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T R IBE Z A 44

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features Show & Tell The Cold War New to Town

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cover by dan winters

Behind the Scenes

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Social Hour

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Object of Our Affection

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Communit y

Kristin Armstrong

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Creatively Speaking

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Exposed

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Office Style

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Perspective: TJ Tucker

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My Life

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Style Pick

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Arts

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

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Style

Things We Love

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Dining

Dining Pick

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Our Little Secret

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photographs clockwise from left: dachis group presents TRIBEZA Style week, photography by john pesina; tj tucker, photography by leann mueller; cody haltom's studio, photography by bill sallans; hopsfields, photography courtesy of hopsfields; paul fucik's surfboard, photography by adam voorhes.

Contents


Follow your bliss.* *Without packing a single suitcase.

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Editor’s Letter

Anniversary

year

it wa s i m p o s s i b l e n ot to b e i n s pi r e d

PUBLISHER PUBliSHer

George T. Elliman EDITOR + editor creative director

Lauren Smith Ford DESIGNER deSiGner

Avalon McKenzie Editorial editorial Assistant aSSiStant + Events eventS

Carolyn Harrold

Senior Account accoUnt ExeCutives execUtiveS

Ashley Beall Andrea Brunner Kimberly Chassay principals PrinciPalS

Elliman George T. Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

by our surroundings at the photo shoot for the home spotlighted on this month’s cover and in the feature “The Balcones House.” Elizabeth Alford, her husband, Michael Young (both of Pollen Architecture), children graciously openeddesigners their truein labor of love to our crew, and we iand ' v e their l e a rtwo ned a lot from the graphic my life — that less is more, all enjoyed pretending it was our house for that a day, imagining the dinner partiescolors we how clean and simple design is powerful, you don’t always need bright would have or the pleasure even of glancing up fromthe a good book seeing theand wonderful to make a bold statement, to appreciate beauty of and a minimalist view of thedesk, treetops from the house. You could how every detailAustin in the has home had organized as everything has its place in feel a designer’s world. such been painstakingly thought out to achieve an end result that feels ultramodern but a talented community of designers, so we decided to celebrate them by devoting warm and livable the same time. Alford her family this entire issue toattheir art, calling it Theand Design Issue. of makers have created the ideal space for their vibrant brood.

tk monday

In our main feature “Show & Tell,” we invited 13 studios or individuals to take I must giveand special thanks ourspread amazing photographer the reigns design theirto own that showcases aCasey few ofDunn their(pictured favorite right), who despite tearingown his ACL and having knee surgery came through the shoot pieces. TRIBEZA’s superstar designer Avalon McKenzie and I for excitedly This mustache man illustrated by after being offfile, crutches justall a few days.visual Caseytreats. has a fine eye out for shooting opened each as theyfor were unique Check the workinteriors, of (in Bryan Keplesky charmed us all. and we were honored to appear) have himArts photograph the cover and three of the articles the order in which they + Recreation, Ptarmak, DJ Stout, Helms in the issue. It Bryan was theKeplesky, stories behind the stories about Austin’s tight-knit Workshop, Cody Haltom, Foxtrot Bravo Alpha, Calebarchitecture Owen Everitt, Ryan Rhodes, Joy Gallagher, community thatMason we alsoMcFee enjoyed hearing and Frank27-page Farkashspread. of Moontower are the subjects David Kampa, and Frank— + Greg VictorEsparza in the whopping For this(who month’s Perspective of our Profile in Style) in the studiodirector course that Alford taught at Mell (whose spectacles are And column, we invited TJwere Tucker, thefirst creative of Texas Monthly, toUT; share hisLawrence personal journey with design. featured on thethrilling “Object new of Our Affection” a good friend foodie of Alford’s after theyMegan presented at Pecha Kucha; with so many people, placespage) and became things on the Austin scene, writer Giller updates us on and Elizabeth Baird, who works Lawrence, didrevered a beautiful of propas styling the home of Tommy and whatarchitect not to miss in “New to Town.” Most for people know the Danjob Winters an award-winning photographer, Lauren themany owners of Lamberts, Perla’s,designer and the soon-to-be-open Elizabeth Café, for the on feature “Curb but he isMoorman, also (among other things) a gifted and illustrator. He createdStreet the original piece the cover Appeal.” as well as the eight-page series of illustrations entitled “Cold War.” As always, we are honored that he takes the time to collaborate with us amongst the many international magazine stories and advertising campaigns he shoots. In Exposed, meet Russell Hill, one of the brains behind the upcoming home improvements store TreeHouse. For this month’s Architecture issue, staff had great intothroughout the way Austinites live, design and We build. hope that If you missed anything fromour Style Week No. 8,fun getdelving the recap our Social Hour pages. areWe in the midst you’ll join us in celebrating this issue at the Better Backyard Series that we are co-hosting at Breed & Co. on 29th Street. of working on one of my favorite issues of the year — The People Issue, profiles of who we deem the 10 People of the On October 15,crowning three of our favorite — in Burton Architects, Pollen Thoughtbarn will Year, then the of the 10 tofirms Watch 2012 Baldridge who always seem to go on toArchitecture, do incredibleand things for Austin— (and build a children’s playscape that will be auctioned off at the event, with all proceeds benefiting the architect’s charity the world). A special thanks to all the designers I have crossed paths with who have each taught me how to see theof choice. the details on which page 37. month brings theinAIA Homes Tour official Austin x Design events, world inGet a different way, is This just what wealso hope diving to this issue doesand forthe you. a month-long series of “celebrating design in both built and natural environments.”

Autumn Ashley Kaci Lee Borowski Sheila Buenrostro Dawn Kay Brittnee Rhodes Michelle Sereno Margo Sivin

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tribeza.com

Lauren Smith Ford lauren@tribeza.com lauren@tribeza.com

Gutter Credits

interns internS


A u s t i n a r t s + c u lt u r e

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Tim McClure Illustrators

Joy Gallagher Dan Winters

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Casey Dunn LeAnn Mueller John Pesina Annie Ray Bill Sallans Hayden Spears Adam Voorhes WRITERS

Megan Giller Jackie Rangel Karen O. Spezia TJ Tucker Jill Visit

Copyright @ 2011 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. mailing address 706a west 34th street austin, texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 fax (512) 474 4715 www.tribeza.com Founded in March of 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine.


Style Week

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TRIBEZA Fashion Show at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum 1. Mary Yancy, Anne Elizabeth Wynn & Rosa Rivera 2. Kris Krause, Andra Liemandt & Kelly Haselwood 3. Morgan Nelson & Annie Deedee Massey 4. Kevin Burns & Paula Greenfield 5. Matt & Jessica Conaway 6. A model in Service Menswear 7. Deborah Green, Armando Zambrano & Bobbi Topfer 8. Rebecca Baker, Kelly Sellers & Eloise Dejoria 9. A model in By George 10. A model in Julian Gold 11. Miranda Darr, Danyel Alexander & Tanda Fox 12. Tyler White & Casey Miller

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P h oto g r a ph y by j o h n p e s i n a


FAMOUS AUSTIN COWS MOO-VING TO ‘LIVE’ AUCTION

VIP GUEST JAY LENO! FOR VIP ACCESS: 512-225-5299

Benefitting SuperHero Kids at Dell Children’s Hospital

Presented by Milton Verret

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Kids Welcome!

Sunday November 13th at the ACL-Live Moody Theatre at W Hotel. Bidding Starts Promptly at 6pm. Cocktail Attire. Black Tie Optional. Millions of visitors and Austin residents have enjoyed the famous full size Art Cows lining the streets of downtown Austin since July. Now it’s time for these cows to start moo-ving to a new home! Join Austin philanthropist Milton Verret and U.S. Money Reserve as they present a once in a lifetime opportunity for the general public to buy these famous works of art at one of the city’s greatest auctions in history! It all takes place on Sunday night, November 13th when 40 Cows from the herd will be displayed on stage, up for auction one at a time, at the ACL-Live Moody Theatre at the W Hotel. Each cow, decorated by local Austin artists with themes highlighting the great state of Texas, will be available for bid with NO RESERVE; meaning that the highest bid takes home each amazing work of art. Cows will go from $500 to $10,000. The proceeds benefit the Superhero Kids at Dell Children’s Hospital of Austin, which means all the money stays right here. Less than 2,000 seats are remaining for this superstar event that everyone in the city will be talking about. It will be a complete sellout with a who’s who of Austinites in attendance. Do not wait to secure your VIP Access. The Live Auction begins promptly at 6pm. Don’t be left out of one of Austin’s biggest, most exciting events of the year: the famous Art Cow Live Auction!


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TRIBEZA Rock + Runway Show at the American Legion 1. Joanna Wilkinson & Jillian Newman 2. Katie Ferguson, Katy Snell & Tizi Adams 3. Stephen Sowan & Claire Griffy 4. Bobby Johns & Steve Shuck 5. Mark Ashby, Michele Lorenz & Tony Senecal 6. Lindsey Sauerzopf & Baldwin Cunningham 7. Models wearing looks from Allens Boots and By George 8. Alysha Walker & Matt Rainwaters 9. Lauren Cummings & Jennifer Williams 10. A model in By George 11. Jesse Plemons 12. Blake Reeves & Mayra Garza 13. Colton Gerard with models wearing coats from his collection

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P h oto g r a ph y by j o h n p e s i n a


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TRIBEZA Style Week Kickoff at W Austin and Shear Style Hair Show at Palm Door Style Week Kickoff Party: 1. Sara & Lati Domi 2. Clay Smith, Maggie Stephens & Erin Driscoll 3. Celina Menchaca & Laura Komkov 4. Chuck & Jill Sack 5. Katherine Burciaga, Laura Hamilton and Caitlan Hickey Shear Style Hair Show: 6. Lashandra Royster & Kenisha Williams 7. Shelley Godfrey & Marilee Ransom 8. Kevin Cabiya & Ashley Hartgrove 9. JosĂŠ Buitron & Bill Pitts 10. Portland, Lindsey Wirth, Isaac Stryker, Mandy Denson & Tim Patrick 11. Hair & makeup by Propaganda Hair Group 12. Melissa Howui, Brianda Chapa & Christina Clark 13. Alicia Ward & Cassidy Blackwell

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Style Brunch + Designer Showcase at Shoreline Grill and SKETCH at Beehive Style Brunch: 1. Caitlin Ryan, Camille Styles & Alex Winkleman 2. Shiloh Uhlir, Lacey Miller, Megan Moore & Jenny Murphy 3. Martha Lynn Kale & Sarah Reeves 4. Yvonne Lambert, Tolly Moseley & Danielle Thomas 5. Elizabeth Good, Joanna McCreary & Emily Keast 6. Emily Hallman 7. Ricky Hodge, Victoria Avila & Sofia Avila SKETCH: 8. Tania Quintanilla, Peggy Blum & Kerri Curtis 9. Sonali Khosla & Mala Khosla 10. Erica Holley & Eden Young 11. Mandy Dugan, Marques Harper & Kate Risinger

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Social Hour

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A selection of party pics from happenings in every corner of the city.

2 1 Ann Richards School Birthday Bash

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The Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders celebrated its fourth anniversary with a bash at the stunning Westlake home of Dr. John Hogg and David Garza.

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Glitz

Supporters gathered at the home of Cord and Anne Shiflet for Glitz, a benefit for Out Youth, an Austin nonprofit that provides a safe space for gay and transgender teens. The event was co-chaired by Tanya Burdick and Clay Smith.

Andy Roddick Foundation Gala

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No one gets the party started quite as well as Sir Elton John, who performed at this year’s Andy Roddick Foundation Gala held at ACL Live at The Moody Theater. Guests enjoyed dinner, a live auction and a performance by the man himself. The sold out evening raised over one million dollars for local Austin charities. Ann Richards School: 1. Sofia Hruby, Nancy Smith & Erin Simons 2. Nancy Gray & John Hogg 3. David Garza & Marina Sifuentes Glitz: 4. Sivan & Stephan Silver 5. Aubrey Wilkerson with Anne & Cord Shiflet 6. Travis Cordingly & Edgar Aguillon Andy Roddick: 7. Brooklyn Decker 8. Oscar Torres & Anna Anami 9. Fred Couples & Midge Trammell 10. James Blake 11. Jonathan & Lauren Creath 12. Kathryn & Josh Dines 13. Anil & Katie Mahendra

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P h oto g r a ph y by j o h n p e s i n a


AUSTIN 512.231.3700 © SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 2011 ONLINE: SAKS.COM FACEBOOK.COM/SAKS TWITTER.COM/SAKS SAKSPOV.COM

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CultureMap Austin Launch Party

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Austin’s new daily digital magazine CultureMap celebrated their launch at Pine Street Station with music from The Crooks, lots of cocktails and treats and an excited crowd.

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Warby Parker at Bows + Arrows

Guests celebrated the opening of the new Warby Parker showroom in Bows + Arrows with food from Contigo, cocktails and music spun by Josh and Steve from White Denim.

CultureMap Lauch Party: 1. Mimi Klasson-Imler, Corinne Kimbro & Sarah Stimulensen 2. Josh Mazour of Crooks 3. Taylor Cumbie & Rachel H. Malish 4. Kelly Schneider, Stephen Newman & Veronica Castelo 5. Jocelyn Selig & Caroline Hammond Bows + Arrows: 6. Josh Bisch & Andrea Wagner 7. Jessica Auer & Melissa Rivera 8. Lauren & Chase Browder 9. Phillip Orchard & Constance Dykhuizen 10. Jenny Lee & Diana Pittman 11. Ed & Kerri Hughey 12. Julianna Tran & Kevin Yeh 13. Joel Pall & Kristy Matthews 14. Kelsi Berry & Steven Miller

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We would like to announce that our store will be closed during our restructuring process. We are excited about the changes and future of Gilda Grace Collections but we’ll miss you all. Happy Holidays and we look forward to seeing you at our relaunch in 2012. Please keep in touch with us and receive updates www.gildagracecollections.com


community

column

Finding Your Voice BY K R I STI N ARMSTRONG

I have always admired anyone with a gift for the arts — people who can paint, draw, sculpt, make music, dance, craft, imagine and create. The Bible says we aren’t supposed to covet anyone else’s gifts so I try to be grateful for the gift of words. But if God had asked me in advance, and if I were feeling

bold, I might have had the nerve to tell him that I would really like the gift of a beautiful voice. Or if I were being really greedy, I would actually like the gift of words and the voice so I could write my own stuff. When I was young, I didn’t know what gifts I had, and in my au-

i llu s t r at i o n by j oy g a ll ag h er For a limite d- e dit ion p r int , c o nta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c o m .

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community

column

I labored over the binder that held all the song titles, wanting to find the perfect song to showcase my talent.

dacity I figured all of them were up for grabs. I wondered if I could maybe be a singer, so I put albums on my old Sanyo stereo and turned the volume way up and sang at the top of my lungs. Luckily for everyone else in my family, my room was above the garage. Once on a family outing to Six Flags Over Georgia, I came face to face with an opportunity to discover my future singing stardom….a voice recording studio! I begged my parents, who were dubious about wasting the money but acquiesced because they did not want to crush my fragile dreams. They were probably shocked that their quiet, nerdy daughter would voluntarily step so far outside of her comfort zone. I labored over the binder that held all the song titles, wanting to find the perfect song that would showcase my talent. I considered some Janis Joplin, thinking I could make my voice gravelly and sound older than I was. Or maybe something more current, like the Go-Go’s or Cyndi Lauper? Eventually I settled on a classic, one I had sung in my room a million times — “The Rose,” by Bette Midler. I should have noted the way my parents’ eyebrows went up or my brother’s eyes rolled, but I was going for it, and nothing could stop me now. My mouth felt thick and sticky and my hands were frozen and sweat-soaked when I stood in front of the microphone. The guy gave me a brief overview and told me to watch for the red light and then the song would play in my headphones and that was my cue to begin. I gulped. Some say love, it is a river that drowns the tender reed. Some say love, it is a razor that leaves your soul to bleed…. I was so nervous that I had to swallow more than usual and it was throwing my timing off. I couldn’t tell how I sounded because

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everything sounded great with Bette crooning in my ears, guiding me. I tried to will myself to relax, pretending I was just sitting next to my stereo on the daybed up in my room. By the grace of God, I finally got through the song. My parents paid and we got a cassette tape of my recording, and we went to get some lunch to celebrate. We sat down at a picnic table and just as I was about to take a bite out of my cheeseburger, I heard it — the first few notes of my song. I hadn’t noticed before that they were PLAYING the recorded songs over the loudspeakers at the park! My family suddenly got very quiet. The tinny voice I heard was most definitely not me, could not be me, no way did my voice squeak and quiver like that! My eyes must have registered pure panic, because my family understood what needed to happen next without words. We threw the rest of our lunch in the trash and took off running for the car. I wanted to burst into tears at the humiliation of it all, added to the death of a dream, but by the time my family and I got to the car, wheezing and laughing, I had to laugh too. There have been threats over that cassette tape for years; that it would surface at my rehearsal dinner, etc. I secretly hope my brother plays it at my wake. I got over my dreams of being a great singer, and settled for being an okay singer. I had a solo singing part in a play in high school and my family didn’t even run for the doors (as far as I know, it was dark in there). These days I sing in my car, my shower and my church and I write lyrics without music in a journal with frayed corners. An artist lives within us all.


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section s u b s epcr toifoi nl e community exposed

Bryony GomezPalacio + Armin Vit founders, underconsideration

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est is not in the vocabulary of creative power couple, Bryony Gomez-Palacio and Armin Vit. After working in New York for two of the world’s most renowned design firms, Addison and Pentagram, the couple moved to Austin in 2009. In addition to writing, lecturing around the world and designing for clients like Rizzoli, Creativity magazine and various non-profit organizations, Gomez-Palacio and Vit founded UnderConsideration — the only blog included in national design museum Cooper-Hewitt’s third Triennial, Design Life Now. Since its creation, UnderConsideration has launched seven sites — Art of Menu, Brand New, For Print Only, Quipsologies, Speak Up, The Design Encyclopedia and Word It, all focused on creating dialogue and appreciation for design. In September, UnderConsideration also hosted their second Brand New Conference in San Francisco. The one-day event included eight presentations and an after party. When the couple is not designing, you can probably find them running along Shoal Creek or spending time as a family. a. mckenzie

11 Questions

f o r a r m i n + B ryo n y What piece of art would you like to own? Bryony: One of my mother’s paintings. She lives in Mexico. Or a Picasso. Armin: I would love to have a Jeff Koons balloon animal. Where would you live if you weren’t here in Austin? Bryony: New York. I think our hearts will always be in New York. If you weren’t writing books and running UnderConsideration, what do you think you would be doing? Bryony: Graphic design for clients, cooking and running.

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Armin: I think I would like to be a garbage man. You get to work outside. What period in design is your favorite? Bryony: Modern design from the 1950s. Armin: Mid-1990s grunge. When and where are you happiest? Bryony: Outside. Being active. Running or reading. Armin: The corny answer would be “time with my family.” The real answer: 5:30am, coffee in hand, ready to start the workday.  How did you all meet? Bryony: We met at a club in Mexico City. It was really late at night.

What do you miss about childhood? Bryony: Not having to have a schedule. I also miss growing up on a farm with my four brothers. Armin: Video games. I used to play a lot of EA’s Madden. Who are your fantasy dinner party guests? Armin: Louis C.K., Jerry Seinfeld and Ricky Gervais. Who is your favorite fictional character? Bryony: Anne of Green Gables. Armin: Garfield. What do you believe makes for a successful life? Not to sound superfluous, but money. Makes living life a little easier. 

P h oto g r a ph y by Jay B s au c eda


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community

perspective

i n hi s ow n wor ds

TJ Tucker

How a small town boy from West Texas who loved to draw became the creative director for the state’s most renowned publication, Texas Monthly

I

grew up on a ranch in West Texas. One day, when I was six years old, I spied my dad sketching something on a piece of torn cattle feed sack. He’d just formed a partnership with another rancher, and he was sketching out ideas for the new venture’s cattle brand. It was simple: the first letter of each man’s last name — a “T” and an “H,” combined into one symbol. I’d seen cattle brands before, of course, but I’d never really considered their origin. It was an enlightening moment — the idea that you could marry form and content to communicate something meaningful. Therein began an obsession with drawing and painting. My small-town elementary school didn’t teach art, and I was perpetually in trouble for drawing in class. My mom decided to send me to the one and only local art teacher, Gene Swinson. Gene was a close family friend, a World War II hero and a grand imagineer. I can still recall his small studio, where he had books and magazines stacked floor to ceiling. Maps, photographs, paintings and spoils of war lined the walls. Interestingly, Gene never forced me to draw or paint during our sessions; he had a very Bohemian approach. His number one goal was simply to keep kids interested. Some days, we didn’t even put pencil to paper. Instead we’d play war games with lead soldiers and wooden tanks on his huge model table, or we’d pore over all those books and magazines. Texas Monthly and Rolling Stone were two of my favorites. They had swagger. I didn’t know why they looked so much better than other publications; I just knew they stood out. In 1996 I headed for Lubbock to attend Texas Tech University, where I majored in graphic design. Tech didn’t have publication classes then, so a future in magazines seemed improbable. My

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sophomore year, I was working at an ad agency part-time when I got a call from Artie Limmer, a photographer who ran an in-house design shop at Tech called Creative Services. He needed someone who could art direct and design a vast array of printed materials for the school, including a science and research publication called Vistas, the chancellor’s annual report, books, logos, billboards, bus wraps, websites, media guides and outdoor signage. It was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up: Here was a job that would allow me to make not only big decisions but also, and more importantly, big mistakes. So I signed on. I especially loved working on Vistas. I began to think of the doctors, researchers and professors who were profiled in its pages as celebrities, and I aimed to treat the stories with as much imagination and grandeur as possible. I’ll confess, at times my concepts left people scratching their head. They probably felt I was being a little too ambitious. But my work at Creative Services certainly beefed up my portfolio: Suddenly, I had publication experience and was winning awards. One day in design class, I was talking with one of my professors, and he asked me what I wanted to do after graduation. Hand to heart, I looked him in the eye and said, “I’m going to be the next art director of Texas Monthly.” That dream didn’t get realized right away — but almost. In 2003, I was contemplating a move to Santa Fe to work at Outside when I learned that an associate art director position had opened up at Texas Monthly. I soon found myself on a plane bound for Austin. Incredibly, I ended up landing the job, and over the next three-and-a-half years I worked under editor Evan Smith and art director Scott Dadich. That’s when my magazine education

really began. I say that now with tongue pressed firmly in cheek: The fact of the matter was that I was a shy, greener-than-grass rookie, and Evan and Scott were Category 5 forces at Texas Monthly. But they took me under their respective wings, allowed me in on decision-making, and ultimately taught me to think differently and outside the box when it came to magazines. So much has happened since then. I was promoted to art director in 2006, when I got to run the art department and, with my talented staff, focus with more of a singular vision on the magazine’s look and feel, cover to cover. I became creative director in 2009, which meant that, in addition to my regular magazine duties, I’d now oversee creative content for the entire Texas Monthly brand. The magazine is so much more today than a print product: We exist online, on tablet, in apps, on Facebook, on Twitter. We even host a popular BBQ Festival once a year. Texas Monthly’s current editor, Jake Silverstein, has an incredible respect for the reader, and together we’ve had great fun producing pages and extending the TM brand. At the end of the day, though, my passion still lies in art directing and designing the magazine. The process never gets old: starting over each month with caliber content, listening to the smart voices around me — editors, writers, designers, photographers, illustrators — and aiming for that authentic, memorable, graphic finish. It’s far from a one-man show at Texas Monthly; anyone who has worked there will tell you it’s a special place. Why? The people. It’s a highly collaborative environment, and that may just be my favorite thing about coming in to the office every day. True successful collaboration is the most satisfying part of my job. P h oto g r a ph y by l e a n n m u ell er


Introducing this year’s Introducing this year’s celebrity stars! celebrity stars!

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The Honorable Samuel T. Biscoe The Honorable Samuel T. Biscoe George T. Eilliman George T. Eilliman

Publisher - Tribeza Magazine Publisher - Tribeza Magazine

Travis County Judge Travis County Judge - Commissioners Court Commissioners Court


Kumara Wilcoxon Kumara Wilcoxon

Vice President Vice President - Heuven Properties VanVan Heuven Properties

Ryan Nail Ryan Nail

Founder - Corefit Austin Founder - Corefit Austin

Carol Adams Carol Adams

President - Animal Trustees President - Animal Trustees of Austin of Austin

Vaughn Brock Vaughn Brock

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november Calendars arts & entertainment

Entertainment Calendar Music B-52s

Nov 2, 6pm Stubb’s Guy Clark Tribute

Nov 2, 7pm Michael and Susan Dell Hall The Miles Davis Experience

Nov 2, 8pm Bass Concert Hall

Fun Fun Fun Fest

Nov 4-6 Auditorium Shores

Peter Murphy And She Wants Revenge

Nov 5, 6:30 ACL Live at The Moody Theater Bob Schneider

Nov 10, 8:30pm ACL Live at The Moody Theater Method Man

Nov 10, 7pm Stubb’s

The Sounds

Nov 11, 8pm La Zona Rosa

Aretha Franklin

Nov 15, 6:30pm ACL Live at The Moody Theater Morrissey

Nov 15, 7:30pm Bass Concert Hall Ghostland Observatory

Nov 19, 6:30pm ACL Live at The Moody Theater Idina Menzel

Nov 20, 7pm The Long Center David Hidalgo

Nov 30, 8pm Bass Concert Hall

Comedy Joan Rivers

Nov 3, 8pm Paramount Theatre

Ron White

Nov 4, 9:30pm Paramount Theatre Carlos Mencia

Nov 17, 10:30pm Cap City Comedy Club A Tuna Christmas

Nov 22, 8pm Paramount Theatre

Theater Interpreti Veneziani

Nov 3, 8pm Bass Concert Hall Ballet Austin II’s Peter and the Wolf

Nov 5-6, 2pm & 4:30pm AustinVentures Studio Theater South Pacific

Nov 8-13 Bass Concert Hall

Other

Luna Negra Dance Theatre

Nov 18, 8pm Bass Concert Hall

Intergalactic Nemesis

Nov 22, 8pm Michael and Susan Dell Hall Spring Awakening

Through Nov 13 ZACH Theatre

Red Hot Patriot

Through Nov 13 ZACH Theatre

Film Film + Food + Focused on Good Film Festival hosted by Lights. Camera. Help.

Nov 4, 6pm CTC Garden

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Nov 5, 11:55pm Alamo Drafthouse Village

Austin Tequila Fest

Nov 4, 7pm Casa Chapala Mexican Grill and Cantina Vintage Market

Nov 5, 10am The Vintage Vault

Artists on Recovery featuring Rob Lowe

Nov 8, 11:30am ACL Live at The Moody Theatre Thrive Austin Festival

Nov 11, 4pm Pine St. Station Comic Con

Nov 11, 4pm Austin Convention Center CharityBash Third Annual Live Auction

Nov 11, 7pm El Sol y La Luna

REC L A I M E D S PAC E

Custom Modular Homes Starting from the $40’s reclaimedspace.com 443 N. Bastrop Hwy | Austin, TX 78741 | 512.844.4366

Christmas at the Caswell House: Candlelight Dinner

Nov 12, 7pm Daniel H. Caswell House

Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure

Nov 13, 6am Downtown Austin

the Spirit of Place Gala

Nov 13, 6pm Four Seasons Hotel

junior league of austin presents a christmas affair

Nov 17-20 Palmer Events Center

Rainforest Partnership Celebration: A Night in the Clouds

Nov 17, 6-9pm Barr Mansion

Ninth Annual Big Reds & Bubbles Wine Tasting

Nov 17, 6:30pm The Driskill


arts & entertainment

ca l e n da r s

Arts Calendar November 4 Visual Arts Center

The Mobile Archive: Video Selections from the Israeli Center for Digital Art and Looking for a Flight Reception: 6-8pm Through Dec 17 November 5 Wally Workman Gallery

Joyce Howell Reception: 6-8pm Through Nov 26

November 11 Gallery Shoal Creek

Marc Burckhardt + Gustavo Torres Reception: 6-8pm Through Dec 3 November 12 AMOA Laguna Gloria

Family Saturday 12-3pm

November 15 Arthouse

Expanded Pursuits: Adult Art Class 6-7:30pm November 18 Visual Arts Center

MAKE and Faculty Exhibition: Part One Reception: 6-9pm Through Dec 17

image courtesy of fun fun fun fest.

November 19 Women & Their Work

Jasmyne Graybill: Home Sweet Home Reception: 7-9pm Through Jan 5 November 22 AMOA Laguna Gloria

Buster Graybill: Progeny of Tush Hog Through Feb 19 November 30 AMOA Laguna Gloria

Whole Hog 7-9pm

Ongoing Arthouse

Sarah Buckius: Trapped Inside Pixels Through Nov 6 Carols Rosales-Silva: National Register LOBBY Projects Through Nov 27 The Anxiety of Photography Through Dec 30 Blanton Museum of Art

Storied Past: Four Centuries of French Drawings Through Dec 31 El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa Through Jan 22 Gallery Shoal Creek

The Sum of All Parts/ New Works by Shawn Camp Through Nov 5 Harry Ransom Center

Frida Kahlo’s Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird Through Jan 8 Banned, Burned, Seized and Censored & The Greenwich Village Bookshop Door: A Portal to Bohemia, 1920-1925 Through Jan 22 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Field Notes Through Dec 4 Watercolors by Nick Swift Through Dec 31 Visual Arts Center

Mika Tajima: The Architect’s Garden Through Dec 17 Women & Their Work

Margaret Meehan: Hystrionics and the Forgotten Arm Through Nov 12

EVENT p i ck

Fun Fun Fun Fest November 4-6 Auditorium Shores funfunfunfest.com

C

arving a niche into Austin’s packed festival scene is no easy feat, yet over the course of six years, Fun Fun Fun Fest has built a devout and eager fan base by delivering a steady stream of independent music and entertainment in enough genres to satisfy the most varied tastes. Founder Graham Williams explains, “I think our fest stands out from the crowd partly due to the talent we book, as we try hard not to cookie-cutter it and copy every fest with the same line up. How many fests have wrestling rings and mechanical bulls and a sexy saxman serenading the crowd between bands?” With its growing popularity, this year FFF will pick up its stakes and move to Auditorium Shores, where this year’s line-up includes such diverse acts as M83, Public Enemy and Slayer, as well as Austin natives Spoon and Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears. In addition to three stages packed with music, Fun Fun Fun Fest features the always-popular Yellow Stage where Alamo Drafthouse tenants Master Pancake and punk rock-legend-turnedspoken-word artist Henry Rollins are set to perform. K. Borowski tribeza.com

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Arthouse

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: Th–F 11–7, Sa 10–5, Su 1–5 arthousetexas.org Austin Children’s Museum

201 Colorado St. (512) 472 2499 Hours: Tu 10–5, W 10–8, Th–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 austinkids.org AMOA Downtown

FREESTANDING A Group Show at Delta Millworks November 12-13 & 19-20 4701 E. 5th St.

T

he East Austin Studio Tour is known for giving attendees an otherwise unseen peek into the creative (and sometimes unorthodox) workspaces of local artists. The Delta Millworks will do just that by opening their doors for two weekends during EAST to present FREESTANDING, a group exhibition. Owner Robbie Davis will transform his spacious wood mill into a temporary art gallery, allowing it to serve as a unique backdrop for works from painters Shanny Lott and Jean Rather, photographers John Langmore and Bob Wynn as well as digital collage artist Peggy Weiss. “This project has been a wonderful collaboration,” says Lott, “It is a mutual admiration society.” The exhibition is free and open to the public. k. borowski

823 Congress Ave. (512) 495 9224 Hours: Tu, W, F 10–5, Th 10–8, Sa 10–6, Su 12–6 amoa.org AMOA Laguna Gloria

3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–Sun 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 amoa.org

Blanton Museum of Art

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org

The Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–6, Su 12–6 thestoryoftexas.com Elisabet Ney Museum

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney French Legation Museum

802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org George Washington Carver Museum

1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver Harry Ransom Center

300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ Library and Museum

2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlib.utexas.edu

Mexic–Arte Museum

419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. Henry Museum

409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5

Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: W–F 10–4:30, Sa–Su 1–4:30 umlaufsculpture.org

Galleries Art on 5th

1501 W. 5th St. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com The Art Gallery at John-William Interiors

3010 W. Anderson Ln. (512) 451 5511 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 , Su 12–5 mannfinearts.com Artworks Gallery

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

photo courtesy of shanny lott.

Art Spaces

Museums


Austin Art Garage

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com Austin Art Space Gallery and Studios

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com Austin Galleries

1219 W. 6th St. (512) 495 9363 Hours: M 10–3, Tu–Sa 10–5 or by appointment austingalleries.com B. HOLLYMAN GALLERY

1202-A W. 6th. St. (512) 825 6866 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5 bhollymangallery.com Birdhouse

1304 E. Cesar Chavez St. By appointment only birdhousegallery.com Brocca Gallery

1103 E. 6th St. (512) 628 1306 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 broccagallery.com

Bydee Art Gallery

1050 E. 11th St., #120 (512) 480 3100 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–7 bydee.com champion

800 Brazos St. (512) 354 1035 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 championcontemporary.com

Creative Research Laboratory

Jean–Marc Fray Gallery

Davis Gallery

La Peña

2832 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 322 2099 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–5 uts.cc.utexas.edu

837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com Flatbed Press

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 flatbedpress.com Gallery 5619

5619 Airport Blvd. (512) 751 2360 gallery5619.org Gallery Black Lagoon

4301 Guadalupe St., Ste. A (512) 371 8838 Hours: W–F 3–7 galleryblacklagoon.com

Gallery Shoal Creek

2905 San Gabriel St., #101 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–6, Sa 11–4 galleryshoalcreek.com grayDUCK gallery

608 W. Monroe Dr. (512) 826 5334 Hours: W–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com Haven Gallery & Fine Gifts

1122 W. 6th St. (512) 477 2700 Hours: M–Sa 11–6, Su 11–4 havengalleryaustin.com

1009 W. 6th St. (512) 457 0077 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 jeanmarcfray.com

227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 9–5, Sa–Su 9–3 lapena–austin.org Lora Reynolds Gallery

360 Nueces St., Ste. C (512) 215 4965 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com Lotus Gallery

1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: Mo–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com Maranda Pleasant Gallery

2235 E. 6th St. (713) 922 8584 By appointment only bigmodernart.com Mass Gallery

916 Springdale Rd. Hours: W 7–9, Sa 12–5 massgallery.org The nancy Wilson Scanlan Gallery

6500 St. Stephen’s Dr. (512) 327 1213 Hours: W–F 9–5 sstx.org

Okay Mountain Gallery

1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. Hours: W 7–9, Sa 12–5 okaymountain.com Positive Images

1118 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1831 Hours: M–Sa 10–5, Su 11–4 Pro–Jex Gallery

1710 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. C (512) 472 7707 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–4 Russell Collection Fine Art

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com sofa

301 E. 33rd St., #7 By appointment only sofagallerytx.com Stephen L. Clark Gallery

1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com Studio 107

411 Brazos St., #107 (512) 477 9092 Hours: Tu–Sa 1–6 studio107.com

Testsite

502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 Hours: Su 2–5 fluentcollab.org

Wally Workman Gallery

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

Women & Their Work

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org Yard Dog

1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

Alternative Spaces ARTPOST: The Center for Creative Expression

4704 E. Cesar Chavez St. artpostaustin.com Austin Presence

2785 Bee Cave Rd., #336 (512) 306 9636 Hours: Tu–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austinpresence.com Big Medium

5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 385 1670 bigmedium.org Clarksville Pottery

4001 N. Lamar Blvd., #200 (512) 454 9079 Hours: M–Sa 10–6:30, Su 12–4 clarksvillepottery.com

Domy Books

913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 476 DOMY Hours: Tue–F 1–9, Sa 12–9, Su 12–7 domystore.com Julia C. Butridge Gallery

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9:30, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/ dougherty/gallery.htm Pump Project Art Complex

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org

Quattro Gallery

12971 Pond Springs Rd. (512) 219 3150 Hours: M–Tu 10–3, W–Sa 11–4 quattrogallery.com Roi James

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 Hours: By appointment only roijames.com United States Art Authority

2906 Fruth St. (512) 476 4455 unitedstatesartauthority.com To have your gallery considered for listing in the Arts Guide, please send a request to events@tribeza.com.


section style t h isnugb ss ewcet l io on ve

Things We Love

MARK Skateboards Skaters with an eye for design have flocked to Austin’s newest line of decks, Mark Skateboards. Founded by Mark Gobble, a long-time skater and educator, and Marc English, an award winning designer, the limited-edition boards are hand silk-screened right here in the USA on sustainably harvested North American maple. For more information, visit markskateboards.com.

Standard Grit Standard Grit Flags are handmade keepsakes designed in Austin and crafted in North Carolina. What started as a causal collaboration between Christian Helms and his sister-in-law, soon evolved into seasonal collections of textile tradition and Southern heritage. These decorative flags encapsulate Southern charm with a rugged, vintage aesthetic. Since Standard Grit only produces three new flags, four times a year, you can be assured of the attention to detail in each hand-sewn stitch. No flagpole? No problem. These one-of-akind flags are often framed, draped over couches or passed along as modern day family heirlooms. Standard Grit flags can be purchased at Yard Dog Art Gallery in Austin and online at standardgrit.com.

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Chuck & Jake The duo behind Austin-based clothing company Chuck & Jake, Chuck Freeman and Jake Hiller, have rethought the pocket. Founded in 2009, these two gents set out to transform the traditional pocket tee to encompass the varied and youthful vibe of our city. Since then, their take on the classic American Apparel crew necks, V-necks and tank tops are uniquely customized with patterned fabric swatches for each hand-sewn pocket. Chuck & Jake reflects the eclectic ethos of Austin in each design without foregoing comfort or style. The fall collection will debut later this month in select Austin boutiques, but for now you can purchase their trendy tees online at chuckandjake.com because “everyone deserves a pocket.” M. Sereno

STANDARD GRIT PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN HELMS, PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRENT HUMPHREyS; MARK SKATEBOARDS PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MARK SKATEBOARDS; CHUCK & JAKE PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CHUCK & JAKE.

With an eye for the details, designers around Austin are making everything from skateboards to creatively crafted clothing.


Shown: Canapo chaise by Franco Albini, Plana coffee table by Charlotte Perriand, Deep rug and Blitz entertainment wall unit.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.814.8702 • scottcooner.com


I T’S B E E N S O L O N G , IT’L L F E E L L I K E T H E F I R S T T I M E R E W A R D Y O U R PAT I E N C E . S A V O R T H E F R E S H E S T F L O R I D A S T O N E C R A B.

Every Monday night, enjoy all-you-can-eat Florida Stone Crab for one low price. From our traps to your table in hours. Make your reservation today. Downtown 4th and Colorado 512 482 9000 Arboretum 183 and Great Hills Trail 512 794 8300 www.trulucks.com


Design “ is D9@HîE6== Everything ” J]^giZZchijY^dhiV`ZdkZg VhegZVY^ci]ZbV\Vo^cZid — Paul Rand — h]dlXVhZi]Z^g[Vkdg^iZYZh^\ch$

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We are a graphic design firm that believes in collaborating with clients and designers who value creative work. Our work grounds itself in technique, process, craftsmanship and the ability to strike a balance between timelessness and trends. At Arts and Recreation we love life, honor our craft and get our hands dirty on a daily basis.

www.arts-rec.com

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CREATE

E L E VAT E

Meet Ptarmak. We craft brands, design packaging, move graphics, and make things — with all our heads, hands and hearts. REMEMBER, PTMK LOVES YOU.


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Pentagram is a multidisciplinary design consultancy with offices in London, New York, Berlin and Austin. It was originally founded by five designers in 1972 and the Austin office was established in 1994. DJ Stout is one of seventeen international Partners and his staff in Austin includes Associate Partner, Julie Savasky, designers Barrett Fry, Stu Taylor, Carla Rogers and Cassandra Cisneros. Pentagram Austin handles a variety of projects for a broad range of national and international clients. 512.476.3076 pentagram.com

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Since 2004 I have worked in Austin, Texas in the disciplines of design, art direction, writing and publishing. Three of my long-term projects have been Misprint Magazine, Birds Barbershop and Fun Fun Fun Fest.

Festival Poster

Cover; Vol 6 No 1

5th Anniversary Poster

Logo

Alison Narro

Annual Event; Misprint Beard & Moustache Competition

Snake Plissken Logo "Event" Poster

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Koozie


Trent Lesikar

Stage Signage

Cover; Vol 5 No 1

Event Poster

Logo

Mural Detail; 41st Street

Erin Williamson

Event Poster

Mural Detail; East 6th Program Illustration

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ALL STAR BLUES JAM

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WITH

poster design by: joygallagher@gmail.com

Tommy Shannon Malford Milligan Gary Clark Jr. Carolyn Wonderland Gary Primich Phil Brown

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Frank+Victor Design is a full-service design and branding firm formed by Josh Finto and Chris Visit in 2007. In that time, they’ve expanded from Josh’s dining room, which they shared with two cats, to a Hyde Park studio of seven designers. Polar opposites on the creative spectrum, they blend their uncommon expertise to go from black and white to gray matter—the stuff behind intelligent, strategy-driven design. While their disparate points of view make for interesting debate on strategy, style and typeface selection, it also enables them to see solutions from every angle, accommodating any type of design challenge that comes their way.

“One of the oldest family-run businesses in Houston is also America's finest bespoke shirt maker. Hamilton Shirt Co. came to us with a great story in need of a fitting brand. We developed a forward-looking image that pays tribute to the past and helped launch their ready-to-wear line in 2010.”

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“To assure the local community that the new W Austin Hotel & Residences would not pave the way to a more Dallas-like downtown, Stratus Properties gave us a call. We adapted the iconic W brand and introduced it as another Austin classic in the making.”


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“We're tech geeks with an unabashed love for learning what makes things tick. Not only do we understand why Widget #AZ1234 is superior to #AZ123, we also can’t wait to get our hands on one. Our penchant for engineer-speak has made us a trusted partner of Silicon Labs.”

“Known for their uncompromising performance and styling, Tigé Boats is one of the fastest-growing inboard boat builders on the water and needed a visual presence that could keep up. Our work reflects the inspired engineering of the boats and the competitive attitude of the people who make them.”

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style

behind the scenes

In Crust we Trust

design renaissance man, ed temple, gives us an inside look at the brand development of home slice pizza.

Each set of menus is based around a different theme. The menus below include a PacMan inspired cover and a cover adopting the look of the Velvet Underground's album, Velvet Underground & Nico, originally designed by Andy Warhol.

For more information, visit homeslicepizza. com, and to view more of Ed Temple's work, visit flickr.com/photos/eatemple.

P h oto g r aph y by hay d en sp e a r s

A recurring icon throughout the restaurant is the Queen of Pies logo — complete with crown & mustache.

Temple has designed many event posters for the restaurant. This poster is for the annual Home Slice-O-Rama Pizza Carnival.

I

t is easy to tell that Home Slice crafts delicious pizza — especially from the 90-minute wait on a Friday night. What sets the South Congress favorite apart is the restaurant’s ability to serve up a fun and memorable experience — along with a mouth-watering slice of pie, of course. From the colorful mural, to the menus, every detail has been accounted for. The art director behind it all is Ed Temple, whose designs promote humor and play. “We wanted to encourage engagement,” Temple says, “When we created the activity books for the restaurant, we wanted parents to want to do them too.” Temple and Home Slice Co-Owner Jen Strickland met while working at Milkshake Media. When Strickland opened the restaurant with her husband Joseph Strickland and Terri Hannifin, she said she knew Temple was the perfect person for the job, “Ed is an idea man who can execute every facet of a project. Not only is he a talented graphic designer and illustrator, but an inspired copywriter too. Many times he'll bring us something he’s been exploring that he thinks we should incorporate and we end up just going with it...having him involved from the beginning has not only helped us solidify our brand but keeps us fresh at the same time.” A. McKenzie tribeza.com

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style

object of our affection

Paul Fucik’s Surfboard A n active member of the Surfrider Foundation and the owner of new East Side design firm Arts and Recreation, Paul Fucik’s cleverly designed shortboard is for more than just showing off in the water. The intriguing sailor adorning the board’s belly is the face of Fucik’s The Slick is Thick awareness campaign in response to the Gulf oil spill. And when Fucik uses it, he hopes the curious sailor will inspire questions and a dialogue about the spill. “We always try to use a bit of humor, to bring awareness through humor,” he explains. Fucik, who grew up surfing in the Gulf near Houston and worked at a board shop doing repairs in high school, shaped the board himself in his childhood

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friend Nick Wiersema’s shop, Chaos Surf boards. He then silkscreened the design on rice paper and “glassed it” to the board. Fucik’s DIY approach speaks to the hands on style at Arts and Recreation, which he started earlier this year after parting ways with the other founding members of Decoder Ring. Their client roster already includes Stubb’s Bar-B-Q, Big Red Sun, Hill Country Conservancy, Thunderbird Marfa, Ballroom Marfa and more, so stay tuned for lots more inspired design sure to come from this shop. C. harrold

P h oto g r aph y by a da m vo o r h e s


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style

column

Creatively Speaking BY Ti m M c Clu r e

cofounder gsd&m

City of the Violet Crown. Austin, Texas isn’t the only city that lays claim to this colorful sobriquet. Turns out Athens, Greece may own the original bragging rights. O. Henry, you may have met your match!

Pindar (522-443 BC), an ancient Greek lyric poet, wrote of his beloved Athens: “City of light, with thy violet crown, beloved of poets, thou art the bulwark of Greece.” William Sydney Porter, writing as O. Henry, was a Johnny-come-lately when he

i l lust r at i o n by j oy g a l l ag h er For a limite d- e dit ion p r int , c o nta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c o m .

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column

Remember that no matter what its origins, the City of the Violet Crown is a colorful reminder of what makes our city unique.

penned these words in Chapter 2 of Tictocq: “The drawing rooms of one of the most magnificent private residences in Austin are ablaze with lights. Carriages line the streets in front, and from gate to doorway is spread a velvet carpet, on which the delicate feet of the guests may tread. The occasion is the entrée into society of one of the fairest buds in the City of the Violet Crown.” The slogan, as we ad folks shamelessly call it, is generally thought to refer to the atmospheric condition more commonly known as the Belt of Venus, a Victorian-era moniker for the pinkish glow or anti-twilight arch that extends roughly 10 to 20 degrees above the horizon over our fair city. Often the glow is separated from the horizon by a dark layer, commonly referred to as the Earth’s shadow or “dark segment.” Meteorologists will tell you that the arch’s light rose color is due to a backscattering of reddened light from the rising or setting Sun. A similar effect can be seen during a total solar eclipse. There are those non-believers, of course, who insist that the term derives from the moonlight towers of Austin, the 31 metal giants erected in 1895 using electricity from Austin’s first power plant on the Colorado River. (Contrary to popular belief, they were never placed in the shape of a star.) The original towers first used carbon arc lamps that were lit nightly by a worker who ascended the 165-foot-tall towers in an elevator that ran up the center of the framework. The carbon arc lamps were replaced in the 1920s by incandescent lamps, and then by mercury vapor lamps in 1936. Seventeen towers are still in use today, and a replica of a moonlight tower serves as the center post for the Christmas tree at the Zilker Park Trail of Lights. My friend Bill Banowsky recently opened Violet Crown Cinema, an art house in Austin’s Second Street District. According to Bill, who

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sold his company, Magnolia Pictures, to Mark Cuban and Todd Wagner in 2003 then went on to run one of their subsidiaries, Landmark Theatres, for several years, he became convinced there was a better model for the art house experience by visiting almost every art cinema in the country. An “art cinema,” by Bill’s definition, features art, independent, documentary and foreign films. Asked how he arrived at the name Violet Crown Cinema, Bill agrees that the City of the Violet Crown is one of Austin’s oldest nicknames, and credits William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. O. Henry, with the name. “It was my wife’s idea,” Bill admits. “She’s the clever one.” Another friend of mine, who shall remain nameless, has a slightly different theory. According to him or her, Austin’s legendary violet crown that often makes an appearance just before dawn or just after dusk, is a unique condition resulting from an unusually high concentration of lithium in the Austin atmosphere. That phenomenon, if true, not only explains why people in Austin are so happy all the time, it would rank right up there with the Northern Lights, a.k.a. Aurora Borealis, and reserve it a place among Texas tall tales with the infamous Marfa Lights. To further confuse the issue, Austin is also home of the Violet Crown Soap Company, Violet Crown Community Works, Violet Crown Computing, Violet Crown Cycles, Violet Crown Garden Club, Violet Crown Radio Players, Violet Crown Realty, Violet Crown Sports Association, the list goes on. So the next time you witness a glorious violet dawn or dusk display in the skies above our beloved Austin, remember that no matter what its origins, the City of the Violet Crown is a colorful reminder of what makes our city unique. Maybe the time has come to bestow a violet crown upon our own famous Queen. Leslie, are you listening?


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style

rebecca Naul ,

office fa shion

Creative Assistant, wearing a Nine West dress paired with a necklace by Kendra Scott.

Maureen Serrao Cole ,

Jann Baskett,

Principal, Brand & Strategy, clad in all black, Baskett says: “It's a bit of a holdover from my previous life in NY. ”

Managing Director, got her shoes from Zappos. “I rarely have time to actually visit shoe stores these days,” she says.

Office Style

brad phillips ,

Principal, Interaction Experience, his sleeve was a collaboration with Mike Norris at Southside Tattoo on South Congress.

The stylish team behind the design firm FBA, Foxtrot Bravo Alpha, shows off their creativity with inspired outfit choices. They office in a woody 1920s bungalow on the East Side, minutes from downtown but far enough out to hear roosters crowing in the morning. ryan thompson ,

Art Director, "The organization (or disorganization) of my desk resembles the way I work. There is a method but only I know what it is," he says.

vicki webster ,

Senior Producer, she describes her style as Texas Casual. christine wu,

Intern, loves to shop at Madewell online and when traveling.

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P h oto g r aph y by j o h n p e s i n a


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my life

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photographs courtesy of dj stout.

DJ Stout It has been a wild ride for this Austin design icon from his post as the award-winning art director of Texas Monthly to his current position as partner at Pentagram. 1. Crying in front of Las Manitas after the doors closed for good 2. In the Austin office with the Pentagram staff 3. Holding the "DJ is Back" poster I designed for a lecture at the Dallas Society of Visual Communications 4. With Lana at Maria's Tacos 5. Sitting on my grandfather's lap in Van Horn, Texas. He was a ranch foreman and cowboy. 6. Drinking a scotch at the gala where I awarded the AIGA Fellow Award 7. Hugging my German Shepherd, Jupiter 8. Speaking at the launch event for Alpine Cowboys, the book I wrote and designed 9. On a motorcycle during the Texas Monthly cover shoot with Ann Richards 10. With all my photographer friends at the Texas Monthly 25th Anniversary celebration, 1999 11. With my two brothers, John and Ted, my two sons, Nick and Patrick, and my nephew, Ben, on our annual backpacking trip in Yellowstone 12. Holding my daughter Lucy in one hand. tribeza.com

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style

pick

Gopher Illustrated

a local magazine is giving a voice to global artistic talent.

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P h oto g r aph y by j o h n p e s i n a

magazine photograph courtesy of gopher illustrated.

I

n today’s media landscape, new artistic discoveries and cultural commentaries can be made, shared and forgotten in an instant. Creating a lasting artifact amidst the multitude of media outlets can be a difficult task. Luckily, Michu Benaim and Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz, two Founders and content veteran editors, were up to the editors of Gopher Illustrated, even featured a candid interview with art Lope Guiterrez and Michu world superstar Jeff Koons. With specifichallenge and have recently Benaim, are cataloging cally commissioned titles for every story or become a part of Austin’s bourenduring cultural content article, verbal and visual elements comingle geoning design scene. Their in an aim to produce more than a magazine. on the pages in a way that gives equal credit bi-annual publication, Gopher Illustrated, is a carefully curated journal to the authors and the designers. of design and literary discoveries that hopes to combat the increasingly Well-trained editors of cultural content, they cull inspiration and fleeting consumption of cultural knowledge. The magazine’s core identity is stated plainly in its tagline, “more than a magazine — a collectible ideas from a number of sources. The original motivation for the page of colorful stickers at the back of each issue? That decision derived from in motion.” flipping through vintage science magazines that used similar interactive Dedicated to showcasing a variety of artistic talent from around the elements. But perhaps one of the most striking characteristics of the world, Gopher itself was launched in Caracas, Venezuela in July 2010. publication is its unapologetic lack of coverage of current newsworthy Prior to Gopher, Benaim and Gutiérrez-Ruiz had both been deeply inevents. Instead, their thematically curated content encourages a susvolved with Plátanoverde, a popular Venezuelan arts magazine. However, tained interaction, creating something that Benaim and Gutiérrez-Ruiz once the plan for their own publication was hatched, they realized two things — its potential for success and their desire to experience a new cre- hope readers will want to revisit multiple times. And as if launching an international design and culture magazine was ative city. So the young editors relocated to Austin. “We like the warm attitude here. And creatively, there is a lot of ground to be covered — a lot of not enough to keep this hyper-creative duo busy, Benaim and GutiérrezRuiz recently opened In House International, a design and communicapossibility,” explains Gutiérrez-Ruiz. The magazine, with its meticulously tions studio, in conjunction with Gopher’s Buenos Aires-based senior designed pages that adhere to a specific two-color scheme which varies designer, Alex Wright. While the theme of the forthcoming February by issue, highlights well-known and emerging artists alike. “The idea 2012 issue of Gopher Illustrated may be “Risky Business,” is to bring in work that hasn’t been translated to the Michu Benaim and Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz have proven that mainstream yet. To start a sophisticated conversation,” Gopher Illustrated sometimes, certain risks are well worth taking. J. rangel Benaim says. The most recent issue, On City Limits, gopherillustrated.org


La Fleur Vintage French Floral Design www.lfvaustin.com | (512) 458-8500


pick

Congress 200 Congress Ave. (The Austonian) (512) 827 2760 congressaustin.com

D

o I have to wear a jacket? Our LA houseguest anxiously queried when he learned we’d be dining at Congress one night. I stifled a laugh. Congress may be Austin’s hottest new fine dining restaurant, but this is still Austin: no stuffy dress codes, no snooty waiters, no overwrought decor. In our town, “fine dining” simply means you’re gonna have a fine time eating a fine meal. Of course, Congress will cost you more than your favorite food trailer. And you might want to wash behind your ears. But dinner at Congress is an accessible experience for any food fan.

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stylish, chic and a little edgy. He offers just two dining options: a three-course and seven-course pre-fixe tasting menu. There are no a la carte items, unless you upgrade your meal with optional luxury “enhancements” like caviar or foie gras. Yet pre-fixe doesn’t mean rigid and the staff happily accommodated the food allergy of one of our dinner guests. Executive Chef Bull and Chef de Cuisine Rebecca Meeker source topquality seasonal ingredients resulting in constantly changing dishes. Our group opted for the seven-course tasting and each modest-sized dish was like unwrapping a precious gift. First came silky hamachi sashimi garnished with avocado, grapefruit, turnip and chive. Next, a slow-poached The décor at Congress, the restaurant egg atop chorizo, potato, dijonnaise, anchoring the celery and garlic croutons. Then, a Austonian, reflects Chef David Bull’s broiled spot prawn and white ascuisine: stylish, chic paragus drizzled in brown butter. and a little edgy. Crispy veal sweetbreads came In case you haven’t heard of it yet next served with tender ravioli, (in Bon Appétit, Wine Spectator, The ratatouille, goat cheese and squash blossoms. New York Times, Esquire, Forbes, et al), ConFollowed by an espresso-rubbed Prime rib gress is Chef David Bull’s newest restaurant. eye cap with pomme puree and smoked caraFor years, Bull was the wunderkind behind mel. Then a cheese course featuring Swissthe stove at the Driskill Grill before leaving style Challerhocker, beer nuts, caraway stout to work around the state. Now he’s back and and mostardo. And finally dessert — Pastry has landed with a splash, simultaneously Chef Plinio Sandalio’s pillowy sweet potato opening three adjoining eateries in downbeignets, salted butter ice cream, pecan town’s Austonian luxury high-rise. Each is brittle and meringue. named after the street it fronts: Congress is Congress offers a wine pairing option with the fine dining venue, Second is the casual each course, but instead we chose our own bistro and Bar Congress is the intimate cockbottles with the helpful guidance of June tail lounge linking the two. Though all three Rodil, named 2009 Texas’ Best Sommelier. share the same kitchen, executive chef and Service was impeccable yet never intrusive management team, each has its own distincand the hours — and courses — glided by. tive menu and personality. Blissfully satisfied, we floated out of ConWith Congress, Bull finally has a restaugress (the restaurant) and onto Congress rant that suits him. At the Driskill, his clean, (the street), slightly startled by the fantasy modern cooking seemed incongruent with world we’d departed and the real world we’d the hotel’s old-world baroque setting. But entered. K. SPEZIA at Congress, the décor reflects his cuisine:

chef david bull, photography by marshall wright; congress interior, photography by casey dunn.

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New to Town

By Megan Giller Photography by Bill Sallans

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Peopl e // Liz Baloutine Owner, Seedlings Gardening When Liz Baloutine left her job in May with the Austin Groundskeeper to start Seedlings Gardening, she knew she wanted to tend for chefs. A longtime foodie who has worked for Dai Due and El Chile, Baloutine had been tending vegetable and cutting gardens on the side for two years. Now she is devoting all of her time to the many vegetable, fruit and herb gardens at restaurants and residences. Her favorite repeat customers? Spoon & Co. and Olivia, both of which she has been working with for years. “Chefs are really into experimenting, and I’ve gotten into growing plants with multiple uses,” Baloutine says. Restaurants

enjoy working with her because of her flexibility and creativity. “You can get squash and okra any day of the week at the farmer’s market, but you can’t always get my melon and basil flowers,” she says. Be on the lookout for Baloutine’s gardens popping up across Austin — she has pending proposals with several other local restaurants, and she’s just getting started. “Everywhere I go, I have a vegetable garden,” she says. For more information, visit seedlingsgardening.com.

Matthew Odam Restaurant Critic Austin American Statesman Matthew Odam isn’t new to the Statesman or the food scene: He’s been covering movies and contributing food stories to the paper since 2007. Since Mike Sutter’s departure, Odam has become the official restaurant critic at the Statesman, putting his knowledge of good food to good use. He’ll continue to head up the Austin Movie Blog too. Odam looks for restaurants that understand the communal aspects of dining. “I like a place that takes pride in a commitment to

photograph courtesy of liz baloutine.

Ten of the freshest people, places and trends in Austin’s food community reflect the city’s casual vibe and commitment to keeping it local.


Matthew Odam, Restaurant Critic at the Austin American Statesman

sustainability and knows how to make a delicious plate of food without being too fussy,” he says. Odam is playing it close to the vest with his favorite restaurant, though. He says, “You’ll just have to keep reading the Statesman to find out.”

Places // Elizabeth Street Cafe 1501 S. 1st St. Opening in December Come December, you won’t have to trek to North Lamar to find tasty Vietnamese food. Larry McGuire and Thomas Moorman, of Lambert’s and Perla’s, have reconstructed the old Bouldin Creek Café location into the Elizabeth Street Café. “We wanted a FrenchVietnamese neighborhood café hangout,” says McGuire. The restaurant will feature traditional Vietnamese cuisine like pho and vermicelli bowls, as well as the ever-popular báhn

mì. Pastry chef Alex Manley will be focusing on baguettes for the báhn mì, as well as croissants and brioche for breakfast. We’ve also heard that there will be six types of spring rolls on the menu, including one with Dungeness crab. “Our signature is approachable foods done with care and high-quality ingredients,” says McGuire. Look for distressed formal gardens with boxwoods, olive trees, Italian cypress and tropical touches landscaped by D-Crain out front and a healthy herb garden in back. The neighborhood café will feature black and white marble floors, a teal crocodile banquette in the main dining room, turquoise Thonet chairs and antique light fixtures. All that for under $15 per meal? Count us in.

Old School Bar and Grill 401 E. 6th St. It’s been just over a year since Dan Parrott opened Old School BBQ and Grill, and he’s already taking Austin by storm. Or smoke. First there was the yellow school bus synonymous with brisket and burgers. Then in July came Old School Grill on Parmer Lane, with its massive pastas and creative burgers like the Texas Two Thep (with jalapeños and sriracha). And in October Parrott launched the Old School Bar and Grill at Sixth and Trinity. “We’re doing our best to confuse people with the names,” he says. The Bar and Grill has a similar menu to the Parmer Lane location, including a New York strip steak transformed into a high-quality chicken-fried

Old School Bar and Grill boasts a vibrant atmosphere, as well as flavorful dishes like New Orleans BBQ shrimp, sautéed in peppered butter sauce.

steak. Parrott, who has been a chef and restaurateur for 37 years, says, “I put all my killer recipes in my travel book. We joked that it was going to be my son’s retirement.” Instead, the two picked out their favorites and opened up shop. The Grill also hosts live music upstairs. Big Momma, the school bus, will be back soon, too, so you’ll be able to hit it up old school with her in West Campus. Visit osgaustin.com for more information.

Lenoir 1807 S. 1st St. Opening in December Power foodies Jessica Maher and Todd Duplechan dreamed of opening their own restaurant long before they were married. This winter the couple is taking the plunge and opening Lenoir, a neighborhood prix fixe–menu restaurant. “We want to provide that big city restaurant experience in a casual Austin way,” Maher says. The menu will feature “hot-weather foods” and will be guided by local produce and the seasons. Maher revealed that there will be three-course and five-course options, and she hinted that Duplechan would be doing a play on pho and tribeza.com

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playing up spice and chilis, creating food that is “not heavy but really flavorful.” A seasoned pastry chef, Maher will be handling the desserts. “Flavors that are familiar,” she says, but also surprising. That sentiment might just be the heart of Lenoir.

John Mueller, Photography by LeAnn Mueller

JMueller BBQ 1502 S. 1st St. Rumors have followed John Mueller for almost the past 10 years. “This time the less people know about me, the better,” says the grandson of Louis Mueller, who has just opened a long-awaited barbecue trailer in

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Hopfields 3110 Guadalupe St. Watch out, Black Star Co-Op and Draught House: In November, Bay and Lindsay Anthon are opening Hopfields, the newest hot spot for beer drinkers. If you’re a wine sort of guy or gal or hungry for some wholesome food, this gastro pub is your spot too. According to Anthon, her mother, a lifelong cook “specializing in French homecooking style dishes,” provided most of the recipes, with some innovations (the Pascal burger, for example, has Camembert cheese, cornichons and whole-grain mustard). But the real focus of Hopfields is on craft beer. There will be 40 craft beers on tap, as well as bottles. Also look for creative wine and beer concoc-

tions, using fresh juices and tinctured herbs. “I’m looking forward to experimenting with cinnamon and nutmeg,” Linday says. Those drinks are just what you need to warm you up this winter. Visit hopfieldsaustin.com for more information.

t r e n ds // MEAT LOVERS It’s hard to deny the popularity of meat. Take Bacon, for instance, a themed eatery whose motto is “Bacon marks the spot.” Don’t believe them? The bacon waffles (thick cuts cooked into the waffles and topped with bananas) and broken-yolk BLT might change your mind. Or head over to Sputnik, the latest project from Brandon Stratton, in the old Good Knight location. Sputnik serves

hopsfield photograph courtesy of hopsfield; bacon photograph courtesy of bacon.

Jessica Maher and Todd Duplechan prepare to open Lenoir in December. Photography by Chad Wadsworth.

South Austin. His previous establishment, John Mueller’s Bar-B-Q, on Manor Road, which closed abruptly in 2006, was famous for its brisket and infamous for Mueller’s personality. The youngest Mueller says that this time things will be different. “I have my family’s backing now,” he says. At the trailer’s soft opening, the entire Mueller family worked the trailer along with him. The menu recalls the Manor location’s, with all the barbecue staples, including homemade sausage. At last, downtown Austin is home to two incredible barbecue restaurants (oldtime Austinites will remember that Aaron Franklin worked at the old Mueller location). Still curious about all those rumors? As Mueller says, “The truth isn’t nearly as exciting as the myth.” Visit jmuellerbbq.com for more information.


house-ground beef burgers and traditional hot dogs, with some chili thrown in. And you can look forward to Zack Northcutt’s Bangers Sausage House and Beer Garden opening in the fall. As Jed Taylor of Bacon says, “we are thankful for the fans and the die-hard meat lovers.” Visit baconaustin.com for more information.

Austin Men's Cooking Club The Austin Men’s Cooking Club may not be new, but it is unique. On the third Thursday of every month, a dozen guys gather at the Kitchen Space, a commercial kitchen, to spend the night cooking (the club has almost 30 members). The men take turns planning the menus, which range from Italian to French to German, as well as providing recipes, ingredients and instructions. “I started the club to build community and bring people together,” says founder Tom Sunstrom. Now it’s getting national coverage. Online L.A. based magazine SecondAct featured a story about the club in September; Andrew Zimmern of the Travel Channel is following them on Twitter; and Nightline has been calling as well. “Many people seem to be blown away by the fact that men cook,” Sunstrom says. To prove their commitment, the club keeps on cooking: They once roasted a whole white fish encased in salt, pulled the tender meat out, and enjoyed. Visit austincookingclub.com for more information.

FRIED CHICKEN

Tom Sunstrom, founder of Austin Men's Cooking Club

The weather may have cooled down, but Austin’s still frying. Chicken, that is. Ms. P’s Electric Cock (1101 S. Congress Ave.), a vintage trailer with a neon sign shouting “CHICKEN,” serves locally sourced, allnatural spicy fried chicken and, of course, yeast risen waffles. As for the name? “In tribeza.com

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Oil on canvas, 48x36 inches

Joyce Howell

Olivia chef, James Holmes, is opening Lucy's Fried Chicken in December.

2002 I went to see a band called ‘Ms. Rae and The Royal Family Electric Cock,’” says Perry Ray, or Ms. P. She plans to expand into a brick-and-mortar car hop, “where you can get a bucket of wings and cold beer.” Speaking of fried chicken and beer, James Holmes is taking Olivia’s famous brunch item and opening “a chicken shack with a rock-and-roll feel” in December just off of South Congress. Lucy’s

Fried Chicken (2218 College Ave.) will serve “Texas Southern cuisine done right,” says Holmes: the signature fried chicken, grilled and raw oysters with compound butters, fried deviled eggs and a selection of five pies daily. Guests can expect bluesy music on the patio on the weekends, but it can’t be too blue if everyone’s digging into that chicken. Visit lucysaustin.com and electriccock.com for more information.

November 5-26 Opening Reception Saturday, November 5 6-8pm

Wally Workman Gallery 1202 W. 6th St. Austin, TX 78703 512.472.7428 www.wallyworkman.com Tues-Sat 10-5

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7:30pm | Dec 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 21, 22 2pm | Dec 4, 11, 17, 18, 23 LONG CENTER Choreography by Stephen Mills Music by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky Musical Accompaniment by Austin Symphony Orchestra

THE 49TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION OF

The Nutcracker Austin’s Holiday Tradition

Whether starting a new tradition or continuing a long-standing one, The Nutcracker is a magical, memory making experience for all ages, with an army of mischievous mice, a bevy of bon-bons, a slurry of sparkling snowflakes, and one jovial Mother Ginger... plus the Austin Symphony Orchestra! Tchaikovsky’s holiday masterpiece sparkles with the original choreography of Stephen Mills and comes to life with over 200 dancers.

Tickets starting at $15 Visit www.balletaustin.org or call 512.476.2163

The Nutcracker Underwriter

Season Sponsors

Production Sponsors

Season Underwriter

Media Sponsors

Education Underwriter

This project is funded and supported in part by the City of Austin through the Cultural Arts Division believing an investment in the Arts is an investment in Austin's Future and by a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, which believes that a great nation deserves great art. Visit Austin at NowPlayingAustin.com


Now Open!

Extraordinary vintage for women

We BUY vintage clothing, shoes, and accessories everyday

high-end designer clothing, shoes, and handbags we accept consignments everyday no appointment necessary

1700 B. South Congress Ave. (enter on Milton) 512.912.9779 feathersboutique@hotmail.com feathersboutiquevintage.blogspot.com

705 b south lamar 512 916 9961 info@mossaustin.com www.mossaustin.com

Now carrying shoes from Jeffrey Campbell and Dolce Vita

Photography: Amanda Elmore


Marketplace

Austin Essentials


our little secret

Jill Visit’s I KORIENTE

621 E. 7th St. (512) 275 0852 koriente.com

108

november 2011

tribeza.com

like simple things. T-shirts and jeans, sentences without semicolons and fresh, fuss-free food. Take salads, for example. Do I really need the Gorgonzola crumbles, cranberries, candied walnuts, raspberry-chipotle dressing AND cayenne-infused, Parmesanroasted pepitas? No. Give me mixed greens with a citrus vinaigrette and I’m happy. Simple flavors, fresh ingredients, no cheese crumbles. That said, you wouldn’t think that a Korean restaurant would be on my favorites list — all those little bowls of stuff, über spicy kimchee and elaborate sauces and marinades. To be honest, my husband dragged me to Koriente against my will on my first visit. But every now and then, he turns out to be right! What awaited me was a tiny oasis of healthful, simple, delicious food. This nontraditional gem special-

izes in fresh ingredients prepared with minimal fuss with a very original take on classic Korean cuisine. It’s basically food heaven. Koriente is a quirky little hideaway on Seventh Street with a smallish menu featuring noodle salads, steamed veggies, hummus hand rolls and even the traditional bulgogi. But I order the same thing every time: the Noodle Garden with Tofu. This delicious concoction consists of a mixed green salad topped with mung bean noodles and veggies — julienned cucumbers, sliced avocado and carrots (gotta sub carrots for bell peppers — blech). It’s topped off with sautéed, marinated tofu and a little bit of simple soy dressing. There’s the perfect amount of contrast between the cool salad and the warm tofu, the crunchy veggies and the soft noodles. It’s just the right amount of food, and there’s zero guilt to impede my digestion. But while their food keeps me coming back, there’s a lot more to love about Koriente. They have an unfailingly friendly staff, strangely comfy bouncy chairs and free miso soup at lunch! While you eat, you can gaze upon the most baffling amalgam of wall art ever assembled under one roof, ranging from photos of naked clowns to an old portrait of Oscar Wilde. I’m sure there’s a thread of continuity there, but trying to figure it out is really half the fun. So my secret’s out. This little haven of simplicity shines like a beacon in a world of 45-ingredient salads, and it has won a permanent place in my heart and my stomach. Here’s to you, Koriente! You are the T-shirt and jeans of this crazy food world, and what higher praise could I give? JILL VISIT Jill Visit is the Creative Director on the Global Marketing Team at Whole Foods Market. P h oto g r ap h y by A NN I E R AY



TRIBEZA November Design Issue