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Austin 2236 West Braker Lane 512.451.1233

San Antonio 18603 Blanco Road 210.545.4366


1615 The High Road | Leah Petri

Central Austin Estate | Laura Gottesman

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512.451.2422 gottesmanresidential.com

2627 West 45th Street | Lissa Gray Anderson

G O T T E S M A N R E S I D E N T I A L R E A L E S TAT E

The Summit Estate | Alaina Martin and Laura Gottesman


Cayena - New Construction | Southwest Austin www.cayenaatx.com

2100 Sharon Lane | Tarr ytown | Available Summer 2020 www.sharonatx.com

411 W St. Elmo #6 | South Congress/South 1st St. www.411stelmo.com

10512 Superview Drive | Overlook Estates www.superviewdrive.com

Nicole Kessler Broker Associate Compass Real Estate nicolekessler.com © Compass 2020 ¦ All Rights Reserved by Compass ¦ Made in NYC. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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WE K NOW A U S T IN We’re offering what’s next, NOW. With over 35 years of experience in the Austin area, Prospect Real Estate is focused on providing the best urban living experience and attainable opportunities in the city. Our agents have their fingers on the pulse of Austin with exclusive access to new build inventory you can’t find anywhere else. We buy Austin, we sell Austin — we LIVE Austin. We’re proud to be the exclusive listing agent for Natiivo Austin. 512-640-1881 • INFO@PROSPECTREALESTATE.COM

P ROSPECTREAL ESTATE. COM

6 MARCH 2020 |

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ARTIST CONCEPT

ARTIST CONCEPT

City on the Rise NATIIVO AUSTIN IS THE FIRST PROPERT Y DESIGNED, BUILT AND LICENSED FOR HOMESHARING.

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oming Fall 2021 to the historic Rainey Street District, Natiivo Austin will be a standout among the thriving community as the first building purposefully built, designed, and licensed for homesharing. This unique concept is entirely new to the market, let alone Austin, blending the amenity of hotel stays with the benefit of homeownership. Each of the 249 fully-furnished units offers buyers the ability to stay and enjoy their space themselves or list it independently on home sharing websites or through the building’s concierge team. Natiivo Austin is co-developed by Newgard and Pearlstone Partners development firms and is the first of two planned Natiivo properties with Natiivo Miami scheduled to open in 2022.

Natiivo Austin construction is well underway for the 33-story building, which will stand on East Avenue at the southern end of the Rainey Street District, mere steps from both the nightlife and outdoor recreation the area offers. Not only are bars, restaurants, and iconic city sights within walking distance, the building promises its residents access to a spacious fitness center (complete with yoga and Peloton bike studio), 24-hour concierge and valet, 10th-floor communal outdoor terrace, and 7,000 square foot rooftop deck and pool—and that’s just to name a few of the near endless list of amenities and services included with Natiivo Austin. With architecture by STG Design and interiors by INC, the building itself is something

to behold. From the thoughtfully incorporated parking podium and glassy exterior to its modern styling and hand-selected local furnishings, these spaces are inspired. Natiivo Austin’s 15 individual floor plans range from studios to two-bedrooms and start on the 11th floor, each with spectacular views of Austin in every direction. For those already in the market or those now wanting to be, units start in the $500s and have already proven popular with just over half of the inventory reserved in a matter of months. Visit natiivoaustin.com or the Natiivo Austin Sales Center at 219 W 4th St. to own your piece of the city.

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CONTENTS

MARCH / MUSIC + FILM

Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson at the Texas Film Awards, 2003.

P H OTO G R A P H S B YJ AC K I E L E E YO U N G , A L E X A N D R A VA L E N T I

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“Texas Piano Man” Robert Ellis is one of seven local artists making moves.

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DEPARTMENTS

ON THE COVER Six female drummers pounding out a new rhythm for women in the industry.

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Lindsay Beaver and the other drummers came together for a photoshoot at Arlyn Studios.

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Social Hour p. 16

Staycation p. 70

Kristin’s Column p. 24

Karen’s Pick p. 78

Tribeza Talk p. 27

Dining Guide p. 80

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 34

A Look Behind p. 84

Music Pick p. 35 Art Pick p. 36 Event Pick p. 38

FEATURES

Sex Cymbals p. 44 Capturing the Moment p. 58


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Z E R O + M A R I A C O R N EJ O tribeza.com

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EDITOR'S LETTER

Suzanne Kilpatrick suzanne@tribeza.com

10 MARCH 2020 |

tribeza.com

Attracting legendary artists including Ray Charles, Neil Young and Willie Nelson, Arlyn Studios is a hub for Austin’s vibrant music community.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J AC K I E L E E YO U N G

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ne major theme emerged in composing this month’s music and film issue and that’s just how beautifully hospitable Austin remains for artists, despite the city’s rapid development. You might be familiar with the Austin Film Society and Austin Studios, but the many great things they have done to build a meaningful movie-making community is not as widely known as it should be. We compiled a visual history to celebrate their respective 35th and 20th anniversaries, challenging the belief that one must move to L.A. to make celluloid history. Likewise, the creative gurus behind Mondo Gallery have cornered the market on modern movie posters, churning out some of the most important printed matter of our time from Hyde Park. When writers cover the local music experience, it’s often from the eye of the beholder. But what is it like to live and work here as an industry vet? We take readers inside a number of incredible nooks where the dream is alive. Vanessa Blankenship profiles Libby Rose, who humbly shares her story about building a music festival. The annual event is based outside Athens, Georgia, but Rose consciously makes Austin home, an oasis from the grind and a source for finding new acts. Additionally, Tobin Levy writes about six female drummers who debunk the myth that percussion is a man’s game. Their experience climbing the ranks here in Austin is practically antithetical to the #MeToo indignities so pervasive elsewhere, and their life as artists is pure. Nina Singh captures it perfectly: “In Hollywood, it felt like everyone working a regular job was dissatisfied and waiting to be discovered. When I visited Austin, I thought, ‘Wow, these people are just happy to be working—at H-E-B, Planet K, wherever. They are just really friendly and grateful. This is where I belong.’” Special thanks to Arlyn Studios for graciously sharing its magical space for the shoot and Jackie Lee Young for capturing the power and sheer awesomeness of each musician.


Artisans of Comfort

SPRING 2020 DOMAIN NORTHSIDE / MGBWHOME.COM


TRIBEZ A

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AUSTIN CUR ATED

M A R C H 2 02 0

YEARS

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Suzanne Kilpatrick ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Aaron Parsley

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Hannah J. Phillips

EDITOR-AT-L ARGE

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Vanessa Blankenship

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Paul Krushin

ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres INTERNS

Luna Estrella Trichelle Lee Lindsey Logan

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen O. Spezia WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Vanessa Blankenship Tobin Levy Laurel Miller Hannah J. Phillips Kathryn Stouffer COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Holly Cowart Erin Reas Jackie Lee Young ILLUSTR ATOR

Whitney Avra

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

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Sold I Mid Century Modern Castlewood Forest I $550K Just Listed I Driftwood $1,125,000 | www.901sadwillow.com Sold I Designer Renovation Northwest Hills I $910K

Hendrix & Zulu Group, Luxury Service at Every Price Point Hendrix & Zulu Group ABR, CLHMS, GRI, MCNE 512.436.0640 HendrixZuluGroup@compass.com All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.


1601 West 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas • 512- 458- 5407 Monday through Saturday 10:00am-5:30pm www.GardenRoomBoutique.com

follow us on instagram @gardenroomatx


SIVELY O U L C X E NT RIBEZA.COM SHORT FILM DEBUT

FAIRIES

Austin director and producer Dorothy Bennett debuts her beautiful short film, "Fairies," about the magic of youth, sisterhood and the bittersweet experience of growing up. "Fairies" stars real-life sisters Meira and Natalie Arbuckle. Watch the poignant short film at tribeza.com/fairies.

Follow us @Tribeza on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Stories from this issue are available at tribeza.com, in addition to fresh content daily on Austin's best food, fashion, design and more. Keep up by subscribing to our weekly Tribeza Talk newsletter. tribeza.com/sign-up-newsletter

Behind the scenes of "Fairies," produced in Austin.


LANTANA 20/20 RIBBON-CUTTING AND GRAND OPENING CEREMONY Stratus Properties, in partnership with the Austin Chamber of Commerce, launched the grand opening of Lantana Place on January 9 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and community-wide party featuring craft cocktails, bites, giveaways and music. Located on Southwest Parkway, the mixed-use development provides a unique retail center for the beautiful Hill Country and greater Austin areas.

UMLAUF BURLESQUE BALL UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum hosted its inaugural auction at Sky Candy on January 18. The packed burlesque-themed evening featured libations, sultry aerial performances and unique auctions. Earnings from the elegant affair will help expand UMLAUF’s permanent collection and broaden the museum’s rotating exhibitions and community activities.

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INTERIORS TOUR KICKOFF

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y K E I T H C H E N A N D E R I N R E A S

LANTANA 20/20 RIBBON-CUTTING AND GRAND OPENING CEREMONY: 1. Drew Cable, Amanda Tatom, Suzanne Erickson, Chessie Zimmerman & Ansley Walker 2. Jon Andrus, Laurie Swan & Mike Rollins 3. Dana Germer & Leslie Davenport UMLAUF BURLESQUE BALL: 4. Kathy & Colten Smith 5. Crutch & Danna Crutchfield 6. Aerin Coleman & Sarah Story INTERIORS TOUR KICKOFF: 7. Cameron Breed & Diane Humphreys 8. Kevin Burns & Merrill Alley 9. Cecilia Claire, Andree Chalaron & Soledad Fernandez-Whitechurch

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y T K T K T K T K T K T K

On January 23, Tribeza welcomed its annual Interiors Tour with a kickoff party at Urbanspace Interiors in the Seaholm District. Participating Austin architects and designers gathered with tourgoers for a night of mingling over live music and a beautiful antipasti spread from Gusto Italian Kitchen.


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SOCIAL HOUR

INTERIORS TOUR WRAP PARTY On January 26, hundreds made their way to eight gorgeous homes for the Tribeza Interiors Tour 2020, presented by SWBC Mortgage, to see the exceptional work of Austin’s most talented designers. The sunny Sunday concluded with a fun bash at Davis Gallery, where attendees discussed their favorite moments of the day while surrounded by the artwork of Roi James, music from Scott Strickland, tasty bites by Santa Rita Cantina and Dulce Vida Tequila cocktails.

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KEYHOLDER’20 Powered by the Women’s Fund, Keyholder’20 brought supporters together at the Long Center on January 30. The evening’s mission focused on closing the opportunity gap for women in Central Texas and hosted speaker Ziauddin Yousafzai, father of Pakistani activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai. Ziauddin shared the inspiring story of how he developed the Malala Fund, whose mission is to provide access to education for every girl facing gender discrimination.

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DELL CHILDREN’S BALL

INTERIORS TOUR WRAP PARTY: 1. Joan Snyder & Edgar Farrera 2. Denise McIntyre & Roi James 3. Allison Kopp, Katy Taylor & Libby Engleman 4. Guillermo Alarcon, Stephanie Vidal & Kevin Ivester KEYHOLDER’20: 5. Mayor Steve Adler, Ziauddin Yousafzai & Marjorie Clifton 6. Sheryl Winarick, Rahkee Jain & Savya Jain Desai DELL CHILDREN'S BALL: 7. Amy Martin, Lindsay Warnock & Katherine Gallagher 8. Michael & Susan Dell 9. Andrew & Donna Tryba

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I N T E R I O R S TO U R P H OTO G R A P H S B Y E R I N R E A S

On February 1, hundreds attended the 2020 Dell Children’s Ball at the Fairmont Hotel. An impressive $2 million was raised, benefitting the Dell Children’s Medical Center and its mission to treat Central Texas’ youngest and most vulnerable patients.


AMARRA | VILL AS at Barton Creek

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Global Real Estate Advisor melissa.kilian@sothebysrealty.com 512.217.2020 tribeza.com

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SOCIAL HOUR

CASABLANCA GALA CASA of Travis County moved closer toward its vision of providing volunteer advocates for 100 percent of children in need at the CASAblanca Gala on February 1. Taking place at the Omni Barton Creek Resort & Spa, more than 1,000 generous Austinites helped raise a record-breaking sum of more than $1.7 million, which will support our community’s children who’ve been abused or neglected.

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ANGELINA EBERLY LUNCHEON Nearly 300 of Austin’s city leaders and history enthusiasts came together for the Angelina Eberly Luncheon in The Austin Club’s Medallion Ballroom on February 7. Proceeds from the luncheon benefit the Austin History Center Association, which will allocate a portion to the Austin History Center of the Austin Public Library in a joint effort to preserve the city’s rich history.

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On February 7, Devil May Care celebrated the debut of its vibrant new West Sixth Street lounge. The invite-only event showcased the restaurant’s eclectic style, innovative cocktails and Mediterranean-inspired bites, all while engaging guests with live entertainment by DJ Mel, tarot card readings by Sound Sight Tarot and two performances by professional belly dancers Amae Danseuse and Laman.

CASABLANCA GALA: 1. Maggie & Newton Wong 2. Maria Hayes, China Widener, Simmi Menta & Greg Bow 3. Leslie & Jeff Socha ANGELINA EBERLY LUNCHEON: 4. Saundra Kirk & Luci Baines Johnson with Guest 5. Jim Innes & Pastor Steve Manning 6. Charles Peveto, Lori Martin & Mandy Dealey DEVIL MAY CARE LAUNCH: 7. Danielle Carrier & Rachel Holtin 8. Patricia Perdomo & Tania Ortega 9. Patrick Sims & John King

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H A D W A DA M S , J I M I N N E S & A M A N DA H A R T F I E L D , O H H A P P Y DAY B O OT H

DEVIL MAY CARE LAUNCH


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Chris Long | Broker Associate |

| 512.289.6300 | chris.long@compass.com | chrislongaustin.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property tribeza.com already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

| MARCH 2020

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Titos & Tapas!

WESTSIDE LANDING ROUGH HOLLOW

MODEL HOME GRAND OPENING Saturday, March 7th 11-3pm 317 Hidden Beacon Bend, Austin, TX 78738 • • • •

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Now through April 30th receive a $20,000 credit for options or upgrades on your new home in Westside Landing at Rough Hollow. Call Today For Details.*

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Who do you want to be on the other side of this? FREEDOM. CLARITY. AUTHENTICITY. INTENTION.

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COMMUNITY + CULTURE

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H E L A I N E B AC H

ON THE RISE Pelvis Wrestley frontman Benjamin Violet is one of seven Austin artists to watch, p. 27.


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Whitney Avra

24 MARCH 2020 |

tribeza.com


BACK IN THE DAY, people shared stories around the campfire as a means of passing wisdom from generation to generation. When Jesus was walking around, he told parables to translate deeper spiritual insight and lessons into more relatable stories. The Buddhist Zen stories contain profound messages in a similar way. Apparently, humans have an easier time seeing the bigger picture through the lens of story. In our media-driven culture today, parables are conveyed in film, even in some Netf lix series. What was once delivered via spoken word or ink on a page is now alive in action, dialogue, emotion, special effects, lighting and music. Film can be so engaging and Netf lix can be so binge-worthy that we pay more attention to other people's stories and lose awareness that we, too, are living our own film. In fact, we are screenwriting, directing, editing, casting and starring in our own story. It can be unsettling to consider this, particularly if you have narrated your life from the perspective of a victim (of circumstances, or of other people’s drama). Empowerment comes when we’re able to shift the mindset that events happen to us, realizing instead that we get to choose what happens - or at least how we respond. We can choose the cinematography of our life by deciding what we want to look at. We can decide if we want to co-star with a best actor or actress, or if we want to keep rehearsing with stunt doubles and extras. We can choose if we want more drama, more comedy, more action

or more epic adventure. We can change scenes, we can work with a plot twist, we can edit and rewrite, we can do a second take, we can practice some improvisation. I know what it is to be a supporting actress, to lose my plotline and my voice in someone else’s film. And I know what it is to write and direct for myself. I like to think consciously about my own story, the parable of my life, especially now that I am about halfway through. I think it’s helpful to

you just want me to listen, do you want me to listen and ask questions, or do you want to know what I think?” I get to swim to this new space, almost like a sandbar, treading familiar waters of mothering and venturing into the open ocean of friendship. I get to savor this earned delight. I get to love these people so well that they can leave (and return) with ease. I want to love my friends and family with a deeper sense of reverence and appreciation. I want them to know the vastness of what that love means; how far and how deep it extends; how much I want the very best for them, whether that means holding on or letting go. I want to show up in a way that signifies all of me, all in. I want to love a man, my man, in a way that I am now capable of, my edges worn smooth and warm like sea glass, taking full responsibility for my own energy, my own happiness. I want to fully inhabit the woman I was created to be. I want to love my readers by offering words well-chosen, translating emotions and experiences into universal connection and resonance that lifts us all higher. I want to love my clients with my best, ever-evolving translation of unconditional love, inviting them to experience freedom and acceptance in my presence, and in their own. I want to be a conduit and a collaborator, a partner in healing and transformation. I want to work together to love, accept and feed the caterpillar; be patient, gentle and intentional with the cocoon; and celebrate the butterfly. I want every single one of us who wants to fly to grow wings.

"We are screenwriting, directing, editing, casting and starring in our own story." take a brief intermission before the second act, and check in with my intentions. I intend for my second act to be all about love. I want to love my children in a new way, in alignment with who and where they are today. This year, all my children will be in college. They still need their mom, and always will. But I am needed in a different and dynamic way. I am a consultant, a bank, a travel agent, a source of comfort, an encourager, a listener, a lighthouse, a touchstone. When I look at them, I see the sum of every age they have ever been and my love for them is irrevocable and timeless. I get to ask, “Do

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1214 West 6th St Austin,TX 78703 www.juliangold.com ( 5 1 2 ) 4 7 3 - 2 4 9 3 @juliangoldatx tribeza.com


K L B EZA TA I R T

SEVEN ARTISTS SET TING THE STAGE FOR A NEW WAVE OF AUSTIN MUSIC. BY K ATHRYN STOUFFER

BLACK PUMAS RISING P H OTO G R A P H S B Y LY Z A R E N E E A N D L I I N A R A U D .

The soulful sounds of Black Pumas members Eric Burton and Adrian Quesada have pulsed through stereos across Austin since 2017, but with a recent Grammy nomination for Best New Artist only months after the release of their inaugural album, they’ve been set on a much vaster stage. The duo’s seemingly disparate backgrounds led to a fortuitous formation. Quesada has a Grammy and a wealth of experience under his guitar strap, while Burton is fresh off his Sixth Street busking grind. Now, their authentic, innovative sound offers the best elements of soul, funk and R&B. One can’t help but feel the spirit of the songs in Burton’s expressive lyrics and captivating range,

which have garnered the record an impressive list of accolades. In addition to the Grammy nomination and an "Austin City Limits" taping, the group has made appearances on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” and “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon." Adding to that recognition, Austin’s mayor, Steve Adler, declared May 7 as Black Pumas Day.  To experience Quesada and Burton onstage, die-hards and new fans alike can catch them at the Coachella and Newport Folk festivals this year. In Austin, the group has sold out three upcoming shows at Stubb’s Outdoors, recently adding a fourth to appease hopeful fans—a run unprecedented at this institutional venue.

Reflecting on the local music scene, Quesada tells Tribeza, “Austin was the only place this band could have come together and had the trajectory we’ve had, from the deep talent pool, sense of community among musician friends and the culture that supports live music, both venues and audiences. Black Pumas are forever grateful to Austin, Texas.” On what’s next for the duo, Quesada acknowledges a packed tour schedule—14 countries, to be specific—but provides hope to eager fans, sharing they are “slowly, surely starting to work on new music.” Stay tuned and stay gold.

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PELVIS WRESTLEY

ROBERT ELLIS

Although not new to the Austin music landscape, Jake Lloyd is making strides with his eponymous band. His most recent album, “MoonLit Mornings,” received acclaim from NPR and this year garnered Lloyd an Austin Music Awards nomination for Best Performing Band in the R&B/Soul category. The singer’s music knows no bounds of genre—a chorus of rap followed by a measure of R&B with rock undertones, a dynamic nature suggesting Lloyd’s willingness to experiment. “Austin has always been slow to embrace soul or hip-hop or ‘urban’ music, so adding other elements to my sound has become a necessity,” Lloyd shares. “Various rock and country aspects are things I have been playing with a lot recently.” For inspiration, Lloyd looks to stories, particularly those found in film. “I love film almost as much as music, and my favorite movies inspire the imagery I try to portray in my lyrics.” As for what’s next? Lloyd hints at an EP and a new single to drop in the coming months. 

Pelvis Wrestley is not shy about redefining cultural norms. Spearheaded by Austin-bred Benjamin Violet, the group features a smattering of other local talent, including Santiago RD of Daphne Tunes and Sarah Schultz of Sun June. Their first single, “Susanna,” along with the yet-to-be-released record, takes an alternative approach to country, mixing in synthesizers, a nod to rock and lyrics that ring more close to home for modern listeners. The group’s formation coincided with, and very much represents, Violet’s homecoming to Austin after a decade long Texas hiatus. Violet sings the city’s praises: “The community here has inspired me to dive into the craft of songwriting and performance in such tender and challenging ways.” Beyond the musical support found in Austin, Violet notes the magnetic spirit of the physical earth here. “Our record title, ‘Vortexas Vorever,’ is a reference to feeling the pull of coming back home to Austin and to the healing energetic vortex here.” The group is currently pursuing an avenue to release its debut album.

Robert Ellis, the self-proclaimed “Texas Piano Man,” dons a crisp white tuxedo and a coordinating cowboy hat as he dances around a grand piano. Equal parts performer and musician, Ellis has embraced a new persona with his most recent album, the fifth in his repertoire. Ellis’ opening line, “I’m fucking crazy, you know that it’s true,” sets the tone for an album filled with forthright commentary on life and love. “Nobody Smokes Anymore” urges listeners to stress a little less, embrace “the good old days” and take a drag now and again. “Topo Chico” pays tribute to the bubbly sensation that has Texans opting for sparkling over still. Ellis’ fresh persona coincides with a reimagined sound. While his past albums boast tunes with heavy country and folk influence and an emphasis on the singer-songwriter’s heartfelt lyrics, the messages in “Texas Piano Man” are delivered with tongue-in-cheek humor and edgy piano ballads. You can catch Ellis enlivening stages with his pop-inspired sound at venues big and small across town.

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y KO N S TA N T I N B E LY S H E V, J AC K S O N M O N TG O M E RY A N D A L E X A N D R A VA L E N T I .

JAKE LLOYD


P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M OYO OY E LO L A , N I C K W O N G A N D J AC K I E L E E YO U N G .

MÉLAT

DAYGLOW

MOLLY BURCH

Mélat is charting a course for female-led R&B in a city dominated by rock and countrified blues. Her ethereal vocals and impressive pitch range are captivating, as are the deeply felt, selfreflective lyrics. On growing up and remaining in Austin, Mélat shares, “I have always felt that who I have become is a result of living in this eclectic town and being a black, first-generation Ethiopian American woman.” But there’s more to the story, and more that she wants to accomplish here. “I have always felt underrepresented and misunderstood in my own hometown.” Rather than moving on from her hometown, Mélat is committed here so that she can “continue [her] craft to provide cultural impact,” which would be swallowed in larger entertainment hubs.  Featured on Billboard.com, her femaleforward “After All” music video is evidence of the singer’s strides toward better representation for black women in Austin.

Texas native Sloan Struble made his way from Aledo to Austin to attend the University of Texas. Soon into his stint as a student, his self-released album, ”Fuzzybrain,” paved a new yet very clear path for the young artist, who launches a headlining tour this spring. Struble, unassuming and optimistic, has grander hopes for how fans will interact with his bouncy tunes. “I want [fans] to make friends,” he says. “The impact of a show only lasts so long, but if you end up making a friend there, that impact can last quite a long time. I’d really love for people to share this whole experience in a way that goes beyond just the music.”  Struble expertly meshes his mature emotional intelligence with the reality of his youth, forming irresistible bedroom pop hits that offer a welcome change of pace in a recent flood of melancholic sounds from indie pop artists. If “Dayglow” didn’t betray Struble’s greater purpose already, he shares that “For as long as I’ve made music, it’s been my goal to use it to help people feel better.”

This past fall, Molly Burch could be found floating in front of denim-clad audiences with her ballad-filled album, “First Flower.” Her soft, warm demeanor and deep, resonating vocals entrance listeners with both their sound and lyrical quality. While defined as indie pop, Burch’s records offer more—hints of jazz and an ineffable uniqueness, qualities that have led to a burgeoning career. After a West Coast upbringing and East Coast schooling, Burch took a risk and landed in the middle. Regarding the choice to build a career in Texas, Burch says, “I’ve grown so much as a musician in Austin,” sharing that the songs written upon moving here landed her at her current label. “The music community here is supportive, tight-knit and the farthest thing from a competitive environment.”  Burch will be supporting husband-and-wife pop duo Tennis on their spring tour, which arrived in Austin on February 29 and continues coast to coast through May 9.   

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One of the best places in the world to find movie posters isn’t in a tiny nook of Hollywood but in Austin’s Hyde Park. Originally a humble purveyor of T-shirts, Mondo has morphed into a powerhouse of various other cinephile paraphernalia, including vinyl records, collectibles, board games, puzzles and—most notably—posters. An offshoot of the Alamo Drafthouse, the business has revived the movie poster from a lackluster promotional tool to a collectible art form over the last 16 years. Conjuring the midcentury spirit of hand-drawn film posters, Mondo commissions

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artists from around the nation to design alternative works honoring motion pictures of all kinds. While the outfit prizes art over commerce, Mondo’s business is, well, mondo. Through licensing deals, the company produces official posters for major motion picture franchises like “Star Wars,” and the products go for thousands of dollars on the resale market. Securing the licensing deal with a celluloid icon early on helped prove the company’s legitimacy to customers and studios alike. Throughout the first “Star Wars” series, Rob Jones, Mondo’s co-founder and senior creative director,

says artists were encouraged to dive deep into the areas of the brand universe that most fascinated them in order to produce unique artwork that wouldn’t be expected from any other manufacturer. Today, Mondo’s posters can be found in The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences archive. Superfans can enjoy seeing the work up close through The Mondo Gallery, a permanent space featuring a curated mix of original artwork and limited-edition screen prints. –Lindsey Logan For more information, visit mondotees.com

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F M O N D O .

POSTER CHILD

A local powerhouse churns out some of the most important movie posters of our time


COMISSIONS OPEN

nebulagallery fine art gallery

Downtown 217 West 2nd Street Austin, Texas 78701 www.thenebulagallery.com tribeza.com

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Ellen Heck

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Wally Workman Gallery

1202 w. 6th st. austin, tx 78703 wallyworkman.com 512.472.7428 images (l to r): At the Well as an Arrangement of Shapes/Alice in Conversation with the Walrus/ Abstraction from the Well


ARTS + HAPPENINGS

GATHER ROUND Margot Price headlines Camp Lucy's intimate Campfire Gathering, p. 35.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y B O B B I R I C H

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC SONGS IN THE SKYSPACE

March 1 - 29 James Turrell Skyspace, The Color Inside LILA DOWNS

March 4 Paramount Theatre MIKE AND THE MOONPIES

March 6 Antone’s Nightclub

ASO: MARCH MADNESS

March 6 & 7 Long Center

URBAN MUSIC FEST

TEXAS FILM AWARDS

OTIS THE DESTROYER

BEST COAST

2020 FLY FISHING FILM TOUR

March 12 Frank Erwin Center March 12 Stubb's BBQ

MARSHALL CHARLOFF & THE PURPLE XPERIENCE

March 14 One World Theatre RÜFÜS DU SOL

March 14 Germania Insurance Amphitheater KEANE

March 15 Emo's Austin

ICE CUBE

March 7 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre JILL SCOTT

March 7 ACL Live at The Moody Theater TRIPPIE REDD

March 8 Stubb's BBQ

CAMPFIRE GATHERING

March 16 - 18 Camp Lucy

LUCK REUNION

March 19 Luck Ranch

BUDDY GUY

HARRY CONNICK JR.

March 10 Long Center

March 22 ACL Live at The Moody Theater OZUNA

March 22 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

POST MALONE

March 10 Frank Erwin Center 38TH ANNUAL AUSTIN MUSIC AWARDS

March 11 ACL Live at The Moody Theater HIPPIE SABOTAGE

March 11 Stubb's BBQ

BRITTANY HOWARD

March 27 Stubb's BBQ

YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND

March 27 Scoot Inn

RAY WYLIE HUBBARD

March 27 Gruene Hall

MARCIA BALL

March 11 Long Center

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CHRIS STAPLETON

RICKY SKAGS

March 27 One World Theatre tribeza.com

March 27 & 28 Auditorium Shores March 28 Mohawk Austin

THE GLITCH MOB

March 28 Emo's Austin

March 12 Austin Studios

March 27 Paramount Theatre

THEATER

STURGILL SIMPSON

March 28 Frank Erwin Center

JERRY JEFF WALKER

March 28 & 29 Gruene Hall

BIG GIGANTIC

March 29 ACL Live at The Moody Theater BAD RELIGION & AKALINE TRIO

April 1 Stubb's BBQ

CHRISTOPHER CROSS

April 1 Paramount Theatre

ISBEN'S "HEDDA" - A NEW ADAPTATION

Through March 8 Long Center

MARCUS; OR THE SECRET OF SWEET

Through March 8 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre A NIGHT WITH JANIS JOPLIN

Through March 8 ZACH Theatre HOUSE

Through March 28 Hyde Park Theatre EVERY BRILLANT THING

FILM MONTOPOLIS: THE RETURN OF DRAW EGAN W/ LIVE SCORE

March 5 Alamo Drafthouse - Ritz

PEE-WEE'S BIG ADVENTURE W/ PAUL REUBENS

March 6 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

THE BANFF CENTRE MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

March 8 & 9 Paramount Theatre

Through March 29 ZACH Theatre

BAD GIRLS UPSET BY THE TRUTH

March 10, 21 & 29 Various Locations

THE OFFICE! A MUSICAL PARODY

March 11 Paramount Theatre ALADDIN

March 11 - 22 Bass Concert Hall BALLET AUSTIN: THE AUSTIN MUSIC PROJECT

March 27 - 29 Long Center

COMEDY GABRIEL IGLESIAS

March 6 Frank Erwin Center

ROSS MATTHEWS

March 6 Paramount Theatre

TRIXIE MATTEL

March 10 Paramount Center

COLIN MOCHRIE & BRAD SHERWOOD

March 26 Paramount Center

LISA LAMPANELLI

March 26 & 27 Bass Concert Hall

BRIAN POSEHN

March 26 - 28 Cap City Comedy Club APRIL FOOLS' COMEDY JAM II

March 28 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

FAMILY SOMEBODY LOVES YOU, MR. HATCH

Through April 4 ZACH Theatre FAMILY DAY

March 8 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT

March 27 Thinkery


AUSTIN FAIRYTALE BALL

March 28 Palmer Events Center

PAW PATROL LIVE! RACE TO THE RESCUE

March 31 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

OTHER AMPLIFY AUSTIN DAY

March 5 & 6 Various Locations

GT WORLD CHALLENGE AMERICA

March 6 – 8 Circuit of the America WATER LANTERN FESTIVAL

March 7 Mueller Lake Park

WHINE DOWN W/ JANA KRAMER + MICHAEL CAUSSIN

March 7 Stateside at the Paramount WICKED WINE RUN

March 7 Spicewood Vineyards

THE ILLUSIONISTS

March 9 Long Center

TEXAS AUTHOR SERIES: LARA PRESCOTT

March 11 Chez Zee American Bistro SXSW FESTIVAL & CONFERENCE

March 13 - 22 Various Locations

HOLI: FESTIVAL OF COLORS & LOVE

March 14 Radha Madhav Dham AUSTIN SPRING BOUTIQUE

March 14 & 15 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park LAISSEZ FAIR VINTAGE MARKET

March 14 & 15 Passport Vintage

THE RIVETER FESTIVAL

March 14 - 16 The Riveter Austin

RODEO AUSTIN

March 14 – 28 Travis County Expo Center ST. PADDY’S DAY

March 17 Scholz Garten

CLYDE LITTLEFIELD TEXAS RELAYS

March 25 – 28 Mike A. Myers Stadium

BLANTON BLOCK PARTY

March 28 Blanton Museum of Art ABC KITE FEST

March 29 Zilker Park

AUSTIN LAMB JAM 2020

March 29 Hotel Van Zandt

2020 GUEST CHEF DINNER SERIES: ERIK BRUNER-YANG

March 30 Arlo Grey

MUSIC PICK

Campfire Gathering By Aaron Parsley C AMP LUCY, DRIPPING SPRINGS, MARCH 16 – 18

The SXSW Music Festival brings a disparate assortment of acts to the city for a cosmopolitan experience, with fans crisscrossing Austin to follow the buzz about an emerging band or catch a secret set by a dependable favorite. But if you’re not up for fighting scooter traffic, networking industry types and the velvet barricades between you and a great show, there’s a new gig west of town that offers a long but focused list of talent performing in a more bucolic setting. The inaugural Campfire Gathering, which spans three days in mid-March, will bring a tight selection of Americana, folk, country and rock musicians to Hill Country resort Camp Lucy in Dripping Springs. With Americana rocker and Austin native Shakey Graves and Willie Nelson-approved country singersongwriter Margo Price headlining, Campfire Gathering emerges from the gate to showcase first-class talent, even if it is the fest’s first rodeo. Comfy yet campy accommodations like creekside cabins, air-conditioned yurts and RVs are available for those who want to bunk on-site. Between performances, campers can live that ranch life with horseback riding, fishing, archery, hatchet throwing and hiking. But if you dig a little twang and the melancholy ache of Americana and folk greatness, you might not have time to relive your childhood summer camp dreams of earning an archery badge. The music lineup includes Austin-loved acts like White Denim, "Texas Piano Man" Robert Ellis and Kelsey Wilson’s solo project Sir Woman. It will be an opportunity to experience much more music, including intimate sets by Canadian cowboy sensation Colter Wall, mysterious masked man Orville Peck, rockers Deer Tick and Delta Spirit, and stylish outlaw country star Nikki Lane, whose distinct vocals and sweet storytelling were made for a serenade under the stars.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts FLATBED REDUX Through March 21 Flatbed Gallery & Press ART ART ART Through March 28 Art for the People Gallery BACK TO THE WORLD Through March 28 Davis Gallery

ART PICK

Jill Bedgood, “Barnacles of Existence” By Holly Cowart WOMEN & THEIR WORK, MARCH 7 – APRIL 21

What does it mean to be human? The existential question has warranted a great many opinions throughout time. It has been the subject of heated debates, made way for groundbreaking inventions and influenced profound works of art. For Jill Bedgood, it’s a question she has spent her life exploring and the inspiration behind her latest exhibition, “Barnacles of Existence,” on display at Women & Their Work beginning this month. While based in San Antonio, Bedgood is a proactive member of Austin’s art scene. Since earning her MFA from the University of Texas, she’s been a visiting artist for both her alma mater and Austin Community College and worked closely with the City of Austin to enhance the community’s access to public art, from citywide installations to consultation. Now she returns to present a timeless and philosophical exhibition that showcases meticulously sculpted remnants of past, present and future. Known for her mixed-media work, Bedgood uses plaster casts, paint, powdered graphite and gold leaf to encase a treasure trove of symbolic objects and hidden meanings, drawing the viewer in to scour the details. You might find elements of nature, such as seashells nestled against fine jewelry and other man-made creations. Meanwhile, other pieces take a more minimalist approach, molding one or two objects from a sea of white to form a connection all their own. The longer you look, the more abstract representations emerge, highlighting the duplexity that exists within human nature, the impact of nostalgia on materialism and the ubiquitous cycle of life. What defines good and evil, success and failure? And why are certain things deemed valuable enough to transcend time? By asking the question, Bedgood invites the audience to search for their own answer.

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BETELHEM MAKONNEN: ROCK STANDARD TIME March 6 - April 4 Big Medium BOB SCHNEIDER + MARGIE CRINER March 6 - April 11 Yard Dog Art Gallery SARAH SUDHOFF: POINT OF ORIGIN March 6 – April 19 grayDUCK Gallery

ECHOES & SPACES Through March 28 ICOSA Collective

ON THE PLIGHT OF THE PRIMROSE March 6 – April 19 Dimension Gallery

ROSY CAMPANITA: EL CAMINO DEL CORAZÓN Through March 28 Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center

THE PEOPLE’S GALLERY March 6 – January 1 Austin City Hall

THE CAT BEHIND THE HAT Through March 29 Ao5 Gallery LAWRENCE JOLLY: ATTACHEMENTS Through March 29 Link & Pin Gallery

AUSTIN FORGING COMPETITION 2020 March 7 Community First! Village ELIZABETH SCHWAIGER: DARKENING WARMTH March 7 – 28 Co-Lab Projects

DANIEL JOHNSTON Through March 31 Austin Central Library

ELLEN HECK: FORM AND FUNCTION March 7 – 29 Wally Workman Gallery

UMLAUF PRIZE EXPANDED Through April 5 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

SXSW ART PROGRAM March 13 - 22 Various Locations

IF THESE WALLS COULD TALK: CONVERSATIONS OVER PIE Through May 3 Neill-Cochran House Museum

SUSANNAH HADDAD: A DECONSTRUCTED VIEW Through April 25 Dougherty Arts Center

" B A R N AC L E S O F E X I S T E N C E " ( D E TA I L ) 2 02 0

THREAD COUNT Through March 14 Cloud Tree Studios & Gallery


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

EVENT PICK

Texas Film Awards By Trichelle Lee AUSTIN STUDIOS, MARCH 12

Grab your popcorn—the Texas Film Awards return to Austin this month. It promises to be a glamorous night. Former Dallas resident Kaitlyn Dever, who starred in the adored coming-of-age comedy “Booksmart” in 2019, will be presented with the Rising Star Award at this year’s gala. Film score composer Adrian Quesada, half of Austin’s Grammy-nominated psychedelic soul duo Black Pumas, will perform. Plus, Parker Posey, whose first major film role was in the Austin-shot classic “Dazed and Confused,” will emcee the ceremony, which welcomes movie-making talent into the Texas Film Hall of Fame, an institution founded by The Texas Tribune CEO Evan Smith and The Austin Chronicle co-founder Louis Black. More than 90 artists and movies have joined the prestigious club in its near-20-year history, including previous Rising Star Award winners Jesse Plemons of “Breaking Bad” fame, “X-Men” franchise regular Tye Sheridan and “Aquaman” star Amber Heard. Presented by the Austin Film Society and held at Austin Studios, the Texas Film Awards “will be a celebratory kickoff to another milestone year in AFS’s history as we continue to build Austin’s film culture and film production ecosystem,” says CEO Rebecca Campbell. Proceeds from ticket sales will go toward the artistic and educational programs of the AFS, which celebrates its 35th anniversary this year. Special guests and VIPs are invited to a private screening at AFS Cinema on the eve of the gala. The next morning, an honoree brunch and panel discussion precede the big event. Stars will walk the red carpet before the dinner and awards presentation, which is sure to showcase all the ways Texas continues to redefine cinema.

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1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M I G U E L A N G E L

MUSEUMS


SHOP . DINE . EXPERIENCE 7 FOR ALL MANKIND AWAY BAKERY LORRAINE BLDWN BONOBOS BRANDY MELVILLE CB2 CASPER CULINARY DROPOUT DOC B’S FRESH KITCHEN DRYBAR FLOWER CHILD FREE PEOPLE JENI’S SPLENDID ICE CREAMS LIVELY MARINE LAYER NORDSTROM PAIGE RAY-BAN SOULCYCLE SUITSUPPLY SUR LA TABLE TARKA INDIAN KITCHEN THEORY VELVET TACO WARBY PARKER YETI

FOLLOW US

@DomainNORTHSIDE

DOMAINNORTHSIDE.COM

SPRING MOVIES AT DOMAIN NORTHSIDE EVERY SATURDAY IN MARCH AT 6PM ON THE LAWN


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: M–F 10–6, Su 10-2 adamsgalleriesaustin.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: T–Th 11–6, F-Su 11–7 artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–F 10–5, Sa 10–4 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: T-Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 763 0646 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com

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BALE CREEK ALLEN GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 633 0545 Hours: By appointment only balecreekallengallery.com

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CAMIBAart 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CENTRAL LIBRARY GALLERY 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 974 7400 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F-Sa 10-6, Su 12-6 library.austintexas.gov/ central/gallery CO-LAB PROJECTS 1023 Springdale Rd., Ste. 1B (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FLATBED PRESS & GALLERY 3701 Drossett Dr. (512) 477 9328 Hours: W–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 flatbedpress.com FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com ICOSA COLLECTIVE 916 Springdale Rd. #102 (512) 920 2062 Hours: F–Sa 12–6 icosacollective.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: F-Su 12–4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com

PRIZER GALLERY 2023 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 575 3559 Hours: Sa 12–5 prizerartsandletters.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com NEBULA GALLERY 217 W. 2nd St. (512) 546 3963 Hours: T - W 1 – 6, Th - F 1 – 7, Sa 12 – 7, Sun 12 – 6 thenebulagallery.com NORTHERN-SOUTHERN 1902 E. 12th St. (646) 342 2969 Hours: Sa 3–6:30 northern-southern.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 974 1300 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 sites.utexas.edu/utvac WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org

YARD DOG 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 912 1613 Hours: F–Sa 1–5, yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (512) 300 0898 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.us INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


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FEATURES

TO THEIR OWN BEAT Meet six Austin women drumming out their own path in the music industry, p. 44.

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The late, great jazz drummer Buddy Rich once said, “Every  drummer  that had a  name had a  name  because of his  individual  playing. He didn’t sound like anybody else.”  Note the masculine pronoun.  While the annals of music history are rife with female drummers—Karen Carpenter, Viola Smith, Shelia E., Moe Tucker and Cindy Blackman, to name a few—drumming has traditionally been treated as a man’s game.   Texas Music Hall of Famer Paul Minor likens the obstacles faced by female drummers to those faced by women in the military.  “I can imagine people similarly doubting whether women have the kind of stamina or strength required to do the job,” says Minor. “But I feel like that mindset has been overcome, at least in our community.”  Indeed,  Austin boasts more than a few topnotch  female  drummers, who transfix listeners with their signature styles and warrant name recognition.  They  include Karen Biller, Karrie Sheehan, Lindsay Beaver, Lisa Pankratz, Masumi Jones and Nina Singh. We brought them together at Arlyn Studios to talk about their experience in the Austin music scene.

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Karen Biller’s career as a professional drummer spans more than 20 years, reflecting both an affinity for challenges and a deftness at vaulting among musical genres. In addition to Rosie Flores, she plays full time— as Karen “Scaren Killer” Biller—with Pretties for You, an all-women Alice Cooper tribute band. “When I first started playing drums, it was all hard rock and heavy metal. I feel like I’m definitely a rocker at heart,” says Biller. Growing up in Indiana, she was often told that girls couldn’t play drums. “I was pretty rebellious as a youngster and I loved playing drums, so I decided that’s exactly what I was going to do.” Her parents, neither of whom are musicians, were supportive, enduring countless hours of Metallica and Megadeth on their daughter’s behalf. Biller went on to earn a degree in classical percussion from Indiana University, where she also played with a jazz big band. Then, in 1994, Biller moved to Austin. The weather was right, the rent was affordable, and “you could go out and play every night and learn your craft,” she says. She plied her trade at venues up and down Sixth Street. “I was able to develop all these styles of music that I hadn’t developed at that point.” This included country, swing, roots and surf music and led to performing with folks such as Cornell Heard, Johnny Bush and Teisco Del Rey. Today, Biller performs with Rosie Flores and Pretties for You, as well

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as pickup shows with musicians such as Lara Price and Chaparral. When not drumming, she's samba dancing. In just a few years, her favorite pastime quickly morphed from something she “wanted to try” into glittery costumes, feathered headdresses and a place on center stage at the Austin Samba school. “To me, dancing and drumming are the same thing,” she says. “It’s all rhythm. I love it!” Being a percussionist in a male-dominated field has had its annoyances. The falsehood that women drummers can’t hit hard persists. “I’m like, ‘You’re kidding, right?’” says Biller. “No one has ever had to ask me to play louder. I’m going to play what fits the music. I play a lot harder than a lot of men do. And I have a lot of energy, so I have to kind of hold myself back sometimes.” This isn’t the only myth she confronts. “People come up to me all the time and say, ‘You’re the only woman I’ve ever seen playing drums,’ and I’m like, well, do they not go out very much? Because in Austin there are a lot of great female drummers.” Biller is a captivating force, with thousands of shows to choose from when asked for the most memorable. Gigs stand out in different ways, but it’s the Country Cruise she circles back to. One particular show coincided with 40-foot swells: “So I’m at a 45-degree angle trying to play drums and I have all these other musicians watching me. That was fun.”


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Karrie Sheehan displays an uncanny ability to remain optimistic in torrential rain, like the time she rode a February nor’easter up the East Coast in a Ford Transit with country singer Bonnie Montgomery. “It was scary, but fun,” she says. “It’s what I love about touring. You kind of lose yourself in it and forget all of the mundane things. You’re just in this very creative world. You see all these different places, meet all these different people. And when you get good responses, it’s just really heartwarming. It really reaffirms why you do what you do.” Besides Montgomery, Sheehan also plays with Summer Dean, Ella Reid, the Rollfast Ramblers and Fire Women (an all-female tribute band to The Cult). She has performed with local favorites such as the Texas Tycoons and Dale Watson, playing everything from Western swing to gothic rock. She even plays djembe drum at her yoga studio in Buda, where she lives. “I aim to play as many genres as I’m able with whoever asks,” says Sheehan, who’s fiery, fearless and seemingly tireless, teaching drumming and working two part-time jobs on top of her regular gigs. The 39-year-old took up drumming at 24. Starting relatively late in life presented far more challenges than her gender. “Early on, if there were

times I wasn’t taken seriously, it was because I wasn’t where I needed to be skill-wise,” she says. “It might sound weird, but I don’t really feel like I have a gender when I’m playing. I do want to feel like I’m representing [women] well, of course.” Some of the best advice she’s received came from women drummers, including Lisa Pankratz, who offered invaluable insight soon after Sheehan moved to Austin from her hometown of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Gearing up to play with Kathy Valentine’s all-female band, The Bluebonnets, Sheehan admits that she was nervous. “And Lisa, who’s one of my favorite drummers, told me, ‘A hit with intention means a lot more than a hit that’s on time but doesn’t seem like you meant to do it.’ So, basically, no matter what, play with confidence. And I took that with me.” Sheehan speaks with enormous gratitude for the friends and fellow musicians who’ve offered sage and supportive words. Part of what she loves about drumming is honing the art of listening to bandmates and connecting with an audience through sound. She’s hoping to do the same in Europe one day. “I’ve just got to keep going at it,” she says. For Sheehan, there’s no doubt about it: it’s just a matter a time.

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Y A S D LIN R E V BEA

Lindsay Beaver is a blues-rocking, soul-singing drummer, songwriter and bandleader. She’s the first Canadian to be signed to Alligator Records, a label she shares with one of her heroes, Texas legend Marcia Ball. Four years ago, friend and mentor Jimmie Vaughan introduced her to his hometown, where, at 35, Beaver has made a career on the stage’s foreground, standing front and center at her kit. “A friend likens it to yodeling while playing soccer,” says Beaver of singing while drumming. “And it’s kind of true.” A classically trained vocalist, Beaver’s passion for drumming was accidental and instantaneous. She was 19 and singing in a jazz band. Rehearsals were at her house. Rather than have the drummer shuttle his kit back and forth, Beaver’s father gifted her one. “I started playing and was hooked,” she says. Initially, she maintained a kind of split musical personality, relegating her vocal skills to jazz gigs and saving her drumming chops for a regular blues jam. Beaver, who went on to study jazz drumming in Toronto, has spent the majority of her career fronting bands rather than working as a side person. Nonetheless, she’s grown accustomed to people automatically deferring to the first guy who walks into the room as opposed to her.

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“My bandmates have always been wonderful in that they always say, ‘You know, I’m not in charge. Go talk to her.’” Still, she’s learned to send a sheet detailing the stage arrangement to venues beforehand. “I’m the front person and I’m 5-foot-1, and sitting in the back just doesn’t work. My kit has to be in front. It’s not a vanity thing, it’s a sound thing. But I’ve had to fight over it so much, and I do think it’s because it’s a gender thing.” For Beaver, if wishes were free, “the gender thing” would be a moot point in the music industry. “It’s the playing that has to come first, and that’s always been my mandate. Forget what I look like. How do I sound?” Beaver’s commitment to sound is why she fell in love with Austin. “I remember coming here in November to do my first record, and I fell in love with the city. I fell in love with the fact that it wasn’t freezing in November. And I fell in love with how many great musicians there are. This city is full of so much talent, it’s insane.” Beaver balances a gloriously noise-filled life with the quiet of Driftwood. This spring, she’ll head into Austin at least once a week for a not-to-be-missed Tuesday night show at Antone’s.


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LISA PANKRAT Z At 52, Lisa Pankratz has established herself as a premier roots drummer and a side musician with the magnetism of a frontwoman. She toured with the late rockabilly icon Ronnie Dawson and has been performing with the Grammy-winning Dave Alvin for more than a decade. She’s played Carnegie Hall, the Grand Ole Opry and “Austin City Limits,” the latter many times over. “No one ever told me no,” says Pankratz when talking about her musical journey and a running theme in fan commentary. “I never expected how many people would get in touch just to say thank you for inspiring them. It’s because at one point in their life they were literally told, ‘You are not allowed to do this. Period.’” The “this” isn’t always music-related and the people reaching out include men and women. Pankratz, who was born in Austin, grew up watching her father play drums with his reggae band at the Armadillo World Headquarters, where, as the toddler of a young musician, she was a regular. Her childhood memories include the aroma of biergarten chalupas and an enviable list of live performances by Dr. John, The Pointer Sisters and

her uncle’s band, Greezy Wheels. As a teen, she was sitting in at gigs at Liberty Lunch. “I had a lot of good opportunities living in a wonderful town and coming from a family that really embraced music,” she says. Growing up, Pankratz wasn’t immune to cultural skepticism about female drummers. “The idea that you need to be a boy to play this kind of music, we would joke about it quite a bit, because at a certain point you got to get past that stuff and realize it’s about who can play and who can’t play.” Pankratz is, however, amenable to the idea that being a woman or, more specifically, having “women’s intuition,” has its stylistic advantages. “I might take slings and arrows,” says Pankratz. “It doesn’t mean it’s better [to be a female drummer] or anything like that. But I do think there’s an empathy to the song and to the musicians around me that helps me be a musician and a side person. If part of that has to do with the fact that I’m female, then so be it. I’m sure there’s a flip side of that, to bringing the experience. Ultimately, we’re all speaking the same language.”

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I M U MAS S E N JO

When Masumi Jones was 14 years old, she was living in Fukuyama, Japan, dreaming of life as a drummer in a pop band. She hadn’t yet heard of Austin, Texas, or taken a drum lesson. Now 47, Jones radiates gratitude for realized dreams and all things music. She's a staple at the Elephant Room, playing Tuesday and Thursday Happy Hour with Sarah Sharp and Mitch Watkins, respectively, and every first and third Wednesday with the Jitterbug Vipers. Jones’ trajectory from hopeful adolescent to drumming virtuoso is a colorful one. She spent her teenage years in a medley of Japanese punk and pop-rock cover bands and under the musical tutelage of a drummer who introduced her to jazz. From the moment she heard Count Basie, she was hooked. From there, it was Waseda University in Tokyo and an all-female big band, followed by Berklee College of Music in Boston, where Jones formed a Japanese female trio, Groovin’ Girls. Featured in a short documentary screened at SXSW in 2017, the group played jazz festivals, made records and formed a reunion tour. Because gender roles are more strictly defined in Japan, Jones’ primary obstacle as a female drummer was social scrutiny. “Society, mostly old people, doesn’t like women working at night. Especially when they are mothers, working at night is a scandal,” says

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Jones, a working mom who returned to Tokyo after Boston. “I was fortunate my family understood my situation and helped me a lot, but working late nights—in concert halls, bars or at studio sessions—was very tough mentally.” In 2008, Jones moved from Japan to Austin, sight unseen. Her friends back home are still skeptical. “They think outside of Japan is very dangerous—guns, drugs, crimes,” she says with a laugh. So far, aside from the heat, the surprises have been good ones. “People are so kind here,” she says, “and there are so many venues with live music.” In Austin, Jones has her tentacles in music at all times. “My nickname is Tako, which means “octopus” in Japanese. People say I play like an octopus.” Though far outnumbered by drums and cymbals when she plays, her arms reign over her instrument, even when her eyes are shut, which they usually are. “A lot of people ask me why I do that,” says Jones. “I heard that processing what we see uses up to 80 percent of brain energy. I think I’m closing my eyes not to waste energy, and to concentrate, to listen.”  In addition to her gigs at the Elephant Room, Jones plays every third Thursday at the Firehouse Lounge with 35mm and every Friday at Austin Jazz Workshop.


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With a career that spans more than three decades, Nina “the Queena” Singh is a straight-shooting 5-foot-2 force to be reckoned with, offering a wealth of industry insights and tales from the road. Her musical moniker, petite stature and playing style have earned her a trove of affectionate nicknames. Gordie Johnson, of Grady, with whom she played for many years, anointed her with the royal designation. Musician Davíd Garza affectionately calls her Funky Niña, but Singh likes to throw folks off with a less decorous descriptor. “I like to say I’m a drum ho,” she says, “because I’m a jobber, meaning, as a drummer, I play the field and perform with a bunch of different bands.”  Singh often fields questions about life as a female drummer. “I always just say I don’t know anything different,” she laughs. “But whether or not something is going to come easy shouldn’t matter. It should be, if that’s what I’m passionate about, that’s what I’m going to do.”  When it comes to her career, Singh’s obstacles were cinematic. Her father was a head Sikh priest at the Golden Temple in India. He moved his family to Vancouver, where Singh was born, to lead services at a new

temple. “The chances of a Sikh priest’s daughter going out and becoming a rock-and-roll drummer are very slim. It’s unheard of,” she says. As soon as she was old enough, Singh left home for Los Angeles and landed her first big touring gig. “Everyone but the saxophone player tried to make a move on me,” says Singh, who was the only woman on the tour. In her experience, that kind of touring nightmare is the exception, not the rule. But at the time, her references were limited, so she put down her drumsticks, moved back to Vancouver and quit. And then she went stircrazy. “I started imagining myself as an old woman,” she says, “like being all crotchety and mean to people because I never followed through with my so-called dream and my ambition.”  Singh returned to Los Angeles and stayed for seven years. “In Hollywood, it felt like everyone working a regular job was dissatisfied and waiting to be discovered,” she remembers. “When I started visiting Austin, I thought, ‘Wow, these people are just happy to be working—at H-E-B, Planet K, wherever. They are just really friendly and grateful. This is where I belong.’” 

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Photograph by David Brendan Hall.

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A look back at 35 years of the Austin Film Society. By Hannah J. Phillips When Richard Linklater founded the Austin Film Society in 1985, he had not yet written “Slacker,” the first film that would bring him critical acclaim. Matthew McConaughey had not even applied to the University of Texas, and South by Southwest would not start for another two years. Austin’s identity as a hub for independent filmmakers did not yet exist. Today, the influence of Linklater’s work and his Austin Film Society are slowly starting to receive due credit. So far, Linklater has been nominated for five Oscars, two Golden Globes and three BAFTAs, winning the Golden Globe and two BAFTAs for “Boyhood” in 2015. More recently, the Centre Pompidou in Paris curated a retrospective exhibit exploring Linklater’s brilliant use of time—whether in a single day in “Dazed and Confused” or over a decade in the Before trilogy (1995, 2004, 2013) and “Boyhood.” The exhibit dedicated an entire room to the AFS, with archival photos and videos showcasing the organization’s significant contribution to film culture in Texas and beyond. Pompidou curator Judith Revault d’Allonnes considers the AFS crucial to Linklater’s own creation. “It is by [watching movies] ranging from the silent era to the latest underground works,” she shares, “that

Richard forged his eye, his outstanding narrative skills and creativity, and his both experimental and classic taste. Founding [AFS] also gave him a strong base to his work and allowed him to escape the industry when he wanted to experiment and regain more freedom.” Linklater’s original vision for the AFS was simple: to show films and help fellow filmmakers. The organization has more than lived up to that promise, expanding its programming to nurture the Austin film community into the powerhouse it is today. From forming the Texas Filmmakers’ Production Fund (TFPF), to establishing the Texas Film Hall of Fame and gifting Austin with an updated art house cinema for both classic and rare films, the AFS has had a profound impact on local filmmakers and film lovers in its 35-year history. This year marks not only the 35th anniversary of the AFS but the 20th anniversary of its production facility, Austin Studios, and the 20th anniversary of the Texas Film Awards. This month, the Texas Film Awards celebrates these milestones at the newly expanded Creative Media Center on March 12. We sat down with CEO Rebecca Campbell and the head of film and creative media, Holly Herrick, for a look back at some of the society’s biggest milestones.

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From 1985 to 1987, Linklater collaborated with the Dobie Theater and Laguna Gloria to exhibit rare and difficult-to-access films around the UT campus. The AFS achieved nonprofit status in 1987, the same year Linklater invited Louis Black (then-editor of the Austin Chronicle), Chale Nafus (who helped establish the film program at Austin Community College) and Charles Ramírez Berg (professor of film at UT) to join the society’s founding board. By 1988, the AFS had established its first programming space, known as Austin Media Arts, above a Quackenbush’s Coffeehouse on the Drag. Campbell, who joined the AFS as a volunteer and went on to become its first full-time staff member, describes the first few years of the AFS as the Austin Media Arts era. “AFS at this time was really a collection of young, boundary-pushing musicians, artists and filmmakers who were really engaged in the avant-garde and arts scene in general,” says Campbell. “Austin Media Arts was more than a space to show films; there were also musical performances happening there, and when Rick started making ‘Slacker,’ it was all the people that hung out there that helped with the production of his film.”

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P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N F I L M S O C I E T Y

AUSTIN MEDIA ARTS ERA

ABOVE: Richard Linklater (left), with cinematographe rs Lee and Bill Daniel (middle and right). A flyer from the first Midnight Experimental Film Series hosted by AFS.


This early era was a scrappy time for the organization, with programming primarily led by volunteers while Linklater’s career as a director skyrocketed. “Slacker,” which first received critical acclaim at Sundance in 1991, was followed by “Dazed and Confused” in 1993 and “Before Sunrise” in 1995.

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In 1996, the AFS hosted retrospectives from German and French directors Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Robert Bresson. “Fassbinder was having a prolific period in the ’80s,” says Campbell, “but his films weren’t coming to the U.S. Bresson was an established director, but it was hard to access his new films. These retrospectives really showed the passion AFS would bring to film education in Austin.” Along with the Fassbinder and Bresson retrospectives, a John Cassavetes series inspired a generation of young directors. “The late-nineties were a pivotal time for independent filmmakers,” says Campbell. “The Zellner brothers were studying at UT at that time, and the Cassavetes series is one that really shaped artists in that era.”

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P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F J A N U S F I L M S

A scene from "The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant."


After meeting Quentin Tarantino at a midnight screening of Robert Altman’s “Nashville,” Linklater invited him to come to Austin. Bonding over a shared passion for film culture and community building, Tarantino and Linklater first started discussing a fund to support fellow filmmakers. The AFS hosted the Texas premiere of Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” in 1994, launching the Texas Filmmakers’ Production Fund at its first Quentin Tarantino Film Festival in 1996. Over the next 10 years, the AFS would host seven QT Fests—first at the Dobie Theater and then at the new Alamo Drafthouse (founded in 1997). The goal of the festival was to increase film education and financial support for local creatives. Cecilia Conti, who started as an intern with the AFS around this time and now serves as a board member, recalls the obscure ’70s films Tarantino would bring to the festivals. “The best thing about being an intern,” says Conti, “was the education in obscure, foreign films—just by virtue of being involved—learning film and interacting with high-level people in the industry. It’s not like you’re a cog in the machine; it’s a family, and we’re all here for the mission.”

DRAFTHOUSE YEARS In 1998, the AFS started collaborating with the Alamo Drafthouse founders, Tim and Karrie League, to bring weekly screenings into the new, one-screen cinema in downtown Austin. The Drafthouse hosted six of the QT Fests during this period, as well as a three-night mini-festival to mark the closure of the Alamo’s first downtown location in 2007. “Alamo was the new kid on the block in ’97,” says Campbell, “and AFS had been around for a while, so AFS audiences were discovering the Alamo at that time and really became loyal customers.” Campbell describes that period as the beginning of a 16-year love affair between the AFS and the Drafthouse, with both organizations growing alongside each other. Eventually, the AFS outgrew the weekly screenings, prompting the organization to search for its own space in 2013. tribeza.com

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During this partnership with the Drafthouse, two major milestones were the launch of Austin Studios in 2000 and the Texas Film Hall of Fame in 2001. To provide production spaces and sound stages for local filmmakers, the AFS renovated empty airplane hangars at the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport. Housing Linklater’s Detour Filmproduction and other film businesses, the 20acre creative production complex became a key catalyst for film creatives and has produced more than 600 film and television projects to date. Three of the most notable films shot on-site at Austin Studios include “Miss Congeniality,” the first big-budget production to film at the facility; “Idiocracy,” starring Luke Wilson and Maya Rudolph; and “Machete” from Robert Rodriguez, who remains a major AFS collaborator. His Troublemaker Studios shares a neighboring hangar at the airport. Rodriguez made a point to stay in Austin as his filmmaking career unfolded. His ability to carve out a career in Texas grew out of his partnership with the AFS and vice versa—it was a symbiotic relationship. “Linklater started AFS while Rodriguez was still at UT,” says Conti, who met Rodriguez while working with AFS. She later worked as a director’s assistant on some of his biggest directorial features, including “Sin City” and “Grindhouse,” and now serves as a senior vice president for his El Rey Network. “Seeing [Linklater] shoot here definitely influenced Robert,” she says, and in turn, Rodriguez brought more of the spotlight to Austin. The AFS hosted his “Grindhouse” premiere in 2007, and Rodriguez used the Austin Studios soundstages for “Machete” in 2010. “AFS is proof that when you remove yourself from the rat race of Los Angeles,” Conti says, “creativity thrives.”

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P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N F I L M S O C I E T Y A N D DAV I D B R E N DA N H A L L .

In this iconic transformation scene from "Miss Congeniality," Sandra Bullock and Michael Caine walk out of the hangar at Austin Studios.

Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino at the Texas Film Awards, 2010.


The lobby at AFS Cinema features posters from Linklater’s personal collection and a central light installation harkening back to vintage theater marquees.

When the AFS outgrew its weekly screenings at the Alamo Drafthouse, the organization started searching for a permanent space to show films in 2013. Working with the Lincoln Village Shopping Center (now known as The Linc) near Highland Mall, the AFS started a crowdfunding campaign to bring a 35mm projector to the Marchesa theater as a semipermanent home. When the Marchesa folded in 2016, the AFS decided to take over the lease and renovate the theater. Adding a second screen and a new lobby designed by Austin architect Michael Hsu, AFS Cinema opened a year later, realizing Linklater’s original vision to showcase independent films. Standing in the AFS Cinema lobby before a press breakfast announcing details for the 2020 Texas Film Awards, Conti points out the film posters from Linklater’s personal collection. “I remember seeing [them] in his offices when I was an AFS intern,” she says. “I’ve loved seeing something I was a part of when I was young just grow and expand.”

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P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N F I L M S O C I E T Y

RECENT MILESTONES The past year fulfilled another major facet of the AFS mission to provide space and support for the local film industry. In December, the TFPF (now called the AFS Grant) surpassed the $2 million mark in grants awarded to emerging filmmakers since starting the fund. Founded in 2018, the Doc Intensive program supports documentary filmmakers in production, postproduction and development. Director Ben Masters participated in the program for his feature documentary, “The River and the Wall,” which won the Louis Black “Lone Star” Award after its world premiere at SXSW in 2019. “The Doc Intensive program really helped us to whittle down our story in ‘The River and the Wall,’ gave us invaluable insight into what sections of the film were and weren’t working, and allowed us to consult with people who know the editing process,” says Masters.

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A still from "The River and the Wall," which received funding from the Doc Intensive Program at AFS. ABOVE: Texas Film Hall of Fame inductee, Renée Zellweger, recently won the Academy Award for her performance in "Judy."


Rising Stars Brooklyn Decker (top) and Kaitlyn Dever (bottom). Parker Posey (middle), with Matthew McConaughey at the 10th anniversary of Dazed and Confused.

Honoring the actors and icons who have made an impact on Texas film culture, the Texas Film Awards directly support regional filmmakers like Masters. Past Hall of Fame inductees include Robin Wright, Renée Zellweger and Terrence Malick (to name a few), while the Rising Star Award recognizes emerging actors set to leave a lasting legacy. This year’s Rising Star Award will honor Kaitlyn Dever, who had a breakout year in 2019 with the SXSW release of “Booksmart,” a Golden Globe nomination for her role in “Unbelievable” on Netflix and a BAFTA Rising Star nod. “She fits the mold of actors who have already made an impact, and who are poised to do great things,” says Campbell. Brooklyn Decker, who received the Rising Star Award at the Texas Film Awards last year, says the ceremony is a chance to celebrate Texas filmmaking and showcase the amazing work the AFS does for young filmmakers—even as early as elementary school. Partnering with the Andy Roddick Foundation, the AFS brings directors into summer camps to teach kids how to make Claymation films and expose them to filmmaking as a career. “The Rising Star Award was a huge honor, when you consider those who have been recognized in the past,” says Decker. “The awards have always been a great way for stars like Renée Zellweger to come back to Texas and share what it meant to their career.” Reflecting on the impact of the AFS in a 2016 documentary on American Masters for PBS (co-directed by founding board member Black), Linklater said it was born out of his desire for community: “I didn’t want to be a writer—that’s a lonely thing. I wanted to be part of an artistic troupe. I wanted to be part of a group, you know—it’s just so much more fun and collaborative, and just better.…The [AFS] taught me everything I need to know to hustle.” tribeza.com

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STAYCATION + STYLE

PROPERLY STYLED Kelly Wearstler creates a local oasis at Austin Proper Hotel, p. 70.

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T R AV E L P I C K

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GET AWAY TO THE HE ART OF DOWNTOWN By Nicole Beckley

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N P R O P E R H OT E L .

A Proper Staycation


AS AUSTIN’S SKYLINE HAS CHANGED drastically in the past few years, so, too, has the downtown experience. New living, dining and entertainment options abound, offering fresh ways to enjoy the city. One of the most important new spots to join the fray is Austin Proper Hotel. Settled along Shoal Creek, the California import occupies a once sparsely populated corridor on the westernmost end of the warehouse district. Since the hotel broke ground in 2016, the surrounding area has developed rapidly, placing the Proper in the heart of the action—steps from ACL Live, Lady Bird Lake and numerous shops and restaurants. Inside, the Proper is inviting and chic, with warm woods and meticulously selected décor. While Austin is the brand’s first location outside

the Golden State, the goal, according to Patrick Pahlke, vice president of commercial at Proper Hospitality, “was not to bring a West Coast vibe or aesthetic to Austin. Instead, [designer Kelly Wearstler] took cues from the city to direct the aesthetics and vibe of the property.” And, boy, did she. Highly inf luenced by the eye-catching details of Austin’s most stately homes, Wearstler spreads details like a sculptural staircase installation of patchwork vintage rugs, arts and crafts motifs, joinery techniques and curious textiles throughout the property. Additionally, there’s an encyclopedic array of 20th-century furniture and accessories, plus f ine art from local makers. The neon light fixture at check-in is reminiscent of Austin’s iconic neon signs, while Rick Van Dyke pottery, Barry Stone photographs and cy press shou sugi ban paneling are but a few of the thoughtfully executed details. I n t he g ue s t r o om s , f loor-to-ceiling windows create a feeling of spaciousness and each interior element invites maximum comfort. A bedside touch screen adjusts lights and window shades, while the bathroom is stocked with iridescent glassware, Aesop bath products and bespoke robes from Kelly Wearstler + Parachute.

Beyond über-comfy living quarters, a hotel stay includes exclusive access to amenities like the on-site gym, which features Peloton bikes, a bevy of top-tier equipment and access to a Rolodex of Austin’s best private trainers. (For added privacy, you can even have a Peloton delivered to your room.) The spa, which opens this month, will likewise be exclusive to guests and residents. To cap off all the wonder, guests do not have to leave the premises for an outstanding meal. Hospitality stalwart McGuire Moorman has devised a food program with a stylish Mexican concept—La Piscina, opening poolside soon—as well as a Mediterranean concept, The Peacock, with a menu inspired by the cuisines of North Africa, Greece, Israel and Lebanon. Perhaps the Proper’s most exclusive space, Goldie’s is a private cocktail lounge ador ned w ith wa llpaper featuring roses and golden warblers. With club chairs and comfy couches, capacity is limited to 30 guests. Launching this month, a live music series, Live at Goldie’s, promises a living room atmosphere of intimate, VIP performances. For more information, visit properhotel. com/hotels/austin

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STYLE PROFILE

F

E S T I VA L D I R E C T O R L I B BY R O S E

LIBBY ROSE MUSIC INSIDER LIBBY ROSE IS REDEFINING THE MODERN MUSIC FESTIVAL AND BUILDING A BE AUTIFUL LIFE IN AUSTIN ALONG THE WAY By Vanessa Blankenship

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lives a somewhat nomadic lifestyle. As co-founder of up-and-coming music festival, Wildwood Revival, she spends much of the year traveling coast to coast searching for gifted musicians, vendors and artisans. But this music industry insider decided to put down roots in Austin, and her new home is the one place where she doesn’t have to worry about calling the shots. Rose describes her life in the Live Music Capital of the World as an oasis, a place to disconnect and enjoy the music scene on the other side of the stage as a spectator in the crowd. “I sort of knew from an early age that I always wanted my home base to be somewhere in the South or Southwest, despite loving to travel everywhere else,” Rose says. “The landscape and the culture and the people just feel like home to me. So to have that place be Austin and also have a reprieve from my work, in terms of being onsite, is really awesome.” Learning the ins and outs of the music business, Rose started her career by collaborating with her close friend Justin Glanville at his recording company, Live & Breathing. There, she would film live recording sessions backstage at music festivals. One of the first festivals Rose partnered with while at Live & Breathing was Pickathon, a small festival outside Portland, Oregon. She felt truly inspired by the setup; with its inviting camping experience and sustainability programs, the event seemed ahead of its time compared with others she’d attended on the East Coast. This sparked Rose’s interest in finding out what it takes to manage a music festival. She


began volunteering at the Newport Folk Festival and now collaborates with AC Entertainment, the company behind Bonnaroo, to help put together the High Water Festival at North Charleston’s Riverfront Park in South Carolina. A f ter spending years connecting w ith musicians and apprenticing at multiple festivals, Rose and her brother, Jesse Collier decided to create a music festival like no other. Together, they created an “anti-festival” where music lovers can take part in reviving the community and enjoy a cultural experience. And so, in 2013, Wildwood Revival was born. “Festival culture has become more about selling as many tickets as possible, having the biggest stage and bringing in the most revenue,” Rose says. “It’s [become] less about the experience and more about the mighty dollar. So Wildwood is the anti-festival, in that we took some of the things that we liked about festivals and rolled in some ideas that we thought would create a more communal event and less of a mass cattle call environment.”

While the music industry remains maledominated, Rose was determined to succeed early on in her career. There were instances where she caught inconsistencies on the booking and production side of planning her festival. “I work in a lot of different circles in the music world,” Rose explains. “So I know pretty immediately when someone is inf lating costs. Maybe it’s not because I’m a woman, but I can tell you that a lot of my male counterparts didn’t have as many of the same experiences as I did.” Rose says she ultimately had a positive experience learning the ropes while starting her business, but she did encounter some cases of sexualization and stereotyping at first. “Men backstage would assume I was the wife or girlfriend of the musician rather than the person running the show,” Rose says. “Men were calling me ‘sweetheart’ or ‘honey’ or being condescending when they don’t know what I’m saying. That’s happened many times…but I’ve had no trouble holding my own.”

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y K R I S T I N K A R C H , H O L L I E LY T L E , A N D R E W H U T TO A N D E M I L I A PA R E .

Scenes from Wildwood Revival. ABOVE: Rose pledged to go single-use plastic free so festivalgoers can bring a cup or purchase a reusable one.

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STYLE PROFILE

Men backstage would assume I was the wife or girlfriend of the musician rather than the person running the show.

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Yogis take a moment to connect with nature at Wildwood Revival. BOTTOM RIGHT: Rose hanging out with photographer friend Hollie Lytle.

Rose’s intimate, three-day celebration is held outside Athens, Georgia, at Cloverleaf Farm. The 35-acre property is owned by her family and features a 7,000-square-foot antebellum farmhouse. Many of the concerts are held in an open-air barn, showcasing about a dozen musicians and bands. Capping the number of attendees at 3,000 people, Wildwood Revival is intentionally small and viewed as a “summer camp for adults,” where guests can enjoy all aspects of art and culture. Serving cuisine inspired by Rose’s travels and providing outdoor activities like yoga, Wildwood is unique because it’s all about connection, authenticity and community. “We wanted to take the feeling you get from visiting places—small-town juke joints and honky-tonks and farmers markets and swap meets, front porch parties, supper clubs—and just kind of bring those elements to the farm in the form of the festival,” Rose says. When Rose isn’t planning for Wildwood or freelancing for other music organizations, her normal day-to-day consists of exploring hole-in-the-wall music venues around Austin. The intimacy of a smaller crowd and watching aspiring artists gain a fanbase is an adrenaline rush for Rose, which is why she loves discovering local talent in Austin’s music scene. A regular at C-Boy’s Heart & Soul on South Congress, Rose remembers watching the Black Pumas perform there before they gained international fame and a Grammy nomination. The funk and soul duo’s connection with the audience and Eric Burton’s captivating voice stood out to Rose, and she immediately booked them for Wildwood in 2018. “[In] this town you can see any given act throughout the month, everything you’d ever want to see. Everyone tours through here,” Rose says. “It’s such a special place that I don’t think there’s anything like it.”

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celebrating

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FOOD + DRINK

WHEN I DIP, YOU DIP, WE DIP A cook-it-yourself Japanese restaurant with a bit of a learning curve, p. 78.

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KAREN'S PICK

DipDipDip Tatsu-Ya By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

“I’M FINALLY GETTING THE HANG OF IT!” boasted the guy at an adjacent

table. He was nearing the end of his meal at DipDipDip Tatsu-Ya, a cookit-yourself Japanese restaurant that has a bit of a learning curve. For the uninitiated, which included most of us dining that evening, the restaurant features shabu-shabu, a hot pot dish of thinly sliced meat and vegetables. The interactive meal requires boiling your own raw ingredients in broth and dipping them in various sauces. Sounds simple, but the multitude of options can be daunting for novices, hence our neighbor’s pride in unlocking its delicious secrets. In Austin’s white-hot dining scene, DipDipDip is one of the hottest. It’s the latest offspring of the local mini-empire that includes soup legends Ramen Tatsu-Ya, curry and cocktail darling Domo Alley-Gato and, my personal favorite, the Tex-Asian smokehouse Kemuri Tatsu-Ya. There’s also a Japanese-Hawaiian cocktail bar, Tiki Tatsu-Ya, in the works. Like all the Tatsu-Ya restaurants, DipDipDip puts a playful, modern spin on Japanese traditions, incorporating hip-hop vibes with stylish décor and Texas ingredients. Shabu-shabu was introduced over a century ago in Osaka and named after the “swish-swish” sound of ingredients stirring in hot broth. Although DipDipDip honors its roots, it also incorporates some unique, updated twists. Diners begin their experience by selecting one of four f lavored cooking broths for their individual pots. Unlike traditional shabu-shabu where guests share cooking vessels, DipDipDip provides each guest with his or her own personal, temperature-controlled cast-iron pot. I chose the pork bone broth, as did my husband, who added the spicy supplements of chili oil, coriander, green peppercorns and black cardamom. Other flavors

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include a spicy, smoky chipotle-and-miso broth; a rich, creamy soy milk broth; and a classic soy-and-seaweed broth. They all start out somewhat bland but build in flavor as you add each new element. Next, diners select from a wide array of ingredients for cooking. Thinly sliced beef is traditional, which DipDipDip offers, as well as much, much more. There are several beef choices from Texas producers like Niman Ranch and Strube Ranch. But the pièce de résistance is the imported


A5 Japanese Miyazaki wagyu, a meat so of vegetables starts each meal, piled high with prized that it’s delivered to your table with its seasonal treats like bok choy, asparagus, leeks own certificate of authenticity. A5 is the top and mushrooms. Also, be sure to check out grade of wagyu, and the Miyazaki brand is the daily specials from the rolling cart before considered one of the best. You pay a premium finalizing your order. for it, but the rich, buttery texture melts in Now for the really fun part: the dipping your mouth. sauces. Each meal comes with traditional Besides beef, there are several pork options, citrusy ponzu and creamy sesame goma dare, including heritage-breed kurobuta loin and as well as a side of koshihikari rice. Diners are belly, plus savory meatballs studded with encouraged to supplement their meals with ginger and pink peppercorns. some of the restaurant’s creative, DIPDIPDIP TATSU-YA Seafood options include shrimpunconventional dips, like the riff 7301 BURNET ROAD a nd- c od me atba l ls, g yoza on ranch dressing called the Spicy wontons stuffed with crab or DIPDIPDIP-TATSUYA.COM Funk, a creamy blend of kimchi, shrimp, and daily specials like garlic-chive oil and fresh herbs. Gulf fish and giant scallops. Vegetable lovers Since it wouldn’t be an Austin restaurant without will rejoice at all of DipDipDip’s gorgeous queso, there’s one called Keep Austin Dipping, farm-fresh options. A complimentary box a thick shiso-kosho sauce served with eggplant relish and a steamed bun. Like all the Tatsu-Ya restaurants, drinks are front and center. I kicked off my meal with the Perfect Highball, a tall, refreshing glass of Suntory Toki whisky, yuzu juice and sparkling water served over ice. A classic Kirin Ichiban lager cut through my meal’s kaleidoscope of flavors and refreshed my palate for another bite, as did my husband’s glass of crisp, sparkling Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco. We were too stuffed for dessert but will return to sample something from the whimsical DipDipDip Ice Cream kiosk adjacent to the restaurant. At DipDipDip, you can create your own meal from the à la carte menu, or if the choices seem overwhelming, order one of the chef-selected omakase dinners. The helpful staff offer advice on cooking times and sauce selections. As we dug into our meal, my husband and I initially fell silent, concentrating on the task at hand. But as dinner progressed, we, too, started to get the hang of it as we dunked and dipped. This immersive, interactive experience isn’t for everyone, but for those who like to roll up their sleeves and play with their food, DipDipDip is for you. Austin diners are eating it up.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St.,

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises deli-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

cious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch,

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

diner favorites. Order up the classics, including

and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and soft

roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is executed

decadent milkshakes.

charcuterie board.

by the Stefano Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs

34TH STREET CAFE

THE BREWER’S TABLE

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

4715 E. 5th St. | (512) 520 8199

This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

CAFÉ JOSIE

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great

at the brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

for weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

source the ingredients, which are utilized in both

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

the kitchen and the brewery to eliminate food waste.

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

ASTI TRATTORIA

The seasonally changing menu is unique but provides

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

options for even the pickiest of eaters.

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential

at more than 900 degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage of cheese on this menu!

CAFÉ NO SÉ

Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

goat-cheese panna cotta.

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

BAR CHI SUSHI

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

classic avocado toast is a must-try.

A great place to stop before or after a night on the

CLARK'S OYSTER BAR

town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu

Small and always buzzing, Clark's extensive caviar and

features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls

oyster menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service

under $10.

34TH STREET CATERING

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

1005 W. 34th Street | (512) 323 2000 34thstreetcafe.com

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Chef Larry McGuire brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood restaurant.

One of the best and most creative full service

COMEDOR

catering companies in Austin. Acclaimed Chef Paul

501 Colorado St. | (512) 499 0977

Peterson brings his culinary experience and high

Hiding in plain sight on one of downtown’s busiest

standards to their catering and to your event. Call

street corners, Comedor is a restaurant full of surprises.

to save the date and they can start planning for any

Lauded chefs Philip Speer and Gabe Erales deliver a

occasion. They're coming to the party!

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make it a refreshing indulgence on West Sixth Street.

menu that is equally clever and unexpected, with contemporary cuisine riffs on Mexican culinary traditions.


ÉPICERIE

HOME SLICE PIZZA

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

For pizza cravings head to Home Slice. Open until 3

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop

a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping conve-

in here for a bite on Sundays.

nience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

HOPFIELDS

2330 W. N Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

At Fonda San Miguel, authentic Interior Mexican

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beau-

food is lovingly served inside a colorful hacienda-style restaurant. The art-adorned walls and indoor, plantfilled courtyard provide a pleasant escape in North

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN + WINE BAR

Austin. Visit the Sunday brunch buffet for the best in

4800 Burnet Road | (512) 458 1100 gustoitaliankitchen.com

“interior Mexican” cuisine.

Nestled in the Rosedale neighborhood of north-

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR 1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

central Austin, Gusto captures the warm, comforting, every-day flavors of Italian cuisine. Dishes range from

tiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents

house-made antipasti to hand-formed pizzas, salads,

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s pro-

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet

panini, fresh pasta, entrees featuring Texas farm

vides modern spins on American classics. Dig into

delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

raised meats, and scratch desserts. Craft cocktails,

a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with

beer on tap, and boutique wines.

cranberry-thyme cocktail.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants

GRIZZELDA’S 105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

HILLSIDE FARMACY

in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

maintained the execution, top-notch service, and

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an

between traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East

Austin staple.

recipes, each fused with a range of f lavors and styles.

Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner spe-

The attention to detail in each dish shines and the

cials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

tortillas are made in-house daily.

HANK’S 5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077 Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a kid-friendly patio all work together to make

HOLY ROLLER 509 Rio Grande St. If all-day brunch is more your style, make a bee-line for downtown diner Holy Roller. Led by Callie Speer,

Hank’s a favorite neighborhood joint. With happy

the punk rock vibe plays out in creative combinations

hour every day from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be

like pancakes with fried chicken and migas kolaches.

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma.

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KEMURI TATSU-YA 2713 E. 2nd St. | (512) 893 5561 Kemuri Tatsu-Ya is a Japanese-Texan mash-up that injects seriously good food with a sense of humor. The East Austin joint features Asian-inspired smoked meats and seafood, along with yakitori, ramen, and izakaya classics meant for sharing. Drinks are also an integral part of the meal, so come thirsty.

LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM 1203 W. 6th St. | (512) 474 5107 Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Chef Ling and her team create sophisticated Chinese dishes that draw enthusiastic crowds day and night. Make sure to stop by during weekend brunch to taste the full mouthwatering dim sum menu.

LE POLITIQUE

LA BARBECUE 2027 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651 This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin

accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming

barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as deli-

marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern

cious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary

f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patis-

Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free

serie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that

beer and live music.

rival the French capital itself.

LAS PALOMAS

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

LENOIR 1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

LORO 2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Le-

and Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a

noir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making

welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive in-

the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable.

door-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office

Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles

of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsur-

from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

prisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

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MATTIE’S 811 W. Live Oak St. | (512) 444 1888 Mattie’s is a glorious urban paradise offering upscale American classics. While the cocktails are top-notch and the cuisine is nothing short of outstanding, Mattie’s ambiance and atmosphere are unmatched. OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits. ODD DUCK 1201 S Lamar Blvd | (512) 433 6521 Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck is the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect seasonal fare and drinks with a strong Texas inf luence sourced locally whenever possible. PARKSIDE 301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898 Patrons f lock to this downtown hideaway for its wide selection of oysters and other modern-American specialties. The 6th Street locale is filled with industrial details and plenty of natural light, so it’s no wonder that reservations are often necessary to get a table in the inviting space. THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.


TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating. The restaurant, located in downtown’s Seaholm district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

PICNIK 4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644 A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients. POOL BURGER 2315 Lake Austin Blvd. | (512) 334 9747 Tiki meets Texas in this neighborhood burger bar. Located behind Deep Eddy Cabaret, crunchy crinkle-cut fries and juicy burgers are served from the window of a 1968 Airstream Land Yacht.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN

RED ASH ITALIA

1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906

The greatest stories are told with family over food

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between

and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies just that,

high-quality food and enticing ambiance. This Ital-

bringing nostalgic and classic Italian American

ian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including

cuisine to the heart of Austin on Barton Springs.

executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

ROSEWOOD

From family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205

VIXEN’S WEDDING

Housed in a historic East Side cottage, this spot is quickly becoming a staple. Chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding homage to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers.

SUERTE 1800 E. 6th St. | (512) 953 0092 Helmed by executive chef Fermín Núñez, Suerte was inspired by extensive travels through Central Mexico. Artisanal masa is the highlight, made from local heirloom corn and used in distinctive dishes rarely found on Austin menus. Order the delectable Suadero Tacos, perfect for sharing with friends.

THAI FRESH 909 W. Mary St. | (512) 494 6436 A restaurant, cooking school and market all in one place. When you’re done dining on traditional Thai favorites, stop by the adjoining coffee bar for freshly brewed joe, homemade ice cream and an array of baked goods.

TINY BOXWOODS 1503 W. 35th St. | (512) 220 0698

1813 E. 6th St. | (737) 242 7555 Vixen’s Wedding is a charming space creating something truly unique. Helmed by culinary super-couple Todd Duplechan and Jessica Maher, the restaurant specializes in Goan cuisine, a cultural mash-up of bright and complex f lavors.

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE 609 W. 6th St. | (512) 542 3380 Owned by actress and Austin resident Sandra Bullock,

This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and

Walton’s is a dreamy brick-walled bakery, deli and

delicious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood.

floral shop. Take some pastries home after indulging in

Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon

gourmet sandwiches and fresh salads for lunch, or stay

Provencal salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

for the rotating dinner menu. Most importantly, make it before 2 p.m. to order the legendary biscuit sandwich served only during breakfast!

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A LOOK BEHIND

Photographs by September Broadhead

In deep South Austin exists a place from another era—a time before Austin was a sea of cranes and condos. In 1979, Penny Grossman left Chicago for Austin to fulfill her dream of opening a dance hall. She purchased a rural 4-acre plot near Slaughter and Manchaca, and opened Sam’s Town Point two years later. Best described as the love child of a honky-tonk and a working-class Milwaukee bar, Sam’s is still going strong, despite its secluded locale and ramshackle exterior. “It’s a challenge to find us; you kind of have to get lost,” says current owner Ramsay Midwood, a songwriter who played his first show at Sam’s in 2002. After nearly two decades as a regular act and talent booker at Sam’s, Midwood purchased the bar from Grossman when she retired in 2017. “She still sits at the corner of the bar every night and gives me her review after every performance,” Midwood says.

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Under Midwood’s stewardship, Sam’s has evolved into something of a collective, entirely owned and operated by the very people who helped make it a destination venue. “ W hen Pen ny decided t o st ep away as owner, the Austin music community and our patrons rallied and made sure Sam’s didn’t go away,” he says. “No other venue in the city is as diverse—we’re not a traditional honky-tonk because we also have Western swing, blues and old-timers like Archie Bell and Roy Head.” While the interior—a no-frills room dominated by acoustic ceiling panels, rickety chairs and a wooden dance f loor—is unchanged, as is the menu (standard burger on industrial bun; cash-only, please), what’s new is a younger generation committed

to maintaining Grossman’s vision. Midwood, for his part, couldn’t be more pleased. “People always ask how much I paid for this place, and I say I got it for a song.” -Laurel Miller


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA March 2020 Issue  

The Music + Film Issue No. 223

TRIBEZA March 2020 Issue  

The Music + Film Issue No. 223

Profile for tribeza