

ery PGM project and passive design is implemented to efficiently

and Edgar’s work, visit pgmdesignbuild.com.

OCTOBER 2015 tribeza.com


The wall of grey leuders limestone in the living room evokes the Prats’ effort to use local materials whenever possible.

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Architects Crangnolino and Alter accentuated qualities like the low-slung roof and overhangs to add unusual characteristics to the house. At first glance, the building may seem like just another one of the classic 1960s ranch homes typical of the neighborhood, but on closer look it’s clear there’s much more to it.

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B Y S O F I A S O KO L O V E PHOTOGRAPHY BY CASEY DUNN

FOR THIS WESTWOOD HOME, Alterstudio architects Ernesto Cragno-

lino and Kevin Alter wanted to riff on a traditional ranch home. “We are asked to remodel ranch homes a lot,” explains Cragnolino, who was the lead on this project, “and they have the same kind of classic problems — endless corridors and rooms with little access to light.” But they are also beautiful homes, he says, with an elegant simplicity to them. This project was a way to recreate that simplicity but in a refined way, through bringing volume and light into the house in unexpected ways. tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

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In the dining room, exterior masonry connects the inside to the outside, drawing the view out.

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In the living room, the client wanted a wet bar that could be hidden. Alterstudio made this a reality with a white barn door slider.

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The family room, which features floor to ceiling glass sliders and uses the same stone as the pool deck, feels contiguous with the exterior. “The spirit of this room is almost like a porch,� explains Cragnolino.

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In the master bathroom, tall windows bring in various different light sources, making the space feel both intimate and expansive.

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The brick wall that extends outside of the master bedroom helps bring the outside in, while also creating a sense of privacy.

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The kitchen was designed to be the control center of the house. The designers specifically kept the kitchen “tucked away� from the more formal rooms in order to create a casual, relaxing atmosphere.

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SEPTEMBER 27, 2015 – JANUARY 24, 2016

Strange Pilgrims Charles Atlas, Trisha Baga, Millie Chen, Phil Collins, Andy Coolquitt, Ayşe Erkmen, Roger Hiorns, Nancy Holt, Lakes Were Rivers, Angelbert Metoyer, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Paul Sharits, Sofía Táboas

Jones Center 700 Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701 thecontemporaryaustin.org

Roger Hiorns, A retrospective view of the pathway, 2008. Foam, compressor, and polyester tanks. Dimensions variable. Artwork © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London. Courtesy the artist; Luhring Augustine, New York; Corvi-Mora, London; and Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam. Image courtesy Atelier Calder, Saché, France. Photograph by Guillaume Blanc, Atelier Calder.

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Visual Arts Center / The University of Texas at Austin 2301 San Jacinto Boulevard Austin, Texas 78712


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5

MY LIFE IN PHOTOS

3

1 2

4

7

8

6

9 11 10

40 years of Fonda San Miguel For four decades, Fonda San Miguel has been serving delicious Interior Mexican cuisine from its famed North Austin restaurant. In honor of this special anniversary, we asked co-owner Tom Gilliland to share some of his favorite memories. 1. One of our many menus from across the years. 2. Co-owner Miguel Ravago, Austin Chronicle Food Editor Virginia B. Wood and I put this cookbook together to celebrate our 30th anniversary, with over 100 recipes. We’re working with University of Texas Press to reissue it. 3. Me with Mercedes Ramos and Taco the Parrot. Taco was maybe six months old in that photograph, and the grandson of the owners of Illy Coffee took the photograph. It’s a great photograph. You can really see Mercedes and Taco looking at each other. 4. A menu from when we were open for lunch. When Fonda San Miguel first opened, we served dinner and lunch for seven or eight years before we stopped lunch service and started putting all of our emphasis on dinner. 5. A feature that Santé Magazine did on us about 15 or 20 years ago. 6. The second menu we ever had. All of those little designs are meant to represent San Miguel de Allende. My favorite is the dog on the church because when you walk down the streets of San Miguel de Allende it’s typical to hear all these dogs barking, look up and see one on the roof! 7. A photo from around 1972 of all the staff at our first restaurant, San Angel, in Houston, in 1972. On the very far left, that’s me — and the fourth person over is Miguel. 8. The very first menu was handwritten by me. In those days we could barely afford the paper it was on. 9. Miguel and I on the cover of the Austin Chronicle. 10. One of our very first menus designed by one of Mexico’s best known and greatest living artists, Pedro Friedeberg. At least five or six pieces of his art are hanging in the restaurant. He was in three or four months ago, we’re old friends. 11. We’ve always put Christmas lights up, from the very beginning. But the blue ones are the ones people noticed — everyone liked them so much. Around twelve years ago we just started leaving them up year round.

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PICK

Communal tabletops made of white oak add to the neighborhood feel of the restaurant.

Unit D Pizzeria

Shoulu Barth opened the restuarant with her husband, Eric, a co-founder of A Parallel Architecture.

T H AT ’ S A M O R E : U N I T D P I Z Z ER I A B R I N G S R EL A X ED I TA L I A N S T Y L E TO C H ER RY WO O D

I

n all narratives, place is essential to the story, and at Unit D Pizzeria one design element worthy of inspiration. Prior to Unit D’s reconstruction, the in Austin’s Cherrywood neighborhood, this couldn’t be more true. Eric ceiling of the building had rusty diagonal bridging between the joists. and Shalou Barth have lived in Cherrywood since 2009, settling there “We riffed off of that and replaced it with woven wood lattice work,” says shortly after moving from San Francisco. Over the years, the self-proclaimed Shalou. Doing this added compelling interior texture in addition to being pizza fanatics missed the Bay Area’s array of artisanal pizza venues, and so sound-diffracting and light filtering. It also created a sense of vertical rethey opened Unit D Pizzeria as a way to fill the void. lief and 3-dimensional depth that defies the building’s low ceiling. “The goal was to make something comfortable and not pretentious,” On any given trip to Unit D Pizzeria, patrons are sipping local craft says Eric about the restaurant, which opened in July and aims to nourish beers or organic, biodynamic wines as golden pies bubble within the AcunCherrywood’s community spirit. to Mario wood-burning oven. Imported from Naples, this hearth is the Previously a meth rehabilitation facility and a day care center amongst restaurant’s complete cooking platform, a place where the flavor-driven, other things, the 1950s building, which Shalou described as “dark” and handcrafted menu comes to life. “full of asbestos,” is now a brightened, reimagined space with a philosophy If one thing is certain, Shalou and Eric’s foray into the restaurant indusrooted in functionality. try is refreshingly humble. Unit D Pizzeria isn’t ostentatious or boastful. “There are no superfluous gestures here,” Shalou says. Rather, the new kid on the Cherrywood block uses simple, quality ingrediInside, sparse light fixtures add a soft glow to the dining room’s butter- ents to make comforting pizza pies and plates that a community of familscotch alcoves and pine walls. Eric, a co-founder of A Parallel Architecture iar faces will return for. After much hard work and dedication, the Barths' who designed the restaurant, also schemed up the communal success shows through in the restaurant’s relaxed, down to 2406 Manor Rd. Unit D earth aura, a quality that embodies the neighborhood’s establetops made of white oak wood. (512) 524 1922 Though most of the building was overhauled, the Barth’s did find sential nature. S. LEWIS

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dining

PICK

Mongers serves up regional classics like the Louisiana barbecue shrimp (left) and red snapper (right).

Mongers Market + Kitchen

2401 E. Cesar Chavez MongersAustin.com

F R E S H S E A F O O D I S T H E S TA R AT T H I S E A S T S I D E H OT S P OT

F

or a landlocked city, Austin boasts a surprising number of good seafood restaurants. So is there room for another fish in this already crowded sea? Yes, if it offers something different like Mongers Market + Kitchen, whose menu sails around the country riffing on regional classics like Louisiana barbecue shrimp, Nantucket fish dip and Baja fish tacos. At the helm is the dream team of Roberto San Miguel and Shane Stark. San Miguel made a name for himself as one of Austin’s top fishmongers, procuring fresh seafood for some of Austin’s best restaurants and farmers’ markets. And Stark came from Kenichi, bringing with him an Asian background that deliciously infuses the menu at Mongers. Mongers is both a seafood market and restaurant. Up front, a display case and raw bar sells a small but fresh selection of seafood to take home. But the main draw is the charming restaurant. Upon arrival, we sat down and started with a sampling from the rotating oyster selection: four different East Coast beauties that were succulently

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fresh. Ceviche is ubiquitous on Austin menus, but Mongers’ is a showstopper: silky cubes of sweet, fresh yellowfin tuna tossed with citrusy kabosu, ginger and sesame. Scooped onto a crispy, tangy housemade salt and vinegar potato chip, this is one of the tastiest treats in town. Next came a steaming bowl of PEI mussels bathed in an aromatic broth of fennel and tomatoes, and dotted with slivers of housemade andouille sausage. The mussels were small, but fresh, and we sopped up every last drop of the dish with a chunk of toasted bread. We hit the jackpot one night with a special offering of soft shell crab: plump, meaty crab dipped in light batter — reminiscent of a funnel cake — and served with zesty Asian dipping sauce and a tangle of peppery arugula. We rounded out our order with a side of tasty apple-jalapeño cole slaw. Tempting menu staples include spins on Southern favorites including fish and cheddar grits, and Gulf red snapper served with earthy morels and spring peas in a chervil cream sauce. We’ll be back

for Sunday brunch to try the crab cake and biscuit Benedict and the buttermilk oyster chilaquiles. For non-seafood fans, there’s a short rib sandwich, braised pork cheeks, and locally sourced chuck steak. Desserts are simple and homey. I especially enjoyed the toasted pound cake and my companion liked the creamy chocolate and coffee pot de cream. There’s an intriguing wine list and our helpful waiter steered us towards starting with a couple of bubblies: a funky but delicious Australian Taltarni Tache Brut Rose and a more classical Spanish Naveran Dama Cava. Next, he recommended a terrific Fillaboa Albarino that was delightfully different. If wine isn’t your thing, the restaurant also offers a nice beer menu. Mongers is as quaint as it is tasty. Seashells, driftwood and splashes of turquoise accent the nautical whitewashed walls. Charming — but not kitschy — it beckons ocean breezes and glowing sunsets. And there’s always room for a place like that. K. SPEZIA

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Dinner & Drinks

DINING GUIDE

Beautiful Architecture: Some of the most beautifully designed restaurants in town. ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR

(512) 394 8150

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

DRINK.WELL.

319 Congress Ave

Chef Bryce Gilmore offers small plates

1200 W 6th St

207 E 53rd St

(512) 472 1884

with locally-sourced ingredients which

(512) 297 2525

(512) 614 6683

Locally-minded American offerings in a

pair with craft beers and fine wines,

Small and typically crowded, Clark’s’ ex-

Located in the North Loop district, Mi-

charming setting; perfect spot for a deca-

guests sit at communal high top tables.

tensive caviar and oyster menu, sharp aes-

chael and Jessica Sanders bring craft

thetics, and excellent service make it a re-

cocktails and American pub fare to drink.

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

freshing indulgence on West Sixth Street.

well. Menu changes seasonally. Snacks to

ARRO

1115 E 11th St

Indoor and outdoor seating is available.

try include fried chickpeas and Twinkies.

601 W 6th St

(512) 542 9542

(512) 992 2776

A cozy, French bistro serving up breakfast,

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lunch, and dinner.

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1100 E 6th St

(512) 827 2760

(512) 467 4280

dent downtown brunch.

Restaurant Group, this west sixth spot offers rich French favorites and an excellent

BOTTICELLI’S

One of downtown's premier dining spots.

When you step inside, it’s like stepping

wine list.

1321 S Congress Ave

Chef David Bull has crafted a menu wor-

into a completely different era. Enjoy de-

(512) 916 1315

thy of his multiple James Beard Award

licious vintage cocktails, ‘30s- and ‘40s-

AUSTIN LAND AND CATTLE

An inviting trattoria with warm Tuscan

nominations.

inspired music, and cuisine by Fermin

1205 N Lamar Blvd

colors. Small bar up front and cozy booths

(512) 472 1813

in back.

Nunez. On nice nights, head back to the CONTIGO

small outdoor patio.

2027 Anchor Ln

The Capital's only independent and family-owned steakhouse serves beef aged the

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

(512) 614 2260

EASY TIGER

same way they have for over 17 years. Make

1201 E 6th St

Ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant

709 E 6th St

sure to order a fresh seafood appetizer;

(512) 382 1189

take on bar fare. Take your pick from the

(512) 614 4972

you won't regret it.

13500 Galleria Circle

exquisite cocktail menu and grab a spot on

Delicious bakeshop upstairs and beer gar-

(512) 441 9000

the expansive outdoor patio.

den downstairs—this is the kind of place

BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE AND

Argentinean specialties like meat sand-

BEER GARDEN

wiches on baguettes, empanadas, and

CRAVE

brew on the patio as the warm aroma of

79 Rainey St

tasty pastries. Intimate patio seating.

340 E 2nd St

croissants and freshly baked pretzels waft

(512) 469 0000

over you from upstairs.

(512) 386 1656

where you can relax while sipping a local

Banger’s brings the German biergarten

CAFÉ JOSIE

A classic American grill with a chic atmo-

tradition stateside with an array of artisan

1200 W 6th St

sphere and a wide selection of diverse din-

EL ALMA

sausages and over 100 beers on tap.

(512) 322 9226

ing choices. Grab an intimate corner table

1025 Barton Springs Rd

Innovative and flavorful plates with fresh

and enjoy lunch, dinner or happy hour!

(512) 609 8923

BARLEY SWINE

ingredients in a quaint and intimate at-

Chef-driven, authentic Mexican cuisine

2024 S Lamar Blvd St

mosphere.

with unmatched outdoor, patio dining.

126 OCTOBER 2015

tribeza.com


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .C O M T O V I E W T H E E N T I R E O N L I N E D I N I N G G U I D E

EL NARANJO

Crowned Best BBQ Restaurant in Ameri-

HILLSIDE FARMACY

Serving lunch, happy hour, and dinner, the

85 Rainey St

ca by Bon Appetit, Aaron Franklin’s epon-

1209 E 11th St

shady porch is the perfect spot for a late-

(512) 474 2776

ymous eatery is a true Austin institution.

(512) 628 0168

afternoon paloma.

Husband and wife team Iliana de la Vega

Go early and be prepared to wait! (We

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beauti-

and Ernesto Torrealba serve up authentic

promise, it is worth it.)

fully restored 50s-style pharmacy with a

LA CONDESA

perfect porch for people watching on the

400 W 2nd St

FRANK

E\east side. Oysters, cheese plates, and

(512) 499 0300

407 Colorado St

nightly dinner specials.

Delectable cocktails, tasty tacos and appe-

cuisine from Mexico’s interior. Dine al fresco on the charming Rainey Street patio. ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

(512) 494 6916

1501 S 1st St

Their official motto proclaims, "Hot dogs

HOME SLICE PIZZA

by the hip and bohemian Condesa neigh-

(512) 291 2881

and cold beer," and...yep, that's basically

1415 S Congress Ave

borhood in Mexico City.

A charming French-Vietnamese eatery

it. Bacon-infused bloodies, a dozen differ-

(512) 444 7437

with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and

ent artisan hot dog options, and one of the

For pizza cravings south of the river, head

LA V

more. Vibrant and comfortable surround-

best beer lists in town.

to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3am on

1501 E 7th St

weekends for your post bar-hopping con-

(512) 391 1888

GOURDOUGH’S

venience, stocked with classics like the

This elegant French restaurant boasts an

EPICERIE

1503 S 1st St

Margherita as well as innovative pies like

ever-changing menu of seasonal ingre-

2307 Hancock Dr

The food trailer affiliated with Gour-

the White Clam and special toppings like

dients with an emphasis on simple, yet

(512) 371 6840

dough’s Public House, providing enor-

fried eggplant and meatballs.

soulful, dishes. Paired with their extensive

A café and grocery with both Louisi-

mous donuts with imaginative twists like

ana and French sensibilities by Thomas

the Mother Clucker—a donut topped with

HOUSE PIZZERIA

Keller-trained Chef Sarah McIntosh.

a fried chicken strip and honey butter.

5111 Airport Blvd (512) 600 4999

LAMBERTS DOWNTOWN BARBECUE

FABI + ROSI

G’RAJ MAHAL

A choice pizza place for a spontaneous

401 W 2nd St

509 Hearn St

73 Rainey St

night out. Fresh and simple. Try the roast-

(512) 494 1500

(512) 236 0642

(512) 480 2255

ed olives and the kale salad, too!

Not your standard barbecue fare, meats

A husband and wife team cook up deli-

Growing from a sprawling food trailer,

cious European-style dishes like pork

G’Raj Mahal’s new dine-in space still of-

JEFFREY’S

eye glazed with brown sugar and mus-

schnitzel and paella.

fers the tasty Indian fare that built its rep-

1204 W Lynn St

tard. Tucked away in the historic Schnei-

utation as the Rainey Street go-to. Grab

(512) 4775584

der Brothers Building in the 2nd Street

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

a beer or wine at the indoor bar or enjoy

This historic Clarksville favorite has man-

District.

306 E 53rd St

people watching over a generous helping

tained the execution, top-notch service,

(512) 459 1010

of your favorite Masala from the patio be-

and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere

LENOIR

Small, neighborhood restaurant in Hyde

fore calling it a night.

that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

1807 S 1st St

food at reasonable prices. Come early for

GREEN PASTURES RESTAURANT

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious

Dollar Oyster Tuesdays.

811 W Live Oak St

1601 Waterston Ave

French-inspired prix-fixe meal in an inti-

(512) 444 4747

(512) 477 5584

mate dining room and table that seats just

FRANKLIN BARBECUE

Feast on continental brunch under the pa-

Rustic, continental fare with an emphasis

34 diners.

900 E 11th St

tio’s majestic oaks. Try the milk punch; it’s

on fresh, local and organic ingredients.

(512) 653 1187

legendary!

ing patio.

tizers, delicious main courses, all inspired

wine list, it’s the perfect setting to celebrate any special occasion.

are given an Austin twist, like the rib-

(512) 215 9778

Park serving thoughtful, locally-sourced

tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

127


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .C O M T O V I E W T H E E N T I R E O N L I N E D I N I N G G U I D E

LITTLE BARREL & BROWN

NO VA KITCHEN & BAR

PERLA’S SEAFOOD & OYSTER BAR

SEARSUCKER

1716 S Congress Ave

87 Rainey St

1400 S Congress Ave

415 Colorado St

(512) 582 1229

(512) 382 5651

(512) 291 7300

(512) 394 8000

From the owners of Botticelli's, this little

Subtle design elements make the space co-

A South Congress staple. Expect the fresh-

Stylish Southern fare from San Diego ce-

resto serves New American/comfort food.

hesive and modern, and its creative twists

est fish and oysters flown in daily from

lebrity chef Brian Malarkey. Go for the

With an impressive 24 seats, this restaurant

on classic, comforting dishes from a pork

both coasts, carefully prepared with sim-

decadent small plates: duck fat fries with

boasts the biggest bar on South Congress.

belly/sirloin burger to seasonally topped

ple yet elegant flavors. Go early on a nice

tomato jam and prosciutto "dust," farm

flatbread pizza.

day to eat oysters and people watch on

bird lollipops with bleu cheese, and the

their fantastic front porch.

“cowboy caviar.”

LUCKY ROBOT 1303 S Congress Ave

ODD DUCK

(512) 444 8081

1201 S Lamar

QUI

SECOND BAR + KITCHEN

A futuristic dining experience on South

(512) 433 6521

1600 E 6th St

200 Congress Ave

Congress, inspired by the vibrant culture

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mor-

(512) 436 9626

(512) 827 2750

and cuisine of Tokyo.

tar, Odd Duck was the first venture from

Chef Paul Qui’s headquarters is one of the

Another venture from Chef David Bull,

acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect

hottest new spots in town for an unparal-

Second offers a swanky bistro experience

LUCY’S FRIED CHICKEN

seasonal fare and drinks with a Texas in-

leled dining experience set under an airy,

in the heart of the 2nd Street District.

5408 Burnet Rd

fluence at this South Lamar oasis.

beautiful backdrop.

2218 College Ave

OLAMAIE

RUSSIAN HOUSE

1417 S 1st St

(512) 297 2423

1610 San Antonio St

307 E 5th St

(512) 326 1999

Two locations, same straight-up Southern

(512) 474 2796

(512) 428 5442

The culinary masterminds behind La

goodness, from moon pies to fried green

A menu that would leave any Southerner

Step into Russian House and you’ll for-

Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a mod-

tomatoes to corn muffins to the crème de

drooling, with a dash of contemporary cu-

get you’re even in Austin. Come here for a

ern twist. An intimate outdoor area, com-

la crème: fried chicken.

linary concepts. The dessert menu offers

slow, relaxing evening to experience deli-

plete with a Thai spirit house, makes for

your classic apple pie, or alternatively a more

cious Russian cuisine, and don’t miss out

an unforgettable experience.

trendy goat’s cheese caramel ice cream.

on their many infused vodkas!

(512) 236 1022

OLIVE & JUNE

SALTY SOW

315 Congress Ave

Created by Rainey Street proprietor

3411 Glenview Ave

1917 Manor Rd

(512) 482 8842

Bridget Dunlap, Mettle offers a diverse,

(512) 467 9898

(512) 391 2337

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s

often-experimental menu exciting for om-

Celebrated Austin Chef Shawn Cirkiel cre-

Salty Sow serves up creative signature

Attic draws from global inspirations and

nivores and vegetarians alike.

ated this southern Italian-style restaurant

drinks, including a Blueberry-Lemon

serves up inventive cocktails in a historic

with a menu that highlights local, seasonal

Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy with

downtown building.

MOONSHINE

ingredients and includes Southern and

sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for

303 Red River St

some Northern Italian favorites.

late-night noshing.

Both a popular dinner and brunch spot,

OLIVIA

SAWYER & CO.

(512) 628 4466

Moonshine’s decadent Southern comfort

2043 S Lamar Blvd

4827 E Cesar Chavez St

Bold, authentic flavors with ingredients

food is a downtown favorite.

(512) 804 2700

(512) 531 9033

imported straight from Mexico; cozy out-

A brunch favorite emphasizing fresh and

Bringing more Cajun and soul food options

door seating.

local produce; an exciting and diverse

to the east side. The mid-century modern de-

menu, from foie gras to French toast.

sign adds quirk to some seriously good food.

SWAY

(512) 514 0664 &

METTLE

SWIFT’S ATTIC

507 Calles St

128 OCTOBER 2015

TAKOBA 1411 E 7th St

(512) 236 9599

tribeza.com


THE BACKSPACE

UCHIKO

507 San Jacinto St

4200 N Lamar Blvd Ste 140

(512) 474 9899

(512) 916 4808

Classic antipasta and exquisite pizzas hot

The sensational sister creation of Uchi,

out of the wood-fired brick oven straight

and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui.

from Naples.

Try the bacon tataki!

THE GROVE WINE BAR + KITCHEN

VINO VINO

800 W 6th St

4119 Guadalupe St

(512) 236 1440

(512) 465 9282

6317 Bee Cave Rd

Two words, mussels and fries. This clas-

(512) 327 8822

sic, dimly-lit wine joint offers exceptional

Lively, popular Westlake wine bar and

shared plates and has the some of the

Italian restaurant. The wine list boasts

friendliest service around.

more than 250 wines by the bottle. WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE TRACE

609 W Sixth St

200 Lavaca St

(512) 542 3380

(512) 542 3660

This cute downtown café serves a mean

At W Austin, TRACE focuses on responsi-

morning shrimp and grits — your perfect

bly- and locally-sourced ingredients from

hangover remedy. Also an array of deli-

Texan farmers and artisans. Great out-

cious pastries, fresh brewed coffee and

door seating and excellent service.

some killer sandwiches for lunch.

TRULUCK’S

WINFLO OSTERIA

400 Colorado St

1315 W 6th St | (512) 582 1027

(512) 482 9000

Classic Italian fare made simply and with

Enjoy nightly entertainment over steak or

locally-sourced ingredients.

fresh-catch seafood. Truluck’s serves the freshest crab, direct from their own fish-

WINK

eries, which they incorporate into nearly

1014 N Lamar Blvd Ste E

every dish.

(512) 482 8868 Rooted in the traditions of the slow food

UCHI

movement, come to Wink for a truly farm-

801 S Lamar Blvd

to-table meal. Stop in for their incredible

(512) 916 4808

happy hour, or stay a little longer with the

Chef Tyson Cole has created an inventive

5- or 7-course chef ’s tasting menu.

menu that puts Uchi foremost among sushi spots in Austin.

tribeza.com OCTOBER 2015

129


AT JEFFERSON SQUARE 1601 WEST 38TH STREET AUSTIN, TX 78731 WWW.ZINKEVERYDAY.COM 512.502.5836

Vegan Jaunt Handbag $128


October 8, 2015

CONTIGO/GARDNER

RAMEN TATSU-YA

FRANKLIN BBQ

JUSTINE’S

WU CHOW

TRAVAASA

UCHI/UCHIKO

EDEN EAST

LENOIR

Charity event benefiting Sustainable Food Center & Urban Roots

Thanks to our Sponsors

TICKETS AND MORE INFO: edibleaustin.com/chefauction

M o n a L i s a’ s C Lo s e t

3703 Kerbey Lane 512.363.5802

monalisascloset.com Tue - Sat 10-6


style

STREET FA SHION

JENNIFER FERRELL in boots

from Sheplers, a belt from Nordstrom, and a necklace handmade by her mother-in-law.

ALLISON DEJONG

MEGAN GRISBY

IVORY CHARLES ASHVY

W H AT AU S T I N I S W E A R I N G T O. . .

UT Tailgate

JIAHUI HUO

The Texas Longhorns are back for a second season under Coach Charlie Strong. On September 12, we caught up with some fashionable football fans before the Longhorns took on Rice for a win.

a freshman and Chinese native, this was Jiahui's first UT tailgate.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y D A N I E L C AVA Z O S

BRYAN MAKIN & JERRAD KOLLER are

self declared "undefeated at tailgating".

CLAIRE BRODY

in a top from Anthropologie and a vintage Dooney & Bourke bag.

132 OCTOBER 2015

tribeza.com

KATHY LODEN in a scarf and

shirt from Sue Patrick, boots from Allens, and earrings from Kendra Scott.

BROOKE BEERMAN


Shown: The 214 Bentwood Chair - With Knot designed by Michael Thonet.

CLASSIC

CHAIR. MODERN

TWIST.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


October Architecture Issue 2015  

Like many newcomers, my first evening in Austin culminated with a late night performance at the Continental Club. I don’t remember who playe...

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