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organic design born in Italy

At Copenhagen you’ll find the areas most unique collection of fine contemporary furniture and accessories from around the world. Our featured item is the Greenwood sideboard by Devina Nais, Italy. Artfully handcrafted from natural oak and iron. Available for immediate delivery as shown or custom order in several finishes. $3798.

furniture and accessories for your modern lifestyle AUSTIN

2236 West Braker Lane

SAN ANTONIO 18603 Blanco Road

512.451.1233 210.545.4366

www.CopenhagenLiving.com


A LOCAL COMPANY PROVIDING A LUXURY EXPERIENCE IN RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE.

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Gottesman Residential Real Estate | 512.451.2422 | gottesmanresidential.com

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NICOLEKESS L E R. COM

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512 Marly Way | Westlake | marlyway.com

10512 Superview Drive | Overlook Estates | superviewdrive.com

Nicole Kessler

Broker Associate Compass Real Estate © Compass 2019 ¦ All Rights Reserved by Compass ¦ Made in NYC. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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WE KNOW AUSTIN We’re offering what’s next, NOW. With over 35 years of experience in the Austin area, Prospect Real Estate is focused on providing the best urban living experience and attainable opportunities in the city. Our agents have their fingers on the pulse of Austin with exclusive access to new build inventory you can’t find anywhere else. We buy Austin, we sell Austin — we LIVE Austin. We’re proud to be the exclusive listing agent for Natiivo Austin, powered by Airbnb 512-640-1881 • INFO@PROSPECTREALESTATE.COM

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PROSPECTREALESTATE.COM tribeza.com


City on the Rise NATIIVO AUSTIN, POWERED BY AIRBNB, IS THE FIRST PROPERT Y DESIGNED, BUILT AND LICENSED FOR HOMESHARING.

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oming Fall 2021 to the historic Rainey Street District, Natiivo Austin, powered by Airbnb, will be a standout among the thriving community as the first building purposefully built, designed, and licensed for homesharing. This unique concept is entirely new to the market, let alone Austin, blending the amenity of hotel stays with the benefit of homeownership. Each of the 249 fully-furnished units offers buyers the ability to stay and enjoy their space themselves or list it independently on Airbnb or through the building’s concierge team. Natiivo Austin is co-developed by Newgard and Pearlstone Partners development firms and is the first of two planned Natiivo properties with Natiivo Miami scheduled to open in 2022.

Natiivo Austin construction is well underway for the 33-story building, which will stand on East Avenue at the southern end of the Rainey Street District, mere steps from both the nightlife and outdoor recreation the area offers. Not only are bars, restaurants, and iconic city sights within walking distance, the building promises its residents access to a spacious fitness center (complete with yoga and Peloton bike studio), 24-hour concierge and valet, 10th-floor communal outdoor terrace, and 7,000 square foot rooftop deck and pool—and that’s just to name a few of the near endless list of amenities and services included with Natiivo Austin. With architecture by STG Design and interiors by INC, the building itself is something

to behold. From the thoughtfully incorporated parking podium and glassy exterior to its modern styling and hand-selected local furnishings, these spaces are inspired. Natiivo Austin’s 15 individual floor plans range from studios to two-bedrooms and start on the 11th floor, each with spectacular views of Austin in every direction. For those already in the market or those now wanting to be, units start in the $500s and have already proven popular with just over half of the inventory reserved in a matter of months. Visit natiivoaustin.com or the Natiivo Austin Sales Center at 219 W 4th St. to own your piece of the city.

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CONTENTS

JANUARY/

INTERIORS

DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 16 Kristin’s Column p.26 Tribeza Talk p. 28 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 34 Music Pick p. 35 Art Pick p. 36 Event Pick p. 38 Interiors Tour p. 42 Style Profile p. 72 Karen’s Pick p. 78 Dining Guide p. 80 A Look Behind p. 84 FEATURES

Imperfectly Perfect p. 54 Earth, Wind & Fire p. 64 Gift Guide p. 82 LEFT Veronica Ortuño's historic Elgin home showcases a style inspired by her Mexican heritage. ON THE COVER Stepping into the iconic Bloomhouse is a mesmerizing and psychedelic experience.

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Photo by Molly Culv

@burnishandplumb

burnishandplumb.com

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EDITOR'S LETTER

T

he Austin longtime locals know and love might be changing every day, yet there’s a certain romantic vision of living here that remains fixed in public imagination and continues to drive an unprecedented number of transplants. There’s the incredible food and nonstop music, but what really seems to inspire the move is the idea of making a home— specifically, an “Austin” home. Nestled in the hills or steps from the wonders of SoCo, the magic of Austin living is on full display in this month’s Interiors issue. The dwellings prove the dream is real, and with them we can see a uniquely Central Texas archetype of American interior design taking shape. Most homes in the world are an amalgam of periods and styles, but increasingly, Bat City dwellers are chiseling a look of their own as iconic as Park Avenue penthouse living or California modern. Our profile on emerging designer Veronica Ortuño really hits this idea home. I love the way she blends classic Southwestern and contemporary hipster elements to make spaces that feel completely evocative of present and future Austin style. I’m also proud to bring readers an interactive element with our 7th annual Interiors Tour. This year is better than ever, with stunning properties dotting every part of town. I tip my hat to the designers for finding time amid their rapidly expanding businesses to share these wonderful projects with the community. Happy decorating!

Suzanne Kilpatrick suzanne@tribeza.com

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FLORAL DESIGN BY DAVID KURIO

TRIBEZ A

19 YEARS

AUSTIN CUR ATED

JA N UA R Y 2 02 0

N O. 2 2 1

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Suzanne Kilpatrick ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Aaron Parsley

EDITOR-AT-L ARGE

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Vanessa Blankenship

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Shaleena Keefer

ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres INTERN

Luna Estrella

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Lauren Jones Hannah J. Phillips COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

WITH OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE, WE SPECIALIZE IN CREATING LASTING MEMORIES ONE EVENT AT A TIME.

PHOTOGR APHERS

Jana Cantua Jonathan Garza Erin Reas Claire Schaper

ILLUSTR ATOR

Hannah-Michelle Bayley

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A

EVENT PLANNERS & DESIGNERS 512.468.7266

CREATIVE-INTL.COM

VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


Julia Hoskins Schlitt, Stacy Wiltshire, Theran Greer, Suellen Young, Anita Howard, Kakky Dyer, Mary Anna Paul F RON T ROW (left to right) Maricruz Acuna, Sheila Paynter, Dru Brown, Marietta Scott, Cindy Goldrick, Amy Rung, Linda Biderman, Stephanie Sachnowitz BACK ROW (left to right)

923 Westbank Drive Suite 100 Austin, Texas 78746

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512.328.0022

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wilsongoldrick.com


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MONTH ON S I H T TR

IBEZA.COM

EAT WITH YOUR HANDS

Austin in a Pocket – From tacos to dumplings to empanadas, the best pocket food in town. tribeza.com/austin-in-a-pocket

EVENTS CALENDAR

Pack your schedule with the best of what Austin has to offer. tribeza.com/events

Stories from this issue are available online at tribeza.com, in addition to weekly online exclusives like these features. Keep up with new content by signing up for our weekly Tribeza Talk newsletter. tribeza.com/sign-up-newsletter

CHEERS TO 2020!

Kindred Spirits – Keep up with cocktail trends and Austin’s cultured bar scene. tribeza.com/kindred-spirits

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BGCAA GREAT FUTURES GALA On November 1, the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Austin Area raised more than $1.1 million during the Great Futures Gala, furthering its mission of providing vital programming for more than 12,000 children. The evening featured incredible auctions, a performance from BGC alumni the Peterson Brothers Band, Austin-inspired dĂŠcor and a captivating performance from a local opera artist.

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PAST PRESENT PEASE On November 7, Pease Park Conservancy supporters and neighbors came together at Austin Central Library to commemorate another year of success for the stunning Pease Park. While getting the latest updates about the highly anticipated Kingsbury Commons project, guests enjoyed wonderful food, live music and a special presentation from keynote speaker and Outdoor Voices founder Ty Haney.

BGCAA GREAT FUTURES GALA: 1. Misti Potter 2. Mark William Calaway & Mark Henry 3. Sonja & William Talbot TWILIGHT ON THE TRAIL: 4. Jeff Trigger & Catherine Robb 5. Susan Jenkins, Laura Colangelo, Jenni Rozas & David Jenkins 6. Kelsey Mohn, Annie Thompson & Kelly Buller PAST PRESENT PEASE: 7. Casey Miller, Marianne DeLeon & Dr. Joni Wallace 8. Heath Riddles & Ty Haney 9. Sarah Lee Marshall & Jason Schubert

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S T E R N H ATC H E R P H OTO G R A P H Y, C H A R L E S Q U I N N & M AT T L A N K E S

During Twilight on the Trail on November 3, The Trail Foundation celebrated the many projects accomplished throughout the Ann and Roy Butler Hike-and-Bike Trail, including the Drake Bridge Commons, Rainey Street Trailhead and Festival Beach Restroom. The gathering also helped gain critical funds for upcoming restoration and beautification projects for the community space, which draws millions of visitors annually.


AMARRA | VILL AS at Barton Creek

AMARRA | VILLAS A 20 acre golf side neighborhood offering thoughtfully designed and well-appointed Spanish Mediterranean Villas. Each residence offers lock and leave convenience, a chef’s kitchen, luxe interior finishes and expansive outdoor living with the option to add a screened-in porch and/or swimming pool.

NOW AVAIL ABLE liveamarra.com

Melissa Meeks Kilian

Global Real Estate Advisor melissa.kilian@sothebysrealty.com 512.217.2020


SOCIAL HOUR

LONE STARS & ANGELS GALA St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital hosted its 13th annual Lone Stars & Angels Gala at Fairmont Austin on November 9, which raised a life-changing $450,000. All proceeds will go toward the hospital’s continued efforts to provide food, travel, housing and treatment for the families of children fighting cancer.

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PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF GREATER TEXAS DINNER 2019 Hundreds of Austin business and community leaders came together for a conversation with Laverne Cox and celebrated Mandy Dealey, the recipient of this year’s Robbie and Tom Ausley Leadership Award. The inaugural Cocktails for a Cause After Party kept the action going with lively entertainment, helping to receive important funds for reproductive health care and sexual health education for all.

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NATIIVO AUSTIN SALES GALLERY OPENING

LONE STARS & ANGELS GALA: 1. Chad & Jennifer Savoy 2. Sydni Williams, Stephanie Worthon, Rachel Green, Zoz Cuccias & Marion James 3. Parker & Rhonda McCollough PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF GREATER TEXAS DINNER 2019: 4. Elaina Vallo, Rhett Vallo & Chrissy Aylor 5. Arati Singh, Margaret Chen Kercher & Kennon Wooten 6. Brett Barnes 7. Laverne Cox NATIIVO AUSTIN SALES GALLERY OPENING: 8. Ravi Arimilli, Bill Knauss & Luca Garulli 9. DJ Chorizo Funk

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S A R A H E N A S A N D B R YA N T H I L L

Natiivo Austin, the first purposely designed, built and licensed property for home sharing, officially lifted the curtain on its new downtown sales gallery at Fourth and Lavaca, offering buyers a much-anticipated look at the design offerings inside the Rainey Street hotel. Attendees enjoyed catering by Word of Mouth and Eddie V’s while DJ Chorizo Funk spun records.


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SOCIAL HOUR

BIG REDS & BUBBLES The Wine & Food Foundation of Texas presented its annual fundraiser, Big Reds & Bubbles, on November 14 at Hotel Ella. During the event, notable Austin chefs married cuisine with pairings curated by some of the world’s finest winemakers. In addition to delicious fare, guests kicked off the holiday season, dancing to live local music and perusing the display of luxurious silent auction items.

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CELEBRATION OF LIFE LUNCHEON On November 15, the Celebration of Life Luncheon and honorary chair Fayruz Benyousef honored survivors and fighters of breast cancer while also raising money for the Seton Breast Care Center and the Zeta Tau Alpha Foundation. Held at the JW Marriott, the dynamic event showcased a fall and holiday fashion show by Julian Gold.

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THE ART OF KINDNESS

BIG REDS & BUBBLES: 1. Del Kolbe & Jill Holechek 2. Mariah Holmes & Alaina Mattix 3. Molly & Terry Li CELEBRATION OF LIFE LUNCHEON: 4. Evan & Lauren Wiatrek 5. Alex Choice & Megan Webb 6. Delaney Brown & Kendall Brown THE ART OF KINDNESS: 7. Amber Allen, Lawton Cummings & Andra Liemandt 8. Camila Alves McConaughey 9. Alexis Davis & Valerie Melton

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B E N P O R T E R A N D J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

Love was in the air on November 15 as The Kindness Campaign partnered with the Grammy Museum for The Art of Kindness. As guests grooved the night away with Grammy Award-winning artist Estelle and “First Lady of Motown” Claudette Robinson, nearly $450,000 was raised, benefitting TKC’s acclaimed social-emotional learning curriculum and innovative programming in the classroom.


HeritageTitleofAustin.com

OUR CLOSINGS GET YOU MOVING

EXCELLENCE IS THE HEART OF HERITAGE | THREE OFFICES TO SERVE YOU

TA R R Y TO W N

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ROLLINGWOOD

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D O W N TO W N


SOCIAL HOUR

AFRICA ROCKS AUSTIN Africa Rocks Austin took place at Antone’s Nightclub on December 5. Hosted by Taylor Kitsch, the uplifting bash presented special musical performances by The Band of Heathens, hip-hop artist Emmanuel Jal and the internationally acclaimed African Children’s Choir. All proceeds went to the nonprofit Music for Life, the sponsoring organization of the children’s choir.

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BLACK FRET BALL At the 2019 Black Fret Ball on December 7, $250,000 in grants were awarded to beloved Austin artists, including The Texas K.G.B., Beat Root Revival, Superfonicos, Black Pumas, Erika Wennerstrom and Tje Austin — just to name a few. Of the 20 nominees, 17 performed live for the crowd of music lovers, who helped contribute to Black Fret’s goal of providing support to local musicians.

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SLIC Design hosted a launch party to celebrate the opening of its new retail store on South Lamar, SLIC Shop. On December 11, friends, family and design enthusiasts gathered at the venue for an evening of cocktails, bites and conversation while perusing SLIC Shop’s curated selection of modern furniture and home décor from local and national vendors.

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AFRICA ROCKS AUSTIN: 1. African Children's Choir member 2. Julia Tracy, Tara Qualls & Emily Bischoff 3. Katarina & Naomi Zito BLACK FRET BALL: 4. Cris & Jena Watters 5. Dave Johnson & Kathy Raesz 6. Noah Krell & Brittany Du Pont SLIC SHOP OPENING: 7. Sara Cukerbaum & Sally Cukerbaum 8. Heather & Richard Ginsberg 9. Jon Montemayor, Charlie Russell & Danielle Russell

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B E N P O R T E R , E R I N R E A S A N D J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

SLIC SHOP OPENING


“Chris not only worked to find the right property, he brought me together with my new community.” Carolyn Sanders

Chris Long | Broker Associate | 512.289.6300 | chris.long@compass.com | chrislongaustin.com

Chris Long is a real estate agent affi liated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Experienced. Trusted. Creative.

Amy Reinarz is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

ABR, CNE, CLHMS, RealtorÂŽ 512.589.0953 amy.reinarz@compass.com

compass.com

Lover of all things Austin, Amy is dedicated to helping you find your place in this world. Amy Knows Austin.


COMMUNITY + CULTURE

P H OTO G R A P H B Y H O L LY CO WA R T.

HOME SWEET HOME Discover Good Company Home and more with our insider’s guide to interior favorites, p. 28.


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

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THIS IS THE TIME OF THE YEAR WHERE we make goals and resolutions, setting our intentions for the year ahead. With fresh calendars and renewed inspiration, we resolve to make changes in our bodies, our finances, our careers, our habits and our relationships. The idea is great. The way we typically go about it is usually not that great. In both my personal spiritual journey and in my work with clients as a therapist, I am learning a lot about energy. People typically motivate to change when they get to a point of discomfort or frustration that exceeds the fear or discomfort associated with change. This is the tipping point, so to speak. I love meeting clients, friends, my kids and myself right here, at the precipice of transformation. It thrills me. My people probably think I have lost my mind. When they tell me how miserable they are and how they cannot stand it another second, all I can think is, “Oh helllyesssssss, let’s do this thing!!!!” I can barely contain myself. Don’t get me wrong, I ache when my people ache, believe me I do. It’s gut-wrenching, heartclutching, breath-holding work at times, this being human gig. But when someone tells me they are losing it, I know they are on the verge of finding it. And this jolts me in a way that only the convergence of passion and purpose can ignite. Once we rea ch this tipping point of experiencing the extreme sensation of what we don’t want, the key is, right in that moment, or as quickly as possible, to shift our stance energetically into the attitude and vibration of what we do want. The momentum will expand exponentially in either direction, and we usually don’t even realize it’s happening until we’re deeper in the negative spiral. The stronger we feel something, the bigger the energy, the more swift and powerful the momentum. This is why a bad morning becomes a bad day, or a

By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Hannah-Michelle Bayley

bad mood becomes a more prevalent state of anxiety or depression. A ripple becomes a wave becomes a tsunami. Here’s how it works. When we are stuck or miserable (usually both at once), we cry out to the Universe. “Hey. This SUCKS!” Take finances, for example. When we experience lack, we desire more. But instead of focusing on abundance or what we do want, we get caught in a scarcity loop. We get fearful and negative and dwell on what we don’t have or what we can’t do—and we offer the exact opposite energy of what we desire. Not surprisingly, we keep coming up short. We nullify our intention and cancel ourselves out energetically. Hence, stuck. Spinning our wheels, mud f lying, going absolutely freaking nowhere but deeper into our own rut. Let’s take relationships as another example. Say we are frustrated with our current partner, or lack of partner. We desire something more fulfilling, but instead of focusing on love, we exude an energy of resentment, loneliness and need. Naturally, this is more of a repellant than an aphrodisiac. Instead of attracting that special someone new, or deepening our connection with our current love, we attract

more resentment, loneliness and need. Alas, not exactly the bliss we had in mind. I love the old therapy shtick from “The Bob Newhart Show.” Whatever the client brings up, Bob as therapist screams, “STOP IT!” in his face. Session over. Oh, if only it was that simple. Wait, then I would be out of a job, or my therapist job, anyway. People are never that simple. But the tipping point can be. We actually do have to stop it. The momentum, I mean. How?! When we notice the icky feeling of what we don’t want, instead of being pissed or disappointed, we can learn to get excited. Ah, here it is, a chance to clarify what I do want! If we don’t have the capacity in that moment to shift our vibration, the best possible thing to do is just stop. Stop thinking about it by thinking about something (anything!) else that feels better, or simply, stop thinking. Take a nap. Meditate. Go for a run. Pet your dog. Do anything to shift the current while it’s still a ripple, if you can. It takes some practice. Play with it. Dabble, gently, until you get the hang of it. Energy is powerful, and most of us have been mishandling it for a long-ass time. A lignment is far better than struggle. Aligning our energy with what we want to do, what we want to have, where we want to go, who we want to be, who we want to be with and how we want to feel. After all, that’s what we’re really after, the deepest longing of all is how we think we will feel when ____. Feel it first, then it comes. I realize this is the opposite of the way we do it, where we wait for it to come in order to feel it. We typically feel what we don’t want and align our energy with that. Stop it! The momentum, the power, comes when we realize we can choose to feel the way we want, now. Now. tribeza.com

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K L TRIBEZA TA

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN

BOLD STROKES During 2019’s East Austin Studio Tour, artist Cecelia Murphy opened her home to display her unique hand-painted wallpaper featuring white magnolias set against a black background in her bedroom and bedsheets printed with her own bougainvillea pattern. Since the fall of 2018, Murphy has created bold custom wallpaper and fabrics with her Cecelia Claire line.   After attending Georgetown University, Murphy went to work as a traveling translator and, after responding to a classified ad, found herself living in Antoni Gaudí’s Casa Mila in Barcelona, Spain. “The thing about Gaudí and his architecture is that every single detail of his buildings is a work of art, from the doorknobs to the handcarved elevator,” Murphy says. The experience motivated Murphy to want to create art specifically belonging to interior spaces. Look for the debut of her commercial wallpaper later this year. -NICOLE BECKLEY

Murphy's designs are lush with florals and greenery.

ceceliaclaire.com

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goodcompany.shop

Founder Mallary Carroll loves combining new peices with vintage discoveries.

FEELS LIKE HOME P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R O C H E L L E A B A N T E A N D H O L LY CO WA R T.

Good Company Home's shelves hold distinctive glassware, plates and pottery.

Mallary Carroll hadn’t set out to open two new shops in 2019. “There was a ‘For Lease’ sign taunting me, and the space was so pretty,” Carroll says. “It just kind of made sense.” She opened her second Good Company outpost on South Congress in February and, in August, after eyeing the perfect spot, debuted Good Company Home a few doors down from her original shop, on West 12th Street. Since 2017, Good Company has specialized in women’s fashion, including Carroll’s own SBJ Austin clothing line, but for the home store, Carroll wanted to curate a mix of new items and vintage pieces that have a “soul.” “I love being out in the field of really yummy-smelling antique places and digging and finding that treasure,” she says. “It really is the best thing.” The new shop will also debut an all-natural apothecary line, including deodorant, hand soaps and rose hip facial oil. -NICOLE BECKLEY

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BUILT TO LAST

“I want to make timeless furniture,” Scott Martin explains, “something people want to hang onto.” Last year, Martin launched Seer Studio, a brand of custom furniture, including contemporary oak and marble tables. A native Texan, Martin came to Austin originally to pursue music, but found himself drawn to the creativity of interior design, going to work with Joel Mozersky. After developing relationships with local upholsterers and fabricators over the years, Martin wanted to try his hand at crafting his own pieces. He sources marble from Italy and oak from Texas, working with craftspeople in San Marcos to create his tables. This year, he’s working to release custom upholstered armchairs and sofas. -NICOLE BECKLEY

seer-studio.com

SUPERTHING COFFEE Created by Patika owners Nick Krupa, Andy Wigginton, Kyle Smith and Tony Smith and released in summer 2019, Superthing coffee is as much a marvel to look at as to drink. The Futura Creative Studio-designed packaging is so beautiful it hurts to throw it away. And

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ingredients are lovingly sourced from sustainable farms in Guatemala, Colombia, Ethiopia and Kenya, then roasted in small batches in Dripping Springs. Purchase online at superthingcoffee.com or in person at Patika locations. – SUZANNE KILPATRICK


Selling in the New Year? Let’s talk Concierge. Make updates to your home without any upfront cost to you. Compass Concierge can help you sell your home faster and at a higher price.

Chris King Realtor ÂŽ 440.708.3381 chris.king@compass.com

Chris King is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal housing opportunity.

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O P E N IN G IN

J A N U A RY

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ARTS + HAPPENINGS

SOUPED UP Head chef Kristen Kish calls on culinary friends for a flavorful new series at Arlo Grey, p. 38.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y C H A S E DA N I E L .

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC January 1 – 7 Various Locations RACH STAR: MUSIC OF BRAHMS & RACHMANINOFF

January 10 & 11 Long Center

January 24 Paramount Theatre LETTUCE

January 24 Stubb’s BBQ PATTY GRIFFIN

ROB BAIRD’S BIRTHDAY BASH

January 24 & 15 Gruene Hall

January 11 Antone’s Nightclub

ANDREW CYRILLE QUARTET

January 17 McCullough Theatre

THE PINK FLOYD LASER SPECTACULAR

January 17 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

PETERSON BROTHERS EP RELEASE

January 25 Native Hostel

AMERICAN AUTHORS & MAGIC GIANT

January 29 Scoot Inn

January 18 Emo’s Austin

KOE WETZEL W/ RAY WYLIE HUBBARD

January 18 ACL Live at The Moody Theater TERRY ALLEN

January 18 Paramount Theatre

January 30 McCullough Theatre ATMOSPHERE

January 31 Stubb’s BBQ January 31 Mohawk

January 18 & 19 Antone’s Nightclub

SAINT MOTEL

January 31 Emo’s Austin

TOOL

January 21 Frank Erwin Center

ERIC JOHNSON CLASSICS

HI, HOW ARE YOU DAY W/ CAGE THE ELEPHANT

January 22 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

tribeza.com

January 8 & 9 Alamo Drafthouse - Ritz & South Lamar

THE LORD OF THE RINGS TRILOGY FEAST

January 9 Alamo Drafthouse - Ritz TEXAS FOCUS: BLOOD SIMPLE

January 16 Bullock Texas State History Museum THE ANTHEM: HUMONCULUS LISTENING PARTY W/ JOHN CAMERON MITCHELL

January 19 AFS Cinema

THEATER

THE WIND DOWN

ELECTRIC GUEST

PAUL CAUTHEN

FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL: VCR PARTY

EARTHGANG

January 29 Come and Take It Live!

BIG FREEDIA

FILM

January 23 Paramount Theatre LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO

FREE WEEK

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ROBERT ELLIS

February 1 Paramount Theatre

TINY BEAUTIFUL THINGS

January 10 – February 2 Austin Playhouse

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL

January 17 – 26 Long Center CLICK

January 17 – February 8 The Vortex GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS

January 19 Paramount Theatre

FRONTERAFEST 2020

January 20 – February 15 Various Locations

HELLO, DOLLY!

January 21 – 26 Bass Concert Hall

A NIGHT WITH JANIS JOPLIN

January 29 – March 8 ZACH Theatre

FORKLIFT DANCEWORKS: SOLO SYMPHONY

January 30 – February 2 Long Center

THE TURN OF THE SCREW

January 30 – February 9 Filigree Theatre SHEN YUN

January 31

COMEDY

JO KOY

January 31 Bass Concert Hall TIM AND ERIC

January 31 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

FAMILY MAGIC TREE HOUSE: SHOWTIME W/ SHAKESPEARE

January 12 Paramount Theatre

MUSIC OF THE BEATLES FOR KIDS

January 12 Mohawk

CHRISTINA P

PJ MASKS LIVE! SAVE THE DAY

January 9 – 11 Cap City Comedy Club

January 17 Long Center

TIM DILLON

WILD KRATTS LIVE 2.0

January 15 – 18 Cap City Comedy Club

January 18 Bass Concert Hall

BUMPING MICS W/ JEFF ROSS & DAVE ATTELL

THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR SHOW

January 16 Paramount Theatre

January 18 – March 14 ZACH Theatre

WORDED FUNNY

PITCH YEA!

January 16 The Fallout Theater

KATHLEEN MADIGAN

January 17 Paramount Theatre

RODNEY CARRINGTON

January 26 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

January 26 Paramount Theatre TROLLS LIVE!

January 31 – February 2 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park


OTHER ICE SKATING ON THE PLAZA

Through January 20 Whole Foods Lamar HOME & GARDEN SHOW

January 10 – 12 Austin Convention Center THE SWOON EVENT

January 12 Springdale Station

ALEX SNODGRASS: THE DEFINED DISH

STAR BREWS BEER FESTIVAL

January 25 West 6th St.

TRIBEZA INTERIORS TOUR

January 26 Various Locations

REVIVE COLLECTIVE WOMEN'S CONFERENCE

January 28 One Eleven East

THE BLIND CAFE

January 29 – 31 The American Legion- Charles Johnson House

January 15 BookPeople

WOMEN’S MARCH ATX

January 18 Texas State Capitol

3M HALF MARATHON

January 19 Downtown Austin

2020 GUEST CHEF DINNER SERIES

January 20 Arlo Grey

MARTIN LUTHER KING MARCH & FESTIVAL

January 20 UT Austin

ATXPLAINED LIVE

January 23 Hogg Auditorium

ROUND TOP WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW

January 24 & 25 Big Red Barn Event Center

EVEREST January 23-26 Long Center An epic journey to the top of the world’s most dangerous mountain is now an intimate and immersive opera, based on Jon Krakauer’s best-selling book Into Thin Air. Tickets start at $39, available at austinopera.org or (512) 472 5992.

MUSIC PICK

Big Freedia By Holly Cowart EMO’S AUSTIN, JANUARY 18

All rise, Big Freedia has arrived. The statuesque, gender-bending musical artist is the stage persona of former gospel singer Freddie Ross. Hailed as the queen of bounce music, Freedia has made a name for not only herself, but her entire genre. With booming vocals that pack a punch, the MC acts as a conductor to both the lyrics and the beat, which is often paired with plenty of wobbling, wiggling and dropping low. Born in New Orleans in the early 1990s, bounce is a high-tempo subset of hiphop and a manifestation of the infectious energy rooted in the culturally rich city. By combining traditional Mardi Gras Indian chants, heavy bass and a call-andresponse formula, it grew largely popular within small Southern communities. It wasn’t until Hurricane Katrina caused the displacement of Freedia and thousands of others that the style reached a national audience. Forced to leave home, she brought New Orleans with her, expanding the reach of booty-shaking bounce. Once the world caught wind of Big Freedia, her trajectory was set. The mogul has since starred in her own Fuse TV reality show named “Big Freedia: Queen of Bounce,” published a memoir and headlined stages around the world. Her unique sound has also inspired numerous well-known performers, including features on Drake’s “Nice For What” and Beyoncé’s “Formation.” It’s barrier-breaking artists like Big Freedia who have helped turn the previously underground category of bounce into a progressive representation of modern-day hip-hop. It’s a genre of expression and freedom, and everyone’s invited. On January 18, pay tribute to the Queen Diva at Emo’s and let loose like never before.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts TOM BANDAGE: EXAMPLE GEOMETRY Through January 19 Dimension Gallery

ED RUSCHA: DRUM SKINS January 11 – July 12 Blanton Museum of Art

GRAY HAWN: DANCING IN THE LIGHT Through January 23 Austin Art & Frame

NATHAN MABRY & DAVID ODO IN CONVERSATION January 14 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

WHERE ARE WE GOING? Through January 25 Art for the People Gallery

ART PICK

Kathryn Polk: “Narrative Lithographs” By Vanessa Blankenship WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY, JANUARY 9 – FEBRUARY 2

Artist Kathryn Polk has been creating intricate lithographs, images printed on flat surfaces like stone, for the past 17 years. Drawing inspiration from her childhood in the South during the ’50s and ’60s, the expected role of women in society and four generations of women in her family, Polk’s artwork commands a strong female presence. The pieces contain unique symbols, like flames, needles and thread, women in pink dresses and daring tattoos, which play a role in the majority of Polk’s creations. While Polk often leaves the meaning behind these symbols, and the repetition of the same characters, up to the audience’s interpretation, she did shed some light on one.  In art pieces like “I Won’t Go Back” and “I Remember Everything,” which will be on display during the show, a bold red thread immediately catches the viewer’s attention. It seemingly is attached to each woman not just physically but emotionally. Polk explains that the thread is associated with her mother because she was a gifted seamstress.  “The red thread is a symbol for my mother, and it also indicates the bloodline between the women in my family and the legacy of her,” she says. Kathryn Polk’s “Narrative Lithographs” can be found at the Wally Workman Gallery from January 9 until February 2. Stop by and form your own interpretations of the artwork with the artist herself during a reception on opening night.

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MOTOWN: THE SOUND OF YOUNG AMERICA Through January 26 LBJ Presidential Library LADDIE JOHN DILL: CONTAINED RADIANCE AUSTIN Through February 1 Lora Reynolds Gallery STORIES TO TELL Through February 2 Harry Ransom Center THE ART OF CHAD SMITH January 4 – 12 Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery JERÓNIMO REYESRETANA: TOPOLOGY OF A CLOUD January 4 – 25 Co-Lab Projects KATHRYN POLK: SOLO SHOW January 9 – February 2 Wally Workman Gallery

PHOTO FANTASTICO January 15 – 17 Various Locations SANGMI YOO: STEREOTYPED ORDINARY January 15 – February 15 Flatbed Press & Gallery PRINTAUSTIN January 15 – February 15 Various Locations POP-UP EXHIBITION: LONE STARDOM January 16 Blanton Museum of Art THE CONTEMPORARY PRINT EXHIBITION OPENING January 17 Big Medium Gallery SPECTRUM: NEW WORK BY ROI JAMES January 18 – February 22 Davis Gallery MIHEE NAHM January 18 – February 27 Women & Their Work Gallery UMLAUF PRIZE EXPANDED: LING-LIN KU January 23 – April 5 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

" I R E M E M B E R E V E R Y T H I N G " B Y K AT H RY N P O L K

JULIE PELAEZ: PLEASE PRESS PAUSE Through January 25 Art for the People Gallery


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A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com

EVENT PICK

2020 Chef Dinner Series By Holly Cowart ARLO GREY, JANUARY 20

Austin is known for collaboration. This is especially true within the The LINE hotel, where its year-old restaurant, Arlo Grey, serves up French- and Italian-inspired fare in a gorgeously eclectic interior. Now that the eatery has successfully found its footing, its team is expanding its offerings with a new dinner series. During the monthly program, founder and chef Kristen Kish will partner with a nationally celebrated chef for a culinary exploration of epic proportions. “The guest series is a way for us to keep learning new things, challenging ourselves to do new food and work with amazing chefs,” says Kish. Kish shot to fame in 2013 after winning the 10th season of “Top Chef.” To kick off this inaugural series, she’s chosen Brooke Williamson, her final competitor in the “Top Chef” finale. The two had an instant bond that led to a long-lasting friendship, making it no surprise that Williamson would be first on the roster. Following her will be Michael Fojtasek, executive chef of Olamaie, and award-winning chef Erik Bruner-Yang the month after. Each individual’s cooking style will be allowed to shine as Kish skillfully works to fuse together cohesive and innovative plates based on their suggestions. “They set the tone and I will follow,” she explains. “We will of course add our Arlo Grey magic, but it is really them driving the kind of vibe they want to create.” The finalized menu will consist of four to five courses matched with specially selected wine, dessert and a Champagne toast. Although steeper than your average night out, at $170 per person, the evening will make for an unforgettable dining experience, perfect for any gastronome.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org


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Design Furniture Accessories Lighting Artwork Rugs Gifts

2714 S Lamar Blvd. | (512) 953-5615 | info@sparrowinteriors.com


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8–5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: W–Th 12–6, F-Su artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu-Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com

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AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com

FLATBED PRESS & GALLERY 3701 Drossett Dr. Hours: Th 10–5 flatbedpress.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org CAMIBAart 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS 1023 Springdale Rd., Ste. 1B (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery

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GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: F-Su 12–4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 sites.utexas.edu/utvac WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org

FREDERICKSBURG

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org

FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org

INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


#HRCATX

2020 HRC Austin Gala Dinner tickets are on sale! Purchase now and support equality, love and local legislative progress.

Saturday, February 8, 2020 JW Marriott www.hrcatx.org


Get a sneak peek inside the one-of-akind homes that will be on this year’s tour. By Lauren Jones

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P H OTO G R A P H S BY A N D R E A C A LO PORTR AIT BY ROB ERT K . CHAMB ER S

What sets Amity Worrel and Andrée Chalaron apart is an innate sense of style, “the eye,” as they call it, and the ability to intuit what clients really want. They also have very impressive backgrounds, working with the best and brightest creatives in the world. Principal designer Worrel started her career at notable firms Bilhuber & Associates and Tom Scheerer, serving high-profile individuals like Anna Wintour and David Bowie, while lead designer Andrée Chalaron represented the best interiors photographers in the industry at Art + Commerce, learning design through osmosis during long days on set. A 1970s marble coffee table shipped from Denmark, vintage tapestry and murals from local artist Emily Eisenhart are but a few pieces in their East Austin residential project that personify the designers’ superb taste. The home, which was built in 2008 by UT grad Ezra Wheeler, “was great, but

the couple wanted to put their personal spin on it,” Chalaron says. The homeowners desired a look that was refreshing, “bright and calm,” with a neutral palette and textures, materials and craftsmanship similar to those they’d seen in a project on the firm’s site. The end result was something even more magical than they had originally conceptualized. The main living spaces are an example of clever space planning, as the designers carved out three separate nooks from one large room, taking tips from their time living in cramped New York apartments. There’s now a library, a foyer featuring a vintage Moroccan rug, a living room with seating for nine, a revamped master bedroom and a master bath. The owners are so thrilled with their home they now ask “What would Andrée do?” when making any new design decisions.

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P H OTO G R A P H BY M O L LY C U LV E R

Sara Barney Like a handful of the designers on this year’s tour, BANDD DESIGN’s Sara Barney started out in quite a different field, establishing a career in the TV industry in L.A. before moving to Austin and leading film and television sales for SXSW. Now, in the three years since starting BANDD, she has worked with numerous young families to create spaces that are “casual, but still beautiful, approachable and functional.” Recently, she took on an extensive project in the Camelot neighborhood near Lost Creek and Loop 360 with architect Stuart Sampley. The original home, which was a run-down ranch-style

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built more than 30 years ago, had the typical problems of older homes: It was dated, with a cramped floor plan and little functionality for today’s needs. With lots of input from the homeowners, the team built a reverse floor plan home with a modern farmhouse aesthetic that they say was “pushed a bit more modern with lots of naturals, leathers and a plaster-concrete finish on the fireplace to give it a cozy feel.” For the designer, this project was all about taking risks and encouraging the family to be a bit more daring with its choices. For example, cue the bright blue kitchen and the floral wallpaper

in the formal dining room to “anchor that side of the house and balance some of the more masculine, rustic pieces.” There’s also the bunkroom, which was one of the last additions to accommodate “all the neighborhood kids that come over for sleepovers,” with another fun wallpaper and clean, simple bunks that will work as the couple’s kids grow older. One of Barney’s best design tips? Wallpaper! “It’s an easy way to break up white walls and bring more personality to a home.”

P O R T R A I T B Y K AT I E J A M E S O N

BANDD DESIGN


HEATHER SCOTT HOME & DESIGN

P O R T R A I T B Y R YA N N F O R D

This Austin home, named Villa Blanca by its owners, is a renovated 1980s four-bedroom, threeand-a-half-bathroom in Lake Pointe featuring plenty of entertaining space and a neutral palette. Designed by Heather Blue Harkovich, who spent a decade in corporate marketing before founding Heather Scott Home & Design with her husband, Scott, in 2006, the home is an ideal example of her firm’s aesthetic: “classic, new traditional and chic.” For the homeowners, the biggest challenge was the home’s dark and dated feel, which was made worse by its cramped interior layout. Thus they tasked Harkovich with a complete remodel of the main living spaces in 2016 and the upstairs this past year.  The first task was creating a larger kitchen by blowing out one of the walls that was encroaching on the space and adding double islands for improved functionality.  The rest of the home includes versatile custom-made furnishings as well as a few vintage finds like the master bathroom’s beautiful Turkish rug. With a palette that satisfies the homeowners’ desire for a more minimalist look, Harkovich made sure to add pops of color in accessories that can be easily swapped out. “When you do interior design over time, you can help people make better decisions,” she says. “Once you’ve experienced it, you develop your knowledge of what works best.” P H OTO G R A P H S BY K AT E Z I M M E R M A N T U R P I N tribeza.com

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P H OTO G R A P H S BY L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

HUGH JEFFERSON RANDOLPH ARCHITECTS The two-story home with the salmon-colored façade on West 32nd Street is easily recognizable to all who drive by it. Built in 1939, the Colonial Revival is a designated city landmark and was the home of Reverend Ernest C. Webb, the Wesley Bible Chair at UT from 1921 to 1923, and his wife, Eleanora, and its current homeowners were keen on keeping many of its original details in tact. They called on Hugh Randolph, who was featured in the 2018 tour and has been running his business in Austin for more than 25 years, for a reverent but modern remodel of the property.  They wanted plenty of contrast, more storage and natural light, as well as a floor plan with a bit of whimsy. The architect believes there “is a blurred line between where architecture stops and interiors begin” thanks to Kimberly Renner of The Renner Project for the finish-outs and inhouse designer Trisha Shepard for the furnishings, which honor the history of the home as well as the juxtaposition of old and new details. Large stucco columns create a sense of shelter toward the back of the home, while the main spaces are balanced with concrete flooring, glass and wooden accents. The living room, with floor-to-ceiling windows, is by far the most contemporary room in the house and inclues a built-in entertainment unit as well as pieces from 1stdibs, artist Roi James, subdued colors and personal items. “Nothing makes a project feel more successful than, when upon completion, the space exudes the clients’ personality and one can feel them in the space,” Shepard says.

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P H OTO G R A P H BY A N D R E A C A LO

Sara Cukerbaum SLIC DESIGN

PORTR AIT BY L AR S FR A ZER

Texas native Sara Cukerbaum isn’t afraid to be bold. The former hedge fund manager turned interior designer opened her business, SLIC Design, in 2010 and has since developed a reputation for her minimalist, modern and colorful aesthetic, rich with clean lines and custom pieces. Recently, Cukerbaum worked with Joseph Design Build—SLIC is its official interiors partner— on the 2,400-square-foot Bouldin Creek home of Via 313 co-founder Brandon Hunt and partner, Leslie Schiemann, choosing furnishings that complemented the couple’s desire for seamless

indoor-outdoor living. And true to her unique style, the designer included one-of-a-kind furnishings with what she describes as “fun pops of color and texture to make it feel special.” To honor the architecture but still keep things comfortable and functional, she went with pieces like a low-profile Italian Tacchini sofa, custom super white quartzite coffee table and blush area rug in the living room. The entire home is lush and funky with a touch of glam, colorful and whimsical but grounded by hints of black, as seen in the couple’s kitchen, turquoise bar stools

and an Article bed in the master. Some of Cukerbaum’s favorite details include the upholstered yellow headboard, 2,000-pound brass-and-steel waterfall-edge dining table built by local fabricator Brian Chilton and the powder bath’s eye-catching wallpaper she purchased from Supply Showroom. “We really wanted something exciting and memorable, as it’s just off the living room,” Cukerbaum says. The textured black-and-white paper by Erica Wakerly is the perfect addition to this home.

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MEETA MORRISON DESIGNS paneling and carpeting. She wanted a larger kitchen, as she and her husband are big entertainers, and a brighter office. She captured a midcentury modern-meets-California deck home aesthetic with large wooden decks at the back of the house, matte flooring that deflects the light during the day and pieces from Austin makers, like the blue-green shimmering tile from Arciterra and a colorful Meeta Morrison acrylic-on-canvas painting above the living room credenza. The most fascinating tidbit about the home? It has a five-star rating from the Austin Energy Green Building Program, thanks to Morrison’s effort to “reuse, recycle and donate.”

“The limestone that was removed from the inside and outside was reused on the exterior walls and landscaping and given to a friend,” she says. “Concrete was recycled. Metal was recycled. Cabinetry was repainted and reused. Appliances were sold or given to friends. It’s very important to me, and whenever I’m on a project, both at remodels and on new construction projects, I talk to my clients about managing waste.”

P O R T R A I T B Y VA L E R I F R E M I N

Meeta Morrison is a fan of all things “modern and eclectic” and is drawn to items with “an obvious handmade appeal,” like Persian rugs and locally made furniture, her aesthetic inspired by her Indian heritage, Texas upbringing and years spent as a studio artist. Over the past decade, she’s taken up a second career in design and has been helping Austinites get their dream home. But one of her latest projects, her own Bee Caves residence, was quite the design challenge. It’s an older home, built in the late 1970s or early 1980s, and exhibited all the common problems, like a tight floor plan, a lack of natural light and small bathrooms. Plus, there was dated wood

P H OTO G R A P H BY M I C H A E L H S U

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P H OTO G R A P H BY R O B E RT G O M E Z

P O R T R A I T B Y N I CO L E M L A K A R

SHABBY SLIPS INTERIORS Shabby Slips’ Sara Scaglione has design in her DNA. Her father was a builder and worked on parts of Houston’s Galleria. When she graduated from St. Edward’s with a degree in fine art, she knew she wanted to open a showroom, as the industry had always been part of her life. By 1994, she was managing the Austin location of Shabby Slips, selling soft, slipcovered pieces, one-of-a-kind European antiques and modern accents like coffee tables, lighting and art. The store is “classic and streamlined and has evolved over the years.” Recently, Scaglione, who enjoys creating contrast with texture and color, revamped the interior of a Westlake home for a client she has known for many years. It’s their third project together, and over time, the homeowners have expanded their tastes, wanting something a bit less traditional for their new home. The family room is warm and casual, with a leather-andchrome chair and darker accents, while the living room is full of natural light and white furnishings that play up a whimsical snake textile, local art and a contemporary chandelier. Scaglione believes that a variety of textures and scale is key. Check out the oversize blackand-gold painting in the master bedroom, the stately midcentury-modern desk and the Moroccan rug in the bathroom. Looking to liven up your home? One of the designer’s trademarks is adding a large tray in the master where the homeowners can display their beautiful items like makeup, perfume and jewelry.

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P H OTO G R A P H BY T R E D U N H A M F I N E F O C U S

Page Gandy grew up in South Texas, just 15 minutes from the Mexican border, which led to her interest in bold color and pattern in each of her projects. Graduating from Rice University with degrees in political science and psychology, she later found her passion for interior design but jokes that psychology is just as much a part of her process as her design education. She’s all about creating livable, functional spaces that work with how a home will really be used, “where the homework will be done and where the Legos will be

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played with,” and as a mother of two boys, designing for families is her forte. This latest project is in Austin’s Westwood neighborhood, nestled between Rollingwood and Westlake, for a family with three young boys. In addition to the interiors, Gandy’s firm, 3 Fold Design Studio, completed the building plans, making room for a big kitchen and separate spaces for the family to use as the children grow older. One of the home’s standout features is the designer’s creative use of Ann Sacks tile, from the

living room fireplace, minimalist kitchen backsplash and laundry room floor. While it includes plenty of fun details, she tends to start with a simple approach and a clean palette. “Fads come and go, so you have to see how much you can push a design where it will still be relevant in 10 years,” she says. “But you can really do something with tile and wallpaper.” In addition to funky high- and low-end tile choices, Gandy turned to Etsy for unique lighting and hardware finds.

P O R T R A I T B Y S Y LV I A W E S L E Y

3 FOLD DESIGN STUDIO


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© 2019 SWBC. All rights reserved. Loans are subject to credit and property approval.Other restrictions and conditions may apply. Programs and guidelines are subject to change without notice. Rates are subject to change daily. Corporate office located at 9311 San Pedro Avenue, Suite 100, San Antonio, TX 78216. SWBC MortgageCorporation, NMLS #9741 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org).

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Representing the best of East Austin real estate. Broker Associate 512.784.2163

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Lindsay Harris is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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FEATURES

FULL BLOOM Step inside the iconic Bloomhouse, one of Austin’s most unusual homes, p. 64.

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Perfectly

Imperfect 54 JANUARY 2020 |

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How Mark Ashby Design converted this small Zilker ranch house into a midcentury-modern dream home by H A N N A H J . P H I L L I P S

photographs by C L AY G R I E R

In this post- “Mad Men” era, the resurgence of midcentury-modern (MCM) design remains as steady as it was when the show wrapped in 2015. Combined with the joy-curated ethos of Marie Kondo’s recent influence, the current aesthetic is simplicity—both as a nostalgic return to the elegance and efficiency of the 1950s and as a nod to a contemporary minimalism that sees the home more as a canvas for living and gathering than as a museum for collecting. With this in mind, the team at Mark Ashby Design worked with Rick and Cindy Black Architects to completely redesign this Zilker home’s kitchen, sunken den and bathrooms. Adding terrazzo floors throughout, the Ashby team used built-in furniture, tile, textures and cabinetry to curate a custom look. The resulting mix of clean minimalism with a personal, natural element in each room creates an overall balance of perfect imperfection. 

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Paper lanterns offer a sleek solution to the challenge of lighting within midcenturymodern design.

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We chatted with designer Christina Simon to learn more about the project and how she aggregates an authentic MCM feel without appearing overstated. The best way to re-create the look, she says, is to learn the language of MCM and adapt it to your own taste and resources. “The concept of midcentury modern can have a number of different expressions,” says Simon. “You might see one type of fabric in Europe and take cues from that to make it more current, or choose a different textile to make it softer. The more you’re studied on it, the more nuanced it will look.” Simon recommends learning this language at local showrooms like The Renner Project, which beautifully displays what has been done in design by collecting all the references in one place. “We are so lucky to have access to a space like The Renner Project, which can inform how we mix and match pieces to create an elevated, inspired feel. Once you know the precedent that places like IKEA and CB2 are stealing from, you can find even better looks in that language.” One huge component of MCM is minimizing

clutter through architectural details, designing built-in furnishings to simplify a home layout. Simon and her team incorporated this into the sunken lounge with a daybed that maximizes both space and light. “For midcentury-modern architects, it was all about simplicity and finding a way to integrate things so they don’t have to move,” says Simon. “For this home, we wanted to add a clean line but with textural interest; replacing the original wall here sparks more curiosity and invites natural light.” Light can be a particularly challenging MCM theme to re-create in contemporary homes without overlaborating. “Some light fixtures from that era can look pretentious, but the Noguchi Museum Shop has been an incredible resource for authentic pieces that aren’t overdone,” she says. “Their paper lantern collaboration from Tom Sachs’ drawings are keeping his work alive and accessible, and we love using these light sculptures for a warm look that isn’t showing off.” 

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" W E A R E A L L C R AV I N G I T E M S T H AT H A V E B E E N H A N D - T O U C H E D A N D H AV E A S O U L . "

Likewise, Simon integrated natural-looking ceramics in the kitchen and an intentionally unintentional collection of planters in the sunbathing addition to add an organic vibe in both spaces. Noting the overlap of the MCM renaissance with a new surge in handmade ceramics, Simon argues that the intersection is no coincidence. “We are all craving items that have been handtouched and have a soul,” she says, “so when we selected the ceramics, we wanted bold, simple shapes but with a texture and nuance so that the lines aren’t exactly perfect.” In the bathroom, a vintage brass vase corresponds to the un-lacquered brass fixtures of the tub to suggest that same hint of imperfection. “The brass is a living metal, so it will change over time with your skin oils and the humidity in Austin,” says Simon. “I loved this bathroom scheme, because when you allow things to not be totally perfect, or when you add something unexpected like the photograph, you make the whole space look more thoughtful.” For Simon, these touches of imperfection create a balanced theme throughout the entire home, using MCM language but departing from it with thoughtful personality. “The more you get off the obvious, beaten path,” she concludes, “the more it looks like you cared about how to put your home together and it becomes more you.”  tribeza.com

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LIGHTING “This is from the Noguchi Museum Shop; we were looking for something bright and luminous and these paper pendants give off the perfect warmth.” Akari 70EN Ceiling Lamp, $550, shop. noguchi.org.

CHRISTINA SIMON’S TIPS ON HOW TO GET THE LOOK

MIDCENTURY-MODERN FURNISHINGS “Getting a MCM look means having a couple of built-in pieces, so we had a carpenter create this daybed. To recreate the look, make a platform daybed and put some cushions on top of it – we had a local upholsterer create ours, and the whole look adds textural interest.” Midcentury Modern Ib Kofod Larsen Selig Armchair, $2,395, chairish.com. (LEFT) Amoeba Wild Walnut 42.5-Inch Wide Coffee Table, $299, article.com. (ABOVE)

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Chisos Aerial, Nick Simonite, Price Upon Request, nicksimonite.com

Fabricut Soho Stripe fabric in Shadow, $83.25/ yard, decoratorsbest.com

B AT H R O O M "This bathing area is a dream come true! If you want to create a thoughtful look like this, you have to be very thoughtful about each piece. If all of these planters were terra-cotta, you get a totally different look, so to get that MCM look, just add in a mix of everything: local nurseries, Pottery Barn, Urban Outfitters – just pick and choose." Deep Nesting Basket Set, $120, connectedgoods.com.

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A historic renovation project preserves the soul of old Austin 64 JANUARY 2020 |

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by Hannah J. Phillips photographs by Jana Cantua tribeza.com

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When David and Susan Claunch started their search for short-term rental properties, they didn’t expect to stumble upon a piece of Austin history. Nestled in the woods of West Lake Hills, David recalls finding Bloomhouse listed in the insert of a magazine. With its organic shape and ethereal concrete dome, the structure was far from the investment piece the couple had in mind; the very thing that made it beautiful also rendered it completely impractical for modern life—much less for tenants. But for David, Bloomhouse was a time capsule from a bygone era, a passion project and an opportunity to preserve a piece of Austin’s soul. “Austinites love to say Keep Austin Weird,” he says, “but it gets less and less weird every day—the Broken Spoke is surrounded by five-story condos. I saw Bloomhouse in that context—as a purveyor of Austin culture—but its location and private ownership meant that not many people were familiar with it.”

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Inside and out, the Bloomhouse's design takes endless twists and turns often like a dream.

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THE BUILDING IS TRULY ORGANIC.

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The home is named for its original owner, Dalton Bloom, who designed the dwelling as an architecture student at the University of Texas in the ’70s. Commissioning his contemporary Charles Harker, Bloom wanted to create an extraordinary space that would stand the test of time. For Harker, the project became a philosophical experiment in organic architecture, responding to the sterile environments he was noticing in contemporary homes. The project developed over 11 years, unfolding as

Harker continually explored the interaction between man and nature. Where other potential investors passed on the enormous undertaking of preserving the home, David saw the challenge as part of its appeal. Drawn by how it captures the “psychedelic cowboy phase” of Austin, he was equally intrigued by the home’s inner working. Purchasing the home in 2017, he also inherited a box of Harker’s sketches and notes, weathered with age and oozing with the delicious smell of old paper. The collection outlines Harker’s theory of art and experiments in physics, ranging from architectural treatises to sketch studies of water droplets splashing together. Some excerpts are pure poetry. “I am against housing as we know it today,” Harker writes in one entry from 1975. Condemning the cookie-cutter trend of suburban housing rather than houses, he hints that the home should be a work of art, but warns that “art which is fully comprehended ceases to function as an art object.” Tucked behind trees on a sloping hill, the structure appears more sculptural than residential. The woods give way to a curved white dome, reaching upward like an enchanted dollop of concrete meringue—as if dropped there by some fairy-tale giant. A footpath of circular tile leads over a miniature moat where seven toadstool-shaped lights stand sentinel at the front door. The interior feels just as mythical: Cozy nooks of handcarved cherry wood meet sweeping lines of white stucco for an effect both intimate and vast. Entering feels at once like falling down the rabbit hole in “Alice in Wonderland”—mesmerizing and psychedelic— and like joining one of J.R.R. Tolkien’s hobbits for tea: snug, charming, warm. tribeza.com

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wo winding staircases flank the interior entrance. The first leads upward into a tower, where a built-in daybed acts as the kind of reading nook Rapunzel might envy. The other leads into the heart of the house, looking down into a sunken lounge, where a spiraling fireplace catches the eye. The hypnotic curvature of the hearth spins in the same direction as the tower staircase, striking a visual parallel without creating a direct copy. “There are repeating themes but no repeating pattern,” says David. “The building is truly organic.” Even the recurring use of circular tile avoids repetition; each one is handmade and individually grouted into the concrete. For these, Harker drew inspiration from magnified views of the cross section of plant stalks, scattered throughout the home to represent the capillary tubes that transfer water and nutrients between roots and leaves. This microcosmic devotion to the minutiae continues to fascinate David, who praises Harker’s ability to sculpt the external structure

A dreamy nook upstairs looking out upon the hills of Westlake.

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while leaving room for interior precision. For the exterior, Harker constructed a shell framework with metal rebar, carving a hand-sprayed polyurethane foam into the desired shape with an 18-inch pruning saw over a period of seven months. In the final stage, he covered the whole dome with an inch of poured concrete. “Everything you see, he carved,” David marvels, “knowing that it would be an inch thicker when it was done. This may not seem like a big deal until you see the intricate interior details.” While his primary goal was to connect man and nature, Harker also wanted to connect people to one another. In the dining area, Harker crafted a nesting cherry table for a convertible breakfast nook beneath an oval window. The main triangular slab slides into custom-built benches to become a banquette, fitting the space with precision and allowing more space for entertaining. David says that parties in the house are always interesting, since it takes most people half an hour to adjust to their surroundings. “Every person that comes here, a different part of the building resonates with them,” he says. “Creatives tend to love it, but some people do get really freaked out. I’ve found that it’s usually the black-and-white thinkers of the world that get disoriented.” The cherry wood theme continues in the kitchen, where exposed shelving looks as though it was sculpted from the tendril roots of a giant tree. The rich wood of built-in cabinetry hides all exterior handles, with no knobs to be found on any door. For the oven, David added a boxed fan for ventilation, covering it with more cherry wood to both modernize and merge with the other fixtures.  Winding into the bedroom, another staircase leads to an enclave that leaves the impression of sleeping in a conch shell. With spiraling stucco overhead, Harker hoped to replicate the acoustics of ocean waves above the bed. 

To honor that same attention to detail, David likewise deliberated over each element of the renovation, which took about 18 months. Structurally, his biggest challenge was water— referring both to the calcified, outdated supply lines and to ceiling damage from four decades of Austin humidity. The irony of Harker’s inspiration from the elements of water and earth, says David, is that concrete absorbs water when it comes in contact with earth. Acting as general contractor, David made several updates himself, but relied on the expertise of highly specialized subcontractors for repairs to the stucco, countertops, plumbing system and ceiling. The aim with each update was to balance modern amenities with the integrity of Harker’s original design. To add handrails to the staircases, for example, David commissioned a local craftsman for handforged steel in a Japanese bronze finish. Corresponding to the curves of Harker’s inset cherry wood, the end of each railing comes to a leaflike point— thus meeting a need for safety with an organic aesthetic that brings nature indoors. For additional furnishings, David and Susan partnered with West Elm to style each room with midcentury-modern pieces that correspond to Harker’s custom table and original designs. “We wanted to restore it to its former glory,” says David, “but we also had to make it both comfortable

and safe to stay here.” The renovation process demanded both patience and persistence, he concludes, but he and his wife relished the opportunity to synergize their passions and preserve a piece of Austin. “I see it as saving a piece of history,” David says. “Those of us who care about the culture of this city—all parts of this city—should do what we can to cherish and hold onto that. With every new high-rise, Austin loses a little of its soul.” Short-term rentals start at $565/night. For more information, visit airbnb.com or toptriprentals.com.

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STYLE PROFILE

By Hannah J. Phillips  Photographs by Claire Schaper

As a first-generation Mexican American, Veronica Ortuño’s earliest memories are of her mother’s ability to create a comfortable space for the family and guests. Her care and tasteful touches gave Ortuño a deep appreciation for design and décor. As an adult, she found outlets for creativity through her own brand, Las Cruxes, which evolved from a clothing resale site into a creative services company. She maintained an interest in interior design but didn’t make it her primary focus until a mutual friend asked her to redesign his Detroit office. Pouring herself into the project, Ortuño didn’t realize she was embarking on a journey that would lead to a full-time career pursuing her lifelong passion. We sat down with Ortuño in her Elgin home to hear how she made the jump and what still inspires her today.    To supplement her college tuition while living in Portland, Oregon, Ortuño started selling reworked vintage and hand-painted garments online through her website, lascruxes.com. The name is a nod to her Mexican heritage, deriving from the word “cruces,” which translates to “crossings.” Ortuño’s mission for the brand is to

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One of many floral arrangements Ortuño has scattered throughout her house in Elgin. LEFT: A quiet nook in a Detroit client’s home.


FAR LEFT: Expertly thrifted vintage shoes. LEFT: The kitchen Ortuño designed for her Detroit project.

represent the intersection of her various sources of inspiration: art, music, fashion, culture and more.    “Over the years, Las Cruxes has had many iterations,” says Ortuño, “but it’s always been about unity and the bridging of different ideas and people.”   Moving to Austin in 2010, Ortuño established Las Cruxes as a brick-and-mortar and experimental space to support other creatives. Originally located behind Spider House coffee, the store became a hub for local artists, serving as a boutique, gallery and community space, later moving to East Austin due to rising rent. Expressing her love of interiors, Ortuño shared photos of the store’s design through the hashtag #lascruxesinteriors. When an acquaintance emailed saying he had seen the photos and appreciated her taste, he asked whether she might be interested in decorating his office and events lounge in Detroit.   “I had about a week to think it over,” Ortuño recalls, “and I decided to take the opportunity. I visited the sites, sketched out the spaces, met with contractors and somehow became the construction manager. Demo started two weeks later, and it was truly a baptism by fire!”   At the time, Ortuño was also taking an online computer-aided design course to gain industry-specific skills. Combined with her natural eye for design and her childhood passion, Ortuño’s love of learning seems to be the secret to her success. After her Detroit project, she continued taking courses and conducting her own research, joining several discussion groups to find support from other designers. “I’m constantly amazed at how many resources we have at our fingertips,” she says. For inspiration, she loves scanning books that

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STYLE PROFILE

A perfectly curated corner in Ortuño's Elgin home. RIGHT: Traditional Mexican floral beeswax candle and a beloved book.

An inspiration shot from architect Ulrich Franzen's penthouse apartment.

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“I’m constantly amazed at how many resources we have at our fingertips.” that span different decades and styles. “I’m drawn to the late-’70s, ’80s and ’90s and have dozens of old Architectural Digest issues I often revisit.” Ortuño also draws inspiration from her Mexican background and travel. While in Detroit, she visited the Detroit Institute of Arts, moved by the glass and clay vessels dating from before the first century.    “The thought of each one surviving such an expanse in history hit me to my core: I could feel the energy carried throughout time,” she says. “It was intense and beautiful!”   Always learning and creating, Ortuño decided to launch her own ceramics collection this year after signing up for a class at the Art School of Laguna Gloria. Offered through The Contemporary Austin, the class allowed Ortuño to explore handcrafted lamps and vessels, which she hopes will live many lives and experience different homes. Her latest collection is a two-handled design inspired by her favorite Greek sculptures and homewares.


F

rom her own heritage, Ortuño draws inspiration from folklore, incor porating element s like milagros (silver and tin votives) and barro negro (black clay) angel candleholders throughout her home. After 10 years of living in Austin, Ortuño moved to Elgin with her husband, Benson Ellis, after falling in love with its historic charm, walkability and welcoming community. The pair found a home from 1905, recently renovated but with original features like arched French glass doors leading into the dining room. Ortuño’s favorite corner is a cozy reading nook beneath another arched window, where she does morning meditations and congregates with friends to listen to records. In Elgin, she loves sourcing pieces for her home and her clients at local antiques shops like Martha’s Market and the Tattered Shutter. She calls Elgin a diamond in the rough, guarding great treasures for those willing to hunt. The town is close enough to Austin to give access to arts and cultural activities, while still providing an escape from city life. “I appreciate being able to retreat into the country, away from the hustle and bustle to recenter and decompress,” she says. “Our home is truly our sanctuary.”   Following her mother’s example, Ortuño is constantly making changes around the house. A recent road trip through New Mexico inspired her to design a pueblostyle fireplace for their dining room, and she and her husband are in the beginning stages of adding an en suite bathroom. Where her business is concerned, she hopes to continue building a clientele in Texas, traveling in between projects for more inspiration. “Ultimately, I want to be able to adapt to my clients’ needs and taste, creating spaces that are personal and unique and hopefully not pigeonholed to one specific style.”

A lamp and customized shade of Ortuño's design. LEFT: Four of many vintage issues of Architectural Digest. ABOVE: Tabletop items from Ortuño's new line of ceramics.

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FOOD + DRINK

IN THE WORKS How this wearhouseturned-brewery is embracing tradition to forge its future, p. 90.

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KAREN'S PICK

Central Machine Works By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

THIS REVIEW WASN’T MY IDEA. BUT MY PEEPS AT TRIBEZA KEPT bugging

me about Central Machine Works Brewery. I argued that I don’t normally write about breweries (or wineries or distilleries), but they urged me on. The food’s great! The beer’s yummy! The space is cool! And they were right. Central Machine Works was an unexpected delight. It’s a brewery offering much more than just a cold pint, with a history, ambiance and menu that’s a cut above most brewpubs in town. Central Machine Works is Austin’s newest brewery in one of its older buildings. Open since November, it’s housed in a massive 1940s metal workshop with a rich, long history. Formerly known as Capitol Machine Works, it produced airplane parts and transport trailers during WWII, then manufactured custom industrial parts for local businesses for decades after the war. Its timeless, corrugated metal warehouse has been a neighborhood landmark for 80 years and CMW’s owners were careful to protect it when repurposing it as a brewery. They maintained its iconic façade yet refashioned its interior to include a spacious beer hall, an intimate tap room with full bar and a working brewery, complete with soaring fermentation tanks. Outside, there’s a beer garden, fire pits, family- and dog-friendly play areas, an outdoor stage for live music and parking for food trucks. Inside and out, the sprawling property accommodates 500 people. Designer and CMW neighbor, David Clark of Kartwheel, was mindful to preserve the integrity of the building and to repurpose materials as much as possible. He incorporated many of the original machines and fixtures into the décor, including an 18,000-pound steel lathe that makes a striking backdrop behind the main bar. The inside is filled with a mishmash of comfortable vintage furniture and the outdoor beer garden hosts picnic tables and patio furniture. On chilly nights, there are fire pits and

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blankets – none of those omnipresent propane heaters. It’s a massive space that somehow feels cozy and nostalgic. The clientele varies throughout the day and week. On a recent Saturday afternoon, families filled the patio as kids played corn hole while their parents happily sipped cold beer. On weekdays, patrons on laptops take advantage of the free WiFi. And in the evenings, singles, couples and groups of all ages roam the various spaces. Since it’s a brewery, let’s talk beer. CMW brewers Scott Rynbrandt and Jordan Bremer are focused on small-batch traditional beers like German pilsners and American-style ales. Recently, only one CMW beer was available, a crisp American Lager, but I’m sure those options will increase quickly. Additionally, there are draft and canned choices from local brewers


like St. Elmo, Friends & Allies, Hops & Grain, Live Oak, Zilker, Southern Heights, Oasis, Real Ale, plus Argus Cider. I like beer, but after one, I’m ready to move on. And luckily, CMW offers a full bar with an impressive cocktail menu. There’s the classics like Bloody Marys and Old Fashioneds, but also creative originals like the Sunriser with vodka, coconut, cardamom and nitro CBD-infused cold brew coffee and the delicious Blueberry Smash mixed with fresh berries, vodka, canton ginger, mint and lemon. There’s also a small but really thoughtful wine list of mostly old world imports. CMW serves both lunch and dinner and while there’s nothing on the menu that will blow your mind, it’s all really good. The German pretzel was warm and soft and served with Kolsch whole grain mustard and oozy beer cheese with an unexpected bite and depth of flavor. There are excellent pizzas, including options with gluten-free cauliflower crusts. We devoured the Pizza Primer; its crispy thin crust offering a bit of chew and topped with fresh, bright tomato sauce and just the right amount of mozzarella and basil. The Beer Brat is a generous sausage on a soft roll topped with sauerkraut, caramelized onions and peppers, and Pilsner mustard. It comes with tasty Zapp’s potato chips, or for a small CENTRAL MACHINE WORKS up-charge you can substitute the amazing Warm German Potato Salad made with tender cubes 4824 EAST CESAR CHAVEZ ST of potato dressed with apple cider vinegar and CMWBREWERY.COM mustard and studded with red onion and chunks 512.220.2340 of thick, diced bacon. The menu also features juicy burgers, Rueben sandwiches, a few salads and a decent kids menu. I’m glad that my Tribeza colleagues get in my business sometimes. Otherwise, I might overlook gems like Central Machine Works. It’s a treasured piece of East Austin’s past that has been reinvented into a delightful and delicious place to be enjoyed for years to come.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

CAFÉ NO SÉ

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises deli-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor

cious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch,

and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

diner favorites. Order up the classics, including

and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the

roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

classic avocado toast is a must-try.

decadent milkshakes.

charcuterie board.

34TH STREET CAFE

THE BREWER’S TABLE

501 Colorado St. | (512) 499 0977

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

4715 E. 5th St. | (512) 520 8199

Hiding in plain sight on one of downtown’s busiest

This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great

at the brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers

for weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

source the ingredients, which are utilized in both

COMEDOR

street corners, Comedor is a restaurant full of surprises. Lauded chefs Philip Speer and Gabe Erales deliver a menu that is equally clever and unexpected, with contemporary cuisine riffs on Mexican culinary traditions.

the kitchen and the brewery to eliminate food waste.

ASTI TRATTORIA

EASY TIGER

The seasonally changing menu is unique but provides

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

options for even the pickiest of eaters.

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-andgoat-cheese panna cotta.

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St.,

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and

EL ALMA

soft centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

executed by the Stefano Ferrara wood-burning

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with

ovens, which runs at more than 900 degrees.

unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Aus-

Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage of

tin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect

cheese on this menu!

for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

CAFÉ JOSIE

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

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with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

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1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

We love this charming French-Vietnamese eatery with

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

a colorful menu of pho, banh mi and sweet treats.

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ÉPICERIE 2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840 A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

HANK’S

ITALIC

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents

and a kid-friendly patio all work together to make

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet

Hank’s a favorite neighborhood joint. With happy hour every day from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

HILLSIDE FARMACY

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food

Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner spe-

with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early

cials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

HOLY ROLLER

delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

509 Rio Grande St.

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

If all-day brunch is more your style, make a bee-line

local and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant,

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s pro-

for downtown diner Holy Roller. Led by Callie Speer,

Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon

vides modern spins on American classics. Dig into

the punk rock vibe plays out in creative combinations

Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find

a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with

like pancakes with fried chicken and migas kolaches.

a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked

cranberry-thyme cocktail.

pastries and a coffee.

HOME SLICE PIZZA GRIZZELDA’S

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere

For pizza cravings head to Home Slice. Open until 3

between traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican

a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping conve-

recipes, each fused with a range of f lavors and styles.

nience and stocked with classics like the Margherita

The attention to detail in each dish shines and the

as well as innovative pies like the White Clam.

tortillas are made in-house daily.

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh,

HOPFIELDS

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the

beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine

Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-

and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect

tossed pizzas and incredible desserts alongside

pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and

locally sourced and seasonally inspired specials.

moules frites.

JUNE’S ALL DAY 1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722 This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering.

JUSTINE’S BRASSERIE 4710 E. 5th St. | (512) 385 2900 Justine’s is a quaint French brasserie deep in East Austin. Don’t let the short drive deter you – the experience of eating traditional French plates among exquisite works of art and decorative string lights makes for one idyllic evening with a significant other.

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KEMURI TATSU-YA 2713 E. 2nd St. | (512) 893 5561 Kemuri Tatsu-Ya is a Japanese-Texan mash-up that injects seriously good food with a sense of humor. The East Austin joint features Asian-inspired smoked meats and seafood, along with yakitori, ramen, and izakaya classics meant for sharing. Drinks are also an integral part of the meal, so come thirsty.

LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM 1203 W. 6th St. | (512) 474 5107 Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Chef Ling and her team create sophisticated Chinese dishes that draw enthusiastic crowds day and night. Make sure to stop by during weekend brunch to taste the full mouthwatering dim sum menu.

LE POLITIQUE

LA BARBECUE 1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651 This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin

accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming

barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as deli-

marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern

cious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary

f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patis-

Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free

serie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that

beer and live music.

rival the French capital itself.

LAS PALOMAS

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

LENOIR 1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

LORO 2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Le-

and Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a

noir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making

welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive in-

the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable.

door-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office

Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles

of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsur-

from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

prisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

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MATTIE’S 811 W. Live Oak St. | (512) 444 1888 Mattie’s is a glorious urban paradise offering upscale American classics. While the cocktails are top-notch and the cuisine is nothing short of outstanding, Mattie’s ambiance and atmosphere are unmatched. OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits. ODD DUCK 1201 S Lamar Blvd | (512) 433 6521 Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck is the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect seasonal fare and drinks with a strong Texas inf luence sourced locally whenever possible. PARKSIDE 301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898 Patrons f lock to this downtown hideaway for its wide selection of oysters and other modern-American specialties. The 6th Street locale is filled with industrial details and plenty of natural light, so it’s no wonder that reservations are often necessary to get a table in the inviting space. THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

PICNIK 4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644 A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients.

THAI FRESH

VIXEN’S WEDDING

909 W. Mary St. | (512) 494 6436

1813 E. 6th St. | (737) 242 7555

A restaurant, cooking school and market all in one

Located in boutique hotel ARRIVE, Vixen’s Wedding

place. When you’re done dining on traditional Thai

is a charming space creating something truly unique.

favorites, stop by the adjoining coffee bar for freshly

Helmed by culinary super-couple Todd Duplechan

brewed joe, homemade ice cream and an array of

and Jessica Maher, the restaurant specializes in

baked goods.

Goan food, a cultural mash-up of bright and complex

POOL BURGER 2315 Lake Austin Blvd. | (512) 334 9747 Tiki meets Texas in this neighborhood burger bar. Located behind Deep Eddy Cabaret, crunchy crinkle-cut fries and juicy burgers are served from the window of a 1968 Airstream Land Yacht.

TINY BOXWOODS

RED ASH ITALIA

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating. The restaurant, located in downtown’s Seaholm district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. This Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

ROSEWOOD 1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205 Housed in a historic East Side cottage, chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding homage to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers. This new spot is sure to quickly become a staple.

1503 W. 35th St. | (512) 220 0698 This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and delicious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood. Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon Provencal salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former

1800 E. 6th St. | (512) 953 0092 Helmed by executive chef Fermín Núñez, Suerte was

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE 609 W. 6th St. | (512) 542 3380 Owned by actress and Austin resident Sandra Bullock, Walton’s is a dreamy brick-walled bakery, deli and floral shop. Take some pastries home after indulging in gourmet sandwiches and fresh salads for lunch, or stay for the rotating dinner menu. Most importantly, make it before 2 p.m. to order the legendary biscuit sandwich served only during breakfast!

WINEBELLY 519 W. Oltorf St. | (512) 487 1569 Named one of the top-20 wine bars in America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro maintains a local feel with its comfortable, laid-back interiors.

home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

SUERTE

f lavors.

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791

inspired by extensive travels through Central Mexico.

This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has

Artisanal masa is the highlight, made from local

one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an

heirloom corn and used in distinctive dishes rarely

inviting ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold

found on Austin menus. Order the delectable Suade-

and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen

ro Tacos, perfect for sharing with friends.

options to choose from.

WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.

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A LOOK BEHIND

An Owl in Cherrywood Inspires Joy and Art

Veronica Roberts' "parliament of owls" and Olive in his home in a tree in Cherrywood.

84 JANUARY 2020 |

The most important work of art in town these days isn’t a painting or sculpture, but a transcendent slice of nature, thanks to the Blanton Museum’s curator of modern and contemporary art, Veronica Roberts. She first spotted an eastern screech owl perched in a tree in Cherrywood on New Year’s Day 2019. Since then, she has named the owl Olive and made a thorough study of his habits during frequent visits with friends and colleagues, lovingly documenting the journey through Instagram (@veronicactx). Quite a fan club has ensued. In fact, Olive has become a sensation among Roberts' circle. “This owl’s been visited by rather

tribeza.com

By Aaron Parsley

famous artists,” says Roberts. “Gallerists ask me about Olive.” Pals of Roberts' began giving owlrelated gifts. Olive fan art arrives in the mail. “I get an owl present from someone every week,” Roberts says. She now has enough figurines for a “parliament of owls.” Followers have been mesmerized by the insider glimpse into the everyday life of the exotic creature as well as a spiritual component that cannot be denied. “These kinds of encounters with nature and wildlife help people understand how magical the natural world is, and that it’s in our midst,” Roberts says. Likewise, in her experience sharing the owl with guests, broken hearts have been soothed and friendships deepened. “The world is such a mess right now,” Roberts says. “People need this … They need beauty and a reminder that there are beautiful things in the world that we aren’t even aware of.”


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA January 2020 Issue  

The Interiors Issue No. 221

TRIBEZA January 2020 Issue  

The Interiors Issue No. 221

Profile for tribeza