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MADE IT

THE MAKERS WHO FUEL THE MAKERS

The coffee community culture we rely on to keep us going.

U N L E A S H YO U R INNER MAKER

Ready for create-ness? We’ve got you covered.

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MAKER S + INDU S TRY

AUSTIN CURATED

From the “garage” to bigger stages, three makers who broke through.

15

YEARS


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Catherine Thomas

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Broker Associate (512) 736 8822 Lynn.Robin@evusa.com

Real Estate Advisor (512) 731 8536 Jacqui.Gilmore@evusa.com

Eden Weiss

Crestview Cottage - 1313 Madison Ave. - Sold in 2 days

austin.evusa.com

Gated Barton Creek Community, $1,850,000

Real Estate Advisor (512) 947 0522 Eden.Weiss@evusa.com

512-328-3939

©2015 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


A higher level of sophistication and knowledge.

Sally Lee

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Real Estate Advisor (512) 415 0026 Sally.Lee@evusa.com

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Joanna Lee

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Real Estate Advisor (512) 627 5875 Freda.Voelker@evusa.com

Nature Lovers Paradise Backing to Barton Creek, $1,925,000

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Dara Allen

Robin Banister

Dru Brown

Kathleen Bucher

Carol Burdette

Roxan Coffman

Leslie Davenport

Susan Griffith

Anne Giles

Cindy Goldrick

Laura Gottesman

Nicole Kessler

John Lairsen

Anna Lee

Kirk Lewis

Chris Long

Joe Longton

Russell Martin

Clay McLaughlin

Desmond Milvenan

Mark F. Moore

Gottesman Residential

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Travis Real Estate

Austin Portfolio - KW

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Kuper Sotheby’s

Moreland Properties

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Wilson & Goldrick

Gottesman Residential

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Engel & Volkers

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Eric Cooper

Roxan Coffman Properties

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The Elite 25℠ represents the top producing agents in Austin luxury residential real estate. Elite25Austin.com Eric Moreland

Stephanie Panozzo

Trey Phillips

Tracy Picone

Cord Shiflet

Martha Small

Jeannette Spinelli

Will Steakley

Greg Walling

Kumara Wilcoxon

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C O N T E N T S : F E AT U R E S

IS THERE AN AUSTIN EFFECT? Does the Austin brand elicit more love for local companies and makers? We have answers.

P. 45

MADE IT— A meet and

greet with three Austin makers who’ve moved from the “garage” to bigger stages. P. 49

THE MAKERS WHO FUEL THE MAKERS We get steamy with Austin coffee shops and their baristas.

P. 56

UNLEASH YOUR INNER MAKER With this list of places to get your maker on, you’re ready for createness.

P. 70

TAKE OVER Two crafters whose hobbies took over their homes, and they’re okay with it.

P. 76

P H OTO G R A P H BY B I L L S A L L A N S

JULY

WHEN CRAFTS


Photography by Ben Sklar

JACQUEMUS

MARNI KENZO

ACNE STUDIOS

DRIES VAN NOTEN

TOMAS MAIER RAQUEL ALLEGRA

ISABEL MARANT

CHLOÉ VETEMENTS

ALASDAIR

PROENZA SCHOULER

ALEXANDER WANG CREATURES OF COMFORT

SIMON MILLER ELDER STATESMAN

GOLDEN GOOSE JENNI KAYNE TOME

CÉLINE

ZERO + MARIA CORNEJO

LANVIN THE ROW

ALAÏA

MARSÈLL

plus MANY MORE

LAMAR · THE MENS SHOP · SOUTH CONGRESS

bygeorgeaustin.com

HELMUT LANG

BALENCIAGA VETEMENTS


CO NTE NT S : DEPARTM ENTS

Social Hour p. 14

Life + Style PRO FI LE I N S T Y LE p. 82 TH I N K S PACE p. 86

F I N D M O R E AT

TRIBEZA.COM

S T Y LE PICK p. 90

T RI B E Z A TALK: JUICE SOCIETY

Community + Culture

L ET ' S GR A B A DOU BL E DOPPIO, PRON TO!

COLUMN: KRISTIN ARMSTRONG p. 23 LOC AL LOVE p. 27 PROFILE p. 30 TRIBEZ A TALK p. 32

Food + Thought

Come with us to a Thursday Night Throwdown, Austin's monthly lat te ar t competition. Austin's star baristas get their game on at this judged contest. The winner takes bragging rights and a monster trophy topped by a steaming pitcher, naturally.

K AREN'S PICK p. 94 CONVERSATION p. 96 DINING GUIDE p. 98

KA REN'S PICK: PIEOUS

DO YOU R SEL F A FAVOR:

Hitch a ride with us and Favor. Think you know what happens when a blue-tux-T-shirted Favor runner hits the road? You might be surprised...

@ TRIBEZ A

A RT PIC K : WARFIELD CENTER GALLERIES The set-up for @weatherupbars' first ever Movie Night, happening every other Monday, all summer long. Stay in the loop by following @tribeza on Instagram.

Arts + Happenings ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDARS

p. 38 MUSIC PICK p. 39 ART PICK p. 40 EVENT PICK p. 42

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

A Look Behind... p. 104

O N T H E C O V E R : N EO N A R T I S T E VA N VOY L E S , P H OTO G R A P H B Y M AT T C O N A N T

JUICE SOCIETY PHOTO BY KATE ZIMMERMAN, WARFIELD CENTER GALLERIES PHOTO BY HAKEEM ADEWUMI, SYLVIA OROZCO PHOTO BY JESSICA PAGES, PIEOUS PHOTO BY HAYDEN SPEARS, VIDEO STILL BY JAMES RUIZ, INSTAGRAM @TRIBEZA

PROF ILE IN ST Y LE: SYLVIA OROZCO


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Dick Clark Contemporary | Stunning City Views 1405Wildcat.com Private Listing | $7,995,000

W Residences | Custom Floor Plan WResidence2805.com Private Listing | $3,850,000

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Immaculate Downtown 2 Story Penthouse NokonahPenthouse.com Private Listing | $4,700,000

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Resort Style Living | 1.56 Acres 216BrandonWay.com $3,450,000


Editor’s L E T T E R

G

BEHIND

THE ISSUE

etting to meet many of the creative people in Austin as we were putting together our annual Makers Issue was very inspiring. These are not

folks spending weekends purchasing foam hearts at Michael’s for scrapbooking. They have taken it way past a private hobby; past that level of being appreciated by only your mom, who will tell you everything you make is lovely. My maker skills were birthed, and peaked, when I was six. My older sisters tied paper streamers to our Sunbeam Mixmaster, switched it on high and I watched, transfi xed, as streamers turned into taut pieces of rope, which were then wound around an empty frozen orange juice can and slathered with glue. Voila! A pencil holder that, apparently, made the “perfect” Mother’s Day gift. There were others that followed … mostly Pinterest fails. Like the monkey cake for my daughter Helen’s fifth birthday. It looked more sinister than simian, and parents told

The zenith of my maker skills. Don't look too closely.

their kids to avert their eyes. Our family’s annual Easter pachanga always has a bunny cake. Every year, I ask my sister Michelle to text me a diagram of how to cut up the two round cake pans to make said bunny. My family always texts each other pictures of their bunny cakes. This year mine was voted most likely to have been affected by the Zika virus. Nope, not all creators are created equal. Which leads to even more admiration for the people who create and make a living out of it. There is so much talent in Austin — it was hard to pick just 20 or so of our neighbors to highlight. In “Made It” we look at three whose making has busted out of the garage and onto store shelves around the country. baristas. Kristin Armstrong, in her column, points out we are all makers — we make kids, dinner and sometimes mistakes. And it’s all good. High scores on Candy Crush can’t come close to the feeling you get when you create. Creating connects us to something deeper in ourselves. Perhaps your inner creator has been hyperextending its hand from a third row seat, squirming to get called on. If so, we’ve rounded up the places you can go to make everything from baskets to boats, homebrew to 3-D printing of prosthetics, in “Unleash Your Inner Maker.” You’re looking more creative by the moment.

MP Mueller

mp@tribeza.com

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

We are very happy to welcome Brittani Sonnenberg to TRIBEZA as our new managing editor. She’s a recent transplant from Berlin, Germany, where she edited the Berlin Journal. A published author, Brittani's work has appeared on NPR, in Time, the Guardian and other well-known publications. Her debut novel, Home Leave, was met with lots of love, including glowing reviews by the New York Times and the New Yorker. We are excited about where her curiosity, writing and worldview will take our TRIBE.

PHOTOS BY MP MUELLER

And, in “The Makers Who Fuel the Makers,” we visit with Austin’s coffee shops and


LOEWY LAW FIRM


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A R T S + C U LT U R E J U LY 2 016

N O. 17 9

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR +

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

MP Mueller

ART DIRECTOR

Callie Dickey

DIRECTOR OF STR ATEGY

Chris Perez

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Elizabeth Arnold

SENIOR DESIGNER

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

COLUMNISTS

DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL

Olivia Leitch

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Becky Bullard Anne Bruno Mimi Faucett Russell Gold Moira Muldoon Sofia Sokolove PHOTOGR APHERS

Miguel Angel Jessica Attie Bill Bastas Birdsong Imaging Matt Conant Chelsea Laine Francis Leah Muse Jessica Pages Annie Ray Bill Sallans Jenny Sathngam Hayden Spears ILLUSTR ATOR

Steve Wolf Isa D'Aniello DESIGN

CONTRIBUTORS

Lexi Ross

PROJECTS

Bo Duncan

SALES & OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Derek Van Wagner INTERNS

Nashwa Bawab Holly Cowart Avery Long Tori Townsend PRINCIPALS

Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres 706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2016 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

Tanya Freach Cesar Riojas S U B SCRIB E TO TRIBEZ A

VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DETAIL S


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SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

Social HOUR ZACH THEATRE RED, HOT AND SOUL GALA On May 7, ZACH Theatre hosted the Red, Hot and Soul Gala, an annual fundraiser aimed at raising money for artistic and educational programs for the theatre. The party featured performances by ZACH vocalists, an auction and a disco dance party at Studio 54.

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BREAST CANCER RESOURCE CENTER ART BRA Art Bra Austin is a fashion show event and auction aimed at raising money for local Austin women affected by breast cancer. Over 100 local artisans submitted wearable pieces to be chosen for the auction and on June 7, 70 of them were displayed on the 30ft runway and auctioned during the live show.

ST. DAVID'S FOUNDATION TOA S T O F T H E TOW N

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St. David’s Toast of the Town went disco-chic with a Studio 54-themed party, held May 14, at a private airplane hangar. Guests danced all night to the music of Johnny Bravo and raised funds for St. David’s Neal Kocurek Scholarship, awarded to central Texas high school seniors pursuing health care professions. Photos supplied.

ZACH Theatre: 1. Jeff & Sylvia Thomas, Daymond & Becky Holditch 2. Darrell & Heather May BCRC: 3. Tammy Holguin Benter, Dr. Beth Hellerstedt, Eden Lackey & Courtney Baucum Duesing 4. Anna Rae, Dr. Ned Snyder & Renee Linke Sendelbach St. David's Foundation: 5. David & Shelby Marquardt 6. Lindete Sparks & Mark Robson 7. Mike & Nicole Nieft

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

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SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

LEUKEMIA AND LY M P H O M A S O C I E T Y ’ S M A N A N D WO M A N OF THE YEAR

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The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society celebrated the end of their 10-week campaign, Man and Woman of the Year, at their Grand Finale Gala on June 4. For the second year in a row, candidates broke fundraising records, raising $969,227 for blood cancer research and treatment. 2016’s Woman of the Year is Amanda Bush, partner at Steele Resources; and the Man of the Year is Billy Snelson, creative director of NFP.

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PARAMOUNT A N N I V ER S A RY G A L A To celebrate their anniversary, the Paramount held a concert and auction event on May 14 that featured Chris Isaak. The sold-out show also included live music from local bands like Dale Watson and His Lonestars, Mayeux & Broussard and Don Leady & His Rockin’ Revue. The night ended with a tent party on Congress Avenue.

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P H OTO G R A P H S BY J EN N Y S AT H N G A M & B I R DS O N G I M AG I N G

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

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CAMILLE STYLES #GE T H E A LT H YGE T TO GE T H ER On May 20, Camille Styles hosted the first ever #GetHealthyGetTogether event at the South Congress Hotel. The idea behind the event was to get readers of Camille Styles’ blog together to have fun and get fit with each other. The yoga and workout event was a huge success and ended with participants getting to enjoy “wellness loot” through a take-home bag.

LLS: 1. Tom & Ashley Loftus 2. Shannon Wolfson & Tyler Sieswerda 3. Blake & Katie Magby Paramount: 4. Mark Weiss & Janet Bray 5. Patricia Vonne, Julie Tereshchuk & Mafalda Tan 6. Judy & Patrick Cantilo #GHGT: 7. Marnie Duncan & Camille Styles 8. Cristina Cleveland & Nancy Tran 9. Sarah Richardson, Kristen Lewis & Kristina Samuel


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SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

CALIFORNIA CLOSETS D E SI GN S T U D I O O N E-Y E A R A N N I V ER S A RY E V EN T On June 3, California Closets held an open house event for their one-year anniversary. During the event, attendees were able to enter into a contest and one lucky winner received a custom kid’s closet, valued at $2,000, to prepare for the upcoming school year.

SHED BARBERSHOP 1S T A N N UA L SU M M ER PA RT Y 1

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On June 12, Cheer Up Charlie’s hosted SHED Barbershop’s 1st annual Summer Party. Austinites beat the heat during this summer celebration with extra special happy hour prices, Cold Ones Pops and even a water slide. Guests were also able to get down to music from Stone Cold Snugglas and DJ HIGHCHURCH.

LENOIR 4TH ANNUAL CRAWFISH BOIL The 4th annual LENOIR Charity Crawfish Boil happened on May 29 at Springdale Farm. The event helps to fundraise two Austin farm projects — Urban Roots and the Springdale Center for Urban Agriculture — that focus on teaching kids about the benefits and business of farming. Besides all-you-can-eat crawfish, the event included a dunk tank and live music.

California Closets: 1. Kathleen Young & Vicky Haas 2. Annalisa, Miles & Malea Milton SHED: 4. Heather McCroskey & Jessica Alexander 5. CL Choate & Abby Pendergrast 6. Roger de Luna & Austin Tinius Lenoir: 7. Justin & Crystal Esquivel 8. Zoe Ramon & Chloe Amour 9. Eric & Melissa Puga

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com


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K R I S T I N ' S CO L U M N

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TO MAKE A LIFE, You Have To Make Mistakes

K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

by Kristin Armstrong I L LU S T R AT ION B Y S T E V E WOL F I CANNOT TELL YOU how many people I

talk to who say, “Oh, I can’t do that; I’m not creative. I can’t make things.” I always contest this opinion. As humans we were created to be creative. We all make things. I bake, I cook, I knit, I paint, I write. I make breakfast. I make love. I make a house a home. I make time. I make an effort. I make the bed. I make memories. I have birthed three babies and seven books. I pack lunches and suitcases. I arrange flowers and schedules. I take photographs, and I take my time. I make plans and reservations. I make changes. I make my grandmother’s cinnamon bread. I make promises and I make amends. When I think about it, I make lots of things. And so do you. I tried to think of the most important thing I make, and I came to the obvious things first like love and babies and a nest for all of that. But the longer I thought about it, I came to an interesting conclusion. The most important thing I make these days is something that might sound odd to your ears at first. It did to mine. I make mistakes. For a recovering perfectionist, this is a hot damn and hallelujah statement. I spent years of my younger life trying to avoid making tribeza.com

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

T H I S P H I LOS O P H Y D O ES N OT Y I E L D H I G H E R L E V E L S O F P E R FO R M A N C E AT WO R K , O R D E E P E R I N T I M ACY A N D FU L F I L L M E N T I N R E L AT I O N S H I P S. I T D O E S N OT M A K E YO U A B E T T E R PA R E N T. I T D O E S N OT M A K E YO U R D R E A M S CO M E T R U E.

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mistakes, or minimizing or rationalizing

up. It weakens our parenting by inhibiting the

can share our weaknesses and tender spots and

the mistakes I made. This philosophy does

connection forged by authenticity. It short-

allow someone to love and protect them, rather

not yield higher levels of performance at

circuits the path to real love, which requires

than cultivating an edge around them. We can

work, or deeper intimacy and fulfillment in

the vulnerability of putting ourselves out there,

sit with our kids in the midst of a rough patch

relationships. It does not make you a better

opening up and speaking from the heart. We

and simply love them, without always having

parent. It does not make your dreams come

cannot be all in, fully immersed in the process

to fix or instruct. We can accept our imperfect

true. It does not make you more capable or

of life, if we are so concerned with the success

partners as the perfect catalyst for our mutual

responsible. It does not protect you from

of the outcome.

transformation. We can screw up without

heartbreak, foolish shenanigans (I love that

Making mistakes frees us from all that. We

saying screw this. We can roll up our sleeves and

word), disappointments, or bumpy detours off

can try new things if we don’t care how we

do the work and know that our effort is valuable

the paved road of life.

look or how we perform. We can really love

and worthy, regardless of how it’s received or

Avoiding making mistakes keeps us from

people, because if our mistakes are okay then

what it garners. We can get more comfortable

making our best life. It keeps us stalled and

by proxy and by golly theirs are okay, too. When

with discomfort, step beyond the limits of what

stunted. It eats away at our courage. It advocates

the pressure of perfection is off the table, it’s

we already know we can do well and venture

for thinking small in the name of reducing risk.

amazing how people and life open up.

bravely into the mist of uncertainty.

It makes us self-conscious and trumps our try.

We can invite people over for dinner when

It causes us to keep quiet when we should speak

the house is messy and the cuisine is subpar. We

JULY 2016 | tribeza.com


Three Unique Modern Homes for sale in the Castle Hill Historic District. Only 2 left!

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L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

local

LOVE by Avery Long We canvassed Austin tastemakers, friends, the interwebs and even walked a few back alleys (we take this stuff seriously) to uncover some made-in-Austin finds. So many great products, so little space, but here are a dozen plus to put in your basket.

LENOIR FINISHING SALT Price: $10/2 oz jar

LENOIR FINISHG SALT PHOTO BY HOLLY COWART, ALL OTHER PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Buy at: Lenoir, Métier Cook's Supply Lenoir’s finishing salt is a secret weapon for chefs

PETRIFIED DESIGN NODO CHAIR

and foodies alike. Sprinkle on eggs, steaks, roasted vegetables and (naturally) popcorn, Lenoir finishing salt ups the umami factor on almost anything.

Price: $520 Contact to order: petrifieddesign.com, 806-790-1622 or Tyson@petrifieddesign.com In comes a ray of sunshine with Petrified Design’s Nodo chair. Ideal for sweet tea sipping by the pool, the Nodo chair is available in a spectrum of colors that make jelly beans jealous. Thanks to the lounger’s cozy comfort and baked-in cool, the Texas heat takes a back seat.

tribeza.com

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L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Price: $9.99/5 oz Twin Pack

DOG + BONE MARTINGALE COLLARS

Buy at: Gothinkbaby.com, Whole Foods and other local retailers

Price: $35 each

THINKBABY BABY BOTTLES

Buy at: Dogplusbone.com and local pet stores

How to be a stellar parent, Step 1: Shop ThinkBaby. ThinkBaby's 100% BPA free baby bottles come with an anti-colic nipple that

Show man's best friend some puppy love with

both mimics the sensation of breast feeding and reduces gas.

Dog + Bone's martingale collars. These color-

Additionally, these bottles can be converted into sippy cups

ful collars satisfy the three crucial S's of dog

and straw bottles as the child grows. Talk about a 3-in-1. ►

gear— safety, security, and (obviously) style. Due to the martingale element of the collars, dog owners are able to safely and effectively communicate with their on-leash pups by us-

ASHLEY WOODSON CATHERINE CUFF

ing the quick pressure/release technique during training. In summation, these pet products

Price: $200/small (2.5" high)

are doggone good. ▼

Buy at: Ashleywoodson.bigcartel.com All that glitters isn't gold. Handmade from responsibly sourced sterling silver and available in small, medium, large and grand, the Catherine Cuff evokes grace and power through its modest elegance. ▼

SWEET THYME DESIGN GARDEN MARKER DE BUCI BABY SMALL BLANKET in Green Floral & Beige Gingham Cotton Price: $80 Buy at: Debucibaby.com Become a swaddling all-star with de Buci Baby's small blanket in green floral and beige gingham cotton. From burp cloths to teddy bears, de Buci Baby is focused on creating luxurious children’s essentials.

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

Price: $15 Buy at: Sweetthymedsgn.com A vintage piece with a modern twist, the “You Belong Among the Wildflowers” garden marker is a must-have for anyone who feeds their soul in their garden.


L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

9 BANDED WHISKEY

DELYSIA CHOCOLATIER

Price: $29.99 Price

Price: Guitar $7/1.5 oz,

Buy at at: Spec's, The Austin Shaker,

Cowboy Boot $20/11.25 oz

Wiggy's and other local liquor stores

Buy at: Delysia.com

Named after the nocturnal nine-

Want to win the belt buckle at the Texas

banded armadillo, 9 Banded

gift rodeo? Give your favorite Lone Star

Whiskey couldn't be more Texan if

chocoholic Delysia’s guitar and cowboy

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packs a punch while maintaining

white, milk and dark chocolate. With award-

an easygoing finish. In all, 9 Banded

winning flavor and a Texas accent, these

Whiskey encapsulates the eclectic essence of Austin in liquor form.

LISA CROWDER JEWELRY ROUGH CUT BRACELET

give Willy Wonka a run for his money.

Price: $275 Buy at: Lisacrowder.com Lisa Crowder makes jewelry that’s lightweight but heavy on chic. Her Rough Cut sterling silver or gold vermeil and goes ►

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bracelet comes in matte sterling, oxidized

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4TH EDITION DESIGNS WATERWAYS COFFEE TABLE

DOS LUNAS CLASICO CHEESE

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A CO N V E R S AT I O N W I T H

Evan VOYLES by Sofia Sokolove Photographs by Matt Conant

T H E M A K E R T H AT ’ S PU T T I NG AUS T I N U P I N L IG H T S .

I

t’s safe to say that our town would look a whole lot different without Evan Voyles in it. The rugged, long-haired 58-year-old sign-maker is

the literal light behind some of Austin’s most iconic restaurants, hotels and movie theaters. His retro, handmade neon signs have helped shape the identity of South Congress by flashing and shining outside of Maya Star, Uncommon Objects, Home Slice Pizza and many venues in between. In other parts of town, like at Justine’s, Voyles’ flickering work stands alone on an otherwise quiet East Austin street, setting the bluesy, late-night mood for the restaurant before you even step in. And the now nationally recognized colorful beacons directing us to Chuy’s or the Alamo Drafthouse? Yep, that’s Voyles’ handiwork, too. We caught up with the maker in his filled-to-thebrim studio on South First Street to learn about what fuels him, the stories behind his most iconic pieces and how a Yale English major becomes a famous neon sign artist.


P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Was there a defining moment when you decided to become a sign maker?

they were cheap and they were totally cool. I had

we’re trying to be direct, we’re trying to blow their

a little storefront in Buda, and I created my first

eyes out and yet not.

Everything in my life has been accidental. I was

neon jungle in the backyard. And we would hang

an English major in college [at Yale University],

them up, and light ’em up, and we would have

and I was interested in how the word looked on

parties back there. So that’s where I was between

the page. But I also almost became an architect;

1989 and 1994, that inventory was building, even

I almost became a lawyer. I almost became an

while that wasn’t my main line of work — I was

artist. I guess I did become an artist. But never

well known for cowboy boots. And then one night

with full intent. I started making (when I was

it all burned down. I had already started making

supposed to be going to law school) a painting

a few signs. But the night it burned down, I had

in the basement of my girlfriend’s building that

nothing left but the signs. So I became a sign

looked like a neon sign. I had no idea how neon

maker, full time, the next morning.

signs were made, and I spent hours trying to get

You’ve made signs for some really impressive innovators — Tim League, Liz Lambert and Larry McGuire, to name a few. What’s that like? It just happens I’ve got some really badass friends. Who knew that some of these ideas would take off? I like to joke about my class of 1996/1997: Chuy’s, Stubb’s BBQ, Alamo Drafthouse. Suddenly it’s 20 years later and it’s like, ‘oh my god they’re all millionaires ... besides me.’ But I live the richest life of all of them, because I’m part of all of that.

canvas to do what cheap metal does much more

Wow, trial by fire. Literally.

easily and much more quickly. It was only years

I had nothing left but signs, so I waded in. And

later that I taught myself how to do it.

ever since then, I’ve gotten better. I’ve learned

change the way my town looks.

things by osmosis, partly by induction. And I’ve

And you get to help create senses of place that are so iconically Austin. How does it feel to see your own work, like the “SOUL” sign at Hotel Saint Cecilia, shared all over social media?

You were an antique dealer for a long time. Is that part of what sent you down this path?

tried always to hew to the idea that if I do it

I was driving on the backroads, constantly, mostly

lifetime.

between Texas and California. It was March of 1989 in Orogrande, New Mexico, which is in the middle of nowhere. It was one of those desert junk shops where they just had stuff out in the sand, and there’s this sign lying there that says “LUNCH.” I kicked it because I knew from my experience there were probably things living in it, and it just skidded away from my boot, and I’m like ‘oh my god — it’s light.’ And I [paid $20 and] picked it up and put it on the roof of the car. And in that moment I got infected. A month later, I’m buying huge things that I can’t pick up. And it doesn’t matter anymore because now I’m obsessed. I had to learn to take them apart in order to get them on and off the roof of the car. And you were buying them just because you loved the way they looked? You weren’t yet thinking ‘I should make these.’

exactly like the old guys did it, it’ll last beyond my

You share your studio with your wife, another maker, fashion designer Gail Chovan. How does that union shape your work? When we first started going out, she was working for Tesoros Trading Company, and that was the first outdoor commercial sign I’d built. She inherited me as part of her duties, like ‘call the sign guy and find out why the thing’s not working.’ Our friendship was forged over us discussing my shortcomings ... as a sign maker. Something we

I get to make cool stuff for cool people. I get to

I think that’s probably the most photographed sign — and it’s not a sign, or it wasn’t intended to be a sign — that I ever did. Kudos to Liz [Lambert] for recognizing it. I didn’t know it would become redolent and iconic. Though you would think, ‘How could you not see that, Evan, it’s SOUL in three foot, two-tone letters with triple stroke neon? Are you that dumb?’ And maybe I am. [Laughs] I just love this stuff, and I like making it, and to get to put it in front of people is amazing.

still do! The foundation of each of our works is

I feel like neon is having a moment.

strikingly similar.

To me, it’s not a moment. It never stopped. It’s not

I’m sure that leads to some really rich conversations about your art. Our conversation is with each other, but it’s also with the street. With people on the street. And everything that informs people on the street, and

Exactly. At that point I was simply buying them

everything that distracts people on the street.

because they were out there, they were available,

We’re tying to be elegant, we’re trying to be subtle,

magic, but its roots are in magic, its roots are in alchemy. It’s simply the best way to write your will upon the night that has ever been invented, and nothing else has rivaled it yet. This interview has been edited and condensed.

tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

31


W E E VA YOU R W E E VA YOU M R E MOR I E S help people show their legacy,” CEO Kim M E MOR I E S “We Gorsuch says of Weeva, her company that lets

T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Tribeza TALK

people collaborate to create beautifully detailed memory books ffor anniversaries, graduations and other occasions. Armed with a deep background in business strategy and a desire to create

A N I NSI DE R ' S GU I DE TO

connections with others, Gorsuch launched

AUS T I N ' S H I DDE N G E M S .

Weeva in March 2014. “If we can create more engagement and more connection and meaning in the lives of other people, that’s a mission worth

by Nicole Beckley

pursuing,” Gorsuch said. For more information visit weeva.com

Thumbs up to these five apps, developed in

to fi ll the void left by Uber and Lyft, including

Austin, that aim to improve your life. On a hot

the non-profit Ride Austin. Created virtually

August day in 2014, Jason Ervin was buying and

overnight by Austin engineers, the ridesharing

moving furniture when his 16-year-old son Ethan

app focuses on downtown and the airport with

joked there should be a way to press a button and

expansion expected later this year. Ride Austin’s

have it delivered. Utilizing the technology that

fare roundup feature will allow riders to round

Jason had built for another project, the father-

fares to the next dollar and donate to charities.

son team began working on Burro, a delivery

Need a limo? One of GetMe’s more unique

service specializing in furniture and household

features lets users opt for limousine service.

goods. Burro can offer delivery in less than

Why not ride in style? Of course, if you prefer to

an hour for around one-third the price of a

drive yourself, clear traffic tickets off your record

traditional service.

with Aceable’s mobile defensive driving course.

For smaller deliveries, Favor has been a fave

Just don’t do it in your car. For more information

since its founding in 2013. Spot the turquoise

visit getburro.com,favordelivery.com, rideaustin.

tuxedo-shirted runners around town couriering

com, getme.com, aceable.com

groceries, take-out and more, on-demand in under an hour. When it comes to getting from place to place, a number of start-ups have stepped up

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BURRO, RIDE AUSTIN, FAVOR, AND WEEVA

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T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

With its brownie-like exterior and soft truffle interior, the decadent Miles of Chocolate dessert has been a hit from its start 14 years ago. While working as a personal chef,

DRINK

Miles Compton crafted his signature baked chocolate creation, and was quickly encouraged by friends to share it with the masses. Compton’s hybrid goody produces epic fans in chocolate-avores and can be picked up from

JUST DESSERTS

the shelves of Whole Foods and Central Market. The company now produces some 360 pounds of the chocolate dessert each day in their East Austin kitchen. “Go and try some,” Compton entreated. “Have it with red wine and strawberries.” Don’t have to tell us twice. For more information visit milesofchocolate.com

F I R E W O R K I T: C A N ' T M I S S D I S P L AY S

WE’RE JUICED

W E L L + GO OD

“Growing up I had horrible eczema and when I turned 14 or 15 I started getting very bad migraines,” Danielle Sobel recalled.

JULY FOURTH HILL COUNTRY GALLERIA LAGO VISTA FRONTIER DAYS INDEPENDENCE DAY FEST JULY 4 TH CELEBRATION 3300 Palm Valley Blvd. Hill Country Galleria Bar-K Recreational Park Mon, July 4 | 10am-11pm Sat, July 2 | 7:30am til dark Mon, July 4 | 6:30-9:30pm

Looking for solutions,

she dug into health research, ultimately earning her health coach certification from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. She also launched a plan for Juice Society, a brand of organic, cold-pressed juices whose first storefront, in Lamar Union, opened in April. The juices are “a great way to introduce nutrients and really healthy things into your life without feeling overwhelmed,” Sobel says. Lately she’s been reaching for Zest (green apple, pear, celery, spinach and lime) and planning for Flycatcher Farms, the company’s newly acquired 6.2 acre farm, which will provide fresh organic produce. For more information visit juice-society.com

Summer can be the prime time for relaxation and self-care, and three new wellness businesses have health goals for you. “People take good care of themselves here a lot in Austin, but they’re always looking for what else they can do to enhance that or even make it a little bit better,” IVitamin CEO Jordan Cobb said.

Opening this summer on

South Congress, the IVitamin hydration therapy lounge offers a host of treatments that provide intravenous vitamins and minerals,

to help

boost the immune system and increase muscle repair. Taking over the former Flipnotics spot on Barton Springs Road, SquareRut Kava Bar slings shells of kava, a drink touted for its relaxation properties, as well as kava chocolates. Ever heard of halotherapy? In Lakeway, Austin Salt Cave, which opened at the end of March, utilizes salt to treat respiratory issues.

Venture into the

cave and prepare to breathe easier. For more information visit ivitamintherapy.com, squarerut.

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

com, austinsaltcave.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JUICE SOCIEY, MILES OF CHOCOLATE, AND AUSTIN SALT CAVE

H-E-B JULY 4 TH CONCERT, FIREWORKS Lady Bird Lake Mon, July 4 | 7-10pm


The Good Egg by Milo Baughman

showrooms located in austin 512.637.0600 san antonio 210.455.0166 details at www.nestmodern.com


This exhibition is organized by the Blanton Museum of Art. Francisco de Goya, Disparate de tontos [or Toritos] [Fools’—or Little Bulls’—Folly] (detail), from Los disparates [Follies]/Los Proverbios [Proverbs], ca. 1816–1819, (published 1877), etching, aquatint, drypoint, and emery stone, 15 15/16 x 12 3/16 in., Yale University Art Gallery, The Arthur Ross Collection

#GoyaMadReason Blanton Museum of Art / The University of Texas at Austin / MLK at Congress / Austin, TX 78712 / 512.471.7324 / www.blantonmuseum.org

@blantonmuseum


Arts +

HAPPENINGS W H E R E T O G O A N D W H AT TO D O I N J U LY Misha Penton's Transparent Vulnerability, July's Event Pick. PHOTO COURTESTY OF MISHA PENTON

A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T C A L E N DA R

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MUSIC PICK

39

ARTS PICK

40

EVENT PICK

42


C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC MUSIC UNDER THE STARS SERIES

July 1-July 29 Bullock Texas State History Museum

WILLIE NELSON’S 4TH OF JULY PICNIC

July 4 Austin360 Amphitheater

AUSTIN SYMPHONY’S JULY 4 CONCERT AND FIREWORKS

July 4 Auditorium Shores

TWENTY ONE PILOTS

July 6 Austin360 Amphitheater

20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION WITH FESTIVAL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA AND PETER BAY

July 8 Bates Recital Hall

FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS

July 9 Bass Concert Hall

WEIRD AL YANKOVIC

July 12 Bass Concert Hall TED NUGENT

July 17 Scoot Inn

DRAKE W/ FUTURE

July 20 Frank Erwin Center

VIOLENT FEMMES

July 20 Stubb’s Outdoors

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

MODEST MOUSE W/ BRAND NEW

July 23 Austin360 Amphitheater

IRON & WINE MIDWIVES BENEFIT CONCERT

July 23 Paramount Theatre

101X BIRTHDAY CONCERT SERIES: FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS W/ ZELLA DAY

July 24 Stubb’s Outdoors

STEVEN TYLER

July 26 Bass Concert Hall STEVE MILLER BAND

MOVIEMAKER DIALOGUE: KICKSTARTER WORKSHOP July 11 AFS Screening Room HANDS ON A HARDBODY 35MM FILM SCREENING AND CONVERSATION July 21 Bullock Texas State History Museum 2016 SUMMER CLASSIC FILM SERIES July 5-10, 12-13, 15-17, 19-22, 24, 26-31 Paramount Theatre 101X SUMMER CINEMA July 13 and 27 Central Market

July 26 Statesman Skyline Theater at The Long Center

SOUND & CINEMA July 6 and 20 The Long Center

AUSTIN CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

SUMMER FILM SERIES: FRIDA July 14 Harry Ransom Center

July 8-10, 15-17, 22-24 Bates Recital Hall

BEHIND THE SCENES SERIES IN THE RECITAL STUDIO

July 7-8, 11-12, 14-15, 18-19, 21-22 Bates Recital Hall TODRICK HALL

July 22 Bass Concert Hall

THEATER HP LOVECRAFT’S THE COLOR OUT OF SPACE July 1 and 2 Space 12

THE ADDAMS FAMILY July 22-Aug 13 The Long Center THE STEADFAST TIN SOLDIER July 24, 26, 29-31 The Long Center BUYER AND CELLAR July 1-3, 6-10, 13-17, 20-24, 27-31 ZACH Theatre MY WAY: A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA July 15-17, 22-24 TexARTS Kam & James Morris Theatre 60-IN-SIXTY 2016 July 22 The North Door

COMEDY MOVIE RIOT July 1 ColdTowne Theater SETH COCKFIELD July 1 and 2 The Velveeta Room MIDNIGHT SOCIETY July 2 ColdTowne Theater

SHREK THE MUSICAL July 8-Aug 13 Zilker Hillside Theater

THIS IS HANDBOMB July 5 The New Movement

GREASE SING-ALONG July 9 Paramount Theatre

TROUBLE ON THE DOUBLE July 9-July 17 The Long Center

MARK NORMAND July 6 Cap City Comedy Club

MARTINIS AND MANICURES: MAGIC MIKE July 10 Paramount Theatre

HENRY VIII July 16 Bates Recital Hall

GARY GULMAN July 28-30 Cap City Comedy Club

FILM


MUSIC PICK

KICK BUTT COMEDY OPEN MIC Wednesdays, July 6, 13, 20, 27 Kick Butt Coffee GOOD FIGHT July 6, 13, 20, 27 The New Movement

CHILDREN MR. PUPPET PERFORMANCE July 1 Laura Bush Library BUBBLEPALOOZA July 16 The Long Center POKEMON TRAINING July 16 Outlaw Moon Games & Toys MARY POPPINS July 20-Sept 4 ZACH Theatre AUSTIN SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S DAY ART PARK July 13, 20, 27 Symphony Square

OTHER

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVE CREANEY

STREET SALSA CLASSES July 3 Dance Austin Studio HILL COUNTRY GALLERIA INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION July 4 Hill Country Galleria

FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS AND SYMPHONY July 4 Vic Mathias Shores FREE SWING DANCE LESSONS July 8 The Highball BODY MIND SPIRIT EXPO July 23 and 24 Palmer Events Center THE WINE DOWN 2016 July 27 ACL Live BYOVINYL July 5, 12, 19, 26 Mohawk DE LA TERRE DINNER SERIES July 11, 18, 25 Foreign & Domestic MOTOWN MONDAY July 4, 11, 18, 25 The Highball LADY BIRD DAY July 24 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center OUR GLOBAL KITCHEN July 1-24 Bullock Texas State History Museum ICE CREAM SOCIALS July 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 South Congress Hotel

ANTON E ’ S 41ST A N N I V E R S A RY: D I R T Y DOZEN BR A S S BAND by Derek Van Wagner

Antone's Nightclub 305 E. 5th St. J U LY 16

Antone's Nightclub has had a variety of different physical addresses over the past 40 years, but its message to the world has always been the same: “Home of the Blues.” The latest iteration of Antone's, off of East 5th Street, is a perfect fit for their mission. The intimate space allows audiences to be near enough to watch the sweat bead on a performer’s brow and feel the growl of a worried and weathered voice. Starting on July 11, Antone's will celebrate its 41st Anniversary with a week of performances from world-renowned artists like Derek O'Brien, Billy Boy Arnold, Jimmie Vaughan and some mysterious special guests. One of the performances that caught our eye during Antone’s celebration week was the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, a compilation of New Orleans’ finest musicians playing original tunes and lively covers brimming with colorful horns and a rock-steady backbeat. The Dirty Dozen has been featured on the albums of some of the best, including David Bowie, Elvis Costello and Dr. John. The opening act is none other than soul legend Bobby Patterson, a Dallas native and a true music veteran, whose songs have been covered by bands ranging from Golden Smog to Albert King. If you want to use words like rowdy, raucous or rambunctious to describe your Saturday night to friends, we highly suggest attending this show. tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

39


A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

ARTS PICK

Arts DIANA GREENBERG:

THE LITTLE SHOW

+ ARTIST TALK

July 7, 5:30pm ArtSpace

July 7 Wally Workman Gallery MURAL WORKSHOP

July 15-17 Hope Outdoor Gallery ART AFTER SIX

July 29, 6pm The People’s Gallery

W R E S T L I N G H I S T O RY: POI NT S A LONG A JOU R N E Y O F D I S / C OV E RY H I D D E N I N THE TEMPLE

FAR OUT FILMS #4

Warfield Center Galleries

210 W. 24th St. The University of Texas M AY 12 – D E C 9

Wrestling History: Points Along a Journey of Dis/covery Hidden in the Temple is the latest exhibition at the newly renovated galleries at the John L. Warfield Center for African and African-American Studies at the University of Texas. This collection features works by contemporary artist Angelbert Metoyer, who splits his time between Houston and Rotterdam. Combining his interests in philosophy, quantum physics and astronomy, and drawing from stories of his own family’s heritage—the Cane River Creoles of 18th century Louisiana—Metoyer delivers a body of work that is spiritually and politically engaging. Curated by Anthony B. Pinn, Ph.D., the show includes painting, sculptural installation, mixed-media collage and video. Metoyer and Pinn see the exhibition as an opportunity to reframe the gallery’s space and bring together images, signs and symbols from an African past, as well as contemporary markers of cultural meaning. “The works are meant to foster transformation,” noted Pinn. The Warfield Center’s state-of-the-art gallery has been designed to exhibit, contemplate and discuss art and material culture as it relates to the Black experience in the United States and throughout the Diaspora.

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

July 30 Art.Science.Gallery.

RECEPTION

RAW-ROYAL STREET ART WALK

July 22, 6pm Royal Street in Salado, TX ART SQUARED ARTS MARKET

July 9 San Marcos Downtown Square BRANDON SNOW: LIFE, DEATH AND BEAUTY

KRISTINA HAGMAN: THE

Through July 7 Art on 5th

VIEWS OF MT. RAINIER

JOHN BREINER:

ETERNAL PARTY AND 36 ART EXHIBITION

July 1-2 Bone Black Print Studio & Gallery ART AND ACTIVITIES AT THE BLANTON’S THIRD THURSDAY

July 21 Blanton Museum of Art FRESH EXCHANGE:

TEEN ARTIST + MENTOR PROGRAM EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION

July 8, 7pm Pump Project

BASTROP FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK July 1

Historic Downtown Bastrop Main Street

AETHERIA

Through July 7 Art on 5th LISA BRAWN: ¿QUIÉN

ES MÁS MACHO? WES ANDERSON VS. THE

WILD BIRDS OF TEXAS: NEW WOODCUTS

Through July 31 Yard Dog Art Gallery

RE-ENVISIONING THE

VIRGIN MARY: COLONIAL PAINTING FROM SOUTH AMERICA

Through July 3 Blanton Museum of Art

PHOTO COU RTE SY OF TH E WARFIEL D CENTER

PREVIEW HAPPY HOUR


E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES MUSEUMS THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

T R A N S PA R E N T V U L N E R A B I L I T Y: A PERFORMANCE AND DISCUSSION

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

CAMIBAart Gallery 2832 E. MLK Jr. Blvd., Ste. #111 J U LY 16 T H , 6 P M

by Sofia Sokolove Artist Misha Penton is many things: a painter, sound artist, contemporary classical singer and writer. For her exhibition Misha Penton: Transparent Vulnerability at CAMIBAart Gallery, she called on her varied talents. The result is an installation featuring her watercolors, accompanied by a recorded audio element Penton composed specifically for the exhibition. “The watercolors,” Penton writes, “echo the ephemeral and transparent quality of my voice work: expressing something evanescent and not-quite-ableto-be-expressed in words.” On Saturday, July 16, that ephemeral quality will be elevated, when Penton, along with contrabassist Brent Fariss, will perform an experimental music work she has created, followed by a discussion with CAMIBAart co-founder and director Troy Campa. The performance, says Campa, will add an additional contemplative layer to the already dreamy installation: “the gentle sound of breath, whispered fragments of poetry, and soaring tones of voice.” Misha Penton: Transparent Vulnerability runs through July 30 at CAMIBAart Gallery in the Flatbed Press building. The performance and discussion on July 16 begins at 6pm. Tickets are free, but must be requested in advance. Visit camibaart.com for more information.

42

JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-Fri 10-4, Sa-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

IMAGE COURTESY OF LOWKEY PHOTO

EVENT PICK


A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T | M U S E U M S & G A L L E R I E S

GALLERIES

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY

LINK & PIN

Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6

2324 S. Lamar Blvd

2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102

russell–collection.com

FREDERICKSBURG

5305 Bolm Rd., #12

(512) 428 4782

(512) 900 8952

78704 GALLERY

(512) 939 6665

Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5

Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4

SPACE 12

AGAVE GALLERY

1400 South Congress

Tu-Sa 12-6

firstaccess.co/gallery

linkpinart.com

3121 E. 12th St.

208 E. San Antonio St.

(512) 708 4678

bigmedium.org

(512) 524 7128

(830) 990 1727

FLATBED PRESS

LORA REYNOLDS

T-F 10-5

Hours: M-Sa 10-5

space12.org

agavegallery.com

Hours: M-F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214

AUSTIN

Hours: M-Sa 10-5

900 RR 620 S. Unit B110

capitalfineart.com

(512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 613 Allen St.

ART AT THE DEN

(512) 300 8217

317 W. 3rd St.

By event and appt only

(512) 222 3364

co-labprojects.org

Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St.

ART ON 5TH

(512) 477 4929

3005 S. Lamar Blvd.

Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4

(512) 481 1111

davisgalleryaustin.com

Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com

DIMENSION GALLERY

SCULPTURE AND 3D ART

ARTWORKS GALLERY

979 Springdale, Ste. 99

1214 W. 6th St.

(512) 479 9941

(512) 472 1550

dimensiongallery.org

Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER

AUSTIN GALLERIES

1110 Barton Springs Rd.

5804 Lookout Mountain Dr.

(512) 974 4000

(512) 495 9363

Hours: M-Th 10-9,

By Appt. Only

F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2

austingalleries.com

austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com

EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO

3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appt. only

AUSTIN ART SPACE

eastsideglassstudio.com

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q

FAREWELL BOOKS

GALLERY AND STUDIOS (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com

913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu-Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com GALLERY BLACK LAGOON

4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838

GALLERY

360 Nueces St., #50 STEPHEN L. CLARK

ARTISANS AT

Hours: W-Sa 11-6

GALLERY

ROCKY HILL

lorareynolds.com

1101 W. 6th St.

234 W. Main St.

(512) 477 0828

(830) 990 8160

Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4

Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3

stephenlclarkgallery.com

artisansatrockyhill.com

Hours: M–Sa 10-6

STUDIO 10

lotusasianart.com

1011 West Lynn

FREDERICKSBURG

(512) 215 4965

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946

(512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5

TESTSITE

galleryblacklagoon.com

massgallery.org

502 W. 33rd St.

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

MODERN ROCKS

Hours: Sa 1-5

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

GALLERY

916 Springdale Rd. #103

(512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

(512) 524 1488

VISUAL ARTS CENTER

Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6

2300 Trinity St.

modernrocksgallery.com

(512) 232 2348

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440

Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5

ART GALLERY 314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707

Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES &

utvac.org

ART GALLERY

WALLY WORKMAN

(830) 997 0073

GALLERY

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5

209 S. Llano Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT

wallyworkman.com

VAUDEVILLE

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

(830) 992 3234

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5

230 E. Main St. Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK 425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

yarddog.com tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

43


AUSTIN SHADEWORKS

Block the Sun, not your view

8868 Research Blvd #101 512-472-1768 |austinshadeworks.com


E N T I C A

H

A

Y

Made in

L

^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ T ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^L ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ U ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ M 2 ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ P A M ^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ Z ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ E U L

L

E

R

T

R

I

1

Y

E

0

B

TEXAS

6

n i t s Au  B

By MP Mueller ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^

When Oprah endorses a product on her show, it changes the trajectory of authors, products and their makers. This has been dubbed the “Oprah Effect.” We wondered if there is an Austin Effect. Are things produced in our city, now the 11th largest in the US, embraced more readily because of the love outsiders have for Austin? And what does that mean for our town’s growth? We talked to some business owners and leaders from different pockets in Austin. Here’s what we found out.

^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

45


"

AUTHENTICITY IS VERY ATTRACTIVE

Many humans are attracted to other humans for their authenticity. You can extend that dotted line and conclude that people who value authenticity

I heard someone once say, ‘You might go to LA to be famous, you might go to Boston to be smart, but you probably come to Austin to be yourself.’”

will most likely be attracted to products, services and

- Will Wynn

cities who are authentic, too. “Austin has a reputation

FORMER AUSTIN MAYOR AND

for being authentic,” noted former Austin Mayor and

INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANT

international trade consultant, Will Wynn. “Young test for it. Part of authenticity is who founded it, what was his or her passion, does it come through in the product and where do they do it?” In his overseas travels, Wynn’s experience is that most people under 30 have heard of Austin and believe it’s cool. Your product has to be from somewhere. ........

Slap “Hecho en Austin, Texas” on it and there’s strong evidence it can boost your brand. ........

^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^

Authenticity Attracts Like People If we buy into the adage that like attracts like, we should erase that fear of socks that don’t match ours moving here. “I always tell people who are wringing their hands about growth, thinking it’s a negative thing, every person moving here wants to be a part of this,” Wynn said. “ They are not bringing Columbus or Berkeley or Charleston with them. They are coming to be a part of the scene, not to change it. They did their research, they chose Austin, they want the vibe and they want to thrive with us.”

46 JULY 2016 |

tribeza.com

^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^

consumers want authenticity— and they have a sniff

We don’t eat our own Far from it. Every person interviewed for this story had lived in other cities before coming or returning home to Austin. They concurred that Austin is a city of people who want to help you succeed. “Austin creates this really perfect incubator for new business,” according to dress designer Miranda Bennett. Bennett, an Austin native, lived and worked in New York City for 10-plus years before coming home. “Moving back from New York I was concerned that because it was a smaller market, people would withhold resources and it wouldn’t be an environment of sharing. But here, there is such an attitude of more is more. People were very generous with collaboration and leads … ‘check out this store, you should sell at this event, connect with this supplier for X, Y, Z.’ There’s the feeling here that anything that succeeds in our community has a ripple effect.”


Au s t i n

(City Limits) Not Texas In terms of economic development and city love, the long-running PBS show with roadies galore, Austin City Limits, can take a big bow. “I don’t want to sound like a pompous travel master,” said Maine Root Soda’s President Mark Seiler, “but we were in a very small town in Paraguay… in a tiny café. There was a little TV with bunny ears on it, broadcasting Austin City Limits. When we told people where we were from, they said ‘Austin City Limits!’ ” Identify yourself as being from Austin when you travel, instead of Texas, and a whole different conversation may unfold.

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

We’re From

But Let Them Know You’ve Been Outside of Texas ................................................................................................................... ......... Aaron Brown, owner of Onion Creek

Keep Austin Weird. He believes there’s

Productions and festival director for

an unspoken thought bubble: If you

topia est, grew up in

are at the top of the game, why are you

riftwood.

For nine years he worked in video

in Austin instead of New York or LA?

production in New York City for com-

“I’m proud that I’m based in Austin,”

panies like H- and the

said Brown, “Austin is the icing on my

iscovery

Channel before returning to Austin.

cake. We can execute at the highest

“If I say I’m from Austin, it does open

level while still having way more fun.

doors to produce in a more creative,

But I also want people to know I’ve

progressive way,” said Brown. But

worked in New York. If

he believes there’s also a trepidation

I need to call someone, I don’t use my

people in the entertainment industry

office phone, I use my cell phone.

may have about our city and it may

The fact I keep my New York number

be related to that cousin we’ve kissed:

tells you a lot.”

Our High-Tech Startups May Get Shorted Some Love “Everybody in the high-tech world has Austin on their radar,” declares local startup veteran Jan Ryan. She’s worked both in Silicon Hills and Silicon Valley raising money for and running big idea companies. She believes it’s easier here for startups to access the people they need to make things happen. Except, perhaps, when it comes to funding. Ryan shared, “With Austin Ventures no longer investing, there are several VCs beginning to come in to fill that vacuum. But while a recent Rice

niversity study showed ustin leading the

way for C money in Texas, there’s a significant gap between what’s invested here and what Austin’s tech sisters like Seattle, LA, Silicon Valley and Boston garner. Capital Factory’s founder Joshua Baer, in a recent story on

T, shared that some Cs may perceive ustin startups as not

ambitious enough. “I’ve heard some VCs say,” Baer noted, “those Austin people, they’ll build up a business until it’s worth about $50 million, then they’ll sell it and go buy a house on the lake and retire.’” VCs want to see “people shooting for the stars,” he said, like Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg. The perception of our JKL and Keeping It Weird attracts a lot of people to work and play here, but could hold us back from capital for startups.

^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^

^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ~~~~~~

But We’ll~~~~~~

EMBRACE YOU

Even If You're Not From Here ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Maine Root’s Seiler noted that when the company first started in Maine, sales calls usually went like this: “ ‘Was your great, great grandfather a whaler who built tall ships?’ That was their qualifying criteria. When we moved to Austin and I started selling soda here, the city gave us a giant hug and we’ve hugged them back.” ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

47


When your workouts are as tired as skinny jeans in July. FRESH Friday is a free community health program that inspires Austinites every week with fresh, new and innovative ways to move your body and help make Austin the fittest city in the U.S.A.

Fresh Friday → Join the movement. freshfridayaustin.com

Always free, always fun, always FRESH. In partnership with Fresh and The Austin Chronicle.

A

X T


photography by Bill Sallans ::::::::: by MP Mueller

MADE IT In this Makers issue, we look at three Austin-based entrepreneurs who made it out of their garages or studio, and on to a much bigger stage. While their inspirations and motivations varied, they share common ingredients to their successes. They all leapt without a safety net, and support of friends and family were key. But their businesses took a distinct upswing with one unglamorous and centuries-old tactic, the trade show. Here are their stories Âť tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

49


Your 80 proof peanut butter, my chocolate. / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / “Our office was [physically] attached to Tito’s Vodka for a number of years. We would bring Tito’s to shows and mix it up with our ginger brew and the old-timers would tell us, ‘That’s a Moscow Mule.’ I can’t claim that I told Tito about Moscow Mules, but we’d say to him, ‘We’ve got ginger, we’re mixing it with your stuff and it seems to be a hit.’”


SODA GOOD

ou can be number

No matter how big they grow, they are a person-

one for four quarters, but if I missed my num-

able and tightly run business. Mark, Marianne

bers for a uarter, you can get fired. He decid-

and his three kids still work the Maine Root

ed to leave his job and work with Matt selling

booth at ustin City Limits estival

soda. Without telling Matt. “I didn’t want a

be their 11th year — handing out soda. “I can’t

safety net. I call Matt and tell him I’m flying in

believe we’ve gotten this far, Mark confessed.

Maine Root organically sweetened sodas got its

[to Maine] on Monday; have a couple of cas-

Every four minutes there are fire drills. But it’s

start 12 years ago with a signature root beer for-

es of root beer and I’ll see what I can sell. It

still really fun and we are still steering our own

mulation in … you guessed it, Maine, but moved

was the middle of January and we would make

course. We’ve got fantastic customers and plan

in the software world ’

:::::::::

M A R K SE I LE R M A IN E ROOT

operations to Austin not long after. Now with

sales calls and get

on being around for as long as we can push our

placements out of

flavors, including best sellers Mexican Cola,

stops. Did that for a month and learned all the

lemonade, root beer and ginger brew, you can

objections to why they wouldn’t carry my prod-

find Maine Root in ,

uct. Wanted to hear them a few hundred times.

cery stores across the

restaurants and groS. It’s a staple in 4

this will

Then I came back, walked into Central Market

Austin restaurants like Torchy’s Tacos and in-

on North Lamar with a bottle of root beer and

ternationally — bubbling out of fountains in

asked who bought root beer. They said go see

Dubai and the Middle East at the popular chain

this guy Rex Howell-Smith. Rex said, Leave

Blu Burger. Who would have thought?

it with my assistant and if I like it you will hear from me.’ I told him I had a wife and three kids

Admittedly, not even Mark Seiler, their pres-

and he needed to hear my pitch. He repeated,

ident, who is still pleasantly surprised at the

‘If I like it you’ll hear from me.’ So I got in my

company’s success. His brother, Matt, devel-

car and within five minutes he called and said,

oped the soda when working in a pizza restau-

I like it. Come see me.’

rant in Portland, Maine. The soda company that served the restaurant was bought by Pepsi.

That was a seminal meeting for Mark. During

Pepsi switched the formulation to high fructose

that meeting Rex pulled out a calculator and

corn syrup. Customers complained, Matt took

helped Mark figure out his wholesale and

notice and made a better root beer using fair

spurred him to get a distributor. Mark quick-

trade organic cane sugar. During that time,

ly figured out the logistics for getting the sodas

Mark was coming off some high-flying golden

from Maine to Texas. He and his wife Marianne

boy years in software sales. He bounced around

spent pretty much every weekend for months

for many years, doing sales for three software

handing out samples in Central Market.

companies enjoying each more than the last,

then Maine Root started taking off.

walker to the root beer mixer and keep it going.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

“ EVERY F OUR M INUT E S TH E RE ARE FIR E DRILLS . B U T IT’ S S T ILL REALLY FUN A N D W E ARE S T ILL S T EER IN G O U R O W N COUR S E. WE’VE GOT FA N TA S T IC C US TOM ER S AN D P L A N O N BEING AROUND F OR A S LO N G AS WE CAN P US H O U R W A L K E R TO T H E R OOT BEER MIXE R A N D KEEP IT GOING.” ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

nd

landing in Austin in 1996. Then 9/11 happened and sales stopped.

He credits those early sales calls in winter’s longest shortest days in Maine as pivotal … hearing

He was burned out. A long-time friend from

yes more than no. nd a subse uent New ork

college died suddenly driving to see Mark. His

City trade show

friend’s brother had died shortly before that. “I

a turning point. “The reaction to our brand on

took that as a sign. I was 38 and I thought, ‘Am

a worldwide stage was very affirmative and told

I going to be more or less desirable at the age of

us we were on the right track, Mark shared.

the ancy oods Show

as

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| JULY 2016

51


“ I would have loved to dress Georgia O’Keefe because she had such a wonderful relationship to her clothing. She had much of her stuff made and once she found a style she liked, she would stick to it. I think she would love the Everyday Dress.


CUT FROM A DIFFERENT C LOT H

Bennett’s Everyday

:::::::::

wardrobe staple. It’s purposefully minimalist and seasonless, and offers only one size per item.

M IR A N DA BE N N E TT STUD I O

Refreshingly, one si e really does seem to fit all well. I love that I can dress women of every age

ress may soon replace

ianne on urstenberg’s wrap dress as a timeless

and si e, the soft-spoken Bennett shared. I’ve literally had every demographic you can imagine. Miranda Bennett’s women’s clothing line story arc might go something like this: launch, grow,

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

grow some more. Stop, reinvent and start anew. Often when a company pauses and pivots, it’s because they are missing the mark with their market and need time to retool. But that wasn’t the case with the 32-year-old Bennett. Her New ork City-based line of clothing, launched after graduating from college in the Big Apple, had been growing steadily for seven years before she hit the pause button. Bennett put everything on hiatus to fulfill a longing to get her hands back in her business — literally — starting with developing natural dye techniques. Starting from a East

-s uare-foot studio in

ustin, she experimented with natural

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Bennett divulged that her director of production, the

-something rianna, okingly complained

dyes made from wood fibers to achieve signa-

that her mom keeps stealing her pieces to wear. “I always want things to be timeless and seasonless

ture colors no other designers could offer. She

putting the woman first and meld ing with a woman’s personal style, to be used in a lot of dif-

developed techniques to do patterning and

ferent ways, she explained.

evolved from exclusively using higher end silks and georgette fabrics to incorporating cotton

Reading between the seams, Bennett’s clothes are as much about freedom as they are looking good.

gauzes and denims. After a gestation period of

Wearing one of her dresses and getting a compliment from another woman, it’s given and received

six months, Bennett gave birth to the Everyday

with an unspoken solidarity

Dress, now her line’s perennial anchor style

fabrics that don’t allow your body to breathe. And still look like a boss. Maybe that’s why her line

that women can wear week round.

has such a loyal, expanding audience.

She relaunched by showcasing her new styles

for choosing yourself over being a slave to tight-fitting clothes or

ye vats, drying racks, cutting tables, rolls of fabric and swatches populate half of Bennett’s ,

-

at eli , an ustin event that makers have to be

s uare-foot studio workshop. Her dog’s paws click on the cement floors, trailing her from room to

invited to. Buyers from local fashion retailers

room on our tour. A soundtrack that’s a fusion of old standards and a reggae beat permeates the

Kick Pleat and Olive were early fans and Ben-

studio, filled with late morning sunlight. Her staff of seven is busy, filling orders from more than

nett was back in production. More trade shows and more orders followed in

. This time,

every stitch, dye batch, fabric cut and order

stores and a burgeoning online business. On a table is a sticky note that reads, Let’s not run out of fabric.

smiley face is drawn under it. With the growing demand for Miranda Bennett Studio

creations, running out of fabric could be a real possibility.

shipment was done in-house. tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

53


The Howler brothers named their clothing line after the vociferous Howler monkeys that provided the soundtrack for many of their Costa Rican surfing adventures. “Our clothing is designed for chasing all your passions,” Heard noted. “Not only the adventures, but the adventures getting to that surf spot — flat tires on the coast of Mexico, the oyster bar you discover on the way.” /////////////////////////////////////////////


HO WLER S UCC ESS :::::::::

C H A SE HE ARD H O W LE R BROTHE RS or the better part of two years, Chase Heard and Andy Stepanian spent weekends and nights heeding a call. Buddies from their days at the University of Virginia, they grew up surfing and fishing in the waters of lorida and ir-

ACL Fe st o rgan i zers appro ach ed H ow l er Brot h ers t o c reate so met h i n g spec i al fo r t h i s year ’s mu si c fest . W ithin a week , t h ey ramped u p a spec i al Yel l ow Ro se c ollect i o n i n c l u di n g a G au ch o sh i rt w i t h a yel l ow rose embro i dered o n i t . A rec en t ru n o f G au ch o sh i rt s featur i n g Po sei do n ri di n g t wo do l ph i n s qu i c kl y so l d out; J i mmy Ki mmel emai l ed H ow l er Brot h ers t o reque st t h e sh i rt w i t h pi zzas o n t h e yo kes.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

ginia before settling in Texas. They saw a gap in the sporting goods apparel market. Most of the

along with another college pal and partner, Mason Brent, based in Virginia, worked the business

brands stocked by stores reflected mountain

from their respective homes for two years. Their first boost came from an unexpected market fly

based sporting aesthetics, like ice climbing.

-fishing enthusiasts. The fly-fishing world has a younger undercurrent that has a more hip aes-

They smelled opportunity. “We felt like there

thetic and appreciates a little more humor and style, Heard said.

was a hole in the market to create a brand with a different aesthetic and voice, Heard recalled.

Soon the business grew to where working out of the house was an overbearing presence. “There

We wanted something with a little more flavor

was no escaping it, especially for my wife and kids, Heard said. The blessing and curse was that I

and style. We figured out how to make them a

could go to the garage at night and work. When their first employee came knocking on the garage

little more functional for the outdoors: breath-

door to the house to use the bathroom, asking, Is the baby sleeping

able fabric, stretch fabrics with vintage yokes.

make a leap. Heard left his job to full-time nurture the growing brand. They then “stumbled into

Something you can wear on the boat and then

wholesaling, he recounted. Shops came calling and they found themselves asking other successful

wear to the bar afterwards and feel totally com-

brands, like eti, How do you do this stuff

fortable.

really started ramping up. Trade shows, wholesale activity, social media, email marketing and col-

they reali ed it was time to

When they added a regional sales rep team, things

laborations with other brands like Smith Sunglasses have helped catapult their brand to a bigger They never intended to own a clothing com-

stage.

pany, holding full-time jobs as an architect Chase and a lawyer

ecember

Heard designs all the clothes himself, focusing on details like top-stitching, fabric colors, and what

, Howler Brothers launched before Christ-

ndy . But in

to embroider on the yoke of their best-selling item, the pearl-snapped Gaucho shirt. Stepanian, a

mas with a website shared with friends. “We

practicing attorney based in Houston, is the voice of the brand, developing copy for their website,

had spent the better part of two years figuring

marketing and promotional materials. Brent handles C O and wholesaler duties, and Rick Witten-

out the brand, sourcing a cut and sew program,

braker oined as a partner in

4, leading the brand’s marketing.

Heard recalled. “We were just thrilled to have a couple hundred dollars in sales. Our entire

Today, Howler Brothers wear is in more than

stock

come through the brand’s online store — something unique for a clothing company, Heard said.

pallets

was in my garage.

stores around the country, and

of their sales

They are finding a wide audience heeding the call, including Will errell. He’s been photographed It didn’t stay there long. Word of mouth spread

wearing gear in W Magazine and as he took in exhibits at

about this coastal brand with a little Texas and

guys wearing Howler stuff in high school and then up through

surf flavor mixed in. Heard and his wife, Helen,

are like me they aspire to be like their younger selves.

rt Basel in Miami Beach. There are , Heard shared.

lot of them

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56 JULY 2016 |

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Sometimes, even just sliding out of the office for a quick coffee can be enough to reset the mind and increase productivity. But if coffee is fuel for people creating businesses or inking books, what fuels the coffee makers? People, as it turns out. We chatted with a few coffee makers in three great Austin shops and heard about the pleasures of being the makers behind the makers. Over at Fleet Coffee, the small triangular coffee shop on East Austin’s Webberville Road, a couple sometimes opens a tab in the morning, then runs in and out throughout the day, ordering coffee. At the end of the day, they close out. They’re among the regulars at Fleet, where wooden boards comprise part of the ceiling and the walls are industrial concrete chic. The young and hip drop by in flip-flops or heels to grab a cup of coffee and possibly a breakfast taco. Why do people go to one coffee house and not another? The coffee is bound to be a big part of it: Fleet is a specialty shop; even the drip coffee is made to order, and their baristas think of coffee as an ingredient. leet co-founder Loren o Perkins is the real deal, a US Barista and Brewers Cup Champion. He loves to craft “an experience for people when they come into the space” and “gently guide them” through their mornings. Reading people is part of a good barista’s job. “At the end of the day, we make beautiful coffee for people. But the coffee is only a vehicle. … The real end goal is authentic, human interaction, Perkins said.

ccording to Perkins, about

percent of people coming to Fleet are taking a break from work, to get coffee and “soak up some sunshine.” To Fleet’s credit, the shop feels friendly, the chitchat easy and warm. Barista Chris Juare likes to make latte art that relates to something fun in the moment.” When he and the customer have “a little bit of time and patience,” the longtime Lola Savannah barista may make snowflakes in the winter, bunnies in the spring or jack o’ lanterns around Halloween. A customer who’s just come from Las egas may get a deck of cards.

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Customers at both Fleet Coffee and CaffĂŠ Medici enjoy an easy relationship with one another and the baristas.

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Lola Savannah Coffee Lounge in Westlake is attached to The Grove Wine Bar & Kitchen and features a ceiling covered in coffee bean sacks, terrific service and, at least on the day when we stopped by, some expensive cars in the parking lot. Joshua Baer of Capital Factory is an investor in Lola Savannah he and other tech entrepreneurs meet there.

The people are one reason Juarez loves his job. “I feel AS THOUGH I am one with the community here.”

But tech folks aren’t the only ones at Lola Savannah; parents with kids pop by and friends meet up. The people are one of the reasons

Barista Chris Juarez of Lola Savannah creates latte art to suit the season or mood.

Juare loves his ob. I don’t live in Westlake, he said, but I feel as though I am one with the community here.” Appreciating the people and community is a sentiment we heard from each of the baristas we visited. People are the favorite part of Caff Medici Coffee Director Tyler Cutbirth’s job. One of the things that I love most about coffee is the relationships that are built from coffee,” he said. Cutbirth has seen customers on blind dates and people interviewing for jobs, possibly key moments in lives.

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Cutbirth, for the record, doesn’t just want to see customers. He wants to provide excellent service and provide coffee the way they like it.

“I don’t care if you want three pumps of chocolate in your cup of coffee. If that makes your day,” vaclav said, “then I want to provide you with that.” Call it coffee without judgment.

The original Caff Medici on West Lynn in Clarksville has no open parking the day we visit; it’s hopping, and as the sun rises higher, the tables inside fill up, as do the shaded stone tables outside. A woman discusses owning work processes with a man in a striped polo and jeans. Some kids bike up with a parent. A woman carries a Strand canvas bag, likely from the famous bookstore in New York. “Maker” is a hot word these days, implying something artisanal or hand-crafted. But it’s also a great word; it calls attention to creating something. Perkins, Juare and Cutbirth all take making a cup of coffee very seriously – in chatting with them there were mentions of using math and weighing out coffee to get the cup right, as well as passion, professionalism and Michelangelo. But there was also always a discussion of community. Perhaps that’s something great baristas make, too.

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Caffé Medici’s Michael Vaclav at his 2nd and Congress location inside the Austonian.


Baristas at CaffĂŠ Medici (above left, bottom left) and Fleet (bottom right) understand that reading people is as much a part of the job as making the perfect cup of coffee.


HOW DO BARISTAS LET OFF STEAM? Photog raphs b y C helsea La i n e Fra n c i s By MP Mueller

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Thursday Night Latte Art ThrowDowns

Together, as it turns out. On the last Thursday of each month, ustin’s finest coffee shop makers gather for Thursday Night Throwdown, or TNT, a latte art competition that provides grounds for new friendships and bragging rights.


WATC H T H E T R I B E Z A V I D EO O F T H U R S DAY N I G H T T H R O W D O W N : A L AT T E A R T CO M P E T I T I O N , AT T R I B E Z A .CO M

TRIBEZA went out to a recent throwdown

giant golden monster composed of wood

gather in a room and get friendly. “The whole

in May

with a pitcher used for steaming milk on top.

idea is that collaboration is the new compe-

capture the sights and sounds in photos and

Winners get to take it back to their own coffee

tition, shares Perkins. While latte art may

a video documenting the event. If only there

ground ero and autograph it with uotes for

seem to be the focus of this, the real treasure

was smell-o-vision. Coffee and beer were

infamy. Smoke weed is immortali ed on it by

is that we are gathering in a room with people

poured the crowd of about

a winning barista from coffee shop Once Over.

who are passionate about coffee and good

this one held at Cuv e Coffee

to

was noisy.

things happen. We get to make better coffee,

By pm the competition bracket, written on a scrap piece of cardboard box, was filled and

Hosted by the Austin Coffee Society, the event

people get to drink better coffee, local busi-

baristas ponied up $5 for the entry fee.

moves to a different independent Austin coffee

nesses thrive and our community is support-

shop each month. There are more than

ed.” We’ll have a cup of what he’s having.

of

It’s winner take all in this udged competition

those in ustin now, estimates Loren o Per-

that’s been going for seven years now. But

kins, chair of the Society and co-owner of leet

the real pri e is the gilded trophy

Coffee. This competition is all about getting

dubbed

the McFalls Cup after a previous winner — a

baristas and coffee people from around town to tribeza.com

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S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

AUSTIN

CO-WORKING GUIDE

Impact Hub Austin

To the creative professionals of Austin, the term “office” holds a different meaning. Co-working spaces offer young companies and budding entrepreneurs a flexible and comfortable office environment where they can work and network together. With unique amenities from Wi-Fi to fully-stocked kitchens and weekly happy hours, this trend is now a staple in Austin’s booming creative community. I N T H I S S P E C I A L G U I D E , YO U ’ L L L E A R N A B O U T T H E VA R I E T Y O F T H E S E C O M M U N A L OFFICES, THEIR UNIQUE VIBES AND SPECIAL OFFERINGS.

64

JULY 2016 | tribeza.com


D OW N TOW N

Galvanize 1 1 8 N U E C E S S T. G A LVA N I Z E.CO M /A U S T I N (512) 717 5244

Galvanize is a dynamic learning community for technology with seven urban campuses across US, including Austin, Denver, San Francisco and Seattle. More than just a coworking space, Galvanize offers a unique combination of education, workspace and networking. The company’s mission is to make opportunities in technology more accessible. Galvanize

brings

students,

start-ups

and

A H O M E B A S E [ FO R ] S TA R TU P S A N D E S TA B L I S H E D C O M PA N I E S B U I L D I N G T E C H E N A B L E D I N N O VAT I O N S . large companies together in one community. Campuses also serve as home-base to startups and established companies building techenabled innovations. Galvanize offers seats, desks and private suites to tech start-ups and entrepreneurs. Members also get access to a curated program of networking events, workshops and mentorship.


S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

BRENTWOOD

Link Flex 2 3 0 1 W. A N D E R S O N L N . L I N K F L E X S PAC E .CO M (737) 529 6828

Link Flex is a new luxury offering with highend, month-to-month office space available in North Central Austin from the operator of Link Coworking, whose modern, efficient coworking environment has set a high standard for

collaborative

spaces

in

Austin.

Link

Flex offers co-working in f lexible terms, f lexible sizes and f lexible pricing for your busy life. You can now book fully furnished

[ T H I S ] MO D E R N, E F F I C I E N T C O -W O R K I N G E N V I R O N M E N T H A S S E T A H I G H S TA N D A R D F O R C O L L A B O R AT I V E S PA C E S I N A U S T I N . (with electronic sit/stand desks) premium office space. Meeting rooms, mail services and recurring events are options available for members only. Link Flex is wired with fiber

for

supercharged

productivity

and

memberships offer flexible, month-to-month rental agreements. They’re officially opening this July, when you can check out more at the grand opening celebration on the 14 th .

P


ICON KEY P

Impact Hub Austin at Vuka 4 1 1 W. M O N R O E S T.

( 5 1 2 ) 76 1 3 8 4 2 | I M PAC T H U B A U S T I N .CO M

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KITCHEN

TechSpace Austin

PET FRIENDLY

9 8 S A N J A C I N TO B LV D. , S T E . 1 0 0 & 4 0 0 ( 5 1 2 ) 6 6 4 2 0 0 0 | T EC H S PAC E.CO M

ustin is a global co-working community

TechSpace Austin occupies 28,000 square feet of beauti-

that offers shared workspace, events and programming,

fully designed flexible work space on the first and fourth

connecting ustinites to a movement for good at over

floors of one of ustin’s premier downtown locations, the

locations worldwide, including three in ustin at Monroe,

San Jacinto Center. The first floor houses TechSpace’s

North Lamar and St. Elmo . The community is connected

co-working and event space, featuring

by the shared goal of using business and entrepreneurship

with wall-to-wall windows, conference rooms, commu-

as a tool to drive positive change. or-profit, social-profit

nity lounge areas, full kitchen, fitness center and a Wi- i

and nonprofit companies, organi ations, entrepreneurs,

enabled outdoor deck. The fourth floor delivers

activists and creative professionals are all welcome to oin

s uare feet of modern, collaborative private office suites

ustin’s next generation of purpose-driven enterprises.

P

$

bringing

-foot ceilings

,

ustin supercharged, best-in-class private

spaces for entrepreneurs, startups and small to mid-si e businesses.

$

Perch CoWorking 2 2 3 5 E . 6 T H S T. , S T E . 1 0 7

( 5 1 2 ) 7 7 9 3 0 4 6 | P E R C H CO WO R K A U S T I N .CO M

Perch is a laid-back, friendly neighborhood co-working community in East

ustin. Monthly memberships and

dedicated desks are available. Members en oy a central, vibrant locale on East Sixth, plenty of natural light, a ro-

Urban Co-Lab

tating selection of local art, a conference room, 4- access

1 8 1 8 E . 1 2 T H S T.

and a mellow, productive work environment.

( 5 1 2 ) 6 4 0 9 6 0 5 | U R B A N CO - L A B.CO M

rban Co-Lab aspires to build community for people who are looking to create scalable impact. Missioned by the belief that innovation can stem from anywhere and committed to fostering collaboration within our local community, rban Co-Lab is creating space for diversity in entrepreneurship and beyond.

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$

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FREE PARKING

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DROP-IN RATES OUTDOOR SPACE


ICON KEY P

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TechShop Austin-Round Rock

Industrious

1 2 0 S U N DA N C E P K W Y. , S T E . 3 5 0

2 0 1 W. 5 T H S T.

( 5 1 2 ) 9 0 0 4 6 6 4 | T EC H S H O P.CO M

( 9 2 9 ) 2 8 3 6 7 8 0 | I N D U S T R I O U S O F F I C E .CO M

TechShop is a vibrant community of creative talent and

Industrious is redefining the co-working experience by

home to entrepreneurs, makers, artists, fabricators and

putting hospitality first. With private glass offices and

more. With access to over

million worth of professional

beautiful common areas, you’ll discover an energy you

e uipment, software, huge pro ect areas, large worktables

can’t find in the home office, a professionalism that’s miss-

and private conference rooms, TechShop provides space to

ing at the coffee shop and an attention to detail that makes

work, and community support. Plus free coffee and pop-

you proud and excited to come to work every day. In addi-

corn!

tion to standard amenities, Industrious offers conference

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rooms, complimentary snacks and beverages, built-in networking events and a national network of offices for its members.

Createscape 7 0 1 T I L L E R Y S T.

( 5 1 2 ) 76 1 5 8 4 7 | C R E AT E S C A P E W O R K .CO

Createscape Coworking is in East where

their ideas or creative pro ects. This space is perfect for

Capital Factory

working on collaborative works and an ideal way to meet

7 0 1 B R A ZO S S T. , S T E . 1 6 0 0

local creatives to help inspire.

( 5 1 2 ) L I V W O R K | C A P I TA L FAC TO RY.CO M

In the heart of

ustin and is a place

ustin professionals and creatives can work on

owntown ustin, more than

,

en-

trepreneurs, programmers and designers will gather this year for meetups, classes, co-working and more at Capital actory. The tech meetups and hackathons hosted at Capital actory create a talent pipeline that touches almost every programmer and designer in

ustin. This allows

the entrepreneurs gathering here to surround themselves with both the talent they need to build the perfect team and angel investors who provide the means to pursue their dreams.

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S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

Austin Fashion & Design Co-op 1 2 0 0 E . 1 1 T H S T. , S T E . 1 0 4

( 5 1 2 ) 7 7 9 3 0 4 6 | AT X F D C .CO M

C is a community of independent fashion and home goods designers coming together in a shared ustin studio and retail space. Members have 4- access to their dedicated work table in an open studio space. Members may market their brands in

C’s curated retail store and

by throwing trunk shows, pop-up shops and sponsored events. If you are a designer looking for the ideal space to start or develop pro ects, display your brand in a retail setting and be part of a design merchandising incubator,

Fibercove

1 7 0 0 S . L A M A R B LV D. , S T E . 3 3 8 ( 5 1 2 ) 5 9 6 2 6 8 3 | F I B E R CO V E.CO M

ibercove is a co-working, meeting and event space locat-

check it out.

ed on South Lamar. We provide a full service co-working

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experience focused on productivity and connectivity for professionals. With fiber internet, a stocked kitchen, free parking, standing desks and private meeting rooms, minimi e your workday friction so you can get working.

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Orange Coworking

2 1 1 0 W. S L A U G H T E R L N .

( 5 1 2 ) 76 1 5 8 4 7 | O R A N G ECO WO R K I N G .CO M / E N

Orange Coworking in South ustin stands out from other

WeWork

collectives, which normally have an urban or tech focus.

( 8 5 5 ) 5 W E WO R K | W E WO R K .CO M

preneurs and freelancers from all industries and all walks

Orange Coworking stands out because of its mix of entre-

3300 N. I-35

WeWork provides beautiful workspace, an inspiring community and meaningful business services to tens of thousands of members around the world. WeWork

ni-

versity Park offers views like nowhere else in ustin. With floor-to-ceiling windows, you can en oy views of the niversity of Texas stadium and tower, the rolling hills and the beautiful State Capitol Building. WeWork

niversity

Park members also have access to free parking and a fitness center.

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$

of life working together every day.

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Photographs by Jessica Attie By Becky Bullard


On a recent visit to my in-laws’ home, I found my mother-in-law in the backyard, standing alone, silently surveying her vegetable garden. “Plotting against the squirrels?” I asked, knowing they’d wreaked havoc on her radishes. She looked a bit sheepish and said, ”No…You know how sometimes

Above: Exploring 3-D printing at TechShop. Below: A sample from a leather-working class at Canoe.

you can’t help staring at Ruby [my 2-year-old daughter], totally overwhelmed and in awe of how wonderful she is? Well, that’s kind of how I feel about my garden.” ........

I immediately knew what she was talking about. Anyone who’s ever made something probably knows that feeling — that sense of pride and affection for this thing you’ve created with your own two hands. I remember coming home after class at the Stitch Lab on South

irst Street with my first-ever sewing pro ect

a

pillowcase. All I’d done was sew four straight lines; I think I even had to rip out and re-do one of the lines a couple times. But I brought that pillow home and laid it gingerly on the couch like it was a newborn. I stepped back to admire it for a minute, then proceeded to pat it, fluff it, run a finger along the stitches. When I finally pulled myself away, I couldn’t help but peek back around the doorframe at it one last time before leaving the room. I might have even sighed audibly. Six years and two couches later, that funny little throw pillow is still on display.

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........ Why do we get such visceral satisfaction from creating something, whether it’s a garden, a pillowcase, a line of code, or something as purely aesthetic as a drawing or a piece of jewelry? In much the same way that our bodies are wired to enjoy creating new humans, our brains are designed to enjoy creating new things.

Dr. Cathy Malchiodi writes in Psychology Today, “The capacity to find joy in creativity through the pleasure of invention and exploration … is based in evolutionary biology, to ensure the survival of individuals and communities through innovation.” ........

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We en oy attempting new feats, learning new skills and creating things that never existed before because it’s how we remain adaptable as humans. Our changing world requires new approaches, new perspectives, new innovations. Making things, even things that may seem completely trivial, is part of what helps us evolve. In Austin, it sometimes feels that creativity is in the drinking water, or at least in the Topo Chico. In 2015, Forbes named ustin

merica’s fourth most creative city, ust behind San

rancisco, Boston and Nashville, and ust ahead of New York. Has Austin become a mecca for makers because our city is evolving so rapidly, or is our city changing at lightning speed because of its electrified, creative citi enry It’s a bit of a backyard chicken-and-egg uestion. ou don’t need to be a capital on the East

rtist with an official stop

ustin Studio Tour to experience the oy and

satisfaction that comes with creating. In her recent guide to creativity, Big Magic, writer Eli abeth

ilbert defines

creative living as “any life that is driven more strongly by curiosity than by fear.” Have you convinced yourself you’re not the creative type, for whatever reason If so, you’re missing out. We’re so much happier when we stop making excuses and start making stuff, even if it might not be considered “good” or “important.” Not only is making stuff inherently en oyable, it can also be contagious. That may be why so many Austin makers are creating opportunities for others to learn their craft. From sword making to beekeeping to cake baking and code writing, there’s never been a better time to explore your curiosity, learn something new and experience the elation of creation.

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Not only is making stuff inherently enjoyable, it can also be contagious. That may be why so many Austin makers are creating opportunities for others to learn their craft. From sword making to beekeeping to cake baking and code writing, there’s never been a better time to explore your curiosity, learn something new and experience the elation of creation.

Here are a host of opportunities to set your inner maker free: AUSTIN BOOK ARTS CENTER

AUSTIN LEARNSHOP

CANOE

In an increasingly digital world, the

Austin Learnshop seeks to provide

At Canoe, Natalie Davis puts a

ustin Book rts Center is fighting

opportunities for more people to take

modern spin on an old-school

to keep book from becoming a four-

part in Austin’s creative community.

material

letter word. Kindle your appreciation

Past learnshops, taught by some of

her deep knowledge of leathercraft

for paper through bookbinding,

the city’s most renowned creators, have

in leather tooling classes at her

typesetting and letterpress printing

included everything from “Intro to

studio, where students can learn

classes designed for bibliophiles of

Woodworking” with BDJ Craft Works

how to stamp, dye and finish leather.

all ages.

to weaving, brush lettering and

atxbookarts.org

........ AUSTIN HOMEBREW SUPPLY Amidst the current craft beer explosion, many discerning drinkers are choosing a brew-it-yourself approach. Austin Homebrew Supply offers aspiring brewers all the necessary equipment and ingredients, as well as a monthly “Introduction to Homebrewing Class” complete with live demonstration. austinhomebrew.com

74 JULY 2016 |

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even coding. austinlearnshop.com

........ AUSTIN TINKERING SCHOOL Here, kids create using real tools — casting a sword with molten metal or using a drill press to build a life-si e, functional boat. Adults can reclaim their own childhood with a choice of four unique private parties — Nerdy Derby, Toy Boat Regatta, Marshmallow Shooters or Shop Class 101. austintinkeringschool.com

leather. She en oys sharing

canoegoods.com

........ CRAFT mix of

I tool-and-supply

library, maker space and workshop center, CRAFT’s motto is “We hoard so you don’t have to.” Workshops run the gamut from “Build Your Own Succulent Sanctuary to HandMilled Soap Making” and “Intro to Screenprinting.” madeatcraft.com


CREATIVE SIDE JEWELRY ACADEMY OF AUSTIN or over

years, ewelry maker

THE ART SCHOOL AT LAGUNA GLORIA

STITCH LAB Whether you’re a lifelong crafter or

For over 50 years, The Art School

a sew-phobic newbie, this charming

Courtney ray has offered courses

has offered an astounding array

studio and its disarming instructors

in a wide array of techniques for

of classes for children and adults

will put you at ease. Learn everything

students of all skill levels. One of

at the stunning Laguna loria on

from sewing-machine basics to

her most popular classes is “Forged

Lake Austin. Opportunities for

advanced garment design, plus stamp

Together,” where couples can work

artistic exploration range from the

carving, fabric dyeing, crochet and

with a Master

prehistoric—stone carving—to the

more. Discover a host of unique

ultra-modern iPhoneography and

fabrics and vintage crafting supplies

everything in between.

in their shop.

theartschool.amoa.org

stitchlab.biz

........

........

WILDERNESS SCHOOL

MAKE IT SWEET

SUSTAINABLE FOOD CENTER

Twenty minutes outside of Austin,

The largest cake supply store in

The SFC’s food gardening classes

the Earth Native Wilderness School

Central Texas, Make It Sweet carries

are held in the fall and spring

sits on 25 wooded acres teeming

everything you need to perfect your

planting seasons and are tailored

with native flora and fauna. Their

confections. Their classes fill up

specifically to ustin-area gardeners,

summer camp-meets-Survivor

quickly and range from the classic

covering everything from raised bed

curriculum covers everything from

(pie baking, tiered cakes) to the

construction to pest management.

basket weaving and plant medicine

deliciously whimsical (cakes that

The paid classes at this local non-

to overnight shelter making and

look like tacos or tiny animals

profit allow them to offer free

bow building.

made from modeling chocolate).

classes at Austin schools, rec centers,

earthnativeschool.com

allinonebakeshop.com

........

........

GENERAL ASSEMBLY With learning opportunities ranging

ROUND ROCK HONEY BEEKEEPING SCHOOL

from

This three-hour course teaches the

This expansive DIY workshop and

eneral ssembly

bee-curious everything they need

fabrication studio is a maker’s

seeks to transform thinkers into

to know about starting their own

ultimate playground, offering access

creators, filling knowledge gaps in

apiary. Students will learn all about

to laser cutters, -

technology, data and design. Learn

sustainable beekeeping and honey

woodshop, welding stations, and

User Experience Design, JavaScript

production practices before suiting

much more. Members can reserve

Development, Visual Web Design and

up and interacting with one of Round

and use TechShop tools, but anyone

many more tech-forward skills from

Rock Honey’s hives.

can take classes ranging from -

roundrockhoney.com

modeling to soldering to garden bench

oldsmith to create

one-of-a-kind wedding rings. creativeside.org

........ EARTH NATIVE

-minute workshops to full-

time courses,

some of the best in town. generalassemb.ly/austin

and shelters. sustainablefoodcenter.org

........ TECHSHOP

printers, a

construction. techshop.ws/austin_round_rock.html tribeza.com

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WHE N CR AFTS TA K E OV E R By Anne Bruno Photographs by Holly Cowart

It starts off as a hobby, a small charm fashioned out of metal, making homebrew or a baby onesie. But then it morphs and like the mutant moth that ate Toledo; books, furniture, appliances – even family members – are rearranged to feed the creative urge. For this Makers Issue, TRIBEZA visited two crafters whose “hobbies” have clearly taken over. While no two crafters are alike, these share one thing – the invisible thought bubble that pops up over their heads and says, “How did this happen?”

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In tr ic a t e d e ta il s in Ja c k ie S t e n c e ' s m e t a l ro b ots a n d " c a tb ots " gi ve eac h o n e a d is t in c t p e r s ona l i t y.

A photographer by profession, Jackie Stence's crafting life began as a

Lately, those concoctions are beautifully imaginative little magnetic

child working on her mother's miniature silver and black 1920s Singer

robots or “catbots” full of personality made of stamped, oxidized brass

sewing machine, which now sits on Stence's dining room table. “I made

and copper. They're adorned with colorful anodized aluminum wire,

so many doll clothes on this when I was little,” she says. “Mostly for my

pieces of discarded electronics or anything Stence may come across

troll dolls. Remember those things with the crazy hair? I bet I can still

to please her discriminating eye.

tell you all their names.” “Ten years ago, as a way to keep an eye on what my son was watching,

78

Judging by the number of cigar boxes, plastic containers and all manner

I started making earrings here in what used to be our office T room,

of storage compartments for beads, wire, sheet metal fragments, old

says Stence. One thing led to another, the T moved out and Stence s

washers, hydrogen peroxide, vinegar and various varieties of salt,

computer was soon oined by new tools including, among other

Stence s memory has to be good in order to find ust the right piece of

things, a cartoon-look-alike anvil that practically screams ACME, a

special something needed at ust the right moment to complete what

bench grinder, an industrial metal die cutter, 20-pound hammers, an

she calls “my concoctions.”

embosser and typography stamps in fonts ranging from miniscule to

JULY 2016 | tribeza.com


extra large. And then there's an oddly realistic rubber purse in the shape of a chicken — complete with golden beak, red comb and wattle — who goes by the name of Henrianne. Stence creates these earrings and ’bots, she says, because she can't not create. The opinions of those who buy her Screen Door Jewelry Concoctions online or in stores matter to Stence, but not nearly as much as her own.

A short drive from Stence's home studio, the vibe at Shannon Kors' creative space is completely different. The first thing you notice upon entering her cozy apartment is a wall-sized vintage map of Paris, setting the tone for the carefully curated style throughout her home and a fondness for all things French. Then you turn the corner. “‘Shannon, OMG, that's a ton of fabric!’ is what I usually get when friends come over,” says Kors. “Yeah, I know ... I really can't help it. I guess I'm addicted to fabric.” Shanno n Ko rs

ors produces concert videos in her day ob. In her free time, she uses her self-taught sewing skills to create more-sophisticated-thansaccharine baby and toddler clothes and accoutrements.

started sim ply eno ug h, with this surf-them ed o nesie.

“People are usually surprised I don't have kids. By coincidence, I live next door to a day care center, so right out the window behind

In the last four years, her bedroom dresser, as well as a country French

my sewing machine, there's always inspiration. Actually, at times

chest that her T sits on, have surrendered themselves to every imag-

it does get a little noisy,” Kors says.

inable color and pattern of fabric, both new and vintage. I used to ust have big bins all over the place, so now with the wall of shelving, plus

ourteen years ago, ors took up surfing, about the same time her sister

the furniture, it s a lot more efficient.

had her first child. To ensure her niece s newborn wardrobe was absolutely complete, she went in search of a surf-themed onesie and came up empty. That s when I thought, I ll ust make it myself.” As is the case

According to Kors, the most exciting outcome of the business occurs when she encounters a baby sporting something she s made. I ust love

with so many crafters who've made that fateful statement, Kors says

it,” Kors says. “I can't help myself from going over and saying ‘Hey, I

she had no idea it would lead her here or that she'd be selling at local

made that!’”

retailers or online at Etsy.

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Life + Life + STYLE STYLE H O W W E L I V E R I G H T N OW

H O W W E L I V E R I G H T N OW

Inside the newly opened Bricolage Curated Florals studio on East Sixth Street. PHOTOGRAPH BY CHELSEA LAINE FRANCIS

Eye Joy, a new way to see Austin. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEAH MUSE

ST YLE PROFILE

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T H I N K S PAC E

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ST YLE PICK

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PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

Sylvia OROZ CO T H E A R T I S T A N D FOU N DE R OF AUS T I N ’ S M E X IC-A R T E M USE U M G I V E S US A PE E K I NSI DE H E R E CL E C T IC , A R T-F I L L E D HOM E .

by Mimi Faucett Photographs by Jessica Pages

SYLVIA OROZCO HAS A WAY with a canvas.

The Executive Director of Austin’s Mexic-Arte Museum is also an artist. She creates thoughtprovoking work that spans artistic categories from her modest apartment near Tarrytown. While her day job involves scouting Latino and Chicano artists and collections — and doing “a little bit of everything” at the museum — her home is where she explores her own craft. “I like to have my art here,” explains Orozco. “At the museum we show other artists’ work, and here, I get to see my own.” Walking into her home it’s hard to know where to look first

framed paintings cover the walls,

3D studies lay on the counter and every surface is laden with found trinkets and artisan wares. A space with this amount of handcrafted pieces could easily feel overwhelming or crowded, but not here. Orozco’s elevated sense of style and trained eye has created a home that feels every bit as curated as a museum. In the living room you are greeted by a geometric painting on her easel, still wet from a morning’s work. “I’m very into the Golden Section lately,” explains Orozco, referring to the numerous geometric paintings around her apartment that embody

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CO N T I N U ED O N PAG E 8 4


Katy’s Living Room Addition, 78704

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PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

the compositional strategy. It’s obvious she is a perpetual student of her craft. A walk around the room reveals more geometric studies, a painted series of portraits of famous Mexican artists, haunting portrayals of the Bastrop fire and the

flood in Cuero, Texas, and a scenic

depiction of the Davis Mountains. A sculptural object she picked up at the East Austin Studio Tour sits on the coffee table alongside folk art sculptures, or alebrijes, from Oaxaca, and traditional Mexican pottery. The gallery-style interiors continue through the kitchen and into the unit’s two bedrooms. Here you’ll find a series of self portraits, a study of women in water and photographs of the artist’s late mother. Orozco credits her mother for her own penchant for organizing. Cuero, Orozco’s hometown, is often her artistic muse. She moved to Austin to study painting at the University of Texas, and continued her education in Mexico City earning a Master of Fine Arts in mural painting. It was there that she began an art school teaching oil painting and color theory, and amassed a collection of books and articles on the subject. fter five years, she came back to

ustin with

the idea to “start some sort of art gallery or art center” for Mexican artists — something that didn’t exist in the area. In 1984, she and two other artists incorporated the Mexic-Arte Museum. Today, the museum is one of only a handful of museums in the United States dedicated to Latino art — compared to the nearly 150 in Mexico City alone. Orozco’s personal aesthetic is a clear reflection of the life she’s built for herself, most notably in her collected home. “I believe if you like something, just keep doing it,” she smiled. And we certainly hope she does.

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Art adorns every inch of Orozco’s two-bedroom apartment. Each piece carries a different story that feels as fresh to the artist as the wet paint on her easel.


www.eswealth.com | 512.250.2277 Jenny Fleming, CPA

Sara Seely, CFA

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Soul is IMPORTANT Here JOSH UA BI NG A M A N OF H E L M B O OT S

by MP Mueller | Photographs by Hayden Spears THIS STORY STARTED AS A LOOK inside a Maker’s office a look at the space where they create, and what kinds of things inspire them. But when we met with Joshua Bingaman, the founder of Helm Boots, we discovered his office is kind of an un-office. His desk looks like two supersi ed metal T trays on wheels. It’s fitting, really, for this energetic, expressive and unassuming leader who is always in motion. His hands and body language

rival his words in communication — shoulder shrugs, furrowed eyebrows, hands in his jeans pockets and alternatively pushing back his hair. Bingaman perches in different places around his open office warehouse space in East ustin to work, and often walks down to neighbor Revival Cycles and conducts business from one of the motorcycle shop’s bays. A serial entrepreneur (shoe store in San CO N T I N U ED O N PAG E 8 8

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T H I N K S PAC E | L I F E + S T Y L E

Family photos over his desk: wife Sarah, a therapist; Samuel, 8; Ruth, 6 and Josephine, 3. B & W pictures: his grandmother Marion Bingaman and grandfather John Bingaman.

Twice a week, Bingaman writes inspirational quotes on this board and then emails the staff and they talk about them. Every season the insoles of each boot are embossed with a quote, too. “We don’t promote that we put the quotes in there, but it’s the small surprising details that give people pleasure,” Bingaman says.


You know you are a FOJ (friend of Joshua) when there’s a Helm Boot named after you.

All Helm Boots have signature elements of white midsoles and leather soles.

Francisco, successful coffee shop) Bingaman somewhat tripped into the shoe business. While visiting an aunt in Istanbul — who knew a guy, who knew a guy — Bingaman had seven styles of boots fabricated in a shoe factory there. Minimums were 100 pairs, so he ordered 100 pairs of each style, put them on his credit card and shipped them back to Austin. After the launch party at his then coffee shop, Progress Coffee, local men’s shop Stag picked them up, followed by other boutiques. Nordstrom now carries his boots and Helm is launching their line on Zappos soon. Helm has one store in Austin, with another planned, along with an expansion to Houston. After the initial launch, Bingaman soon brought manufacturing to the US and today, Helm is

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one of the few American shoe companies whose products are still made in America. Bingaman is passionate about supporting American manufacturers and their employees. And he’s passionate about caring for his own. “We are not a heritage brand, but this is based on people. The three Ps of Helm are people, product, profit. If people are on board and taken care of, the product will be there. If the product’s taken care of, the profit comes, Bingaman says. Names mean a lot here. You know you are a FOJ (friend of Joshua) when there’s a Helm Boot named after you. Bingaman’s company was named after a close lifelong friend, Dave Helm. (Bingaman named his son after him, too). “He used to be in the Peace Corps, ex-hippie, traveled through Guatemala, Honduras, building water wells and rebuilding houses post-hurricanes,” Bingaman says of his friend. “Watching his altruism and work ethic growing up was a large part of me wanting to name my son and business after him.” The Samuel, (for his son), Emi (Hebrew for “grandmother,” which his three kids call his mother), Tante, Poppy, Ernest (“a really rad ¾ monkstrap style boot” named after his dad, an ambulance driver and Cadillac dealer in Altus, OK), the Alan, Stefan, etc. The list goes on and boots on pavement now carry the names of parents of people who work at Helm, friends Bingaman grew up with and local business owners.


T H I N K S PAC E | L I F E + S T Y L E Autographed picture of Michael Jordan. “Got my first pair of Air Jordans in the late 80s. Packaging, smell of the shoe, design … I looked down and these shoes made me so cool and comfortable.”

Bingaman reads all the time — The New Yorker cover to cover, fiction, poetry (he minored in poetry in college), and business books. Current reads? “Nike’s Phil Knight’s memoir and The Hard Things About Hard Things, a business book by Ben Horowitz.”

Journal for sketching and notes.

Headphones. Soundtracks fuel his day, The Knick, Black Swan and The Assassination of Jesse James, plus the new Radiohead song, “Daydreaming.”

Current poetry read. Today’s coffee remains.

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STYLE PICK | LIFE + STYLE THE DAY DR. CATHERINE PARK signed the lease

to the building for her business, EyeJoy, she gave birth to her son. Looking back, she felt like she gave birth to both. EyeJoy first opened in inside the HEB at Red River and 41st Streets, but Park had a vision for a space she could make her own. It took her three years of scouting before she found the perfect property for her business on North Lamar. The remodeled building reflects Park’s vision for an optometry office and eyewear retail store that is both practical and aesthetically pleasing. “I came in on a rainy day to look at the building

Eye JOY

before we remodeled anything and it looked like it

MODE R N A E S T H E T IC S R E V E A L A N E Y E FOR H IG H S T Y L E

humble beginnings of this space that now looks

was crying,” Park noted. Glancing around EyeJoy, it might be hard for customers to imagine the like it stepped out from the pages of a high-end interior design magazine. EyeJoy's aesthetic, which Park describes as “fresh, modern but approachable,” is apparent

by Nashwa Bawab

when customers see the unique mural — designed

Photographs by Leah Muse

by Park — on the side of EyeJoy. Walk inside and you are greeted by modern furniture and art by K&A, Eames and Sean Patrick Daigle. Austinite Kim Lewis did the interior design. Noted Park, “I didn’t want the typical stark medical decor or your typical high-end department store environment either.” Park selects all the eyewear brands and frame collections for sale at EyeJoy, including fashion forward eyewear brands like Shamballa and Matsuda. “We have a variety of customers so it’s really important to me that we cater to all types of people.” Throughout EyeJoy, the “fresh, modern but approachable” look is evident. It gives another, more stylish definition to vision, a somewhat rare sight in optometry shops. Dr. Catherine Park's vision for EyeJoy was to make an aesthetically pleasing space that was comfortable enough to be like home.

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5 2 0 9 N . L A M A R B LV D . (512) 459 5700 E Y E J OY T E X A S . C O M


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Food +

THOUGHT A G LO B A L PERSPECTIVE ON OUR LO C A L D I N I N G S C E N E The Sampler at Karen's July dining pick, Pieous. PHOTOGRAPH BY HAYDEN SPEARS

K AREN'S PICK

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D I N N E R CO N V E R S AT I O N

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DINING GUIDE

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The Rocket pizza with prosciutto and arugula, a crowd favorite at Pieous.

In addition to their cooking skills, Josh and Paige personally remodeled the building.

Josh oversees the pizza and pastrami, while Paige is in charge of salads and dessert. Almost everything is made from scratch. The pizza is some of the best in Austin and authentically Neapolitan — with the papers to prove it. Pieous is a member of AVPN, the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana, an Italian designation given to pizzerias that meet strict Neapolitan requirements. Its delicious dough is made from a sourdough starter created by Josh decades

Pieous

ago. Like any true Neapolitan pie, it has a thin bottom with a pillowy, chewy, charred crust

R E V ISI T I NG NA PL E S A N D N E W YOR K BY WAY OF H IG H WAY 2 9 0

that bakes in less than 90 seconds. Pieous

offers

classics

like

Margherita,

Pepperoni and Marinara, but the quality of each pie takes them beyond ordinary with

by Karen Spezia | Photographs by Hayden Spears

ingredients like fresh mozzarella made inhouse daily. It also gleefully steers away from the traditional with offerings like the House

SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY IS HAPPENING on the outskirts of Austin. A funky little

restaurant is cornering the market on two disparate food groups: Neapolitan pizza and pastrami. That’s pretty much all Pieous offers, but they’re so delicious that other options seem superfluous. strange combo, you say? Tell that to the hordes who trek to Pieous daily, patiently queuing up for pizza that rivals Naples’ and pastrami that competes with New York’s. Pieous is the brainchild of Josh and Paige Kaner, two foodies who ditched California and their corporate obs to open Pieous in

in an old BB

oint near

ripping Springs. Why pi a and

pastrami? Well, Josh is a long-time pizza junkie who’s been dabbling in pies for decades. As for the pastrami, the Kaners hated to waste the smoker abandoned by the previous owner, so rather than offer the ubiquitous brisket, they chose pastrami. A perfect pairing was born.

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on Fire with Calabrian peppers, sopressata, spicy onions and crushed chili; and the Bacon Bleu with bacon marmalade, bleu cheese and arugula. Tender, moist and flavorful, Pieous offers pastrami in various forms, including a milehigh sandwich served on homemade sourdough bread. I also love the Pieous Plate, a generous platter of sliced pastrami, pickles, marinated onions, mustard and sourdough bread.


K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

Josh & Paige Kaner; their children Daisy, 8; Casper, 6 & Tosh, 3. Pieous also has a bakeshop serving coffee, pastries and other baked goods.

Although pizza and pastrami are Pieous’ calling cards, don’t overlook its starters and desserts. The Pieous Sampler is a delightful antipasto platter and the Caesar salad is classic perfection. Paige is a talented baker and makes all the tempting desserts. Her blueberry pie bursts with fresh fruit and her outstanding cheesecake is dense and creamy. Other sweets include tiramisu, brownies and giant cookies. Additionally, homemade pastries, coffee and tea are sold next door at Pieous’ mini-bakery, Pie-é-tea. In addition to their cooking skills, Josh and Paige personally remodeled the building, leaving the exterior purposefully rustic, while updating the interior with a cavernous woodburning oven surrounded by a sleek marble bar. Concrete floors and wooden tables are surrounded by chalkboard walls scrawled with clever sayings. A nod to the Kaners’ three children, who are frequently seen scampering around the restaurant, one corner is devoted exclusively to kids, who can create their own chalkboard designs. Pizza and pastrami may seem like an unlikely pair, but just like Josh and Paige Kaner, they’re a match made in heaven.

12005 U. S. 290 W EST (512) 394 70 41 FAC E BOO K .COM/PI EO U S

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Russell Gold is an author, journalist and energy fellow at the University of Texas. Laura Gold is a clinical social worker and Prevention Services program manager for Austin Travis County Integral Care. They have two sons, Isaiah and Joaquin HernandezGold, and a dog, Frida.

T H IS MON T H ' S

Dinner

CONVERSATION H A PPE NS I N T H E G OL D FA M I LY ' S DI N I NG NO OK , W H E R E A SI M PL E CH A L K B OA R D TA K E S A PL ACE OF PROM I N E NCE A N D DR I V E S CON V E R S AT ION .

MY WIFE AND I GREW UP AROUND very different dinner tables. There were religious,

geographic and cultural differences. But that’s not what I’m talking about. She grew up with the television on during dinner. Paul Lynde on Hollywood Squares followed Walter Cronkite while food was on the table. For me, the food was served with a heaping portion of serious conversation in the dining room, around a large table. My parents would talk about their days at work. No topic was off limits, from apartheid to Ronald Reagan. When my wife and I started our family and our family dinners, we did what came

by Russell Gold Photograph by Annie Ray

naturally. We mixed and merged. We created our own traditions. Our dinner table is right next to the kitchen, an informal breakfast nook small enough that our sons can kick each other under the table. And do they ever. Some days, dinner takes on the feel of a subterranean kickboxing match.

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D I N N E R C O N V E R S AT I O N | F O O D + T H O U G H T

The biggest rule of dinner is to shut off all

The chalkboard.

The

response

is

often

grunted

and

electronic distractions. That means my evening

Divided into seven horizontal sections, one

news on the radio, all phones — and the

for each day of the week, it contains all critical

“What did you do at school today?”

television. However, some rules are meant to be

information about the comings and goings

This is met with shrugs, more grunts

broken. Exceptions are made for certain games:

of every family member. It is part collective

and polysyllabic responses that are no more

the twice-a-year Cowboys-Eagles showdown, a

memory. It is part split-flap train station

satisfying than the monosyllabic ones. “I don’t

meaningful Spurs playoff contest or when the

display.

remember.”

monosyllabic.

US or Mexican national soccer team is playing.

Today it looks, thankfully, kind of empty. It

Some days call for that particular form

Dinner conversations tend toward the lighter

is summertime. During the school year, it is

of parental torture known as the persistent

side. My wife and I don’t talk much about our

so crammed with information that it can be

follow-up question. “What are you learning in

jobs. For her, that evolved from previous work

difficult to read. Since we put it up two years

science? Who did you sit with? What did you

as a school social worker. We didn’t want to

ago, the chalkboard has developed its own

play at recess?”

bombard the kids with a daily dose of her work

shorthand language. Until someone invents a

with families in crisis. My work as a writer and journalist focuses on energy. My kids know more about crude oil than your average Wall Street commodities trader. Recently, I said I had an interesting story from work. My older son fixed me with a withering stare. Is it an energy story?” he asked. Did I mention that he’s

Some days call for that particular form of parental torture known as the persistent follow-up question.

a teenager?

flat. Where are you going on the field trip on Thursday?” All right. That worked. With every passing year, the family dinner becomes slightly more endangered. Two, and soon three, nights a week, the spreading demands of soccer practice encroach on dinner’s natural habitat. Late arriving work

Just as the no-television rule is occasionally

emails can intrude. I confess sometimes I break

disregarded, sometimes our conversations turn serious. We don’t shy away from any topic when

Don’t tell our kids, but the chalkboard is a secret weapon when school questions fall

the no-phones-at-the-table rule. Must. Read. real-life Weasley Family Clock, it will do.

.

uick. Email. Sigh.

it arises. One day, we discussed a suicide at a

The chalkboard looms large not only over the

The important thing is to protect the family

school where we knew some students. Recently,

table, but also over family dinner. Because it is

dinner against these forces. Even if the answers

the presidential election has made several

where the dinner conversation usually begins.

are monosyllabic, it is when we all sit together.

appearances.

Comings and goings are discussed, so everyone

It binds us together. We’re on a shared family

More typically, our dinner conversations

is on the same page. My wife and I remind each

voyage for a few more years, until the kids move

function as a time to check in with each other.

other of needs and commitments. (Birthday

out and eventually find their own tables and

Our lives can be hectic, a tightly choreographed

party this weekend. Are you getting a present?

create their own dinner traditions.

dance of comings and goings. Dinner is when

I need to work late; can you pick up from after-

How was your day? What did you do?

we connect.

school care?)

We’re listening. We’re interested.

Looming over the family dinner table is the family chalkboard. Not just any chalkboard.

Dinner conversations usually begin with a question: “How was school today?”

And there’s really only one rule that counts. No kicking. Seriously. tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

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S O M E O F O U R FA V O R I T E R E S T A U R A N T PAT I O S , D E C K S A N D O U T D O O R S PA C E S FO R D I N I N G A L F R ES CO.

ALCOMAR 1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161 Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner or weekend brunch, and start your visit with blood orange margarita and the crab and guacamole. ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR 319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884 Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting; perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

Celebrating 40 years in Austin, Fonda San Miguel offers

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

exquisite Interior Mexican cuisine in a rich environment

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

to stimulate all the senses. Stunning fine art, lush tropical

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas, in-

plants, sparkling light from traditional tin chandeliers…

credible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino),

at Fonda San Miguel, your celebration comes alive.

and locally sourced, seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails, local beers on tap,

24 DINER

and boutique wines from around the world.

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400 Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates 4

APOTHECARY CAFÉ AND WINE BAR

and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 371 1600

burgers, all-day breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

Apothecary’s soothing ambiance and excellent wine selection make it a great spot for drinks and bites with friends.

34TH STREET CAFÉ 1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

Chef Matt Gallagher brings f lavors from different cul-

NAPA FLATS

tures to create a menu featuring items from ceviche to an

8300 N. FM 620, Bldg M, Ste. 100 | (512) 640 8384

ahi tuna roll.

resh, savory cuisine inspired by California flavors with

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

an Italian flair. Made-from-scratch dishes are prepared

ASTI TRATTORIA

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

in an open kitchen over a wood-fired grill.

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

uni ue

tap wine dispenser offers a complete complement of highquality wines by the glass. Finish off the meal with the world-famous gelato.

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The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey and goat cheese panna cotta.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hotspot stays open until am on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features

sake bombs and a vari-

ety of sushi rolls under $10. BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO 1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542 3663 Bee Cave Rd, West Lake Hills, TX 78746 A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch and dinner and in a casual setting. Pop in for their happy hour

LAS PALOMAS 3201 Bee Caves Rd #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant and bar offers authentic Interior Mexican

to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board. BRIBERY BAKERY 2013 Wells Branch Pkwy #109 | (512) 531 9832

THE SOUP PEDDLER 4631 Airport Blvd. | 501 W. Mary St. | 13219 Hwy. 183 N. 2801 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 444 7687 | souppeddler.com

1900 Simond Ave #300 | (512) 297 2720

The Austin foodie legend of the boy and his soup delivery

family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t miss

Pastry Chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confec-

bicycle lives on in four brick and mortar locations. Argu-

the margaritas!

tions. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space

ably ustin’s finest uice and smoothie bar complements

where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine and coffee.

the famed soups and housemade stocks. Eclectic grab-

cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy

BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE AND BEER GARDEN 79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656 Banger’s brings the German biergarten tradition to Rain-

and-go salads and an array of griddled sandwiches round BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

out the menu.

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189 13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

CAFÉ JOSIE

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the f lavors

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

of her culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

the beer garden’s take on eggs Benedict.

forget the chimichurri sauce! Follow up your meal with

menu every night at Cafe Josie, which offers guests a prix

Argentina’s famous dessert, alfajores — shortbread cook-

fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The a la carte

BARLEY SWINE

ies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

menu is also available, featuring classics such as smoked

ey Street with an array of artisan sausages and more than 100 beers on tap. To get the full Banger’s experience, go for their weekend brunch and indulge in the Banger’s Benny,

2024 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locallysourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

meatloaf and redfish tacos. BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

CAFÉ NO SÉ

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamon serrano.

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor

The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some sangria

and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

and enjoy the bites.

for weekend brunching. Their spin on the classic avocado toast is a must-try. tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

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CENTRAL STANDARD

COUNTER CAFÉ

EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 0823

626 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 708 8800

1100 E. 6th St. | (512) 467 4280

Between their full dinner menu, impressive raw bar and

1914 E. 6th St. | (512) 351 9961

Enjoy delicious vintage cocktails, 1930s- and 1940s-in-

craft cocktail offerings, Central Standard at the South

It’s nothing fancy, but this tiny shotgun-style diner has

spired music, and cuisine by Fermin Nunez at East Side

Congress Hotel is the perfect place to spend a night on the

some of the city’s best breakfast offerings. This cafe fuses

Show Room. The small outdoor patio and cozy fireplace

town.

American diner food with a global touch. Make sure to or-

are perfect for breezy nights or casual drinks.

der their famous pancakes and burgers! EASY TIGER

CHINATOWN 3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

COUNTER CULTURE

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

107 W. 5th St. | (512) 343 9307

2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in town. Fast

An East Austin haven for vegans and vegetarians, Counter

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

service in the dining room and delivery is available. This

Culture provides internationally inspired vegan options

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some lo-

restaurant boasts an extensive and diverse dim sum menu

with organic and local food. Daily specials are shared

cal brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack

for customers to munch on!

through their constantly updated Twitter feed.

with beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

DRINK.WELL.

EL ALMA

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and

Located in the North Loop district, Michael and Jessica

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican cuisine with un-

oyster menu, sharp aesthetics, and excellent service make

Sanders bring craft cocktails and American pub fare to

matched outdoor patio dining stands as an Austin dining

it a refreshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry

drink.well. with a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try

gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying de-

McGuire brings East Coast inspired vibes to this seafood

include fried chickpeas and house-made Twinkies.

licious specialized drinks outside for their everyday 3pm5pm happy hour!

restaurant. DUE FORNI CONTIGO

106 E. 6th St. Ste. 106 | (512) 391 9300

EL CHILE

2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

Due Forni serves up Roman and Neapolitan style pizza

1809 Manor Road | (512) 457 9900

Chef Andrew Wiseheart serves ranch-to-table cuisine and

from two specially designed brick ovens. Pair a pizza with

The extensive menu features Mexican classics, including

an elegant take on bar fare at this east side gem. Take your

one of their 40+ wines for the ultimate Italian experience.

ceviche and tamales, and creative drinks like the cantaloupe margarita. Their daily happy hour offers sangria,

pick from the exquisite and bold cocktail menu and grab a spot on the expansive outdoor patio.

EAST SIDE KING

micheladas and margaritas.

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 422 5884 EL CHILITO

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

Winner of the James Beard ward and Top Chef, Paul

315 Congress Ave. Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

offers out-of-this-world pan-Asian food from across town

2219 Manor Rd. | 512-382-3797

Belly up to the counter at this

trailers with fellow chefs Moto Utsunomiya and Ek Tim-

1623 East 7th St. | 512-334-9660

rek. Try their legendary fried brussel sprouts!

All-day breakfast tacos and festive paleta f lavors make El

-seat space for an intimate

dining experience that’s modern yet approachable. This

ui

unique eatery gives three, five and seven course tasting

Chilito an Austin staple. If you’re looking to spice up your

menus in an immersive setting.

caffeine fix, try the Ojo Rojo — an horchata drink with a shot of espresso. Don’t forget to dip some chips into their exotic salsa, the winner of Austin Chronicle’s Hot Sauce

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

Contest.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

HOME SLICE PIZZA

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnam-

Small, neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice

ese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and sweet

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

Pizza. Open until 3am on weekends for your post bar-

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring

locally-sourced food with an international twist at reason-

hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the

comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for Dollar Oysters.

Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam,

favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano. FREEDMEN’S 2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

HOPFIELDS

EMMER & RYE

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

51 Rainey St. #110 | (512) 366 5530

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue,

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beauti-

Named after two types of grains, Emmer & Rye brings their

to the desserts and even their cocktail offerings. Pitmaster

ful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail

farm-to-table menu, in-house fermentation and dim sum

and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbe-

options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restau-

to diners craving wholesome and innovative cuisine. This

cue on a charming outdoor patio.

rant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

GERALDINE’S

ITALIC

605 Davis St. Austin | (512) 476 4755

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

EPICERIE

Located inside Rainey Street's Hotel Van Zandt, Geral-

Chef

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

dine's creates a unique, fun experience by combining cre-

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delica-

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sen-

ative cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady

cies from Pastry Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

sibilities by Thomas Keller-trained Chef Sarah McIntosh.

Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you

Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite

enjoy Chef Frank Mnuk’s dishes and cocktails from bar

JEFFREY’S

on Sundays!

manager Jen Keyser.

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

GOODALL'S KITCHEN AND BAR

in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has main-

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

tained the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but

Fonda San Miguel serves up traditional Mexican cuisine

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides

welcoming atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin

in a sophisticated and colorful setting. For more than 40

modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mort-

staple.

years, Fonda has been serving some of Austin's best mole

adella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry thyme

from its charming North Loop locale.

cocktail.

FOODHEADS

HILLSIDE FARMACY

Rustic, continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local

616 W. 34th St. | (512) 420 8400

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jef-

Fresh and inspired sandwiches, soups and salads in a

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

frey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appetit’s

charming refashioned cottage and porch. This local sand-

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the east side.

“10 Best new Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot

wich shop on 34th Street is the perfect date spot for you

Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are

on their patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a

and your book. Don’t forget to check out the daily soup

whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

coffee.

whole-animal butchery is also home to Kevin Fink, a cook named as one of Food & Wine’s best new chefs.

ndrew Curren of 4

iner and Easy Tiger presents

Named one of Bon Appetit’s “10 Best new Restaurants

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

specials! tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

101


JUNIPER

LENOIR

MOONSHINE PATIO BAR + GRILL

2400 E. Cesar Chavez St. Ste. 304 | (512) 436 3291

1807 S.1st St. | (512) 215 9778

303 Red River St. | (512) 236 9599

Uchi alum Nicholas Yanes cooks up Northern Italian far

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix-

Housed in the historical Hof heintz-Reissig store, Moon-

on the East side. Juniper’s minimalistic menu reinvents

fixe meal in an intimate dining room and table that seats

shine’s decadent Southern comfort food is a downtown

the Italian classics.

just 34 diners.

favorite. Belly up to the bar and indulge in their famous

LA BARBECUE

L'ESTELLE HOUSE

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

88 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588

NORTH

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin bar-

This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional

11506 Century Oaks Ter. | (512) 339 4440

becue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This

French and Southern cuisine. Think late night Parisian-

Enjoy modern Italian cuisine in a sleek interior at this Do-

trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family,

style burgers with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for

main standout. Go during happy hour for a glass of your

whips up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

Sunday brunch.

favorite red and an exceptional cheeseboard.

LA CONDESA

LUCY’S FRIED CHICKEN

ODD DUCK

400 W. 2nd St. | (512) 499 0300

5408 Burnet Rd. | (512) 514 0664 &

1201 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 433 6521

Delectable cocktails, tasty tacos and appetizers all in-

2218 College Ave. | (512) 297 2423

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck

spired by the hip and bohemian Condesa neighborhood in

2900 Ranch Rd 620 N

was the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore.

Mexico City. The elevated Mexican experience includes a

Straight-up Southern goodness, from moon pies to fried

Expect seasonal fare and drinks with a Texas inf luence at

tequila and mezcal menu, so be sure to experiment!

green tomatoes, and the house specialty: fried chicken.

this South Lamar oasis.

shrimp corndog appetizers.

Chef James Holmes puts a fun take on our Southern favorLAMBERTS DOWNTOWN BARBECUE

ites and serves them up with inventive cocktails, like the

OLAMAIE

401 W. 2nd St. | (512) 494 1500

peach cobbler martini.

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

Tucked away in the historic Schneider Brothers Building in

Food + Wine Magazine’s best new chefs Grae Nonas and

the Second Street District, Lamberts doesn’t grill up your

MANUEL’S

MIchael Fojtasek create a menu that will leave any South-

typical barbecue fare. Their have an Austin twist, like the

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 &

erner drooling with a dash of contemporary culinary con-

rib-eye glazed with brown sugar and mustard.

10201 Jollyville Rd. | (512) 345 1042

cepts. The dessert menu offers your classic apple pie, or

Definitely not your standard Tex-Mex, Manuel’s hits all

alternatively a more trendy goat cheese caramel ice cream.

LAUNDERETTE

the right notes for its upscale Mexican cuisine, cleanly pre-

Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits (they’re

2115 Holly St. | (512) 382 1599

sented in a chic setting. It boasts its traditional Mexican

worth every delectable bite).

Culinary magicians and James Beard-nominated chefs

cuisine, so get out of your comfort zone and try one of their

Rene Ortiz and Laura Sawicki surprise diners at this east

Mexican specialties.

day cake ice cream sandwich.

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

Celebrated Austin chef Shawn Cirkiel created this south-

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 680 5045

ern Italian-style restaurant with a menu that highlights

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensi-

local, seasonal ingredients with dishes like saffron ricotta

bility to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitch-

ravioli and pork meatballs.

en and at the counter.

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JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

OLIVE & JUNE 3411 Glenview Ave. | (512) 467 9898

side gem with menu items like crispy pork ribs and a birth-


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

PARKSIDE

SWAY

UCHIKO

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999

4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

Chef Shawn Cirkiel’s f lagship restaurant, featuring a happy

The culinary masterminds behind La Condesa cook up

The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and former home

hour with half-price oysters and tasty cocktails, is a local

Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor

of Top Chef Paul

favorite. Don’t overlook the dessert menu, with delectable

area, complete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an un-

Nicholas Yanes. Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

items such as a brioche beignet and chocolate mousse.

forgettable experience.

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki!

PERLA’S SEAFOOD & OYSTER BAR

SWIFT’S ATTIC

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE

1400 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 291 7300

315 Congress Ave. | (512) 482 8842

609 W. 6th St. | (512) 542 3380

A South Congress staple, expect the freshest fish and oys-

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s Attic draws from

This cute downtown café serves a mean morning shrimp

ters f lown in daily from both coasts, carefully prepared

global inspirations and serves up inventive cocktails in a

and grits — your perfect hangover remedy. Walton’s also

with simple yet elegant f lavors by Chef Larry McGuire.

historic downtown building.

offers an array of delicious pastries, fresh brewed coffee

QUI

TAKOBA

1600 E. 6th St. | (512) 436 9626

1411 E. 7th St. | (512) 628 4466

Both a James Beard-award recipient and winner of Top

Takoba delivers bold, authentic f lavors with ingredients

WINEBELLY

Chef, chef Paul

imported straight from Mexico. Head over to East

519 W. Oltorf St. | (512) 487 1569

ui and renowned chefs Page Presley and

and staple sandwiches for lunch. Be sure to pick up a fresh

ui’s namesake restaurants is one of the

hottest spots in town for an unparalleled dining experience

f lowers from their f loral shop on your way out!

th

Street for tortas, tacos, margaritas and micheladas.

Named as one of the top

wine bars in merica by Wine

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list

set under an airy, beautiful backdrop. THE CLAY PIT

and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro

SALTY SOW

1601 Guadalupe St. | (512) 322 5131

maintains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back in-

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

Zip in for a buffet-style lunch or settle in for a traditional

teriors.

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including

dinner of both classic and contemporary Indian cuisine.

a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy

Stick to the basics for the chicken tikka masala and experi-

WINK

with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-night

ment with their chai spice creme brulee.

1014 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. E | (512) 482 8868 With a rotating daily menu, Wink celebrates true farm-to-

noshing. UCHI

table meals. Stop in for their incredible happy hour, or stay

SECOND BAR + KITCHEN

801 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4808

a little longer for the - or -course chef ’s tasting menu.

200 Congress Ave. | (512) 827 2750

Chef Tyson Cole has created an inventive menu that puts

Another venture from James Beard-nominated chef David

Uchi foremost among sushi spots in Austin. Grab a date

WU CHOW

Bull, Second offers a swanky bistro experience in the heart

and treat yourself by splurging on nationally-recognized

500 W. 5th St. #168 | (512) 476 2469

of the nd Street

sushi.

From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding

istrict.

Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss their weekend dim sum menu.

tribeza.com

| JULY 2016

103


A LOOK BEHIND...

The Grande MACCHIATO

IN THE WORLD OF AUSTIN’S increasingly high-

quality, high-style coffee scene, one originator stands as the Grande Macchiato of them all. We spent a few minutes with Michael Vaclav, founder and owner of CaffĂŠ Medici. Like a proud papa, he shared with us the success of his former baristas

illustration by Isa D'Aniello

104

JULY 2016 | tribeza.com

and where they are now. Many have started their own coffee spots, upping the game for everyone.


Shown: Thoroughly modern Analog table and Drop chairs.

OAK LEGS AREN’T JUST FOR ANTIQUES.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


Designed in Austin. Made in Texas. Allens Boots | Since 1977

July 2016 Makers + Industry Issue  

Nope, not all creators are created equal. Which leads to even more admiration for the people who create and make a living out of it. There i...

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