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unique accessories

Our Ambienti collection of decorative sculptures, featuring playful poses and bright colors are sure to bring life to any environment. Creativity born in Italy. No two are exactly alike. Pop Girl shown. Measures approximately 13” x 13” x 21” h. $445.

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furniture and accessories for your modern lifestyle


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compass.com

Providing exceptional service for over 20 years.

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Mystical High Jewelry

Lotus Garnet in Platinum & Rose Gold

Made in Dancing Metals Studio, Austin, Texas Learn about our Smithsonian exhibit - Visit zoltandavid.com @ZoltanDavidFineJewelry 8 NOVEMBER 2019 |

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1602 Pease Rd | $4,000,000 Coming Soon 1310 Elton Lane | $4,950,000 | 2900 Townes Ln

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All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or tribeza.com other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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AUSTIN - THANK YOU FOR SHOWING HAAM GENEROUS LOVE ON HAAM DAY! With the support of the Central Texas community, the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians’ (HAAM) HAAM Day held on September 24, 2019 was a major success, raising over $600,000 for the organization! Thank you to all the supporters, businesses, volunteers, musicians and everyone who came out to the one of the over 240 shows. The funds raised will go towards providing access to affordable healthcare for Austin’s low-income, working musicians.

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Photos by Ben Porter, Jake Rabin, Joshua Guerra, Lorenzo Marez and Renee Domingues

1. HAAM Day Committee Chair Olga Campos Benz (left), HAAM Executive Director Reenie Collins (middle), and Austin Mayor Steve Adler (right) pose with the HAAM Day proclamation from the City after kicking off the day at 6:00 a.m. at Whole Foods Lamar 2. Hector Ward of Hector Ward & the Big Time performs a lively set at Antone’s Nightclub for the 4th Annual RECA Showcase 3. Caitlyn Macaluso of FVF Law introduces the band at The ABGB – FVF Law was a sponsor 4. Bidi Bidi Banda draws in the crowd at the Historic Scoot in for the inaugural HAAM Day Latinapalooza, which featured and all-Latina lineup 5. James Spear belts it out at Antone’s Nightclub on HAAM Day 6. Catarina Sigerfoos and Alyce Zawaki enjoy the live music at the We Are Blood SHowcase at Still Austin Whiskey 7. (From left to right) HAAM Director of Marketing & Events Rikki Hardy, Kalu James, HAAM Executive Director Reenie Collins, and HAAM Day Committee Chair Olga Campos Benz enjoy music at IBC Bank Plaza 8. Tomar & the FCs perform in front of an excited audience at The ABGB on HAAM Day 9. Rob Mahoney kicks off HAAM Day at Whole Foods Lamar at 6:00 a.m. 10. (Left to right) HAAMbassadors Paul Gonzales, Alison Moore, Phil Lancaster and Tammy Sajak collect donations at Cosmic Coffee + Beer on HAAM Day 11. Shinyribs leads a conga line to collect donations through Cosmic Coffee + Beer during his HAAM Day performance 12. Sponsor Lulu Flores (left), HAAM Day Committee Member Frank Cardenas (middle), and HAAM Day Committee Chair Olga Campos Benz (right) 13. Kyndel Bennett (left) and Matt Long celebrate HAAM Day at Antone’s Nightclub, sponsored by Cayetano Development 14. Madison McWilliams performs inside Waterloo Records in front of a captivated audience for HAAM Day 15. Mayor Pro Tem Delia Garza (left) and HAAM Day Committee Chair Olga Campos Benz (right) at Latinapalooza at the Historic Scoot Inn – Mayor Pro Tem Garza read the HAAM Day proclamation from the City 16. Supporters Kaylon Page (left), Garrett Blanton (middle) and Tom Gleason (right) at the RECA Showcase at Antone’s Nightclub on HAAM Day 17. HAAM Board Members Stephen Jeffrey and John Kunz at Whole Foods Lamar on HAAM Day 18. Cory Baum laughs and enjoys the crowd during his DJ set at Breakaway Records.


40 2019

CELEBRATING

FORTY YEARS AUSTIN ° TEXAS

1601 West 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas • 512- 458- 5407 Monday through Saturday 10:00am-5:30pm www.GardenRoomBoutique.com

follow us on instagram @gardenroomatx


CONTENTS

NOVEMBER / ARTS

DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 22 Kristin’s Column p. 34 Community Profile p. 36 Tribeza Talk p. 40 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 44 Music Pick p. 45 Art Pick p. 46 Event Pick p. 48 Lookbook Live p. 52 Style Profile p. 86 Travel Pick p. 90 Karen’s Pick p. 94 Dining Guide p. 96 A Look Behind p. 100 FEATURES

School of Arts p. 56 The Visionaries p. 64 The Art of Art Collecting p. 76 LEFT Photographer Mia Baxter looks to landscapes and Texan-Mexican culture for inspiration when creating images and collages.

ON THE COVER Abstract artist Tyler Guinn, one of nine visionaries featured in this issue, creates work that symbolizes kindness and understanding.

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THE WOMENS S HOP THE MENS S HOP 52 4 NORTH L A MA R 51 2 472 5951 S OUTH CONGRES S 14 0 0 S OUTH CONGRES S 51 2 4 41 860 0 BYGEORGEAUSTIN.COM

AC N E S T U D I O S

BOGLIOLI

D R I E S VA N N OT E N I SA B E L M A R A N T

B OT T E G A V E N E TA

ENGINEERED GARMENTS

KHAITE

PROENZA SCHOULER

B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I

LO E W E

GABRIELA HEARST

MAISON MARGIELA

SA I N T L AU R E N T

CELINE

SIMON MILLER

MARNI

C H LO É

GOLDEN GOOSE DELUXE BRAND

NAK ARMSTRONG

S TO N E I S L A N D

COMMON PROJECTS

OFFICINE GÉNÉRALE

T H E E L D E R S TAT E S M A N tribeza.com

T H E R OW | NOVEMBER 2019

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EDITOR'S LETTER

Aaron Parsley aaron@tribeza.com

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y C L A I R E S C H A P E R

P

eople come and go in Austin — sometimes like boomerangs. In our November Arts issue we feature nine visionary artists who are worth watching as they grow and enrich their communities by creating vibrant colors, telling compelling narratives and raising evocative questions. Some left Austin for a time and have returned with new perspectives. I can relate. I grew up here but moved away after high school and came back, more than 20 years later, at the start of the summer. My view has changed immeasurably. I arrived from New York City to find my hometown both familiar and brand-new. I see Austin differently now because it has grown and evolved. But also because my appreciation for a city I’ve always loved has deepened. What better way to dive into a new life in Austin than to join the team at Tribeza. As Tribeza's digital director, my goal is to reach new audiences and to seek out untold stories about this dynamic city and its diverse residents. I’ve had a long career as a digital journalist and am thrilled to be on the Austin beat, with all its flavors, sights, sounds and fascinating subjects. I’ve been asked if I miss New York City. Nope! Not yet, anyway. I’m stimulated and inspired by Austin. My first week on the job, I found myself at Tribeza’s Lookbook Live event, tasting delicious food, making new friends and watching a stellar fall fashion show — the highlights of which you can see in this issue and on tribeza.com. Since then, I’ve been editing this issue, amazed by the richness of the local arts community and the excellence of its work. There’s not much to miss when my new home has so much to offer. I’m grateful to Margaret Williams and my new colleagues for their help and guidance. There will be another exciting introduction next month, as Tribeza welcomes a new editor and I get back to work on creating content for tribeza.com and @Tribeza on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Stay tuned, Austin!


WWG

Wally Work m an Gallery

TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

N OV E M B E R 2 01 9

18 YEARS

N O. 2 1 9

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

GUEST EDITOR

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

ART DIRECTOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Aaron Parsley

September Broadhead

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Aaron Parsley

EDITOR-AT-L ARGE

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVENTS MANAGER

Claire Schaper

Krissy Hearn

Shaleena Keefer

OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres INTERNS

Vanessa Blankenship Luna Estrella

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Jess Archer Nicole Beckley Vanessa Blankenship Lauren Jones Regine Malibiran Hannah J. Phillips Kathryn Stouffer Margaret Williams COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Jenny Antill Warren Chang Holly Cowart Jonathan Garza Jessica Pages Erin Reas Claire Schaper

ILLUSTR ATORS

JOSEPH JANSON 1202 West 6th Street · wallyworkmangallery.com · 512.472.7428 Image: Seven Heads, wire, 45 x 25 x 5 in.

RF. Alvarez Corey Carbo

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


Finding your place in the world. Finding your home in Austin.

Nicole Kessler Broker Associate

nicolekessler.com

Š Compass 2019 Œ All Rights Reserved by Compass Œ Made in NYC. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SOCIAL HOUR

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CARITAS OF AUSTIN’S WORDS OF HOPE

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On September 12, friends gathered for Caritas of Austin’s 12th annual Words of Hope dinner. This year’s event raised more than $600,000 to support the organization’s mission to prevent and end homelessness in Austin. Guests enjoyed a live auction and music from Robert Earl Keen, with Jan and Bobby Jenkins taking home the Harvey Penick Award for Excellence in the Game of Life.

HILL COUNTRY NIGHTS

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Hill Country Conservancy's 13th annual Hill Country Nights was held at ACL Live at The Moody Theater on September 13. Attendees enjoyed an evening filled with tasty cocktails and a live music performance from The Texas Gentlemen. The gala raised more than $450,000 to preserve vital natural resources in Austin and the surrounding Hill Country, guaranteeing clean drinking water and access to nature for future generations of Texans.

Held on September 13, WhiskyX displayed more than 60 top and emerging whiskies for enthusiasts to try at Fair Market. Presented by Flaviar, the fun-filled night featured Austin’s best food trucks, a concert from X Ambassadors and even free haircuts and beard trims from local barbers like Shed Barber and Supply.

CARITAS OF AUSTIN WORDS OF HOPE: 1. Anna & Will Hardeman 2. Jo Kathryn Quinn 3. Bobby & Jan Jenkins 4. Waleska & John Lavorato HILL COUNTRY NIGHTS: 5. Austin Root & Jess Graheck 6. Christie & Bill Nalle 7. Megan Iamont, Tori Thompson & Addie Burgess WHISKYX: 8. Lina Martinez, Priscilla Otos & Vinova Deniz 9. Vimal Fernandez & Kim Tesarek

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S A N DY C A R S O N , E R I N R E A S A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

WHISKYX


T H E N E W W AY TO O W N Natiivo, powered by Airbnb, is the revolutionary luxury hospitality brand that gives owners the freedom and flexibility to stay or host with ease. The first property designed, built and licensed for home sharing now calls Austin home. Fully-finished and furnished units in the Rainey Street Historic District from the high $400s NATI I VOAU ST I N . CO M

S ALE S @ N AT I IVOAU ST I N . CO M

This condominium is being developed by 48 East Property,LLC (“Developer”), which has a limited right to use the trademarked names and logos of Natiivo and AirBNB pursuant to a license and marketing agreement with NGD Homesharing, LLC. Any and all statements, disclosures and/or representations shall be deemed made by Developer and not by Natiivo, AirBNB and/or NGD Homesharing, LLC and you agree to look solely to Developer (and not to Natiivo, AirBNB and/or NGD Homesharing, LLC and/or any of its or their affiliates) with respect to any and all matters relating to the marketing and/or development of the Condominium and with respect to the sales of units in the Condominium.We are in compliance with Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968. We have not, and will not, either directly or indirectly, discriminate against you or any other prospective purchaser on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Price and availability subject to change. Renderings, photos, and © 2019. NGD Homesharing LLC and 48 East Property, LLC. All rights reserved.

D E V E LO P E D B Y


SOCIAL HOUR

CHEF’S TABLE AUSTIN The eighth annual Chef’s Table Austin, Water to Thrive’s biggest fundraiser of the year, took place on September 18 at Archer Hotel Austin. As philanthropists dined on incredible courses from top participating Austin chefs, the organization collected $32,000 for The Drop by Drop Fund, furthering its efforts to bring clean, safe water to rural communities in Africa.

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UBUNTU LIFE TRIBE PARTY On September 20, Ubuntu Life hosted its annual Tribe Party at Brazos Hall, where partygoers dressed in safari-chic attire, sipped on classic Kenyan cocktails and feasted on a traditional Swahili spread. Festivities included auctions jam-packed with favorite local brands, a Maasai market and a dance party with Golden Dawn Arkestra. Proceeds went toward breaking ground on a special-needs school and pediatric health center in Kenya.

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The Women’s Symphony League of Austin Fashion Luncheon was held at the Palmer Events Center on September 20. This year’s luncheon showcased stunning styles by Julian Gold and delicious food, with actress Brooke Shields as the keynote speaker. Funds went to the Austin Symphony Orchestra and its youtheducation programs.

CHEF'S TABLE AUSTIN: 1. Teresa Smith & Lisa Clover 2. Cassie Bale, Jane Driscoll & Tobie Funte UBUNTU LIFE TRIBE PARTY: 3. Jeremiah & Mary Kuria 4. Thomas Bercy, Meredith & David Ramos 5. Ella Adams & Mark Hamilton JEWEL BALL FASHION LUNCHEON: 6. Amanda Tatom, Houston Ward & Jaimie Anand 7. Angela Pringle & Elizabeth Cione 8. Katherine Wallin, Jessica Karlsruher & Elizabeth Pitts 9. Kelly Bauch, Daniel Esquivel, Melody McCaig & Liz Howard

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W O M E N ' S S Y M P H O N Y L E AG U E P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

JEWEL BALL FASHION LUNCHEON


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SOCIAL HOUR

EMANCIPET’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY GALA Emancipet celebrated 20 years of service by throwing an extravaganza with cocktails, dinner, a silent auction and an after-party with Alejandro Escovedo and DJ Girlfriend ATX at The Line Austin on September 21. Presenters Jim Spencer, Edward Flores and their dog Kaxan honored guests who helped support Emancipet throughout the years.

EXPLORE AUSTIN’S ASCENT SPEAKER LUNCHEON The sixth annual Ascent Speaker Luncheon, hosted by local nonprofit Explore Austin on September 25, featured TEDx speaker and Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Sarah Moshman as this year’s guest speaker. The luncheon helped support the goals of Explore Austin and its efforts to empower youths through mentoring, leadership and outdoor adventure.

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PRESERVING THE CRAFT

EMANCIPET'S 20TH ANNIVERSARY GALA: 1. Mona Patel, Amber & Chuck Wadey 2. Bryan Taloa & Jennifer Sinski 3. Amy Mills, Jason Rhodes, Angela Dorsey & Missy Nichols 4. B.J. Rogers, Amy Mills & Brian Floyd EXPLORE AUSTIN'S ASCENT SPEAKER LUNCHEON: 5. Keenan McDonald, Josh Winkler & Ryan Fickert 6. Ann Jerome, Sarah Ryan, Catherine Ittner & Caroline Hammond PRESERVING THE CRAFT: 7. Holly Beth Potter, Joe Holm & Christina Cole 8. Carly Young, Kate Linnemann, Annarae Winters & Rachel Harrell 9. Naleah Ryg & Holly Arthur

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S U Z A N N E P R E S S M A N A N D TAY LO R P R I N S E N

On September 26, Austin’s design elite gathered at Preserving the Craft. Guests enjoyed gourmet bites and cocktails at the J&L Hardware showroom and newcomer textile showroom Canvas, co-hosted by Ann Sacks. The circa-1900 building’s historic corridors and parlor rooms house a boutique design center and creative community in a Victorian gem restored by Duckworth.


SOCIAL HOUR

#TRIBWOMENINSPIRE The first-ever #tribWomenInspire was held at Tom and Lynn Meredith’s home on September 26. Coinciding with the annual Texas Tribune Festival, the event celebrated "Orange Is the New Black" author Piper Kerman’s 50th birthday and the inspiration, advocacy and impact of Austin women. Benefitting The Salvation Army Rathgeber Center and Truth Be Told, the evening featured live performances and inspirational conversations and utilized the innovative Austin-based inLieu app to maximize donations.

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HOTEL ZAZA GRAND OPENING PARTY The breathtaking Hotel ZaZa Austin celebrated its grand opening on September 27. Friends, family and Austin VIPs were welcome to explore the new luxury boutique hotel and were treated to bites from onsite restaurant Perfect Strangers and cocktails from Group Therapy. Guests danced the night away to live music by Austin’s own Tomar and the FCs and indie artist Mobley.

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AUSTIN PARKS FOUNDATION PARTY FOR THE PARKS

#TRIBWOMENINSPIRE: 1. Virginia Cumberbatch & Royce Brooks 2. Rhodel Jones & Elizabeth Greene 3. Kathy Terry & Amber Allen HOTEL ZAZA GRAND OPENING PARTY: 4. Alisha Revel & Tanya Sakatan 5. Jeff Kline & John Gill 6. Monica Raygada & Connor Payne AUSTIN PARKS FOUNDATION PARTY FOR THE PARKS: 7. Jen Ohlson, Charles Stuart, Max Rutherford & Margaret Menicucci 8. Stacy Killebrew & Karlie Willburn 9. Jack Ray & Logan Coker

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y DAV I D R I C E , E R I N R E A S A N D K AT R I N A B A R B E R

On October 2 at Republic Square, Austin Parks Foundation presented live music from Bob Schneider and DJ Mel while attendees participated in a silent auction, raffle prizes and more. The Peached Tortilla provided mouthwatering bites, and Zilker Brewing brought flavorsome drinks. Plus, people got the chance to craft their own cocktails at an interactive bar from FBR Management.


LéAna Clifton, Frequency Original works on paper Abstract mixed-media images of speeding trains

VELDT GALLERY Marfa, Texas 432.897.2360 hello@veldtgallery.com We ship anywhere. tribeza.com

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SOCIAL HOUR

FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN AUSTIN’S OPEN HOUSE AND GALLERY EXHIBITION Friends Austin celebrated their second year working in the Austin community on October 3 by opening the doors to their new office and children’s clubhouse. Partners and supporters enjoyed exploring the space and viewing a photo gallery exhibition, which provided insight into the weekly outings of the organization’s professional mentors and the youth they serve.

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IMAGINE A WAY TOUCH THE STARS GALA Imagine A Way’s annual Touch the Stars Gala on October 4 was a night dedicated to a good cause, raising $270,000 for the organization’s mission to provide funding for early intervention and therapies for children with autism. Hosted at the Stephen F. Austin Hotel, the life-changing night featured an after-party with even more opportunities to give back.

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PLAYBINGO LADIES LUNCHEON

FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN AUSTIN'S OPEN HOUSE AND GALLERY EXHIBITION: 1. Carrie Mathews & Jason Shiver 2. Lauren Moorman & Johanna Peyton IMAGINE A WAY TOUCH THE STARS GALA: 3. Matt Wolski & Jenny Lanier 4. Tommy & Laura Craddick 5. Becky & Jim Urhausen PLAY BINGO LADIES LUNCHEON: 6. Trish House & Jennesa McBride 7. Sandra Lott & Renee Codina 8. Abby Argo 9. Cassie LaMere & Jim Spencer

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I M AG I N E A WAY P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B E N P O R T E R

The 16th annual PlayBingo Ladies Luncheon brought together more than 1,200 Austin women to help end the cycle of child abuse. During the event, held on October 5, guests dressed to impress for a fun-filled night of champagne, bidding on lavish silent auction packages and Bingo, all to benefit the Center for Child Protection.


AMARRA at Barton Creek

Refined Homes, Villas and Homesites

liveamarra.com

Melissa Meeks Kilian

Global Real Estate Advisor melissa.kilian@sothebysrealty.com 512.217.2020 tribeza.com

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Gypsy Floral & Events Now offering design services for your home

including: table top designs floral tree installations wreaths garlands

gypsyfloral.com | @gypsyfloral photo by: gloria goode photo

NOW THROUGH JAN. 12, 2020

The University of Texas at Austin / blantonmuseum.org / @blantonmuseum / #BlantonMonsters #BlantonSinFronteras Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders is organized by the Morgan Library & Museum, New York. Arte Sin Fronteras: Prints from the Self Help Graphics Studio is organized by the Blanton Museum of Art. Images: (left) Siren (detail), from Les abus du monde [Abuses of the World], ca. 1510, 7 11/16 x 5 1/4 in., The Morgan Library & Museum, MS M.42, fol.15r, Purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan, 1899, Photography by Janny Chiu, 2017; (right) Teddy Sandoval, Angel Baby (detail), 1995, screenprint, 44 x 30 in., Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Gilberto Cรกrdenas, 2017


COMMUNITY & CULTURE

C H A R L E S W H I T E , S O U N D O F S I L E N C E I I , 19 7 8 CO U R T E S Y O F T H E B L A N TO N M U S E U M O F A R T

ARTIST'S WORK Charles White’s life and work is the focus of two exhibitions this month, p. 40.


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N OLD BOYFRIEND ONCE ASKED ME WHAT I thought the purpose of life was. I think he was feeling rather purposeless when he asked the question, or he was testing me to see if I was for real. I was. I am. I answered before I even knew I was answering, before I had a chance to pause, think, filter or find the perfect word-lover way to express an answer to a question of that magnitude. “Love.” The word came out of my mouth as easily as it comes out of my heart, ringing clear and true and effortless. A huge question answered succinctly and profoundly in one word. The word is as vast as the question, spanning a lifetime, or lifetimes. I have been on quite a journey since he asked me that question, and every step I have made on my spiritual path has confirmed what I already knew to be true. There is no higher purpose, no more relevant calling than Love. At the end of life, no one will actually care where you worked, or how much money you made, or what car you drove, or what you wore to a party. No one will care about your house, or the photos you posted from the fabulous vacations you went on. No one will care about how pretty you once were, or how long you managed to stay that way. No one will care what degrees you got, your titles or accolades or awards. I remember when my grandparents moved into their final stop in an assistedliving home in Arizona. They had a total of 7 boxes. A lifetime of stuff, and it all whittles down to nothing. Because stuff is ultimately nothing. Striving is ultimately nothing. We spend so much time and energy on things that don’t matter. Here’s the thing. No one may care about or remember how fancy your house was, but they will remember how it felt to spend time in your home. I have a photo framed in my office next to my computer of me sitting on my grandmother’s lap, her soft arms wrapped around me as a

little girl. That photo, that woman, was pure comfort to me, the human representation of unconditional love. She did not care what I wore, what I weighed, what my grades were, what job I had, who I married, what the world thought of me. All she cared about was me. She loved me completely and just wanted me to be happy and healthy. All I have to do is look at that photo for a moment and I can call to mind the security of her lap. I can conjure up the feeling of being loved like that. I keep that photo in plain sight because I like thinking that the little girl in me can climb back into her lap anytime I need to, and when I do, all is well. Loving well is an art. It starts with the awareness of something larger than ourselves, call it God, Source, Universe, whatever term feels yummy to you. The knowledge that Divine Love loves you is the beginning of your love story. We have to let that in, receiving it and believing it. Being loved well allows us to love ourselves well, and that has to happen before we can ever even think about loving someone else well. The alchemy of the human and the Divine creates the template. A nd once we get this, really get this, ever y thing cha nges. Then ever y single interaction becomes an intentiona l opportunity to choose love, to be love and to live love. The art is in the infusion and integration of that Love into everything. We can put it in a meal, a memory, a moment, a holiday, a conversation, a letter, a smile, an offering of forgiveness, service or grace. My daughter Isabelle refuses to make her own grilled cheese sandwich even though it would fit easily into her culinary repertoire. She says mine always tastes better. “You know why, right?” I ask her every time I make it. “It’s the love,” she says. She’s exactly right. Twenty years of sick kids, making chicken noodle soup and grilled cheese, the same thing my grandmother and my mother made for me. You better believe it’s the love (and the butter). Practice looking at your life with an artist’s eye and with love as your medium. You will be amazed at the difference in this perspective shift, and how many opportunities you have to create.

“Practice looking at your life with an artist’s eye and with love as your medium.”

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Listening In: Artists Naho Matsuda & Melissa Borrell talk public art, playgrounds and the collaboration it takes to build interactive pieces By Margaret Williams Photographs by Jessica Pages with assistance from Katie Leacroy

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hese days, most of us have our purchases, locations and activities tracked d a i ly. Th i s c on s t a nt cataloging, which we all agree to in the interest of convenience, generates endless amounts of data. The collection of all this information — viewed as benign by some and sinister by others — is rarely referred to as poetic, much less joyful. Designer and artist Naho Matsuda f lipped that notion on its head in her playful and interactive installation “every thing every time,” which presented data-generated poetry in the style of a train station departure board. Placed downtown in Brush Square Park during this year’s SXSW as part of the festival’s Art Program, the piece sat atop a support structure, whose bubble gum-pink and lemon-yellow hues could have been pulled from a European day care center. The whole effect was curious and charming, but what really caught the viewer was the sound and movement being created by the London-based artist’s work. The f lutter of the letters flipping as the poetry changes created a hypnotizing sound known the world over. On this particular day, Matsuda, in town for the annual festival, was delighted to have

found a kindred spirit in Austin-based Melissa Borrell. The jewelry designer turned kinetic and immersive installation artist also comes from a design background, and the two women immediately connected over the f luid way in which they view work that has previously been categorized as either “art” or “design.” Borrell, whose piece “Tessellation Constellation” is installed at the Austin Facebook offices, has been a consistent participant in our city’s public art program. The women dove right in and geeked out over the inventive ways technology can factor into the type of work both artists produce.

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

NAHO MATSUDA: My background is design. Which is similar to you. MELISSA BORRELL: Yes, that’s a big connection. I’m not so much interested in defining what the difference is, whether it’s art or design. NM: You were trained as a jewelry designer. MB: Yeah, I started as a jewelry designer. Whatever medium I worked in, I always worked more as a designer, sculptor. I was very interested in technology, industrial design and the play between functional objects and craft and art. The things I was thinking of in jewelry, I just started picturing them on a larger scale. NM: Yes, a massive difference in scale. MB: It’s a big difference in scale, but it’s funny, because other people think it’s such a big leap, but for me it was totally fluid. Can you explain your piece [“every thing every time”]? I know there is a lot going on behind the scenes. NM: So for this piece now, it’s interesting, because it was an answer to an open call for public artwork. So there was always the element of being in a public space. It uses around 250 different data points, like air quality, water temperature, traffic noise. I looked up what I could find, what’s open access in Austin. I linked all these together with sketches and timetables. I looked up library opening times, barbecue joint hours. The bat colonies fly half an hour after the sun goes down, so that’s in the timetable.  For all these data points, I’ve abstracted them and prewritten a line of poetry for the different statuses. A huge writing exercise, and then it’s an algorithm that randomly picks five of these data points and the poetry is displayed. More and more cities have a lot of sensors. There’s so much data about us.  MB: I think it’s really beautiful how you take little moments and then they become poetry. For me, that’s the core of my work, too, in a different way. But the statement is the same. I want people to slow down and notice. Beautiful things are around us all the time.

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NM: I was wondering here in Austin and the United States how much public art there is, or how much art people interact with in their daily life in the city. MB: Yeah, it’s hard to compare. I’ve been applying a lot, to get my work out there. Austin’s growing so much, and the public art program here is really strong. I love activating a space. I installed one at [Boggy Creek Park] called “SkyLines.” It was illuminated up above. During the day, you didn’t really see it, and then at night, when the lights came on, it was interactive. The colors changed on a regular program, but also, when people came into the space, the sculpture saw them and then reacted.    NM: Yeah, it’s similar for me. I work with a developer and a fabrication studio, so it’s a collaborative process to develop the piece. And it’s something that I really enjoy — working with different people with very specific knowledge and explaining the idea to them. MB:   But also, I think, coming to it as a novice you are able to come up with something that, if you were intimate with that technology, you wouldn’t think of. It’s always the artist who’s like, Well, why don’t we do this? NM: That’s a really important message, to have fresh eyes and not have a preconception of how the technology has to be used. MB: Then it’s also nice to work with somebody who is really fluid in that language. NM: It’s really interesting for me how the initial idea slowly grows into something which is quite collaborative, and then suddenly I feel like it’s not only my project, but it’s everyone’s. It looks like what’s displayed on this piece is so simple, but there’s so much work and technology in it. MB: It doesn’t show ... You want it to look simple — to be clean and to be as direct as possible. NM: What’s your next dream project? Is there something that you want to explore? MB: One, I have dreams of doing some sort of playground. Because that’s kind of the ultimate

interactive sculpture. To have kids climbing on it, that’s a dream that hopefully, eventually, I would love to realize. I also really want to do something suspended. I have a great affinity for things that are floating and moving and creating shadows. What about you? NM: Now that I did this mechanical project, I would like to do a series of paintings. I need to refresh and do something that I can do by myself in my little studio, with very simple materials. And I know that it’s probably surprising for people who see this work. But that’s what I would like to do — paintings that resemble what digital display does. MB: Will they be literal representations or abstract? NM: I think at the beginning literal. I would like to do something with the colors and shapes of voice interactions. MB: I could see eventually things starting to cross again. Maybe your paintings enter into your other data pieces, or vice versa. NM: Yeah, I think it’s interesting. I think when I zoom out, it makes more sense than when I’m in my head and focused. MB: Where will this piece go next? NM:  It will go next to Bristol, to the U.K. There were a couple of people who were interested in showing it in different places. We have to pick out where it can go next.  When you look at cities, they are so messy. There’s so many layers of things happening. That interaction is really interesting. The more I stand next to the piece and observe people, I discover so many things. The way people watch, or read it, and slow down while they walk. Or, if it makes them wonder about where this data comes from, or what is it trying to tell them. This story is part of our series “Listening In,” where we pair SXSW speakers and artists and then happily eavesdrop on the exchange. Find the complete series at  tribeza.com/listening-in.


Naho Matsuda and Melissa Borrell catching up in front of "every thing every time."

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TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

GU IDED BY STA R S

WINNING WORK Betelhem Makonnen is the winner of the 2019 Tito’s Prize —an honor given to one artist each year that comes with $15,000 and a solo exhibition in the Big Medium Gallery. Makonnen initially resisted becoming an artist like many in her family. Born in Ethiopia, she studied history and literature at UT Austin and spent 10 years as a chef before surrendering to art. “I realized I was doing everything else to avoid doing what I really wanted to do,” says Makonnen, who works with video, photography and other materials. BETELHEMMAKONNEN.COM

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To create the intricate inlays in his carved serving boards and tables, Dave Massman turned to a surprising source for inspiration. “My grandfather was a navigator in the Air Force and had to use star charts to guide and make sure the plane was on course,” Massman says. “The templates I use for the constellation [cutting] boards are all from original star charts that he used decades ago.” Massman learned woodworking in his father’s shop as a kid, and in 2013 he officially started Watchman Woodworks. Massman hand-carves a variety of hard woods into wall hangings, cutting boards and sculptures. “They serve as a reminder that my dad and my grandfather and generations before took time to work with their hands and be a part of that slow process,” Massman says. WATCHMANWOODWORKS.COM

LOV E L E T T E R I I I , 19 7 7 CO U R T E S Y O F T H E B L A N TO N M U S E U M O F A R T, I A M A M O U N TA I N , 2 01 7 P H OTO G R A P H B Y E R I C A R O B E R T PA L LO .

TRIBEZ A

Since 2015, ICOSA has produced exhibitions featuring a wide variety of media and styles — from glass sculptures to colorful figurative paintings to paper craft puppets — earning accolades and getting namechecked in The New York Times. The artist-run collective continually surprises in its gallery space, currently housed at Canopy on Springdale Road. ICOSACOLLECTIVE.COM


Real Deal B I G R E D S U N M U R A L P H OTO G R A P H B Y Y E L LO W B I R D M E D I A , I CO S A CO L L E C T I V E P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E O N A L E S I . C H R I S T Y S TA L LO P ' S " G A N A D O R " P H OTO G R A P H B Y P H I L I P R O G E R S .

Mural Maker “Since I was very young I found that art was a way to express those things about me that I might not necessarily be able to say, whether it’s because of the language barrier or simply being in a culture that’s so different,” says Soledad Fernandez-Whitechurch. Fernandez-Whitechurch, who grew up in Paraguay and Argentina as well

as the U.S., studied psychology at the University of Vermont before finding her way to Austin. In her home studio in South Austin she creates abstract paintings in acrylic, inspired by themes of identity. And this year she embarked on her biggest projects to date — murals for Native Hostel and Big Red Sun.

The work of 20th-century artist, activist and educator Charles White is on display at two exhibitions this month. UT’s Art Galleries at Black Studies and the Blanton Museum of Art are showing White’s realistic drawings and illuminating his impact in creating powerful and dignified depictions of African American life. BLANTONMUSEUM.ORG

SOLEPAINTSTHEBLUES.BIGCARTEL.COM

Going Public This fall, TEMPO, part of the City of Austin’s Art in Public Places program, celebrated seven years with seven sculptures from Ender Martos, Brandon Mike, Darcie Book and other local artists. The sculptures, which have been on view at different public library branches, will all be transported this month to Edward Rendon Sr. Metro Park for TEMPO Convergence. Among them will be Christy Stallop’s “Ganador,” a 6-foot-tall grackle with a luchador mask, composed of recycled bicycle tires (right). AUSTINTEXAS.GOV/TEMPO

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#ProtectAustinKids

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Tina Hambly is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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ARTS + HAPPENINGS

HOT TO TROT ThunderCloud Subs Turkey Trot is a Thanksgiving tradition benefiting Caritas of Austin, pg. 48.

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC CHRIS YOUNG

November 7 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

November 8 ACL Live at The Moody Theater RAHIM ALHAJ: LETTERS FROM IRAQ

November 8 McCullough Theatre

RAY WYLIE HUBBARD’S BIRTHDAY BASH

November 9 Paramount Theatre

HAUTE MESS MUSIC FEST

November 9 & 10 Haute Spot Venue

T-PAIN

THEATER

November 12 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

SPRING AWAKENING

THE BLACK KEYS W/ MODEST MOUSE

November 6 – 24 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

November 13 Frank Erwin Center

AUSTIN OPERA: RIGOLETTO

November 9 – 17 Long Center

MATT & KIM

November 13 Emo’s Austin

THIEVERY CORPORATION

November 13 Stubb’s BBQ

CHRISTONE “KINGFISH” INGRAM

November 14 ACL Live at The Moody Theater UTOPIAFEST

November 14 – 16 Reveille Peak Ranch BROCKHAMPTON

THE TEXAS CHILI QUEENS

DUE EAST KICK-OFF PARTY

November 9 – 17 Long Center

November 14 Canopy

RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE

The official kick-off party for the East Austin Studio Tour celebrating 800+ Austin artists: group exhibition, art installations, music, tour catalogs and an open bar. Due EAST provides critical support for the mission of Big Medium.

November 15 ACL Live at The Moody Theater TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND

November 15 Bass Concert Hall SEAL

November 17 ACL Live at The Moody Theater ALESSIA CARA

PLEASE PRESS PAUSE AN EXHIBITION OF TIME & GRATITUDE

November 19 Bass Concert Hall TODRICK

October 12 - January 25 Art for the People Gallery

November 19 Emo’s Austin

Part art, part memory capsules, this interactive exhibit challenges viewers to reflect on what they wish they could pause in their own life. Exhibition runs from October 12 thru January 25. Art for the People Gallery is located at 1711 S. 1st St.

INCUBUS

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November 19 & 20 ACL Live at The Moody Theater HAYES CARLL

November 23 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

FILM AUSTIN JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

November 2 – 8 Various Locations

AN EVENING WITH JOE BOB BRIGGS

November 13 AFS Cinema

WINTERLAND

November 20 Stateside at the Paramount HOUSTON FILM COMMISSION 2019 TEXAS FILMMAKER'S SHOWCASE

November 26 AFS Cinema

November 12 Bass Concert Hall

ISABELLA ROSSELLINI LINK LINK CIRCUS

November 12 – 15 McCullough Theatre

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

November 20 – December 29 ZACH Theatre

BIANCA DEL RIO

November 7 ACL Live at The Moody Theater SKLAR BROTHERS

November 13 – 16 Cap City Comedy Club CRISTELA ALONZO

November 16 Paramount Theatre

DAVID FEHERTY LIVE

November 16 Paramount Theatre TOM SEGURA

November 17 Paramount Theatre GARY OWEN

November 21 – 23 Cap City Comedy Club LEWIS BLACK

November 22 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

SHE LOVES ME

November 22 – December 21 Austin Playhouse THE SANTALAND DIARIES

November 27 – December 29 ZACH Theatre BLUE MAN GROUP: SPEECHLESS

November 29 – December 1 Long Center

COMEDY TREVOR NOAH

November 1 & 2 Bass Concert Hall ANGOLA

November 2 & 9 ColdTowne Theater

CREEK SHOW PREVIEW PARTY November 6th 700 E 9th Street Be one of the first to check out the 2019 Creek Show! Waterloo Greenway Conservancy presents Creek Show Preview Party on Wednesday, November 6th with live music, signature drinks and bites plus an early look at this year’s installations.


FAMILY FAMILY DAY

November 10 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum ROCK THE PARK

November 15 Mueller Lake Park

GINGERBREAD FUN RUN

November 16 Thinkery

MUSIC OF THE KINKS FOR KIDS

November 17 The Mohawk

OTHER FORMULA 1 UNITED STATES GRAND PRIX

November 1 – 3 Circuit of the Americas WURSTFEST

November 1 – 10 New Braunfels TEXAS MONTHLY BBQ FESTIVAL

November 2 & 3 Long Center

AUSTIN DESIGN WEEK

November 4 – 8 Various Locations P H OTO G R A P H B Y D O N N I E H E D D E N

WIZARD WORLD

November 8 – 10 Austin Convention Center DOPE CREATIVES MARKET

November 10 Native Hostel

DOMAIN NORTHSIDE HOLIDAY WINE WALK November 21st Domain NORTHSIDE Kick off the holidays with the Domain NORTHSIDE Wine Walk in partnership with the Wine and Food Foundation of Texas. The event will take place 5-8pm on Palm Way. Happy Holidays!

A DINNER PARTY WITH WALKER LUKENS

November 11 Lucy’s Fried Chicken

AIA DESIGN TALKS

November 12 Austin Central Library

THE BLOODY MARY FESTIVAL

November 17 Fair Market

A CHRISTMAS AFFAIR

November 20 – 24 Palmer Events Center

BLUE GENIE ART BAZA AR

November 29 – December 24 Blue Genie Art Bazaar CHUY’S PARADE

November 30 Congress Avenue

MUSIC PICK

Ryan Bingham By Vanessa Blankenship PAR AMOUNT THEATRE, NOVEMBER 14 & 15

Ryan Bingham, the Grammy-winning songwriter, is more than just a country star. Bingham’s songs lie within the realm of folk, country and blues and give listeners an insight into his often-heartbreaking life stories. Most of his songs are inspired by the music he listened to and his childhood growing up all over New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana and California. At the age of 16, music became Bingham’s identity after his mother gave him his first guitar. “Once I kind of learned a few chords and started to create this music, it really became my voice, in a way, to process the world around me and make sense of things,” Bingham says. The artist is best known for his song “The Weary Kind,” featured in the film Crazy Heart, for which he won an Oscar. The lyrics tell the tragic story of his alcoholic father, whom he lost to suicide. Currently, he’s working on songs for an upcoming acoustic album and filming for Paramount Network’s “Yellowstone.” On the modern Western series, Bingham plays a cowboy named Walker, who works on the Dutton Ranch. Bingham is also excited to return to Austin this November to play two nights at the Paramount Theatre. “I really have a lot of respect for the city and the community that supported a young songwriter starting out playing songs and all of the different venues where you can go perform and cut your teeth and learn your craft,” Bingham says. “I always look forward to coming back to Austin. It’s a special place for me because of that alone.”

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts THE YOUNG ARE AT THE GATE

CRUZADITO TANGO X ART

MICRO PRESS READING ROOM

MATERIAL VICE

Through November 12 Art at The DEN

Through November 13 Central Library Main Gallery PREETIKA RAJGARIAH

“Design Shine” By Holly Cowart UML AUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM, NOVEMBER 20 – JANUARY 19

Barton Springs arts destination UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum is setting aglow this November with a thoughtful exhibition produced in partnership with the Austin Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Light installations developed by three up-and-coming local design teams will be scattered throughout the beautiful gardens amid Charles Umlauf’s 20th-century sculptures. Selected through a juried competition, each work is intentionally reminiscent of the museum’s rich history and takes into account a number of elements, like unpredictable climate and varying visibility through day and night. First, there’s You Are Here, a series of arching structures featuring a curtain of optical fibers that shift colors when touched. Created by design team Ana Kurzan, Christian Klein, Mari Russ and Irela Casanova, the enchanting sculptures are always adapting to their ever-changing environment. Next is Lost Casts, conceived by Alexandra Krippner and Toni Toscano. Interactive electroluminescent wires are cast over water in captivating free-form streaks, harking back to the UMLAUF’s past as a fly-fishing destination for WWII soldiers. Finally, there’s Sergey Belov, Stephanie Belov and Scott Saddler’s Polaris. The team uses pine chairs of differing heights with LED strips outlining their backs. Arranged in a circle, they correspond with topographical components of the site, including the fixed North Star above. The seeming simplicity of the scene in turn becomes a tool allowing viewers to connect more deeply with their surroundings. On November 20, get an early look at this brand-new collaboration with a free public opening from 6 to 8 p.m. and welcome the participating artists to a panel discussion over the commonalities of art, design and architecture within nature.

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November 1 – December 6 Visual Arts Center HUNT SLONEM

Through November 14 Women & Their Work

November 2 – 30 Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery

VITAM CORPORIS: THE BODY IN PRINT

JOSEPH JANSON: SOLO SHOW

LENA SOTSKOVA

CREEK SHOW

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS & COMMUNITY ALTARS

SURREAL SEA 2019

Through November 16 Flatbed Press & Gallery

ART PICK

November 1 – 3 Meet At Relay

Through November 17 Ao5 Gallery

Through November 24 Mexic-Arte Museum HAPPINESS IS A JOURNEY

Through November 24 Big Medium Gallery JON LANGFORD & JO CLAUWAERT

November 2 – December 1 Wally Workman Gallery

November 7 – 17 Waller Creek

November 9 Ion Art

CURATORS IN CONVERSATION: HEATHER PESANTI & ROBERT STORR

November 14 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

Through November 24 Yard Dog Art Gallery

EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR

COLIN MCINTYRE: SYSTEMA PRAETERNATURAE

DESIGN SHINE

Through November 30 Dimension Gallery LONE STAR WILD

Through November 30 Davis Gallery CHARLES WHITE: CELEBRATING THE GORDON GIFT

Through December 1 Blanton Museum of Art

November 16 & 17, 23 & 24 Various Locations

November 20 – January 19 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum BETELHEM MAKONNEN & STEPHANIE CONCEPCION RAMIREZ

November 23 – January 9 Women & Their Work


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com

EVENT PICK

ThunderCloud Subs Turkey Trot By Holly Cowart LONG CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, NOVEMBER 28

Maybe it’s the cooler temperatures, but there’s something about this time of year that brings out the best in people. It’s the season of giving, filled to the brim with holidays and events that connect us with the people we love. If you’re searching for a way to join in on the festivities, look no further than the annual ThunderCloud Subs Turkey Trot, a community tradition and unofficial kickoff to Thanksgiving. Starting and finishing at the Long Center for the Performing Arts, 20,000 runners in turkey-inspired costumes will dash across Austin on a 5 mile course, including a quick visit to the Capitol. Upon their return, a post race party will be waiting with live music, runner awards and a raffle, including a brand-new car. If 5 miles isn’t a fit, there will also be a 1 mile walk available and a Kids K perfect for energetic little ones. Better yet, every cent collected will be donated to longtime local beneficiary Caritas of Austin, which has generated a staggering $3.8 million since the event’s inception, in 1991. Through its mission to prevent homelessness in greater Austin by providing stable housing, access to food, assistance for veterans, employment and training opportunities, the nonprofit wholeheartedly embodies the spirit of generosity. This year, the organization has set out to beat last year’s total by raising more than $35,000. Before settling down around tables of tempting holiday meals this November, relish in a trot well run and feel even better on the inside knowing you’ve helped improve the lives of your neighbors in need.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org


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A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8–5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: W–Th 12–6, F-Su artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu-Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com

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AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org CAMIBAart 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS 1023 Springdale Rd., Ste. 1B (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery

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FLATBED PRESS & GALLERY 3701 Drossett Dr. Hours: Th 10–5 flatbedpress.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: F-Su 12–4 linkpinart.com

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org

MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 209 W. 9th St., #200 (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 sites.utexas.edu/utvac WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


CHANGING THE WAY PEOPLE BUY AND EXPERIENCE ART

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52 NOVEMBER 2019 | tribeza.com P H OTO G R A P H B Y R A N S O M A S H L E Y

PRESENTED BY


Laura Craddick and Jessica Karlsruher

FROM THE PAGE TO THE RUNWAY

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R A N S O M A S H L E Y. J O H N P E S I N A A N D C L A I R E S C H A P E R

There was so much to experience at Tribeza’s Lookbook Live presented by Tru-Skin Dermatology on September 25 at Native Hostel’s hip Grand Ballroom and Romper Room, where we hosted a VIP party. The centerpiece of the night was the runway show with dazzling fall looks selected and styled by Austin boutiques Estilo, ByGeorge, The Garden Room, Hearth & Soul, Julian Gold and Theory. But there was also buzz among 250 guests about the tasty bites by Loro, Lucky Lime, MezzeMe Turkish Kitchen, Ranch Hand, Spread & Co., Thai Fresh and Uncle Nicky’s. Partygoers sipped drinks provided by FIX Vodka, Nine Branded Whiskey, Playa Real Tequila, Susto Mezcal, Treaty Oak Distilling and Rambler Sparkling Water while enjoying tunes spun by DJ Ramesh and DJ King Louie at the VIP pre-party. We offer a special thanks to sponsors Tru-Skin Dermatology, Kendra Scott, Cassandra Collection, Ferrari of Austin and Urban Betty. We also appreciate the participation of Lemon Leaf Florist, Loot Rentals and Vogue Vignette. VIP guests left with gift bags loaded with goods provided by AWAY Austin Spa, Maggie Louise Confections, MINERAL, SoulCycle and more. We are also grateful for our event organizers, Creative Consultants, who seamlessly pulled together a fantastic night of fashion.

Sue Dickerson, Chrissy Dickerson Corey and Patty Hoffpauir

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Compass Concierge Start planning for the Spring 2020 Market with Compass Concierge. The Concierge Program lets you easily prepare your home for sale by fronting the cost of home improvement services like staging, painting, and more. No hidden fees, no interest charged – ever. Tracy Picone Broker Associate tracy.picone@compass.com 512.573.8851 Tracy Picone is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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FEATURES

9 ARTISTS WORTH WATCHING Visual artist Vy Ngo is one of the creators making an impact in our community, p. 64.

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BY JESS ARCHER ILLUSTRATED BY COREY CARBO Maybe you have a day off and are craving inspiration. Or perhaps you want to delight out-of-towners with a tour of artsy Austin. Take time to explore the University of Texas Landmarks program, a collection of more than 40 works of distinguished public art, spread across campus, all free and open to the public. Some pieces are practically hidden in plain sight. Others are impossible to miss. Here are 10 selections from the program that are worth seeking out.

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1. The Color Inside, on the William C. Powers, Jr. Student Activity Center rooftop James Turrell uses light as his medium, projecting rays across plaster walls to create colorful displays amid the silence of a reverent “Skyspace.” Make a reservation and spend an hour at sunrise or sunset to truly experience Turrell’s art. The exhibit is open at other times for quiet contemplation.

2. O N E E V E R Y O N E, at the Health Learning, Health Discovery and Health Transformation Buildings, Dell Medical School Through the particular we experience a touch of the universal. This is the message behind Ann Hamilton’s portraits of Austin residents who were photographed behind frosted, plastic material. The transparent barrier puts details in focus while subtly blurring the rest of the figure.

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3. Amistad América, in Robert B. Rowling Hall, McCombs School of Business Named for the 19th-century ship carrying slaves who famously mutinied and reclaimed their freedom, José Parlá’s sweeping and ambitious mural is more than 4,000 feet of painting. The vivid red, yellow and blue hues suggest the impression of place while simultaneously conveying a journey or route.

4. Monochrome for Austin, at the northwest corner of 24th Street and Speedway When you consider an aluminum canoe, you probably think of its buoyancy on the water. But what about a cluster of 70 recycled canoes and boats hanging from a listing column? Art critic Nancy Princenthal says Nancy Rubins’ piece, which hovers above a walkway to appear both precarious and sturdy, a balancing act of “improbable grace.”

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5. Spontaneous future(s) Possible past, at the Health Transformation Building, Dell Medical School Have you ever pondered all the possible outcomes that could come from a single decision? Beth Campbell has illustrated this kind of mental mapping in her pencil drawing and threedimensional mobile. The piece, which feels like an intimate diary entry gone wild, shows how a single choice can lead to dozens of possible outcomes.

6. Untitled (Seven Mountains), at Bass Concert Hall, sixth floor Ursula von Rydingsvard chipped, carved and rubbed pieces of wood with powdered graphite and then layered them to create seven structures that resemble geological formations. The effect “produces a nuanced surface coloration that suggests the patina of time,� Valerie Fletcher, of the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., writes in an essay about the sculpture.

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7. (Forever Free) Ideas, Languages and Conversations, at the GordonWhite Building Atrium The metaphor in Michael Ray Charles’ work of crutches bound together and suspended in the air is compelling: A device that’s needed for support during a period of weakness now soars and finds strength in numbers. The placement of the sculpture — in a location dedicated to the study of minority cultures and their histories — is no accident.

8. Figure on a Trunk, at Bass Concert Hall Plaza Magdalena Abakanowicz’s bronze figure is impossible to miss. It is “a lone human form, presented on a stage of sorts, as if for our approval, judgement, or condemnation,” according to a Landmark description. The platform under the body’s feet suggests balance, yet it rests on round legs, making viewers question its stability.

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9. Spiral of the Galaxy, at the Health Learning Building Courtyard, Dell Medical School Artist Marc Quinn has called seashells “the most perfect pre-existing sculptural ‘readymades’ in our natural world.” At more than 10 feet tall, his bronze piece with its organic structure stands out in an urban setting — and reminds us that all life is connected and both strong and fragile.

10. And That’s The Way It Is, at Walter Cronkite Plaza, Moody College of Communication Pioneering contemporary media artist Ben Rubin depicts a constant flow of information that is truly something to see at night. This six-channel video projection places overlapping text from five live network news streams, along with archived transcripts of the CBS Evening News from the Walter Cronkite era, onto a building façade.

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L E G E N D

1. The Color Inside, 2013, James Turrell

2. O N E E V E R Y O N E, 2017, Ann Hamilton

3. Amistad América, 2018, José Parlá

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4. Monochrome for Austin, 2015, Nancy Rubins

5. Spontaneous future(s) Possible past, 2019, Beth Campbell


9. Spiral of the Galaxy, 2013, Marc Quinn

6. Untitled (Seven Mountains), 1986 – 1988, Ursula von Rydingsvard

7. (Forever Free) Ideas, Languages and Conversations, 2015, Michael Ray Charles

8. Figure on a Trunk, 2000, Magdalena Abakanowicz

10. And That’s The Way It Is, 2012, Ben Rubin tribeza.com

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BY Regine Malibiran P H O T O G R A P H S BY Claire Schaper

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The

Visionaries Nine artists who are enriching their community and making Austin a more vibrant city

THE VISUAL ARTS HAVE ALWAYS presented an opportunity for creators to tell stories, ask questions and broaden perspectives. In Austin, with its complex history and ever-shifting population, watching the layered and colorful themes emerging from the arts community is like looking through a kaleidoscope as it turns. Here you’ ll find a painter who moonlights as a pediatrician, and artists with no formal training who now make a living off their work. There are international artists who came to this city on a coin toss and now serve as a bridge between Texas and their birthplace. Others chose to leave the city to have new experiences and then returned to their community with new vision. Some have been going to the same place in Austin for years to capture the wholeness of their story before sharing it with the world. Ranging from abstract to realist and across several different media, these visionary artists’works present a multifaceted view of the lives and experiences of Austinites.

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Mia Baxter

Mia Baxter is a fine-photographer who looks to Texan landscapes and Texan-Mexican culture for inspiration. For the past three years, Baxter has been developing her own style of photo collage, repurposing her own prints rather than using others’images. Baxter meticulously cuts each piece of the collage and arranges it carefully to create a new work, displaying both an intentional reconstruction of the places she’ s photographed as well as an evolution of her craft.

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Tyler Guinn Tyler Guinn is an abstract artist who uses his work to“share a light with people”and paints from a foundation of empathy. Guinn creates a shared experience of interpretation with his audience and sees himself as a“coauthor”whenever sharing his work with others. As a Christian, his goal is to create work that symbolizes deeply held values like understanding and kindness, while still allowing room for different perspectives.

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Vy Ngo Vy Ngo is a Vietnamese American visual artist. Inspired by her background as the child of refugees and her career as a physician, Ngo’ s work strives to reflect on some of the most critical themes of the current time: identity, culture and vulnerability. Her most recent collection, “The IN Between,”explores her relationship with the concepts of home and belonging as a firstgeneration American. Unafraid to use her voice, Ngo not only tells her story but uses her experiences and art to advocate for her community.

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Hakeem Adewumi

Hakeem Adewumi is a Nigerian American photographer and creative director who describes his work as“harmony and peace through the lens of a black, gay man.”In 2017, Adewumi participated in the Fulbright Scholar Program and spent nine months in Johannesburg, South Africa, gaining new perspectives and working on his craft. While there, Adewumi was attacked in a hate crime. After leaving a bar with a friend, strangers pursued them, shouting homophobic slurs and eventually stabbing Adewumi. The assault inspired his latest exhibition, “There Are Lifetimes Here. In the Body.” tribeza.com

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h t i m S Kelti Kelti Smith is a painter with a selfproclaimed“Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”style that is both realist and abstract. Smith’ s background is in traditional art — stilllifes and portraits — but she eventually felt a pull towards“free-form.”Her abstract work derives inspiration from her mother, who was a stained-glass artist. Smith continues to explore her two main styles through her latest collection,“Refraction no. 1, no. 2, etc.,”where she combines themes from both to create realistic imagery of foliage and flowers that is then distorted by the reflective nature of glass and the abstract.

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Patrick Puckett is a painter who was“born with a crayon in his hand.”He hasn’ t shied away from color since. Puckett first imagined pursuing the arts as a child after browsing through an old sketchbook that had belonged to his mother in her college days. His latest collection,“Montseras,”utilizes contrasting reds and greens to create unmissable pieces that invite you to wonder about the people depicted. Now a parent himself, Puckett looks forward to being able to share art with his newborn son.

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Angela Navarro is a painter whose signature is an abstract interpretation of flowers and nature. Though Navarro studied fine arts in Spain, she wasn’ t able to truly dive into painting until years later, when she and her young family moved to Austin. After the move, Navarro derived inspiration from her home’ s garden. Her work uses unending lines and recurring color themes to emphasize the interconnectedness of the world and her life.

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Ryan Runcie Ryan Runcie is a studio artist, muralist and art instructor who prides himself on being able to utilize several styles in his work. One of Runcie’ s signatures is the use of vibrant colors when painting portraits“so that your initial thoughts have absolutely nothing to do with the race but the beauty of the person and their personality.”Runcie, who is biracial and a firstgeneration American, creates work that is“focused on building a new story”and taking charge of his own narrative.

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Ines ` Batllo ` is a multimedia artist who utilizes painting, drawing, sculpture and digital art. She’ s known for her unique encaustic style, wherein she uses beeswax and tree resin to preserve her paintings. Her use of this technique reinforces the intent to preserve knowledge and wisdom through her art. Originally from Barcelona, Batllo ` moved to Austin to study digital art 25 years ago. Now she aims to bridge the two cities and has developed a residency for Austin artists to travel to Spain.Â

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FFER By KATHRYN STOU

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Portraits by JENNY

ANTILL


The Art of Art Collecting An expert art adviser shares her secrets to curating a collection in your home

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TEXAS NATIVE ILLA GAUNT has traveled the world studying and discovering fine art. Now based in Houston, she helps clients curate personal collections and has transformed her Instagram account into an accessible platform for arts education. With a Vanderbilt education, Christie’s training and numerous gallery openings under her belt, Gaunt can tactfully identify a true work of art and proceed to transform a house, her blank canvas, into a gallery of its own.

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F R E A D M C K E N D R E E

"I love the juxtaposition of traditional interiors with contemporary art," Gaunt says of a wall sculpture by Derrick Velasquez.

After years advising for galleries, Gaunt began to share her knowledge in more intimate settings. She says, “I always knew I wanted to go out on my own. With the flexibility I have now, I have a wider lens of what I can sell.” Gaunt also speaks to the importance of expanding her clients’ knowledge and appreciation for visual art in their own environments. “It’s really about opening people’s eyes to what’s out there,” Gaunt adds. In addition to advising in cities like New York, Los Angeles and London, Gaunt’s work spans across Texas. From the Holt Cat headquarters in San Antonio and the Lawndale Art Center in Houston, to numerous residences in Houston, Austin and beyond, many Texans have benefited from Gaunt’s discerning eye. While the epicenter of Gaunt’s work is in Texas, she continues to think globally when it comes to sourcing pieces for clients. “The other day I was placing an artist I found in Ireland that does amazing abstracts,” she says. “I can be the eye all over the world of what’s going on.” Gaunt has harnessed the reach of social media to educate others about the importance of the arts. Each Sunday, viewers can tune in to her Instagram feed, @_ig_art, for art history lessons, where she recently covered topics like the famed Fabergé eggs created for the Russian imperial family and the land art movement of the 1960s and 1970s. When asked what holds people back from exploring the world of fine art, Gaunt says, “People feel intimidated by the process. The art world has a reputation of being intimidating and elitist. If you’re a buyer, you’re a buyer. Galleries are always willing [to sell].”  Whether you’re finally surrendering a decadeold concert poster or knee-deep in outfitting your walls with original works, Gaunt has advice for art aficionados at every stage of building a collection.


Gaunt with her 2-year-old daughter, Birdie Gaunt.

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A Guide to Collecting FOR THE POSTGRAD POSTER JUNKIE

Akin to fast fashion, “fast art” graces the walls in homes of millennials and Gen Xers alike. Glossy prints and canvases from your nearest home goods store offer a quick fix but fail to tell a story or provide you with valuable, collectible and shareable works of art. “It’s important to support artists rather than buying pieces that are merely decorative,” Gaunt says. “I encourage new and seasoned collectors to visit galleries and art fairs to experience a variety of artists and media and take photos. This will help you develop a discerning eye as well as give you more insight into what you like.” Finally, Gaunt encourages budding collectors to research the artist and their work. “I tell my clients to buy art that is meaningful rather than trying to match it to your home’s décor,” she advises. “A worthwhile source is Uprise Art, an online gallery with an affordable price point.”

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Photos by Robert Voit of disguised cell phone towers brighten a client's kitchen.

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F E M E R Y DAV I S B A S TA B L E

FOR THE CURIOUS AND BUDGET-CONSCIOUS For those who want to be serious about art but are limited by budget, Gaunt suggests photography and prints as a beginning point for collecting. “Prints are a wonderful way to purchase artists you like but whose prices might otherwise be beyond your budget. But be sure you’re buying from a trustworthy source and request a certificate of

authenticity. As for photography, Texas has its own renowned international photography biennial in Houston, FotoFest, which is a wonderful resource for learning about emerging and established photographers.” Gaunt is also a champion of art auctions such as Christie’s, Phillips and Sotheby’s as a resource for

prints and photography. “Most of the auction houses host an annual auction aimed at first-time buyers of postwar and contemporary art that includes both established names and the best cutting-edge or emerging artists. For example, the one at Christie's is called First Open, and the one at Sotheby's is called First Look.”

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"Powder rooms are a great place for unexpected and whimsical artworks," says Gaunt of this photo by Miles Aldridge.

When your refined tastes, desires and resources align, it can be a serendipitous time to garner more fine works and build on the foundation you presumably have been working on for years. Gaunt suggests getting involved with local museums and art communities as a stepping stone for discovering your new favorite pieces. “Museum patron groups are a valuable resource for learning about artists and gaining in-depth insight into their practices. They also enable you to keep your finger on the pulse of what museums are collecting.” For Austin-based art aficionados, Gaunt recommends The Contemporary Austin. Its membership benefits include studio visits, lectures and curator-lead tours. “I had the privilege of visiting Deborah Roberts’ studio in Austin earlier this year with the museum, and it was insightful. I’ve since procured her work for a client and purchased a piece for my own collection,” Gaunt says. “And when visiting new cities, try to carve out time to visit galleries and introduce yourself. I keep my eye on the up-and-

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coming artists on the rosters at blue-chip galleries — think Gagosian, David Zwirner and Hauser & Wirth. “While visiting, be sure to ask for an artist’s CV to see what collections have bought his or her work — this is an important indication of value and collectability. All this can become complicated and time-consuming, and that’s where I come in: advising clients on purchases and negotiating with galleries.” Gaunt’s skillful work and impeccable taste speak

to her mastery and her passion for guiding others in developing their own artistic tastes. It’s something to consider when plotting your next investment. As for staying up to date on the Texas art scene, Gaunt is an avid supporter of The Contemporary Austin, frequently checks in on what Christie’s has on view and reads quite a bit. “Reading auction catalogs,” she says, “is like getting the September issue of Vogue.”

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F M A RY C R AV E N P H OTO G R A P H Y

FOR THE SEASONED COLLECTOR


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LIFE + STYLE

RUNNING HOME Equinox's Eric Cobb discovers life in Austin and shares his favorite people, places and things, p. 86.

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STYLE PROFILE

A PERFECT FIT ERIC COBB SHARES HIS ESSENTIALS AS HE SET TLES INTO LIFE IN AUSTIN AS THE GROUP FITNESS MANAGER AT EQUINOX

By Vanessa Blankenship Photographs by Holly Cowart

E R I C CO B B L I V E S BY T H E M OT TO “ M A K E ’ E M S W E AT A N D M A K E ’ E M S M I L E .” As the group

fitness manager at Equinox, his mission is to bring “high energy” and “highly engaging” classes to the luxury fitness club’s new location, opening on South Congress this month. Cobb focuses on strengthtraining workouts that incorporate lifting, cardio and yoga — all set to motivating music. Cobb, who grew up in the Midwest, joined the Equinox team in 2013 and recently moved to Austin from New York City. “Between the year-round outdoor activities, the live music and the beautiful outdoor spaces, it’s such a contrast,” says Cobb, who shares the people, places and things he loves in his life.

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Whether it’s to discover new music, to make workout playlists and play them in my classes, this is my go-to. It allows me to make the playlists offline, crossfade the tracks and adjust the equalizer on the fly so that I can maximize the sound in any studio.

I have to wear a tank when I work out as it allows my body to breathe. This tank is super high quality. It’s breathable, light and has the tech to be resistant to bacterial growth, which keeps odors away.

These shoes are so versatile I wear them every day. They are great for general training at the gym, but also work well outside of the gym. I prefer no-show socks and a slightly cuffed jean for a casual night out.

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LADY BIRD LAKE

The versatility here is also key. I can do almost any exercise with them, and they aren’t going anywhere. They’re also great for a run around town as they do let in ambient noise so I can be aware of my surroundings. If I get an important call, I can answer with a double tap.

Whether it’s a quick evening run or a morning off on the water with a kayak or paddleboard, it’s the perfect place to get some “me time.” I’m a recent transplant from NYC, and the year-round utility of Lady Bird Lake is a game-changer for me.

FRENCH PRESS COFFEE

I’m a huge coffee drinker and also try to keep my waste to a minimum. The French press allows me to make better-quality coffee than a drip machine without the waste of plastic containers.

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LIME SCOOTERS

Everything I really need in Austin is just a 10to 20-minute scoot away. When I’m heading somewhere not too far, hopping on a scooter is a huge timesaver. Lime [scooters] are my favorite because they are sturdy, have a strong brake system and some speed. NETFLIX

My job is all about people and being social. Often at the end of the day, my social battery can be low, so Netf lix is a great way for me to unplug and let my mind recharge. While it may sound completely brainless, there are some pretty interesting shows popping up on the platform. One of my favorites is “Chef’s Table.” FAMILY AND CHILDHOOD FRIENDS

I’m lucky to have a family that has a really tight bond and to have a couple of friends I grew up with. Especially after my family and I have moved around so many times, getting my parents, my brothers and my sisters-in-law in one place is asking for nonstop laughter. We all get together about once a year, and it’s something I look forward to all year. INSTAGRAM

More than any other medium, Instagram allows me to communicate in creative ways with my friends, family and followers. I’m definitely not an inf luencer ... but it really lets me express myself when I don’t always have an immediate outlet to do so.

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FOOD + TRAVEL

LONDON TOWN Make your visit to the bustling British capital a poetic experience, p. 90.

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T R AV E L P I C K

g n i l l a C n Londo SLOW DOWN, SLIP AWAY FROM THE CROWDS AND BRING THE CIT Y’S POETRY TO LIFE By Hannah J. Phillips

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W

HEN I MOVED TO LONDON

i n 2010 , I r ememb er pushing through the crowds at Oxford Circus toward the spire of All Souls at Langham Place. Climbing the steps of the church rotunda, I looked back down the long sweep of Regents Street, already feeling at home in this majestic marbled city. Visiting again nearly a decade later, that sense of belonging rushed over me the minute we hit British soil — and not just because I once called it mine. Whether it’s your first visit or 50th, you can’t help but feel a bit of déjà vu when walking around London. We learn British nursery rhymes before we walk, graduating to “The Chronicles of Narnia,” Beatles songs, Bond films and “The Crown.” The city’s iconic image looms larger in our collective cultural consciousness than almost any European city. London is a living museum. Trying to see all it has to offer can be overwhelming. Yes, you can rush around just to say you saw all the exhibits, but in doing so, you exchange its poetry of place for bragging rights. From smaller art collections to sprawling parks and stately homes, here are my favorite places to simply sit and let it all soak in — preferably while sipping tea. Speaking of tea, I recommend an afternoon at The Rubens at the Palace, a hotel near Buckingham Palace. Facing the Royal Mews, The Rubens’ Palace Lounge provides views of the queen’s horses and carriages and serves delicious scones and sandwiches. Hoping to

re-create my first trip to London with my mom when I was 12, I was delighted to find all the elements I remembered — f rom high tea to cheerful doormen in top hats and bright coattails. If travel is an addiction, London was my gateway drug, and The Rubens, my initial enchantment. In the nearly t wo decades since that visit, the hotel has completed a series of renovations that seamlessly preserved its historic charm while adding luxury touches and fine dining options like the Curry Room. Nestled downstairs in the intimate library, the restaurant features elevated and authentic Indian cuisine with an impressive diversity of dishes. Besides its proximity to the palace, The Rubens is also a prime starting point for a walking tour. Stroll through St James’s Park, tracing royal parade routes up the Mall before cutting up to Trafalgar Square, where four colossal lion statues guard Admiral Horatio Nelson on his tall column. Behind Nelson, the National Gallery houses one of the world’s most extensive collections of Western European art. Find the British masters in Room 34: George Stubbs’ glorious life-size “Whistlejacket” holds court here, while J.M.W. Turner’s “Rain, Steam and Speed” transports you to industrial Britain in a sublime interplay between technology and nature. Even non-art lovers can appreciate this wing as the setting of James Bond’s first conversation with Q in “Skyfall.”

ABOVE: Find refuge on the trails of Hampstead Heath. BELOW: A view of iconic Buckingham Palace

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T R AV E L P I C K

RIGHT: More than 10,000 plants cling to the Living Wall at The Rubens at the Palace. BELOW: Through the arches of Covent Garden’s Market Building, Londoners shop and meet for food and drinks.

From Trafalgar Square, wind your way toward Covent Garden. Formerly a covered vegetable market, the neoclassical arcade is now home to luxury shops, restaurants and the Royal Opera House. The city’s best espresso is nearby at Monmouth Coffee Company, perfect for a pick-me-up before catching a play in the West End. For an outdoor adventure, London is replete with royal gardens, but Hampstead Heath is my favorite refuge. I was pleased that its forest paths were still etched in my memory. I could still navigate them without a map. From

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Hampstead station, your first stop on the high street is La Crêperie de Hampstead, which serves the best crêpes outside Paris. The savory mushroom, garlic and ham is a must, and you will wonder how you lived before trying one oozing with dark chocolate and hazelnut cream. No shame in ordering both — you will walk them off. London’s last wild place, the Heath, offers a chance to set your itinerary aside, ambling without aim through ancient woodlands. Just as the dome of St Paul’s commands an upward gaze, the towering trees instill a humbling sense of wonder. Long before the Tube reached Hampstead in 1907, poets and artists like Keats and Constable escaped here to wander these same woods. If you need a specific destination, head to Kenwood House, featured in scenes from “Notting Hill.” The museum houses a lovely private collection that includes more Turner and work by Thomas Gainsborough, among others. Recharge with a hot drink from the café

before setting a course toward Parliament Hill for a panoramic of the city below. Sitting on the same bench that graced the cover of Mumford & Sons’ “Wilder Minds,” you can spot landmarks like St Paul’s and Big Ben, now scattered among skyscrapers like the Gherkin and the Shard. From this vantage point, I like to think that William Wordsworth would still stand by his 1802 poem that “earth has not anything to show more fair” than London’s skyline. In “Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802” she continues: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: ... Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; ... Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! If you step back and slow down in places like The Rubens, the National Gallery and Hampstead Heath, you feel that same deep calm — even in busy, bustling London.


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KAREN'S PICK

ATX Cocina DON’ T WAIT TO E XPERIENCE ELEVATED ME XICAN DISHES CRE ATED BY AN E XPERT CHEF IN A STUNNING DOWNTOWN SPACE By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

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R E G R E T, P R E S U M A B LY, I S A W A S T E O F

time. So why do I keep kicking myself for not discovering ATX Cocina sooner? In the two years since it opened, I could’ve been reveling in its refined Mexican fabulousness. But instead, I hesitated. I worried that it was just another overhyped, overpriced downtown blip. I chased after other new restaurants, doubting there was a need for yet another Mexican restaurant in Austin. But then, my friend, fellow food writer and Mexico native Claudia Alarcón insisted I check it out. She swore the place was legit. She was right. I was wrong. Better late than never. ATX Cocina is now on my list of go-to restaurants. Its sophisticated Mexican food is terrific, as are its drinks, ambiance and service. Run by the aces behind marquee dining destinations like Eddie V’s and


Red Ash, it’s no surprise ATX Cocina fires on all Drinks rival the food at ATX Cocina. If you’re cylinders. I’m delighted I finally experienced it. a tequila or mezcal fan, you’ll be astounded by Executive chef Kevin Taylor’s parents owned a its extensive selection. Cocktails are skillfully Mexican restaurant for more than three decades. crafted, and even the basic house margarita is He grew up in this business. As an adult, he one of the best in town. The beer and wine list honed his skills at modern Mexican overf lows with wonderful treats, standouts like Philadelphia’s El Vez like the bold Chilean Prisma ATX COCINA and the Mansion on Turtle Creek Rosé, which complements almost 110 SAN ANTONIO STREET, SUITE 170 in Dallas. His latest menu offers an everything on the menu. 512-263-2322 overwhelming range of tempting ATX Cocina’s daily happy hour ATXCOCINA.COM options. It all sounds good — and is worth the effort. Although the better yet, it all is good. Making up offerings are limited, they’re an for lost time, I’ve now sampled almost everything incredible value. And some items, like the and there’s not a loser on the list. outstanding cochinita pibil tacos, are offered Start with the sopes, three tender disks made only during happy hour. with Oaxacan heirloom corn that’s ground and cooked in-house, then filled with cochinita pibil, bean purée, and habanero-onion salsa. Or the tacos arabes, succulent roast lamb served on a bed of creamy garbanzo purée and spicy rajas with recado rojo (anchiote paste). Fold some into a warm homemade tortilla and you’re in heaven. Other tasty starters include the bright and herbaceous guacamole, the savory duck carnitas, and any of the fresh seafood crudos. While you could easily make a meal out of ATX Cocina’s starters, don’t miss its show-stopping entrées, all large enough to share. The barbacoa short rib is fork-tender and packed with flavor, garnished with jalapeño-chayote escabeche and cashews. The succulent chile-roasted chicken is served in a pool of lip-smacking white mole with a side of bacon-braised cabbage and grilled cebollitas. One of these days, I’ll try one of the massive grilled meats, like the lamb porterhouse, bone-in ribeye or pork tomahawk. Be sure to order one of the excellent side dishes, like the sweet, butter-poached corn tossed with No matter when you dine, you’ll queso fresco and punched up with smoked aioli, appreciate the restaurant’s stunning lime and cilantro. Or the crispy papas bravas, interior. The soaring dining room is smashed fingerling potatoes drizzled with zippy lined with natural wood and windows smoked-chile aioli. overlook ing L a dy Bird L a ke a nd

downtown’s bustling scene. You’ll also find intimate dining nooks, communal tables, multiple bar options and an outdoor patio. Serving only dinner, except for lunch on Friday, the restaurant is always packed with diners, including young residents from surrounding high-rises, working professionals hosting business dinners, and singles, couples and tourists of all ages. Everyone, it seems, feels comfortable at ATX Cocina. It’s a pleasure to dine there. I’m absolutely smitten. Don’t make the same mistake I did; get over there pronto.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises deli-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

cious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch,

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and soft

diner favorites. Order up the classics, including

and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is executed

roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

by the Stefano Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs

decadent milkshakes.

charcuterie board.

at more than 900 degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware,

34TH STREET CAFE

THE BREWER’S TABLE

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

CAFÉ JOSIE

This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great

at the brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

for weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

source the ingredients, which are utilized in both

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

the kitchen and the brewery to eliminate food

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

ASTI TRATTORIA

waste. The seasonally changing menu is unique

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

but provides options for even the pickiest of eaters.

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential

there is no shortage of cheese on this menu!

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor

them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-

and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

goat-cheese panna cotta.

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the

BAR CHI SUSHI

classic avocado toast is a must-try.

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

EASY TIGER

A great place to stop before or after a night on the

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts

a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu

with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer

features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

under $10.

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

BARLEY SWINE

34TH STREET CATERING

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore

1005 W. 34th Street | (512) 323 2000 34thstreetcafe.com

EL ALMA

encourages sharing with small plates made from

One of the best and most creative full service

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

locally sourced ingredients, served at communal

catering companies in Austin. Acclaimed Chef Paul

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with

tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or

Peterson brings his culinary experience and high

unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Aus-

Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

standards to their catering and to your event. Call

tin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect

to save the date and they can start planning for any

for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the

occasion. They're coming to the party!

everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

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ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

We love this charming French-Vietnamese eatery

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi and sweet

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food

bring comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin

with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early

neighborhood favorite.

on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

EPICERIE 2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840 A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR 1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800 Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme cocktail.

GRIZZELDA’S

IRON CACTUS

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

606 Trinity Street | (512) 472 9240 ironcactus.com

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere

With amazing outdoor patio views, friendly service and

between traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican

a lively full bar, Iron Cactus offers one of the best din-

recipes, each fused with a range of f lavors and styles.

ing experiences around. Leave your worries at the door

The attention to detail in each dish shines and the

and lose yourself in the comforts of the cactus.

tortillas are made in-house daily.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, handtossed pizzas and incredible desserts alongside local-

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

ly sourced and seasonally inspired specials.

2330 W N Loop Blvd | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com

HILLSIDE FARMACY

This holiday season, give friends and family a

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

gorgeous cookbook from Austin’s destination

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East

Mexican restaurant, Fonda San Miguel. Stunning

Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner spe-

photos and more than 100 recipes make it a perfect

cials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

gift. Available at the restaurant or at Amazon.com

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437 For pizza cravings head to Home Slice. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam.

HANK’S 5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077 Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a kid-friendly patio all work together to make Hank’s a favorite neighborhood joint. With happy hour every day from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma.

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JEFFREY’S

LAS PALOMAS

LE POLITIQUE

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 |

110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

laspalomasrestaurant.com

This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously

Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming

favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican

marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern

service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere

cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy

that makes it an Austin staple.

family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

miss the margaritas.

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

LENOIR

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Le-

one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

noir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making

America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge

the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable.

in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

JUNE’S ALL DAY

f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patisserie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town. LORO

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole

serious cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro

and Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a

favorites. Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas

welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive in-

bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages

door-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office

sipping, noshing and lingering. The restaurant’s

of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsur-

namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—one of

prisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out

less than 10 in Texas—who also serves as the bever-

on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai

age director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

LA BARBECUE

The greatest stories are told with family and friends

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream.

over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies

Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

just that, bringing nostalgic and classic ItalianAmerican cuisine to the heart of Austin. From family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

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THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

RED ASH ITALIA

TINY BOXWOODS

303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906

1503 W 35 St. (512) 220 0698

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between

This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and

high-quality food and enticing ambiance. This Ital-

delicious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood.

ian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including

Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon

executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy

Provencal salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

PICNIK 4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644 A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly options and thoughtfully Hunt design ad text-01.ai 1 7/18/2018 10:00:41 AM sourced ingredients.

ROSEWOOD

an exceptional evening.

1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205 Housed in a historic East Side cottage, chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding homage to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers. This

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating. The restaurant, located in downtown’s Seaholm district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

new spot is sure to quickly become a staple.

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hunt design

Lake Travis Earrings in sterling silver, part of the Swimmin Holes collection www.huntdesignjewelry.com 512.527.4239 custom designs welcome tribeza.com

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A LOOK BEHIND

DANIEL JOHNSTON’S KIND LEGACY AUSTIN LOST AN ARTS ICON WHO LE AVES BEHIND SO MUCH TO CHERISH Daniel Johnston, the beloved songwriter and artist behind the iconic “Hi, How Are You” mural on Guadalupe and 21st streets, died in September at the age of 58 of natural causes. His indie style, coupled with lyrics full of impulse, whimsy and heartbreaking truths, was adored by artists like Death Cab for Cutie and Beck, who both covered his songs. Kurt Cobain was also a fan. The late Nirvana frontman wore “Hi, How Are You” T-shirts and praised Johnston as one of the “greatest” songwriters. Amid Austin’s prolific music scene, Johnston made a name for himself in the 1980s with self-produced cassettes, including “Hi, How Are You: The Unfinished Album” whose quirky cover art became the mural that went up in 1993. Johnston’s music was unlike anything

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By Lauren Jones

Austinites had heard before, and he developed an extraordinary cult following. But while he landed a record deal with Atlantic, his only studio album, “Fun,” released in 1994, was not a commercial success. Johnston’s struggles with mental health — he was diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder — kept him in and out of psychiatric institutions during his adult life. In addition to a lasting artistic legacy, Johnston’s story remains inf luential. The Hi, How Are You Project, which was created with the support of Johnston and his family, works to inspire dialogue that focuses on mental wellbeing and eliminating the stigma associated with mental illness. For more information on the organization visit hihowareyou.org.


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA November 2019 Issue  

The Arts Issue No. 219

TRIBEZA November 2019 Issue  

The Arts Issue No. 219

Profile for tribeza