Page 1

JA N UA RY 2016 AUG UST 2015

THE

Interiors I S S U E


Austin Showroom

2236 West Braker

512.451.1233

www.CopenhagenLiving.com


A Higher Level of Sophistication and Knowledge

Michele Turnquist

Real Estate Advisor (512) 431 1121 Michele.Turnquist@evusa.com

McCormick Ranch, $30,000,000

2525 Waymaker Way, $1,749,000

Lynn Robin

Timeless Elegance in Gated Golf Course Community Spicewood, $999,000

Waterfront Tranquility on Barton Creek 12532 Triple Creek, $999,000

Austin Westlake • 3700 Bee Caves • Suite 102 Austin • TX 78746 • USA • +1 512 328 3939

is now

Real Estate Advisor-Broker (512) 736 8822 Lynn.Robin@evusa.com


IN 2014 ENGEL & VÖLKERS BROUGHT THE WORLD TO AUSTIN. Where are we going next? COMING SOON SPRING 2016


theGardenRoom

1601 W. 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas ~ 512-458-5407 Monday through Saturday 10:00am gardenroomboutique.com

5:30pm


GALLERY & MODEL SHOWROOM NOW OPEN

A LIMITED COLLECTION OF 99 STUNNING RESIDENCES & PENTHOUSES F E AT U R I N G I N T E R I O R D E S I G N B Y K E L LY W E A R S T L E R .

NOW SELLING SALE S GALLERY & M O DEL

2 0 8 C O L O R A D O S T. A U S T I N , T X 7 8 7 0 1

512. 3 8 4.13 87

Exclusively represented by Kor Real Estate Texas, LLC.

LIVE AUSTINPROPER.COM

The developers reserve the right to make modifications and changes to the information contained herein. Renderings, photos and sketches are representational and may not be totally accurate. Dimensions, sizes, specifications, layouts, views and materials are approximate and subject to change without notice. We are in compliance with Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968. We have not, and will not, either directly or indirectly, discriminate against you or any other prospective purchaser on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Equal Housing Opportunity. Price and availability subject to change.


showrooms located in austin 512.637.0600 san antonio 210.455.0166 details at www.nestmodern.com


Gottesman Residential Real Estate gottesmanresidential.com l 512.451.2422 l Austin


3602 River Road

2015 Ashby Unit B

1718 Summit View 4300 Verano

98 San Jacinto # 1103

430 Canyon Rim

The Lake House on Lake Travis

2210 Greenlee

3 Wren Valley

2522 Pearce


LEONARD SEATING SYSTEM RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN

WWW.MINOTTI.COM

SCOTT + COONER AUSTIN 115 W. 8TH STREET - AUSTIN TEXAS 78701 PH. 512 480 0436 - WWW.SCOTTCOONER.COM


JA N UA RY

2 016

66

82

86

T R IBE Z A

38

50

42

O N T H E C OV E R : P H O T O B Y C A S E Y D U N N

features

D E PA RTM E NT S

Masters of Their Domain 42

COMMUNIT Y

Retreat, Remodel, Renew 50 On the Map: The New Design District 60 TRIBEZA Interiors Tour 66

12

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

STYLE

Social Hour

18

Column: Kristin Armstrong

Profile in Style

26

Exposed

Street Style

28

TRIBEZA Talk

38

ARTS

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

30

Music Pick

31

Event Pick

32

Art Pick

34

82 100

DINING

Dining Pick

86

Dining Guide

88

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: REBEL PIZZA PHOTO BY HAYDEN SPEARS; CARLY USON PHOTO BY NICOLE MLAKAR; KATIE KIME'S HOME PHOTO BY CHELSEA LAINE FRANCIS; SUPPLY PHOTO BY JESSICA PAGES; PHOTO BY CASEY DUNN; EMMER & RYE PHOTO BY HAYDEN SPEARS.

Contents


ISABEL MARANT KENZO

CÉLINE

DRIES VAN NOTEN ACNE STUDIOS

THE ROW

LANVIN A.P.C.

RAQUEL ALLEGRA

RICK OWENS

ULLA JOHNSON

MARNI

HELMUT LANG

ALEXANDER WANG

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

AUS TI N bygeorgeaustin.com/meetclara LAMAR · THE MENS SHOP · SOUTH CONGRESS

BALENCIAGA PROENZA SCHOULER

plus MANY MORE


Editor's Letter A behind the scenes Instagram from our cover shoot. My New Year’s resolutions include a trip (or three) to stock up on home

I

goods at the newly-opened Kettle & Brine.

have a penchant for changing interiors on a whim. Every few months, usually around deadline, I narrow in on one aspect of my home that I suddenly can’t stand and decide I won’t possibly be able to do another thing until I change it. Furniture is rearranged, rugs swapped from one room to the next and artwork moved from storage to the living room to the dining room and then back into storage. There is always a moment in the middle of it all, when books are stacked precariously in a corner and my end tables are on top of the sofa, when the panic sets in and I think, “Why did I do this?” Then I take a deep breath, collect myself and continue on. I do it because the change feels good. It feels good to walk into a room that you have styled, that is filled with memories and art and great books. Our homes reflect our lives and our perspectives, and they should change as we do. It is no coincidence that our Interiors Issue is published in January. It is a time to examine how we live, who we are and what we want the spaces around us to reflect. This month, TRIBEZA’s longtime columnist Kristin Armstrong captures this sentiment beautifully. She writes, “When we focus on our process and trust that the outcomes will unfold, we walk into our new year wholehearted, grateful, inspired and free.” We hope this issue helps you walk into the new year inspired. From the beautiful home on our cover, a collaboration between Mark Ashby Design, Shiflet Group Architects and Dalgleish Construction Company, to the curated collections at SUPPLY Showroom, there is no shortage of beautiful spaces from which to draw. And if you want to experience many of these homes in person, please join us on January 23 for the third annual TRIBEZA Interiors Tour. We have curated an incredibly dynamic group of homes from some truly talented designers, and we can’t wait to share them with you. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit TRIBEZA.com.

K AT I E F R I E L katie@tribeza.com @katiefriel

14

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


15

A U S T I N A R T S + C U LT U R E

EDITOR

Katie Friel

ASSISTANT EDITOR

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Chris Perez

Ashley Beall

COLUMNIST

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

WRITERS

SALES & OPERATIONS MANAGER

Kristin Armstrong

Nicole Beckley Mikela Floyd Kim Katopodis Sallie Lewis James Ruiz Karen Spezia Sam Sumpter PHOTOGRAPHERS

Take the survey and be entered to win a $100 giftcard from Juniper on Tribeza.com

George Elliman CHIEF OF STRATEGY

Sofia Sokolove

How are we doing?

PUBLISHER

ART DIRECTOR

Ashley Horsley

Miguel Angel Daniel Cavazos Casey Dunn Chelsea Laine Francis Nicole Mlakar Leah Overstreet Jessica Pages John Pesina Jenny Sathngam Hayden Spears ILLUSTRATORS

Joy Gallagher Kelly Colchin

YEARS

Lexi Ross

Derek Van Wagner INTERN

James Ruiz PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres MAILING ADDRESS 706a west 34th street austin, texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 www.tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2016 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

Subscribe to TRIBEZA!

VISIT TRIBEZA .COM FOR DETAIL S


THE BEDROOM EVENT

20% Off All Beds, Dressers, Side Tables & More Throughout the Month of January

Come Visit Us. Shop our showroom tucked away just one mile east of South Congress at 2090 Woodward Street. Or visit us online to see what’s new, find inspiration and browse our digital catalog. Exclusively in Austin. FOURHANDSHOME.COM


social hour

AUSTIN

Social Hour

2

1

6

7

HOPE Art Supper Club

3

8

Austinites gathered at Fair Market on November 21 for the HOPE Art Supper Club. The event featured a private dinner, silent and live auctions and an art display featuring work from some of the best street artists working today. The money raised will go directly to the HOPE Outdoor Gallery, which hopes to relocate its famed Castle Hill graffiti gallery to a permanent location.

4

5

9

10

Big Reds & Bubbles

The Wine & Food Foundation of Texas hosted the 13th Annual Big Reds & Bubbles showcase at the historic Driskill Hotel on November 19. The event featured over 100 varieties of wines and bubbly, which guests paired with bites from over 20 of Austin’s premier chefs. A silent auction and musical performances rounded out the evening.

HOPE: 1. Danielle Nieciag & Asa Hursh 2. Matt Randall, Amanda Huras & Jessica Scott 3. Serese Brown & Jessie Woodward 4. Kendra Erwin & Michael Casias 5. Jen Nash & John Staples Big Reds & Bubbles: 6. Kari Potts & Catherine Keller 7. Chelsea McCullough & Taylor Hughes 8. Becky Womack, Tulsi Oberbeck & Johanna Sheffield 9. Ree Ethridge & Rhone McCall 10. William Van Shellenbeck & Katie Wallace

18

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI)


Tarrytown Craftsman Inspired Home TarrytownCraftsman.com $1,295,000

Stunning Dick Clark Contemporary Close in Westlake | Panoramic City View Lot Private Listing | $10,000,000

RepResenting Austin’s Finest pRopeRties Kumara Wilcoxon 512.423.5035

Kumara@sothebysrealty.com KumaraWilcoxon.com Travis Heights Pristine remodel | Double corner lot Private Listing | $1,950,000

Remodeled Lake Austin Waterfront 3 Acres | 225’ Waterfront | Boat Dock Private Listing | $6,500,000

Westlake Hills Contemporary Westlake-Estates.com Private Listing | $5,890,000

W Residences 28th Floor | SW Corner | Custom Floor Plan Private Listing | $3,850,000


social hour

AUSTIN

1

3

2

5 Feast of Saint Cecilia

6

7

The Hotel Saint Cecilia hosted an exclusive VIP event in honor of the patron saint of music and poetry. The intimate fête also doubled as the release party for the newest Foo Fighters EP, which was recorded at the hotel. McGuire Moorman Hospitality and vintage rentals from Brass & Birch set the scene for a festive celebration.

4

8

9

Black Fret Ball

On December 4, philanthropic music lovers gathered at the Paramount Theatre for the second annual Black Fret Ball. The sold out soirée awarded $150,000 in grants to local musicians. But the giving didn’t stop there. Shakey Graves and Aaron Behrens donated their grants to fellow nominees and the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians, respectively. Additional nominees — including former The Voice star Nakia —provided the gala’s musical entertainment.

Saint Cecilia: 1. David Garza, Liz Lambert & Dan Dyer 2. Drake Vurnette & Jess Williams 3. Bobby Johns, Andi Palacios & David Pulkingham 4. Michelle Alany & Leia Goodpaster Black Fret: 5. David Messier & Andrea Villarreal 6. Chaka & Jon Deas 7. Jill Fiorillo & Matt Ott 8. Molly Schulman & Jess Serna 9. Brendan Anthony & Z. Lynch

20

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY DA N I EL C AVA ZOS & J EN N Y S AT H N G A M


social hour

AUSTIN

1

6

2

7

Dancing with the Stars Austin

3

4

8

A dozen notable Austinites paired up with professional dancers for a glamorous night of competitive dancing at the 9th Annual Dancing with the Stars Austin at the Hilton Austin. The event, held on December 6, was sponsored by Lexus of Austin and Lakeway and raised funds for the Center for Child Protection. At the event’s conclusion, Erin Johnston was awarded the coveted mirror ball trophy.

9

5

10

W Hotel Anniversary Party

The W Hotel celebrated its fifth anniversary with a night of music and mayhem, featuring performances by Hamish Anderson, The Southern Sirens and SPRATX. Guests sipped on drinks from Z Tequila, Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Deep Eddy Vodka while jamming to beats from Bird Peterson, Go Go Garcia and DJ IWannaBeHer.

Dancing with the Stars: 1. Lillyan & Trey Duck 2. Matt Stewart & Cassie LaMere 3. Nathan Clark & Danielle Kress 4. Tanuj & Nidhi Nakra 5. Rebecca & Nicco Azari W Hotel: 6. Kevin Carlson & Emily Fowler 7. Nick Jourdan, Kaitlyn Drake & David Robinson 8. Becky Odé & Monica Ramos 9. Teresa Windham, Chris Dodds & Angela Filardi 10. Liz Brown, Gisela Rodriguez & Amanda Huynh

22

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI)


S O P H I S T I C AT E D S T R AT E G I E S F O R S E L L I N G AUSTIN’S FINEST HOMES

C O M I N G S O O N : B A RT O N C R E E K

C O M I N G S O O N : S H E P H E R D M O U N TA I N

F E AT U R E D L I S T I N G : T R AV I S S E T T L E M E N T

S O L D : B A RT O N C R E E K

ASHLEY PROVIDES THE MARKET EXPERTISE, PERSONALIZED SERVICES, AND FOCUSED STRATEGIES THAT BRING QUALIFIED BUYERS AND SELLERS OF AUSTIN’S MOST EXTRAORDINARY PROPERTIES TOGETHER

• Austin Business Journal Top 3 Producing Agent 2014 – 2015 • Texas Monthly Five Star Agent 2013 – 2015 • Austin’s Platinum Top 50 Award Winner 2015 • AIOREP Top 10 Agent for Client Satisfaction in Texas 2015

ASHLEY ST UCK I

REALTOR©, CHLMS, CIPS, CRS

ASHLEYSTUCKIPRESTIGE.COM

512-217-6103

4301 W WIL L IAM CANNO N DR, BL DG K, #200, AUSTIN, TX 78749 ASHLEY@ASHLEYSTUCKI.COM

ASHLEY STUCKI R E A L T O R

©

PRESTIGE HOME COLLECTION


SERVING CENTRAL

M O T O R I Z A T I O N

TEXAS

&

A U T O M A T I O N

S P E C I A L I S T S

‘87

SI NCE

exterior motorized solar screens

SOLAR SCREENS

|

AW N I N G S

|

ROLLING SHUTTERS

tel.

|

INTERIOR SHADES

512.402.0990

|

INSECT SCREENS

www.txsunandshade.com

11813 Bee Caves Rd., Austin, Texas 78738 Showroom Hours: 10-5 M-F & 10-2 Sat.


OUR SERVICES :

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

FURNITURE + INTERIOR DESIGN

PROJECT MARKETING

»

Make modern design your resolution: Contact us today to perfect your settings. Fjord Lounge Chair | Fjord Stone Ot toman | Gentr y Sofa | Net Tables | Biknit Chair • exclusive to Urbanspace Interiors

801 W 5th #100, ATX | 512 457 8884 Real Estate » urbanspacerealtors.com + Interiors » urbanspaceinteriors.com


community

COLUMN

Examining Our Interiors BY K R I S TI N A R M S TRO NG I LLU S TR ATIO N BY JOY G A LL AG H ER

I LOVE NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS. I love blank slates, do-overs, fresh

starts, new chapters and comebacks. I love the idea that we wake up on January 1 — perhaps a little Champagne bubbly-headed — and get to begin again. Every year, sometime between Christmas and New Year’s Eve, I find time to get together with my brother, Jon. We have a standing annual appointment to make our resolutions. We have been doing this for so long that I cannot recall when we first started. Perhaps in frozen Minnesota during our high school years? Or maybe in college, after our parents moved to Rye, New York? That year we trudged through snowdrifts to find some tiny hole-in-the-wall neighborhood bar and we wrote our resolutions on cocktail napkins. We’ve sat at sushi restaurants and tapas bars in Santa Barbara and dreamed about our futures over blood orange margaritas. We’ve logged some quality time in Austin at my beloved Donn’s Depot. In recent years, we have become more refined. Now we bring actual journals with us, as crinkled cocktail napkins can become cumbersome (and are easily left in a taxi). We take turns, one of us thinks and talks and the other person writes it down. So I scribe his goals and he scribes mine. Of course this is not without considerable leeway because things get lost in translation and muddled in cocktails. Sometimes we have to stop for a bit to play pool, add songs on a jukebox, tell a story, or order some food. Jon’s handwriting is abysmal, left-handed, tiny, cramped chicken scratch, so my goals always look much messier than his do in my nice, neat, older sister handwriting. My brother finds this hilarious because my tidiness has always annoyed him, ever since childhood days when we shared a basement playroom in Michigan and I put a line of masking tape down the middle to divide my orderly side from his pigpen. He chuckles to himself as he writes down my resolutions, and I can tell he is adding his own commentary and side notes. There are often barely legible addendums and asides, subsets, arrows, sorry sketch illustrations, and parenthetical snarkiness. Let’s be honest, no

one knows me like my brother. We share DNA and a past, and our filterless brand of sibling humor is divinely wicked. Sometimes it isn’t until June when I review my mid-year progress (or lack thereof ) that I laugh out loud at something he added to my goals. It’s typically either something totally inappropriate or a zinger with surgical accuracy followed by a crooked penciled smiley face. “Haha, love you too, buddy.” The best thing about this tradition is that we keep it — and each other — real. Jon adds a measure of lightheartedness to a process I grant substantial weight. Taking time out of the holiday bliss, buzz and bustle to pay attention to where we’ve been and where we’re going is an oddly beautiful way to be totally present. He peers inside with me as I examine my own interiors. “Don’t go in there alone!” a humorous therapist friend once said to me. Jon knows where I strive, where I struggle, where I excel, and where I play small. His sidebar commentary in my journal always reminds me that I often make jokes when I need to be serious, and I am often too serious when I need to lighten up. He simultaneously grounds me and cuts me loose. The new year is upon us. As we look ahead, to the blank slate of 2016, let’s appraise our own interiors. We can make surface goals pertaining to ego, appearance, status, travel, or materialism, or we can go deeper. Who do I want to become this year? How can I be more loving, open, authentic, and present? How can I be a clearer conduit of grace and compassion? Who do I need to forgive? How can I better use my blessings to bless? What beliefs about myself do I need to change? How can I show up in new ways in my relationships? What do I need to let go of ? How can I deepen and fortify my integrity? How can I generate less frenzy and more flow? How can I live more consciously, mindfully, faithfully, generously, and intentionally? When we focus on our process and trust that the outcomes will unfold, we walk into our new year wholehearted, grateful, inspired and free.

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY J OY G A L L AG H ER For a limite d- e dit i on p r int , c onta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c om .

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

27


EXPOSED

Allison Burke

Native Austinite and interior designer Allison Burke has the job she never knew she always wanted. After a childhood interest in mathematics led her to pursue a degree in engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, she quickly realized that she was bored out of her mind. In a moment of inspiration, Burke decided to enter the School of Architecture where she graduated with a degree in Interior Design. After stints at various firms, including the Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Burke decided to open her own business. As principal of Allison Burke Interior Design, Burke works with junior designer Rowen Van Ingen to bring her trademark style to both residential and commercial projects. With a few high profile projects wrapping up in early 2016 — including the Penthouse at The W Austin and an exciting ground-up partnership with San Antonio firm Lake Flato kicking off with a Las Vegas project this spring — Burke’s design approach is perhaps best described as collaboration complete with a warm personal touch. Here, she talks to TRIBEZA about her must-have design elements, her favorite Austin aesthetics, and the quote that changed her life. M. FLOYD

28

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


community

PROFILE

ON AUSTIN’S CHANGING DESIGN

NOVICE NEED-TO-KNOW

Austin has seen an immense shift in terms of design – especially the

As far as interior décor, I would say that a beautiful pendant in the dining

restaurant design scene with all the incredible chefs and talent that have

room really helps anchor a space and a rug in the living room also sets a

come to town. Residential clients are also more willing and comfortable

great canvas. When designing/ remodeling a space I would say a ‘must

to have a truly modern interior without the fear of it being cold. Modern

have’ would be to hire a licensed professional.

warmth really can beautifully coexist. WORDS TO LIVE BY While studying engineering, I read a quote by Auguste Rodin that said ‘Love your calling with passion, it is the meaning of your life’ and I decided to change my major the next day. The Interior Design Program was transitioning into the Architecture School at UT the next year and

SMALL CHANGE, BIG IMPACT

If you’re looking to make a big splash at home, definitely paint your interior — a beautiful wall color makes all the difference.

it all felt too good to be true. I never looked back.

GO-TO ITEM WHEN STYLING I’m an incredibly sentimental person, so I always scout a client’s existing belongings to see what we can use to work with. I would much rather a client have a connection with their accessories than something on-trend.

On her go-to item when styling a home or project: "I love styling with books – they add a timeless element to a room and can easily be supplemented." P H OTO G R A P H Y BY L E A H OV ER S T R EE T

NATURE NURTURED I grew up in Lake Travis before most of the roads were even paved – nowhere near like what it’s like now. We were basically told to make our own playground, and I think that sort of creativity really shaped me as a designer.

On the first thing she notices in a space: "Lighting – hands down. I have a visceral response when the lighting is out of balance."

On her favorite Austin aesthetics: "I have always loved the historic Bohn House off 29th Street. Everything from the magical circular door to the glass block sunroom."

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

29


JANUARY CALENDARS arts & entertainment

Entertainment Calendar Music ARMSTRONG LEIGH W/ BLUE HEALER January 6, 9:30pm Lamberts Downtown Barbecue

LUCKENBACH’S 9TH ANNUAL BLUES FESTIVAL January 23, 12pm Luckenbach Dance Hall

JENNIFER FRAUTSCHI January 8-9, 8pm The Long Center

KOOL & THE GANG January 29, 8pm ACL Live at Moody Theater

DAVE RAWLINGS MACHINE January 9, 8pm Paramount Theatre

GRACE POTTER January 30, 8pm ACL Live at Moody Theater

ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO January 9, 8pm ACL Live at Moody Theater

VANESSA CARLTON January 30, 9pm The Parish

MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS January 13, 7pm Bass Concert Hall JOSH RITTER January 14, 7pm ACL Live at Moody Theater RODNEY CARRINGTON January 15, 7pm Bass Concert Hall CITY AND COLOUR January 22, 8pm Stubb’s Outdoors

30

COLIN HAY January 22-23, 8pm Stateside at the Paramount

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

Film JONATHAN DEMME: MADE IN TEXAS January 14, 7pm Bob Bullock Museum SHAUN OF THE DEAD PUB RUN + SCREENING January 26, 7:45pm Stateside at the Paramount I AM BIG BIRD January 30, 7pm The Long Center

HOOK 25TH ANNIVERSARY MOVIE PARTY January 30, 7:30pm The Long Center EAST JERUSALEM/WEST JERUSALEM January 31, 7:30pm Paramount Theater

Theatre ROSE January 7, 8pm Paramount Theatre TOMAS AND THE LIBRARY LADY January 14-31, hours vary ZACH Theatre

Comedy THE COLLEEN & JOSH SHOW January 15, 7pm Paramount Theatre IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY January 28-30, hours vary Stateside at the Paramount PAT DEAN January 29-30, hours vary The Velveeta Room

Children

PATTERN PEOPLE January 23-January 31, hours vary The Long Center

MIKE E. WINFIELD January 13-16, hours vary Cap City Comedy

OF MICE & MEN January 23-January 31 The Long Center

BEN HUR SHRINE CIRCUS January 15-18, hours vary Cedar Park Center

PROMETHEAN WALTZ January 24, 6pm Paramount Theatre

ATX UNCENSORED-ISH! LIVE TAPING January 20, 8pm Cap City Comedy

TRIBES January 27-February 28, hours vary ZACH Theatre

WILD KRATTS LIVE January 23, 2pm, 6:30pm Bass Concert Hall ELEPHANT & PIGGIE’S WE ARE IN A PLAY January 31, 2pm Paramount Theatre

Other CITY-WIDE GARAGE SALE January 2-3, 30-31, hours vary Palmer Events Center THE AMAZING ACRO-CATS January 14-17, hours vary Stateside at the Paramount DANCESTRY….VIVID January 15-16, hours vary The Long Center LAVERNE COX January 22, 8pm Paramount Theatre DEEPAK CHOPRA January 24, 7pm Paramount Theatre HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS January 28-29, 7pm Frank Erwin Center


Art on the Edge promises to be the black-tie fundraiser of 2016, so mark your calendars now! Join local tastemakers, young professionals, creatives, art-lovers, and community leaders to celebrate and support our city’s vibrant cultural scene. Music by Memphis Train Revue / DJ Mel Complimentary Cocktails and Light Bites Host Committee Chair: Kate Perez Host Committee: Bettina and Brian Barrow / Samantha and Stuart Bernstein / A.J. Bingham / Rachel Charlesworth / Michal and Michael DeChellis / Meghan and Stephen Elwell / Julie Fisher / Lindsey and Mike Gehrig / Emily House / Austin Nelsen / Sidney and Paul Pan / Laura Villagran Johnson / Yvette Ruiz / Kerry Rupp / Kevin Smothers / Taylor and Ryan Steed / Mahshad Vakili and Mat Hall Tickets on sale now / $100. Visit www.blantonmuseum.org/artontheedge for details. Major Sponsor: Visionary Founding Sponsor: Lead Media Sponsor: Supporting Media Sponsors:

Blanton Museum of Art / The University of Texas at Austin / MLK at Congress Austin, Texas 78712 / 512.471.7324 / www.blantonmuseum.org

MUSIC PICK

Free Week

W

hile you’re never at a loss for live music in Austin, it typically comes at a price—even if it’s just a $5 cover at a favorite, fittingly grimy hole-in-the-wall. During Free Week, however, you can reap all the benefits of Austin’s music scene, and the only destined wallet damage will be the result of your bar tab. “Free week is different from normal shows in that it is like miniature SXSW unofficial for locals only,” explains Jeremy Rogers of BUHU, a local trio who participated last year and will release their album, Relationshapes, this month. Venues range from Red River staples like The Mohawk, Stubb’s and Empire Control Room to stages at The Belmont, The North Door and more. Bands on the roster include both local and imported talent. For music junkies, this presents the opportunity to see some favorite bands and discover new ones, while for up-andcoming artists, it offers something (almost) as valuable as money: exposure. “If you are a really young act, it's a great way to introduce yourself to vast crowds of people, fellow musicians, promoters and new potential fans,” Rogers says (while also noting that a tip jar for artists wouldn’t hurt). One participating Austin act is funky duo Holiday Mountain. The band’s frontwoman, Laura Patino, praises the “passion and wonderful intentions” required to make the festival happen: “I think it offers a deeper sense of connection to everybody on the scene to say, ‘Hey, [forget] money for now. I’m here because I love how music makes me feel in the moment.’” Free Week takes place throughout the first week of the year at multiple venues across Austin. S. SUMPTER PHOTO BY K AT GOINS

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

31


arts & entertainment

CALENDARS

Arts Calendar WILDFLOWER CENTER

Sun McColgin’s “Relics in the Field” January 2-31

Impossible to Tell: Hector Hernandez & Robert Jackson Harrington Through January 10

PARAMOUNT THEATRE

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

Charles Atlas Performance January 9, 8pm

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

EVENT PICK

FronteraFest

I

f your resolution is to experience more of Austin’s burgeoning theater scene, then make a note to attend the 23rd FronteraFest. The festival showcases 80 short-fringe (25-minute) works and 11 long-fringe works (90 minutes or less). The event serves as a platform for performers to experiment with new material, and produce theater in a sustainable way. For patrons, the festival presents the opportunity to see performances of all different forms, from the traditional to the borderline bizarre. “People have different definitions of fringe,” explains Ken Webster, artistic director of Hyde Park Theatre, who has been involved in FronteraFest since its inception. “It’s kind of an alternative theater, [and] some of the work is more experimental. It’s not all about fancy lights and sounds and costumes— it’s about performance." Frontera—which is put on by Hyde Park Theatre and ScriptWorks—is essentially a tournament, and Tuesday through Friday throughout the festival, Hyde Park Theatre hosts five short-fringe performances per night. Following weeknight performances, audience and panel favorites go on to perform during Best of the Week on the following Saturday, and top acts from each of those Saturday showdowns then advance to Best of the Festival. While long-fringe performances—which run continuously and separately at Ground Floor Theatre—are typically plays, the medium for short-fringe varies and can include anything from improv and sketch comedy to dance performances and slam poetry. “You can pretty much do whatever you want for 25 minutes,” Webster says of Frontera performance protocol, “as long as its legal and you don’t hurt anybody.” FronteraFest takes place over the course of five weeks, with shows at Hyde Park Theatre and Ground Floor Theatre. Find more information and tickets at Hydeparktheatre.org. S. SUMPTER

32

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

GRAYDUCK GALLERY

John Adelman + Joseph Janson January 9-30 LADYBIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER

Crystal Orlando “Passion for Nature” January 9-March 20 WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

Julia Lucey | Upstairs Gallery January 16-February 13 BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

Life and Death on the Border: 1910-1920 January 23-April 23

ONGOING CAMIBAART GALLERY

CAMIBAart Gallery Artists: A Group Show Through January 3 MEXIC-ARTE MUSEUM

Nacimientos: Traditional Nativity Scenes from Mexico Through January 3 YARD DOG

Bob Schneider: Heroes Through January 3

Alyssa Taylor Wendt: Compartments of Desire Through January 14

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940-1978 Through January 17 THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN

Strange Pilgrims Through January 24 FLATBED PRESS AND GALLERY

Centennial Impressions from the Fort Worth Modern Through February 6 BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Donald Moffett Through February 28

UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM

Jesús Moroles: A Tribute Through March 13 BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece Through April 3

I M AG E COU RTE SY OF HYDE PARK TH E ATRE

LADYBIRD JOHNSON


arts & entertainment

ART SPACES

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA

3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–Su 10-4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

ART PICK

PrintAustin

P

rintAustin is similar to the East Austin Studio Tour, but its focus, is on one unique and accessible medium: print. (And no specific geographical restrictions.) Now in its third year, PrintAustin is a self-directed event that occurs over the course of one month at over 30 venues, and shines the spotlight on a traditional and often overlooked art form. “Our main focus is to promote artists working with printmaking,” says Elvia Perrin, co-founder and one of the executive directors of PrintAustin. “It’s a traditional medium, and galleries don’t always exhibit because of the lower price point, the multiplicity. We encourage the galleries to show print exhibitions, which in our world is kind of rare.” The event kicks off January 15 with exhibitions at Canopy featuring the works of artists like Melissa Brown, Carlos Hernandez and more, and continues in full force the following day with a roster of events that includes a juried show at Flatbed Press and Gallery. Throughout the month, attendees can expect an abundance of exhibitions, workshops and interactive activities, plus the opportunity to acquire typically affordable — and always one-of-a-kind — pieces of art. “The reason I love printmaking is it’s so versatile,” says Perrin, an artist herself, who teaches drawing and printmaking at Texas State University. “It can be hand-drawn, photographic, layered with color. The range is like no other form of art ... and each [piece] is uniquely individual because each one is made by hand.” PrintAustin takes place from January 15 through February 15 at multiple venues throughout Austin. For more information, visit printaustin.org. S. SUMPTER

34

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: T-Sa 11-7, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org

BULLOCK MUSEUM

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–6, Su 12–6 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM

802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM

1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER

300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org

MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM

419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM

409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THE THINKERY

1830 Simond Ave (512) 469 6200 Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM

605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

I M AG E COU RTE SY OF PRINTAUS TIN

Museums


Galleries ART AT THE DEN

317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH

3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTPOST:

THE CENTER FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION

4704 E. Cesar Chavez St. artpostaustin.com

ARTWORKS GALLERY

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

AUSTIN GALLERIES

5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appt. only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM

5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT CANOPY

916 Springdale Rd, Bldg 2 #101 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAPITAL FINE ART

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

CO-LAB PROJECTS: N SPACE

(512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY

2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

905 Congress Ave. at Nelsen Partners (512) 300 8217 Hours: W 5:30-8 co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON

702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu-Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

DAVIS GALLERY

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3 galleryshoalcreek.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER

GRAYDUCK GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO

3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appointment only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS

913 E. Cesar Chavez St.

2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA

227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007

Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY

360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W-Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY

1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY

507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org MONDO GALLERY

4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2439 Hours: Tu-Sa 12- 6 mondotees.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12

3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY

1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10

1011 West Lynn Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 (512) 236 1333 studiotenarts.com TINY PARK GALLERY

1101 Navasota St. #2 (512) 809 3242 Hours: Sa 12-5 and by appt. TESTSITE

502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org VISUAL ARTS CENTER

2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG

1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

Fredericksburg AGAVE GALLERY

208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL

234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY

314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY

214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY

209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE

230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK

425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

35


Community Table at Emmer & Rye

Save the Date

GARAGE SALE All of your favorite boutiques on sale, under one roof!

@ Palmer Events Center legaragesale.net for more info

Sat., VIP Pre Shop 10 - 11 am Sat., Jan. 23, 11 am - 6 pm Sun., Jan. 24, 11 am - 5 pm


SHABBY SLIPS I N T E R I O R S

SARA SCAGLIONE - DESIGNER 1126 ½ WEST 6TH STREET | 512.478.5666 | SHABBYSLIPSAUSTIN.COM


TRIBEZ A TALK

LOC A L LOV E

A N I N S I D E R ' S G U I D E TO A U S T I N ' S H I D D E N G E M S . BY N ICO L E B ECKL E Y

WEST ELM GOES LOC AL As part of its LOCAL initiative, modern furniture retailer West Elm is partnering with a handful of local companies to spread the love

GOOD TA STE, PRES ERV ED

for Austin-made goods. “It’s great to see them highlighting the talent we have in Austin and around Texas,” says artist Leah Duncan.

“Some people say I’m the ‘fermentation guy,’ but really I’m just on a quest

Duncan, along with Son of a Sailor, Alyson Fox, and Hemlock &

to experience and manipulate flavors, and fermentation is something that

Heather are being showcased in select Texas stores and online. “Any

just came out of me,” explains Jason White. A few years ago, thanks to

time now we say we’re in West Elm people are like, oh, so you’re not

his Instagram photos, White began getting noticed for his unique food

just a mom and pop shop, which we are, we’re a family-run business,

fermentation projects. The attention brought opportunity, including collaborations with former French Laundry chef Ryan Poli, and eventually led him to Executive Chef Kevin Fink’s new restaurant Emmer & Rye. At the new Rainey Street outpost, White tends to the larder, a trea-

but it legitimizes us and helps spread the word about us, not just in Texas but nationally,” says Hemlock & Heather’s Kelley Denby. The additional reach allows these makers — and their work —

sure trove of grains and vegetables undergoing transformation. Here,

to reach a broader audience. “People tell me all the time that my

Sonora wheat berries will be converted into malt vinegar and eventu-

artwork brings a smile to their face every time they see it in their

ally infused in potatoes for a variation of fish and chips, and little green

home,” Duncan says. “If I’m bringing a bit of cheer, happiness

tomatoes from HausBar Farms will be preserved for a brine. “I’m con-

or warmth to someone’s life through my work that makes it

stantly being inspired because I can ferment a thousand things,” White

all the better.” For more information, visit westelm.com/shop/

says. “But what makes it important to me is the whole process, how

collaborations/all-local

they were grown and how they’re utilized.” For more information, visit emmerandrye.com or follow White’s Instagram @teamsilent

38

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com

EM M ER & RYE PHOTO BY HAYDEN SPE AR S


WO RK IT

What’s January without a little bit of fitness inspiration? Here the TRIBEZA staff shares where they go to break a sweat.

RIDE Indoor Cycling: "I love my 7 am spin classes. The sweating, the dancing, the community — it's the perfect start to my day." — Katie Friel, Editor AU S TI N BO U LDE R I N G PROJ EC T

Pure Austin: "Jerry's 8 am yoga is invigorating and unique. I call it 'sensation yoga' because Jerry always finds a way to make sure

Kor180: "Maja's 30/30 class is my favorite

Valley and Cesar Chavez. You're surrounded

you have a sense of having done something

workout in Austin. Between the cycling, Pi-

by water on both sides and there's a canopy of

good for your body at the end."

lates and Maja's never-ending motivation, I

trees above you — it feels like a total escape."

— George Elliman, Publisher + Principal

leave the class feeling like I can take on any-

— Sofia Sokolove, Assistant Editor

“I love going to Body Pump and Pure Cycling

— Ashley Horsley, Art Director

thing. (And also very sore.)" Austin Bouldering Project:

"I've

rock

climbed, lifted weights, done a little yoga and

— they're both different workouts, but I always leave Pure Austin feeling invigorated."

Lady Bird Lake Hike & Bike Trail: "I like

sat in their sauna all before 10 am!”

— Lexi Ross, Account Executive

to start my run on the east side near Pleasant

— Derek Van Wagner, Sales + Operations Manager

ELEMENTS OF STYLE

When it comes to creating the optimal setting for writing, Austin-based author Karen Olsson likes to keep things simple. To craft her second novel, All The Houses, the former editor of The Texas Observer and contributing editor to Texas Monthly dedicated her mornings to her desk. “It gets cluttered with stuff that I might use for research or inspiration or just the other things that end up on your desk, but I’m always happiest if I can clear that stuff away and just have the desk and my writing pad,” Olsson says. Spaces are important to Olsson, especially as she imagines new characters and the worlds they might inhabit. “I do think that I try to figure out the room that they’re in or the space that they’re in,” Olsson says, “I populate their external world first.” For more information, visit karenolsson.com K AREN OL SSON PHOTO BY L E AH OVER S TREE T

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

39


Brigham Real Estate is a boutique brokerage firm offering an unparalleled level of service to clients. With over 41 combined years of real estate experience in Austin and the Texas Hill Country, Brigham Real Estate will implement strategies proven to provide the seamless sale of your home.

Charlotte Brigham, Broker, MBA 512.423.5707 CharBrigham@gmail.com CharlotteBrigham.com BRE is an affiliate of Mayfair International Realty, offering an international network with over 450 offices worldwide


AUSTIN SHADEWORKS With a New Year, Make a New Room

8868 Research Blvd #101 512-472-1768 austinshadeworks.com


Masters

of Their TWO SAV V Y BUSI N ES S WO MEN TAKE US IN S IDE T HEI R I N N ER SANCT UA RIE S By Kim Katopodis | Photography by Nicole Mlakar

Domain 42

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


PR pro turned lifestyle maven Carly Uson at home with her dog Rain.


Carly Uson their home, they knew changing

middle of the den and open to the stairs that scale

the bright orange and green paint

the center of the house, the pipe is currently caus-

colors was the first thing they

ing a stalemate between Carly and Jason.

needed to do. “Where this is liveable, rustic

[the pipe installation],” she laughs. “He

modern, previously it was just

loves it — it was a selling point for him. I

very straight lines, very simple,

like it too, I think it’s super cool and I think

very minimal, but very bright,”

it brings in that raw, industrial look, but

says Uson. “I always err on the

I would like to pull them out and just put

neutral side these days.”

glass, which would look so beautiful. But

The Usons’ home is light and

44

“My husband and I are in a debate about

he’s fighting me on that.”

bright with floor-to-ceiling win-

The L-shaped sectional in the den carries

dows on almost every wall of

out the neutral trend throughout the house

the main floor. Soft but modern

but is more about utility than style, a fact

touches combine with industrial

which Uson offers no apologies for. “We

elements in the architecture that

have two big dogs and I like a glamour look,

create a disarming juxtaposition

but I don’t like things that are too fussy so

to the exterior.

it’s not liveable. I like the dogs to be able

TURNING INTO the Agave neighborhood

“[My style] is modern rustic

instantly dispels the east side’s reputation as

with touches of luxe and texture. I like some lit-

the hipster capital of Austin. At the base of

tle sexy spots here and there,” explains Uson as

Uson’s love of her animals might be one of

a small hill, the multi-storied, multi-colored

she describes the first of many changes they

the overriding themes in her home. From the

modern homes seemingly pop up out of no-

made to the home. “I try to anchor the house

bronze placard by the doorbell imploring res-

where. Belying the trend of bright exteriors (a

with black and white, but I don’t want to go

cue workers to save their dogs, to wall art on

modern home trend of the last decade), Carly

over the top because I don’t want to go too

every floor, it’s clear this is a home where man

Uson, a PR powerhouse, has a different take

mod. And I don’t want it to feel too feminine

and dog are equal. In addition to a gold framed

on “modern.” Uson and her husband, Jason,

so my husband feels displaced.”

portrait of their pitbull wearing a necktie in

to jump on the couch so I err on the side of cozy,” she explains.

bought their home almost a decade ago and

A unique feature of the house is a free-

the guest bedroom upstairs, the Usons have

while they loved the space and openness of

standing metal pipe wall. Located in the

paid homage to a special canine named Posey

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Though her home has a decidedly modern aesthetic, Uson says she always goes for comfort over clean lines.

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

45


(whose name Uson wears in gold around her neck) in the sitting area of the master. “We had this heart print, and the day Posey, our female rotty passed,” remembers Uson, barely holding back tears, “we took her paw and dipped it in some paint and pressed it on top on the heart. I just cherish that.” This year, Uson says she is exploring new passions she’s always had, but never pursued. “Design has always been something I love, and I’m even doing some design consulting with a company right now,” she says. As for the future, Uson says she’s looking forward to new endeavors. “In January, I’m launching a lifestyle site which will be home decor, lifestyle, fashion, food. I’ve already changed my Instagram to the site’s name, ‘This Felicity,’ which is my grandmother’s name and means ‘happiness.’ It will be a lifestyle site that focuses on the things most lifestyle sites do, but instead of an emphasis on entertaining guests, it will be more on design and decor.” She wants the site to focus on the neighborhood she has come to know in Agave, and the continually changing nature of the city. “I’ve been doing lifestyle for the last 10 years or so now,” she concludes. “I’m just segueing into a new chapter.”

Personal touches — and artwork featuring the couple’s beloved dogs — make Uson’s guest bedroom modern and cozy.

46

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Chelle Neff “WHO BUYS A HOUSE for one party?”

poster above the mantle, glass

Chelle Neff muses, surveying her light filled liv-

bottles flanking the refrigera-

ing room in the University Hills neighborhood

tor, four framed prints mas-

in East Austin.

querading as a headboard in

Perhaps a couple whose home decor includes a subtle scattering of skulls around every corner.

the master bedroom. Neff ’s interior style at

“One reason we loved this house is because

home combines estate and

we’re really into Halloween and every year we

garage sale gems, thrift and

have a party and when we saw this, we said,

antique store finds, treasures

‘This is perfect for the party,’” Neff remembers.

from

high-end

furniture

Neff, the owner of Urban Betty Salon, and

stores, design centers and

her husband, David, a business consultant,

found items. (One dining

moved into their open concept ranch style

room chair was even rescued

home two years ago while planning a wedding

from the curb and rehabbed

and weathering two dog surgeries.

through the magic of You-

The walls on the main floor of the Neff

Tube videos.)

house are fleeced with posters from both Da-

One personal touch the

Chelle Neff, owner

vid and Chelle’s collections prior to getting

couple added was a wood

Urban Betty Salon,

married, which happened right around the

pallet wall in the dining

at her home.

same time they moved into the house.

room, adding a rustic feel

“We’re both real big into music so we pay

of the oft-lauded

to the otherwise vintage rock It fits perfectly,” laughs Neff.

homage to that with these rock posters. David

vibe of the space. A tin, turquoise “weird” sign

already had some, and I had mine so it really all

that Chelle had custom made for David lights

Her personal interior style overflows to the

came together nicely,” Neff says.

up the hearth where a fire would usually be.

professional at Urban Betty, which recently

And then there are the skulls. You don’t no-

“We didn’t know if we should hang it on the

added eight more chairs (which, Neff says,

tice how many there are at first, but they haunt

wall or what, but one day the lady who cleans

almost felt like opening a second location)

the house in subtle ways: Southwestern-style

my house just put it there to get it out of the

during a recent renovation.

skull art in the den, an anatomical skeleton

way and it just hit us that it should be in there.

“At Urban Betty I mix new things with old tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

47


48

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


things so half of our mirrors were bought at estate sales or garage sales, I found some stuff at Austin City-Wide Garage Sale,” she explains. “The couch at Urban Betty is from Salvation Army; my little chair [at home] is from Goodwill — it was only $25! I was going there for Halloween decorations and I saw it and said, ‘That chair is amazing, I have to have it.’” This mix-and-match philosophy was part of the reason Chelle and David’s created the Austin Weird Homes Tour. A conversation after the Modern Homes Tour a few years ago inspired the Neffs to seek out a “weird” homes tour to add to their repertoire. When they couldn’t find one, they were perplexed. “That’s the epitome of Austin, why wouldn’t they have that? I said, ‘’Well, that’s a bummer,’ and about a week later, David said, ‘We should do it,’” Neff recalls. “So the seed was planted and about a year later, we had the first Austin Weird Homes Tour.” Ten percent of the proceeds from the Weird Homes Tour go to charity each year, another passion the Neffs share. In fact, an antique chest from the post office Chelle’s grandparents owned in Throckmorton, Texas showcases trophies and plaques both Neffs have received in recognition of the charitable work they do within the Austin community. It’s an important part of the couple’s ethos, and something that influences many aspects of their work. “The last two years [proceeds from the Tour went to] Caritas, which provides housing for refugees,” explains Neff. “We want something that ties in to the home tour, so there’s a couple more in town we’re looking at, too.” tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

49


BY SO F I A SO KO LOV E

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CASEY DUNN

50

ORIGINALLY DESIGNED in 1992 by David

around the home. “How can we capitalize on the

Shiflet, the site itself is what drove inspiration on

great light, great expansions of windows?”

this extensive two-year Westlake remodel, a collab-

The answer was to keep it (relatively) simple.

orative effort between Shiflet Group Architects,

“We did a lot of editing,” explains Ashby. The family

Dalgleish Construction Company and Mark Ash-

wanted a house that felt comfortable but also fresh,

by Design.

and so he, along with Michele Lorenz of Mark Ash-

“It’s a gated estate on eight acres,” explains Mark

by Design, made sure each piece in the home was able

Ashby of Mark Ashby Design, who was responsi-

to speak for itself. Says Ashby, “The pieces are finely

ble for the interiors. Ashby was inspired by the land

constructed, but they don’t scream for attention.”

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Colorful coffee table books throughout the house placed thoughtfully by Michele Lorenz add a level of comfort without adding clutter. For more on her favorite coffee table books and decorating tips, head to tribeza.com.


One of those pieces is the stunning light fixture above the dining room table, which Lorenz designed in collaboration with Warbach Lighting and Design (featured on our cover). “We wanted it to be the focal point,” she explains, which is why they chose not to put any art over the fireplace. “We wanted it to stand on its own as a structural piece ... this was the first thing we presented [to the client]. Everything else was built off of that.” The goal of the entire project, explains Ashby, was to “take a very handsome architecture footprint and make it modern day.” A lot of that work began with the architectural and construction details. The three — Mark Ashby Design, Shiflet Group Architects and Dalgleish Construction Company — worked together to make the remodel a reality. “There’s a mutual respect and interest in each other’s work that really drives the project,” says Ashby. “I’m driven by the architecture, they love what we do with the interior spaces. They really engage us.” “We wanted to retain the exterior quality of the home,” says Sam Burch of Shiflet, “just update and freshen it up.” Taking out most of the walls to open the house up was a key step, as was careful attention to all of the finishings and construction details — from the unique color stain of the floor (“smoked honey stone”) to the polished look of the stone walls throughout the house. Originally rough cut limestone, the team wanted all the stone smoothed. “David Dalgleish tried to sand it all down, we brought in these giant grinders,” remembers Ashby, “but it ended up being more economical just to take it out and put it back in.” It’s that level of detail and care “that makes these jobs exceptional,” explains Ashby. “There’s a lot of time and care and craftsmen that went into this place.” Says Burch: “It takes all of us to make that house what it is in the end.”

52

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


In the open and expansive

Chris Earl Indigo Splash Mugs, Nagasaki Coffee Spoons in gold. Jenny Pennywood tea towels, Azumaya Copper Kettle, Arbor round walnut and sycamore cutting boards, all available at Kettle & Brine.

kitchen, touches like a stainless steel and stone island elevate the room. “All those subtle details and the way the materials come together, that’s what this house is about,” says Ashby.


The leather tiles on the wall were original to the house, and became a driving force for this room. The family was looking for a home office they could also relax in, which is what inspired the understated yet cozy design of this den.

54

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


In the master bedroom, lush greenery peeks through the windows.“I wanted the landscape to be integral,” explains Mark Ashby. tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

55


56

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Even the closet off of the master bathroom is built to allow natural light into the bright space.

Clothing, shoes and front bag, available at By George

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

57


The family’s two teenage girls weren’t sure what they wanted, but knew that they wanted color, explains Michele Lorenz of Mark Ashby Design. “Once they chose the colors for their room, and I got a feel for their personalities, that’s what kind of drove the rest of the room,” she explains, saying she aimed to create a space that was both a little bit playful and a little bit sophisticated.

58

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


The children’s common room, located downstairs between the two girls’ bedrooms, plays to both of their personalities, with cozy furniture and bright colors. tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

59


THE NEW DESIGN DISTRICT BY JAMES RUIZ I L L U S T R A T I O N S B Y K E L LY C O L C H I N

60

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


AUSTIN’S ARCHITECTURAL vocabulary varies wildly and defies definition. Neighborhoods are composed of picturesque Craftsman bungalows with verdant gardens sitting next to xeriscaped, ultramodern cathedrals of glass and concrete. But the city’s diverse approach to the architectural language of line, shape and form parallels our interest in the color, texture and light of a home’s interior. To serve this wide spectrum of taste, many talented interior designers and business owners have set up shop in Austin’s Design District, which sits along the West 6th corridor between Lamar Boulevard and extends across MoPac onto Lake Austin Boulevard. Whether you are looking to redecorate an entire home with the help of a designer or you are looking for the perfect accent piece to complete a weekend project, the new Design District in Old West Austin is the perfect neighborhood to discover your unique design style.

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

61


1

2

62

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


THE NEW DESIGN DISTRICT

3

4

5 6

8 9

7

10


collection of artisan wallpaper, hardwood

THE NEW DESIGN DISTRICT

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

floor tiles and lighting fixtures. The austere

1202 West 6th St.

yet sunny design studio showcases over 50

Just a few blocks east of JAMES sits the Wal-

independent vendors from around the world,

ly Workman Gallery, a top resource for Austin

encouraging Austinites to lend a sophisticat-

art lovers for more than 30 years. Where the

ed, well-travelled touch to any space.

gallery once specialized in fine art posters, Wal-

3

ly Workman now shows locally- and nationalMIRÓ RIVERA ARCHITECTS

ly-recognized artists. The sense of community

505 Powell St.

is not lost on Rachel Stephens, a director at the

Since 1997, the award-winning Miró Rivera

gallery, who says she’s “delighted that so many de-

design firm has built upon Austin’s architec-

sign firms, galleries and architects have grown

tural DNA in a way that shapes the city’s focus

around us since we opened in 1980.” Stephens

2408 Lake Austin Blvd.

on resourceful sustainability, approachable

also adds that the gallery’s prime location in the

Page Home Design is the west end anchor

modernity and accessible beauty. Whether

shadow of downtown allows it to “get an over-

of the Design District and serves as a retail

you attend a student symphonic concert at

flow of that energy but without all the hassles,”

space and studio where owner Suzie Page

the AISD Performing Arts Center or a rock

a benefit to “clients trying to check things off

works with clients and design novices alike.

concert at the Grand Plaza and Amphitheater

their list.”

As soon as you enter the studio, you’ll find no

at the Circuit of the Americas, Miró Rivera

shortage of classic antiques juxtaposed with

plays an integral role in how Austin lives,

1

PAGE HOME DESIGN

modern art. Baroque designs and traditional furnishings are set against upholstery in strik-

plays and performs.

4

6

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY

1137 West 6th St. JAMES

Owner Lisa Russell is a nine-year resident

Design draws most of its clients from nearby

1411 West 6th St.

of the Design District. Her revered collection

Tarrytown, Pemberton Heights and Westlake,

JAMES, the showroom from local design dar-

of fine art features works from masters like

her lively approach to home design is perfect

ling Meredith Ellis, has been Austin’s source

Renoir and Matisse as well as a growing

for any Austin resident with a passion for color

for custom upholstery, hand-printed textiles

number of contemporary artists. Russell at-

and an eye for the unique.

and specialty wallpaper since its opening this

tributes the gallery’s success to the walkabil-

summer. Inside the quaint bungalow, JAMES

ity and growth of the West 6th corridor as a

also offers vintage furniture and unique light-

dining and shopping destination. Once the

2204 Lake Austin Blvd.

ing fixtures to a discerning clientele. While

gallery moved from its former retail space in

Open since September, SUPPLY Showroom

Ellis’ career has taken her across the country,

The Arboretum shopping center to the Old

is home to some of the newest neighbors in

her inviting showroom is a chic distillation

West Austin location, Russell did more busi-

the Design District — Kristin Gish, Callie

of Southern hospitality — something that is

ness with designers than ever before. “Being

Jenschke and Kim West. These New York City

at once classic and charming with a sense of

able to park in one place and walk around

transplants set up shop in a charming 1930s

humor. Who else could get you to consider a

encourages clients to walk in and consider

bungalow to house their globally-inspired

pastel pink kitchen?

a purchase ... or meet with a designer,” says

ing shades and rich fabrics. Though Page Home

2

64

5

SUPPLY SHOWROOM

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Russell, who welcomes the neighborhoods

to the staying power of her design sensibil-

growth. Now, says Russell, “a husband and wife

ity. Both her showroom and her residential

have lunch at Clark’s [Oyster Bar] across the

projects are exercises in understated ele-

street and then stop by the gallery as part of

gance. But do not let her penchant for clean

their date.”

lines and modern forms fool you. Scaglione

7

surprises the eye with special touches, like a ALEXANDER MARCHANT

printed wall paper in a powder room, a glit-

1114 West 5th St.

tering chandelier in a bedroom, or an accent

Tucked away in a purple warehouse between

of animal print in a home office.

West 5th and 6th streets, Alexander Marchant is a haven for architectural hardware nerds. As the brainchild of Susan Alexander

9

FORTNEY’S ECLECTIC HOME FURNISHINGS

and Laurie Marchant, their showroom tran-

1116 West 6th St.

scends all others by lending expert knowl-

All things rustic, eclectic and funky have a

edge (do you know what an “active door”

home at Fortney’s. In fact, the towering go-

is?!) and meticulous consideration for the

rilla sculpture that stands guard outside the

products they carry and the custom projects

storefront might encourage passersby to dis-

they oversee. But if you’re not in the mar-

miss Fortney’s as gaudy and ostentatious.

ket for new kitchen cabinet hardware, they

However, reserve any harsh judgment be-

also have plenty of lighting and plumbing

cause their expansive collection of indoor and

fixture options as well. Whether you favor

outdoor furnishings is hand-picked and often

a minimalist aesthetic or lean towards the

comprised of one-of-kind gems.

traditional, Alexander Marchant’s offerings satisfy serious designers and weekend DIYers alike.

8

10

KATIE KIME

500 North Lamar, Suite 150 As the easternmost point on our map, Katie

SHABBY SLIPS

Kime is a feast for the eyes. And is there any-

1126 West 6th 1/2 St.

thing the blogger/fashion designer/interior

Another longtime resident of the Design Dis-

decorator/mother can’t do? Her shop is a

trict, Shabby Slips has expanded from what

shrine to pattern, print and play. Katie Kime

was once a modest slipcover business based

offers everything for the young-at-heart, in-

in Houston to a full-service interior design

cluding her customizable Bright Bar collec-

firm. In an ever-changing town like Austin,

tion and ready-to-wear designs. There’s even

owner Sara Scaglione’s successful career —

a gilded faux elephant trophy that you can

which spans two decades — is a testament

hang in your home — you know, in case you ever need a conversation starter.

DESIGN: BROADLY DEFINED The Design District in Old West Austin is not just home to interior design firms and architects. The historic neighborhood also boasts other local movers and shakers who carry the “designer” title.

PENTAGRAM 1508 W 5th St #100 ALPHEUS MEDIA 1414 W 6th St WILDFLOWER ORGANICS 524 North Lamar Blvd. #101 DAVID ALAN RUGS 1009 West 6th St. CALIFORNIA CLOSETS 500 North Lamar Blvd. JEAN-MARC FRAY 1009 West 6th St. #102 ARTWORKS 1214 West 6th St. LINDA ASAF 1405 West 6th St. BY GEORGE 524 North Lamar Blvd. JULIAN GOLD 1214 West 6th St. FOUND 501 Oakland Ave.

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

65


TRIBEZ A INTERIORS TOUR PR E SE NT E D BY TREEHOUSE RETURNS FOR A T HI R D FA B U LOU S YEAR. IN THIS ISSUE, MEET T HE DE SI G NE R S AND TAKE A SNEAK PEEK INTO T HE B E AU T I FUL HOMES FEATURED ON TH I S Y E A R’S TOU R . HERE, THEY SHARE WHERE THE Y T U R N FOR INSPIRATION, THEIR PERSON A L PHI LOSOPHI E S AND TELL US THE SURPRISING DE SI G N E L EMENTS FEATURED IN THEIR OW N HOM E S .

BY KAT I E F R I E L | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY C H E L S E A L A I N E F R A N C I S


Allison Crawford Design From Wall Street to Westlake, this design pro has made her mark. Allison Crawford’s career has had a decidedly interesting trajectory. After graduation from Southern Methodist University, Crawford landed a job working on Wall Street. Unhappy and creatively unfulfilled in her marketing gig, she enrolled at New York University to study design. After moving to Austin, she renovated her first home in 2005. Since then, her business has grown thanks to a close-knit community and referrals from previous jobs. Says the designer, “I’ve actually moved to Austin three times. Opportunities take me to other cities, but I always come back to this vibrant city! I love the diversity and the support of creative entrepreneurs.” What is your personal design philosophy? I believe a space should tell a story. While working with clients, I try to get to know them and infuse the space with their personal story.

Since her first renovation in

Where, what or to whom do you turn for inspiration?

Bouldin Creek in 2005, Al-

I’m always inspired during my travel experiences, whether it’s a quick

business thanks to referrals.

lison Crawford has built her

getaway to Tulum or an adventure trip through Myanmar. Throughout my travels across all continents, I’ve found inspiration from local artists, textiles, architecture and museums. I like to bring back something special from each trip that reminds me of the experience like street art or handmade candles. On a trip to Morocco, I carefully carried a gorgeous metal with camel bone mirror through Africa and Europe. After having it at home for a few months, I accidently dropped it and it was damaged, but the mirror, even with its imperfections, tells a story (or two). What would people be surprised to find in your home? A messy bed. I’m obsessed with low maintenance, perfectly imperfect beds right now. My black and white linen sheets are always wrinkled, but the bed is super easy to make… It’s effortlessly chic. Share a few favorite elements from your project featured on the TRIBEZA Interiors Tour. I’m not afraid to take risks and make bold, unusual choices. You’ll find traditional prints by Peter Max and Norman Rockwell next to contemporary, bright abstracts and modern black and white photography. I like to support Texas artists and recently commissioned a colorful abstract from Jerry Cabrera for my entryway to set the mood for the whole house. tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

67


Meredith Ellis (left) with her business partner (and client!) Lisa Womack (right).

Meredith Ellis It’s been a whirlwind year for Meredith Ellis. Design has long been a part of Meredith Ellis’ life. Growing up in the Texas Hill Country, Ellis was “raised in the business.” Says the designer, “My mother was an interior designer in Texas for 30 plus years, so you can say it’s in my blood.” Though she has lived in Colorado, San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles, Ellis eventually returned to Texas in 2010 to raise her family — and build her business. “We wanted to be near family, in a place that was laid back, outdoorsy, beautiful, but at the same time emerging,” she explains. Like Austin, Ellis’ business has also grown thanks to her penchant for timeless design and an incredible pedigree. In addition to her work as an in-demand interior designer, Ellis also recently opened JAMES, a showroom in the heart of downtown’s Design District. What is your personal design philosophy? Decorate for the way you live. I firmly believe in creating a home that represents you. Where, what or to whom do you turn for inspiration? Obviously nothing beats travel for true culture and inspiration, but these days I find a lot of inspiration on Instagram. I love photographer Miguel Flores-Vianna and Ashley Hicks’ feeds. I live vicariously through their travels, and constantly find inspiration in the photos of aging castles, ornate palaces and ancient textiles. Share a few favorite elements from your project featured on the TRIBEZA Interiors Tour. That is hard to choose! This has been such a fun project because my client, Lisa [Womack], and I clicked immediately. Not to mention she came to the project with a fabulous collection of antiques, art and accessories. Lisa has a fabulous Cape Buffalo mount that her husband’s grandmother shot in Botswana when she was in her 70s. She had mounted it above the fireplace in the living room, [but] … there seemed to be a void surrounding the piece — it needed more prominence. I took the existing fireplace, surrounded it with additional paneling, added an antique mirror above the mantle and then built a custom frame around the mirror. The Cape Buffalo was then mounted on the mirror. It was a bit of an undertaking, and at times there was a lot of nail biting. But in the end, it proved that it was needed. It was an example in trusting my gut. Lisa and I gelled so much and had so much fun, that when she heard of my long-time dream of opening a high-end design showroom she said she wanted to be involved. She’s now one of the partners in JAMES.

68

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Unexpected twists on traditional is a hallmark of Ellis’ style.

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

69


Living in Austin, says the designer, “We have had the

What is your personal design philosophy?

opportunity to work with clients

My personal design philosophy is truly a

from all over the world.”

balancing act. A designer’s job is never just about the pretty stuff. Over time, I have learned the importance of wearing different “hats” throughout the design process. In addition to leading a creative vision to execution, a designer also is an accountant, a project manager, a problem solver, an installer, and even a relationship counselor. Where, what or to whom do you turn for inspiration? I am inspired by so many different things — pretty much everything that you can see, touch and feel. I typically start my process with a pattern, a pop of something special and go from there. What would people be surprised to find in your home? In my personal home, there are lots of interesting finds, but my favorite things are the original pieces of art from some of our best friends. My husband has given [the art] to me as gifts for special occasions. They have meaning for me and I love to see them everyday. Share a few favorite elements from your

Butter Lutz Interiors

This project has many unique wall treatments. The powder bath has a stunning charcoal sequin wallcovering and their daughter’s bedroom has a

Showcasing her third home in as many years, Amy Lutz returns to the tour with

playful Indian motif with elephant paper from local designer Katie Kime.

another Tarrytown gem.

There is also a wall of glass in the back with the 15-foot steel dining window

After interior designer Amy Lutz graduated from Abilene Christian University

70

project featured on the TRIBEZA Interiors Tour.

flanked by sliders on either side.

with a degree in fashion merchandising, she quickly garnered a reputation for cre-

We tried to make sure that almost everything in the home had a story,

ating stunning visual displays. “I realized I had a knack for visual displays which lead

history and a purpose, all the while realizing that this 3500 square feet had

me to start my own business in golf merchandising,” says Lutz. “I did buying and visual

to function effortlessly for a family with small children. While that was a

merchandising for several golf pro shops in the Dallas-Fort Worth area until I took the

tricky task, the end result is what makes us good at what we do; this house

head buying position at Austin Country Club in late 2000.” For the past 15 years, Lutz

works for them using every square inch for an intended purpose while be-

has been working with clients to craft beautiful — yet functional — interiors.

ing a beautiful showpiece for family and friends to enjoy.

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


Katie Kime It’s Katie Kime’s Austin, we’re just living in it. Over the past six months, designer Katie Kime completed renovations on her

on my own, or with mentors, and they have all been beneficial to my career. What is your personal design philosophy? There are no rules. I really go with my gut even if it’s not textbook. Pairing things a

Rollingwood home, got married and opened her flagship retail location on Lamar

lot of people wouldn’t is what most people seem to know me for.

Boulevard. Kime, whose design sensibilities are a mix of bright patterns, traditional

Why Austin versus another city?

forms and high-low is branching beyond design and into a bona fide lifestyle brand.

I was actually between Austin and Nashville as cities I could imagine moving to

In addition to wallpaper, furniture and home accessories, fans of the Katie Kime

and settling down in. I chose Austin because I felt the design scene and growth

aesthetic can also get apparel (she recently partnered with MOD Fitness to launch

projected in the city could foster my design career better than Nashville.

a workout line), stationery and more.

Where or to whom do you turn for inspiration? David Hicks and Dorothy Draper are huge sources of inspiration for me.

Tell us about your background and education.

What would people be surprised to find in your home?

I grew up in North Carolina and went to Duke. I studied visual arts there

High mixed with low. I love a bargain and am not afraid to pair an Ikea

which was a 10 medium major, meaning from drawing to painting to color

hack with a higher end custom piece.

theory to screen printing, I had to show a certain level of competence in [all

Share a few favorite elements from your project featured on the TRIBEZA

of those] mediums. After college, I worked with a large commercial interior

Interiors Tour.

firm in Atlanta [called] Rule, Joy, Trammell + Rubio but my most useful

While in most areas I added my own flair and signature style, I also com-

learning really came from just trying new things in hope of figuring them

promised with my husband. My closet and the guest house - these are the

out. Sewing, photography, Photoshop, painting, these were all things I did

main two areas where I didn’t have to consult or negotiate with [anyone].

Among the many gems in Kime’s home are a massive walk-in closet and large screened-in back porch perfect for lazy Sunday mornings.

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

71


“For the most part, pieces should be chosen to last.�


Turnstyle Design Growing up between Belgium and the U.S., interior designer Lieve Saether was raised by an artistic family who emphasized the importance of “boundary-less thinking on art, space, and everyday objects.” Says the designer, “The art of not only beauty, but quality, craftsmanship and origin have always been essential to me. As an art history and fine arts major studying at University in Brussels, in a way it was inevitable that I became an interior designer.” Along with her husband and two children, Saether moved to Austin in 2007 where she launched Turnstyle Design.

What is your personal design philosophy? Make it you and make it last. Our company name Turnstyle was specifically chosen to communicate our belief that things are just things until they are shifted to fit the user. For me, our homes are the places in which we should feel most like ourselves. Where, what or to whom do you turn for inspiration? Like anyone I am inspired by the many wonderful things around, but for me ... I gravitate toward the home’s [original era], and how it might have originally felt in its heyday. I like to ensure some part of that remains in the finished product even if in a subtle way. Be that in furniture or in the room’s architectural details, or in the way the space will be used going forward. My preference, most often, is for a house to keep a part of its soul that way. What would people be surprised to find in your home? Despite our choice to have a grown up home, we’ve had a rope swing hanging from our loft in the living room. (As one can imagine, that got a ton of

Of moving her family and business to Austin, Saether call it an “organic choice.”

wear!) We’ve created and adapted large scale permanent art pieces with our kids and the neighborhood children, and we generally love displaying family-created projects in an elevated way. Why shouldn’t your child’s finger paint art be properly matted and framed in the living room? It’s the imperfections on the dining table and the YouTube crafts that end up on the entry console that keep us living in the moment. Share a few favorite elements from your project featured on the TRIBEZA Interiors Tour. This project was about giving the family a design plan to understand what they couldn’t at first articulate by themselves. [The clients] are open to ideas and where things come from, so the fact that we’ve now established their individual stamp is a big part of what I love about this project — or any project we do for that matter. More specifically though, this home has some great references to 1930’s designer William Haines (an American actor and interior designer my client has long admired). The references are subtle, but direct, so I’ll let readers see if they can spot them while they are on the tour! tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

73


Urbanspace Interiors Modern meets cool at these east side ‘mini-hotels’ Urbanspace Interiors’ Merrill Alley and Shannon Stott-Sosa were both destined to be designers. “I come from architect/ designer parents so you could say the love of design is in my blood,” says Alley. It’s a sentiment Stott-Sosa echos: “My father is a carpenter, so I grew up around houses under construction.” After graduating from the University of Kansas and Texas State University, respectively, Alley and Stott-Sosa forged careers that eventually brought them to Urbanspace, one of Austin’s premier real estate and interior design firms. This year, Urbanspace is featuring two east side properties that showcase the firm’s modern-meets-chic aesthetic. What is your personal design philosophy? Merrill Alley: Whether commercial or residential, I believe a space has to have a personality that reflects its inhabitants. Where, what or to whom do you turn for inspiration? Shannon Stott-Sosa (left)

Merrill Alley and Shannon Stott-Sosa: Most consistently we are inspired by

and Merrill Alley (right) were

the interesting/ unique/ fun loving clients we have the privilege of design-

tasked with designing two of

ing for. In addition to our clients, a ton of our inspiration comes di-

Urbanspace’s east side homes.

rectly from the product lines represented in our showroom. Most of our lines are European, [and feature] designers that bring innovation and cool unexpected elements to furniture design. For example, the queen of design: Patricia Urquiola. No one can mix and create patterns, colors and textures like her. What would people be surprised to find in your home? Alley: An absurd number of plants. Stott-Sosa: Not sure if anyone would really be surprised because I’m a bit of a ‘curator,’ but I’m most proud of my rather large display of Texas collector plates. Share a few favorite elements from your project featured on the TRIBEZA Interiors Tour. Alley: I particularly love the master bedroom and bathrooms in these homes. Stott-Sosa: Since these are typically used as mini-hotels, we were able to create an experience out of the design, going bold with wallpaper, tile and furniture. Though, I know that everyone would be totally open to a ‘Treat Yo’self ’ neon sign in their living room.

74

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


The designers were able to “go bold” with pops of color and show-stopping details like the “treat yo self” sign.

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

75


Gandy matches an elegant aesthetic with kid-friendly materials.

3 Fold Design Studio Fusing form and function with family-friendly, Page Gandy invites us into her Westwood abode.

tion [from the Art Institute of Atlanta]. We moved on a whim, not knowing

Page Gandy has always had a passion for design. “I always loved architecture and

much about the city except people said it was “cool.” We have not regretted

design and, in fact, in my high school yearbook I [said I] aspired to be an interior

the decision in the 10 years since.

designer,” says Gandy. At her design firm, 3 Fold Design Studio, Gandy creates

What would people be surprised to find in your home?

projects with a penchant for sustainability and an emphasis on collaborative design.

I have two young boys, so our house is truly kid friendly. Every material and piece of furniture has been “kid-tested.” We usually have a soccer game

76

What is your personal design philosophy?

going on in the living room, our back patio can be taken over as a roller

My design philosophy revolves around the sometimes competing ideas of sim-

hockey rink, and some sort of car/train/Lego track seems to always be in

plicity and individuality. [I focus on] allowing an ease of living rooted in a func-

the middle of it all.

tional origin with an appreciation for the things that truly matter, packaged in a

Share a few favorite elements from your project featured on the TRIBEZA

creative, unique space that defines the client’s overall aesthetic.

Interiors Tour.

Where, what or to whom do you turn for inspiration?

I have a bit of a tile obsession and had a lot of fun picking out tile for my house.

I love materials - tile, wallpaper, wood, fabric.

I also love the back window wall. Before, [there was a] single set of French

Why did you launch your studio in Austin versus another city?

doors and huge fireplace that cut out the view to the backyard. Comparing [the

My husband is from DC, we met in Houston and lived in Atlanta for several

original design] to the current wall of windows and sliding doors, I am still

years. He got a job opportunity in Austin when I was approaching gradua-

amazed at the transformation.

JANUARY 2016 tribeza.com


6 J A N U A RY

23, 2016

P RES ENT ED BY

contemporary furniture & accessories

V I S I T T R I B E Z A E V E N T S . C O M / I N T E R I O R S -T O U R F O R T I C K E T S A N D M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N


2913 Marina Shores Dr.

$2,750,000 Distinctive Lakefront Home with Remarkable Views www.2913MarinaShoresDr.com

Susan Griffith

Broker, Elite 25 Kuper Sotheby's International Realty www.susangriffithrealestate.com | susan.griffith@sothebysrealty.com


dining P I C K profile in S T Y L E

P H OTO G R A P H Y CO U RT E S Y O F P R ELO G ' S


profile in

STYLE

SUPPLY Showroom A L A B O R ATO RY O F D E S I G N O N L A K E AU S T I N B O U L E VA R D

A

ustin’s design landscape welcomed an eclectic addition in September 2015 with the opening of SUPPLY Showroom. Owners Callie Jenschke, Kim West and Kristin Gish started the boutique design business after moving to Austin and meeting through mutual friends. With their combined design experience, the former New Yorkers recognized an opportunity to create a space for small, lesserknown design vendors with a selection inspired by the diverse products available in New York City. Be it product expertise, vendor selection, or business acumen, Jenschke, West and Gish each bring a distinct aesthetic and individual polish to curate a trade showroom for both industry insiders and retail customers. SUPPLY, which is located in a charming 1930s bungalow on Lake Austin Boulevard, is a welcoming destination for devotees of design. Inside the showroom are clean white walls contrasted by dark gray trim, wooden floors and a pale pink ceiling. Natural light floods in from the bungalow’s windows, filtering through racks of leather and onto shelves of stylish throw pillows. Throughout, a well-curated and diverse selection of textural fabrics and wallpapers hang like art. Blending cultural influences is SUPPLY’s intention, as

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J E S S I C A PAG E S

is creating an Austin home for small, unique vendors from around the world. “We have fabric from Italy, lighting from the UK, leather from Australia, furniture from LA and everywhere in between,” explains Gish. Similar to the diversity of products at SUPPLY is the range of projects that the trio takes on. Gish, Jenschke and West work with both commercial and residential customers on jobs large and small, from a restaurant or hotel design to an office or private home. “We like to think of SUPPLY as a laboratory of design,” says West. From fabric to lighting, furniture to wallpaper, the SUPPLY Showroom is a unique artisanal experience. “Our main goal in opening is to showcase some of the amazing products in the design world and offer these unique and special finds to the Austin and Central Texas design community,” says Jenschke. At SUPPLY, Jenschke, West and Gish are doing more than furnishing people with fabrics, furniture, wallpaper and pillows. Together, they are sharing with the city a haven for the handmade and far-flung worldly design. SUPPLY is located at 2204 Lake Austin Boulevard. Open M-F from 10-5. supplyshowroom.com. S. LEWIS tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

83


profile in

STYLE

2.

1.

3. 1. Inside SUPPLY's sunny showroom, a Martin Huxford light fixture hangs overhead a Madeline Weinrib rug and an ottoman from The Foundation Shop. 2. Printed pillows cluster cheerily on wall perches. 3. Folded rugs are piled below an art piece by Cande titled Tiroteos y Liroios, 2015. 4. SUPPLY's array of 'Stone Textile' fabrics offer visitors a study in earthy print diversity. 5. A montage of Mirth tiles creates a printed patchwork

84 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com


5.

4.

7.

6. against the space's white walls. 6. The showroom's eclectic wallpaper samples sit on clean, tiered shelves. 7. A block printed hide by New York design company AVO hangs on a wall beyond a rack of Abigail Borg wallpapers.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J E S S I C A PAG E S

tribeza.com JANUARY 2016

85


dining

PICK

Rebel Pizza Bar

7858 Shoal Creek Blvd. rebelpizzabar.com

C A S UA L FA R E S ERV ED A M I D U N I Q U E S T R EE T A RT I N T ER I O R S

D

espite the bravado of its name and its slogan (“Forget the Rules!”) Rebel Pizza Bar is a pleasantly mainstream new restaurant on Anderson Lane. Some might consider its graffiti-covered walls a bit edgy, or think its rooftop patio covered in Astroturf and a bocce ball court is somewhat quirky. Or regard its obscure location as rather unorthodox. But once you find it, Rebel Pizza Bar is a conventionally enjoyable place for a night out. Tucked behind a mattress store and above a Chinese restaurant, Rebel welcomes diners through an industrial stairwell leading up to the second floor dining room. Its interiors are covered in colorful graffiti created by 16 local artists like Justen Foss, Lucas Aoki, and Roshi K. It’s a vibrant explosion of color, shapes and storytelling that will occasionally rotate with new artists. Rebel isn’t breaking any new ground here — Austin restaurants like East Side King and Ramen Tatsu-Ya have featured graffiti art for years — but

86 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com

few have the sprawling space like Rebel to showcase such varied artists’ work. For sports lovers, TVs are everywhere – in the corners, above the bar, on the patio — and provide sightlines no matter where you sit. With the Super Bowl and March Madness on the horizon, Rebel will undoubtedly be a popular destination for game watching. In spite of its urban streetwise swagger, Rebel’s food is accessible and crowd-pleasing, as witnessed by its happy mix of families, couples and singles at the bar. It’s not challenging, cuttingedge cuisine; it’s an offering of updated greatest hits. So sit back, relax, and let the comfort food fly. We started with the signature Not Knots, Rebel’s riff on garlic knots: bite-size pizza dough stuffed with cheese and fillings like pepperoni, sausage or sun-dried tomato. They’re so wildly popular they had already sold out of most flavors one evening. There are also bar favorites like hot wings, waffles fries and chicken strips.

To offset our gut-busting sausage Not Knots, we ordered the Rizzo Salad, a heaping tangle of tender arugula dotted with creamy ricotta, toasted almonds, roasted fennel, orange segments and sun-dried tomatoes. Creative twists on Caesar, spinach and Italian salads are also on the menu. But the star at Rebel is the pizza and the Get Up Stand Up pie was the highlight of our meal. The thin, crispy crust was covered with fresh, bright marinara sauce and topped with spicy sausage, mushrooms, fresh jalapeno, homemade ricotta and buffalo mozzarella. It was a powerhouse of flavors and that left us jostling for the last slice. For dessert, there’s whimsical homemade cotton candy, plus Amy’s ice cream, fudge brownies and hot doughnuts a la mode. And although Rebel offers a full bar, skip the lackluster cocktails and go for the beer or wine, like a frosty Real Ale Hans Pilsner or a juicy glass of 19 Crimes Red Blend. Rebel may pose as a radical badass joint, but it’s really a softy at heart that makes everyone feel right at home. K. SPEZIA P H OTO G R A P H Y BY H AY D EN S P E A R S


START YOUR YEAR OFF RIGHT WITH FARE AT OUR FAVORITE RESTAUR ANTS .

TACO FLATS

24 DINER

APIS

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

23526 Hwy. 71 West | (512) 436 8918

5520 Burnet Rd. #101 | (512) 284 8352

As the name suggests, this dinner

Situated on six acres in the Texas

The resurrected Taco Flats located on Burnet

promises delicious plates 24/7. Head

Hill Country, the menu at Apis pays

Road has become known for slinging traditional

over any time of the day or night to

homage to the honeybee through the

Mexican tacos on handmade tortillas, a crafty

satisfy cravings. Menu highlights

innovative use of fresh produce and

agave-based cocktail program, and its extensive

include roasted chicken, burgers,

honey provided by the restaurant’s

beer list. Reclaimed woods, custom furniture,

breakfast served around the clock,

own apiary.

and light fixtures create a laid back interior with

and one of a kind milkshakes like

good energy. Long communal seating, a large U-

roasted banana and brown sugar.

APOTHECARY CAFÉ AND

shaped bar, and an open style kitchen will remind

An extensive gluten free menu is also

WINE BAR

you of trendy neighborhood bars in Mexico City.

available.

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 371 1600 Apothecary’s soothing ambiance and

34TH STREET CAFÉ

GUSTO 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed

excellent wine selection make it a great

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 Consistently

satisfying

spot for drinks and bites with friends.

American

fare that toes the casual/fancy line

ARRO

— great for weeknight dinners and

601 W. 6th St. | (512) 992 2776

weekend indulgences alike. Order the

From Easy Tiger and 24 Diner’s ELM

chicken piccata.

Restaurant Group, this West Sixth

pizzas, incredible desserts (don’t miss the

spot offers rich French favorites and

salted caramel budino), and locally sourced,

ALCOMAR

seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Full

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161

bar with craft cocktails, local beers on tap, and

This seafood spot is a top choice for

ASTI TRATTORIA

boutique wines from around the world.

lunch or dinner. The newest concept

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

from the folks behind El Chile and

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria of-

El Chilito, Alcomar serves up some of

fers delicious Italian cuisine, like saf-

the city’s most delicious Latin Ameri-

fron risotto with seafood.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

an excellent wine list.

can-inspired dishes.

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 ANDIAMO ITALIANO

Miguel offers exquisite Interior Mexican

2521 Rutland Dr. | (512) 719 3377

Austin’s only independent and family-

cuisine in a rich environment to stimulate

This neighborhood restaurant locat-

owned steakhouse has served beef

all the senses. Stunning fine art, lush tropi-

ed in an unassuming North Austin

aged the same way for over 17 years.

strip mall offers delectable, home-

Make sure to order a fresh seafood ap-

made Italian fare.

petizer; you won't regret it.

cal plants, sparkling light from traditional tin chandeliers…at Fonda San Miguel, your celebration comes alive. 459-4121 or www.

88 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com

AUSTIN LAND AND CATTLE

Celebrating 40 years in Austin, Fonda San

fondasanmiguel.com for details.

1205 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 1813


cornerstonearchitectsllp.com

CLOSING JANUARY 24, 2016

Strange Pilgrims Charles Atlas, Trisha Baga, Millie Chen, Phil Collins, Andy Coolquitt, Ayşe Erkmen, Roger Hiorns, Nancy Holt, Lakes Were Rivers, Angelbert Metoyer, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Paul Sharits, Sofía Táboas

Jones Center 700 Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701 thecontemporaryaustin.org

Roger Hiorns, A retrospective view of the pathway, 2008–2015. Foam, compressor, and polyester tanks. Dimensions variable. Installation view, Strange Pilgrims, The Contemporary Austin – Betty and Edward Sculpture Park at Laguna Gloria, 2015. Artwork © Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London. Courtesy the artist; Luhring Augustine, New York; Covi-Mora, London; and Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam. Image © The Contemporary Austin. Courtesy The Contemporary Austin. Photograph by Brian Fitzsimmons.

Betty and Edward Marcus Sculpture Park / Laguna Gloria 3809 West 35th Street Austin, Texas 78703

Strange Pilgrims is organized by The Contemporary Austin. Special venue support and artist-in-residence partnership has been provided through the Visual Arts Center in the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. Strange Pilgrims Exhibition Support: The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, AXA Art Americas Corporation, Suzanne Deal Booth, Lannan Foundation, The Moody Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Texas Monthly, Vision Fund Leaders and Contributors. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts, and by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Art Works.

Visual Arts Center / The University of Texas at Austin 2301 San Jacinto Boulevard Austin, Texas 78712


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE AND

wiches on baguettes, empanadas and tasty

CONTIGO

DARUMA RAMEN

BEER GARDEN

pastries. Intimate patio seating.

2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

612-B E. 6th St. | (512) 369 3897

Ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant take

From the owners of the popular Kome on

79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656 Banger’s brings the German biergarten tra-

BUFALINA

on bar fare. Take your pick from the exqui-

Airport Boulevard, Daruma features rich

dition stateside with an array of artisan sau-

1519 E. Cesar Chavez | (512) 524 2523

site cocktail menu and grab a spot on the

chicken broth-based ramen and a simple,

sages and more than 100 beers on tap.

Wood-fired pizza with an elegant, trendy

expansive outdoor patio.

veggie-friendly menu.

vibe; Insider tip: Get the Fresca pie. BARLEY SWINE

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

DRINK.WELL.

2024 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 394 8150

BULLFIGHT

315 Congress Ave. Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

Chef Bryce Gilmore offers small plates with

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

Belly up to the counter at this 24-seat space

Located in the North Loop district, Michael

locally-sourced ingredients at communal

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to

for an intimate dining experience that’s

and Jessica Sanders bring craft cocktails

high top tables.

Spain for classic tapas and an extensive

modern yet approachable.

and American pub fare to drink.well. with

wine list. BENJI'S CANTINA

a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try COUNTER CAFÉ

include fried chickpeas and house-made Twinkies.

716 W. 6th St. | (512) 476 8226

CAFÉ JOSIE

626 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 708 8800

Rooftop dining on West Sixth. Benji’s offers

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

1914 E. 6th St.

a fresh, innovative approach to Tex-Mex.

Innovative and flavorful plates with fresh

It’s nothing fancy, but this tiny shotgun-style

DUE FORNI

ingredients, served in a quaint and intimate

diner has some of the city’s best breakfast

106 E. 6th St. Ste. 106 | (512) 391 9300

atmosphere.

offerings. Both the pancakes and the ham-

Due Forni serves up Roman and Neapoli-

burger are legendary.

tan style pizza from two specially designed

BLACKBIRD AND HENRY 3016 Guadalupe St. | (512) 394 5264 Globally inspired dishes are the star at this

CANTINE

casual but adventurous neighborhood res-

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 628 0348

COUNTER CULTURE

taurant. Enjoy lunch, dinner or brunch.

From the owners of Asti and Fino, a chic

2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

EAST SIDE KING

and rustic Italian restaurant offering pizzas,

An East Austin haven for vegans and veg-

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 422 5884

cocktails and more.

etarians.

Chefs Paul Qui, Moto Utsunomiya and Ek

A cozy, French bistro serving up breakfast,

CHINATOWN

CRAVE

lunch and dinner.

3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

340 E. 2nd St. | (512) 469 0000

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

brick ovens.

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Timrek offer out-of-this-world pan-Asian food from across town trailers.

107 W 5th St | (512) 343 9307

A classic American grill with a chic atmo-

EL ALMA

BOTTICELLI’S

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in

sphere and a wide selection of diverse dining

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

1321 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 916 1315

town. Fast service in the dining room and

choices. Grab an intimate corner table and

Chef-driven, authentic Mexican cuisine

An inviting trattoria with warm Tuscan col-

delivery is available.

enjoy lunch, dinner or happy hour!

with unmatched outdoor patio dining.

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

DAI DUE

EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 0688

1100 E. 6th St. | (512) 467 4280

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive

Dai Due’s breakfast, lunch and dinner

When you step inside, it’s like stepping into

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

caviar and oyster menu, sharp aesthetics,

menus change frequently, offering guests a

a completely different era. Enjoy delicious

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

and excellent service make it a refreshing

fleeting but delectable taste of the season’s

vintage cocktails, 1930s- and 1940s-in-

Argentinean specialties like meat sand-

indulgence on West Sixth Street. Indoor and

best local offerings. There’s a reason Dai

spired music, and cuisine by Fermin Nunez.

outdoor seating is available.

Due was named one of Bon Appetit’s Best

On nice nights, head back to the small out-

New Restaurants.

door patio.

ors, featuring a small bar up front and cozy booths in back.

90 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com


WWG

Wal ly Wor km a n Ga llery

John Adelman & Joseph Janson 12 0 2 west 6th street aust i n , tex a s 7 8 7 0 3 wa l ly workman.com 5 1 2 . 4 7 2 . 7 4 2 8 Sh ow dates : Janu ar y 9 - 3 0 , 2 0 1 6 O p en i ng R ecep t ion Sat u rday, Janu ar y 9 images ( lef t) : Adelman, 4 Came ra s, gel i n k & acr y l i c on pap er, 2 5 x 1 9 i n. (r ight) : Janso n , Tar R abb i t , wo o d , tar, w i re, m eta l , stone, 61 x 13 x 28 in.

The Health Club for All Seasons


EASY TIGER

and steaks in a sleek and modern space. En-

artisan hot dog options, and one of the best

Modern spins on American classics and

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

joy new and innovative cocktails in the Finn

beer lists in town.

locally-sourced veggie sides inside Hotel

A delicious bakeshop upstairs and beer gar-

& Porter Loft Bar.

Ella. FREEDMEN’S

den downstairs. This downtown restaurant is the kind of place where you can relax while

FOGO DE CHAO

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

GOURDOUGH’S

sipping a local brew on the patio as the smell

309 E. 3rd St. | (512) 472 0220

Housed in a historic Austin landmark,

1503 S. 1st St.

of croissants and freshly baked pretzels waft

An authentic Brazilian steakhouse that

smoke imbues the flavors of everything at

Gourdough’s Public House is famous for

over you from upstairs.

shares the gaucho way of preparing meats.

Freedmen’s from the barbecue, to the des-

serving enormous donuts with imagina-

Enjoy a fine dining experience unlike any

serts, to even their cocktail offerings.

tive twists. Order up the Mother Clucker, a

EL ALMA

other.

donut topped with a fried chicken strip and FUKUMOTO

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

honey butter.

Chef-driven, authentic Mexican cuisine

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

514 Medina St. | (512) 770 6880

with unmatched outdoor patio dining.

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

Tucked between Fifth and Sixth streets,

HAYMAKER

Fonda San Miguel serves up traditional

Fukumoto serves up fresh sushi made with

2310 Manor Rd. | (512) 243 6702

EL NARANJO

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated and col-

high quality seafood, local produce and an

Comfort food meets sports bar meets beer

85 Rainey St. | (512) 474 2776

orful setting. For more than 40 years, Fonda

inventive menu.

pub in Cherrywood, an easygoing place to

Husband and wife team Iliana de la Vega

has been serving some of Austin's best mole

and Ernesto Torrealba serve up authentic

from its charming North Loop locale.

get a craft beer and elevated bar food. Get GALAXY CAFÉ

the namesake: The Haymaker is an open-

4616 Triangle Ave. | (512) 323 9494

faced roast beef sandwich, topped with fla-

FOODHEADS

1000 W. Lynn St. | (512) 478 3434

vorful slaw, tomatoes, a fried egg, decadent

616 W. 34th St. | (512) 420 8400

Features menu options that surpass the

gruyere sauce, and — wait for it — French

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

Fresh and inspired sandwiches, soups and

typical café, combining deli style favorites

fries.

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

salads in a charming, refashioned cottage

with comfort food. Bonus points for serving

A charming French-Vietnamese eatery with

and porch.

breakfast until 4pm on weekends.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

GARDNER

Equal parts charcuterie, cheese, and wine

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

1914 E. 6th St. Ste. C | (512) 354 1480

shop, Henri’s offers a cozy space to explore

EPICERIE

Small, neighborhood restaurant in Hyde

The second restaurant from the duo be-

new wines or take a bottle home.

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

Park serving thoughtful, locally-sourced

hind Contigo, Gardner provides a seasonal,

A café and grocery with both Louisiana

food at reasonable prices. Come early for

vegetable-focused lesson in balancing flavor,

HILLSIDE FARMACY

and French sensibilities by Thomas Keller-

Dollar Oyster Tuesdays.

texture and wonder.

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

FORK & VINE

GLORIA’S

restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a per-

FABI + ROSI

3010 W. Anderson Ln. | (512) 489 7000

3309 Esperanza Crossing Ste. 100 (512) 833 6400

fect porch for people watching on the east

509 Hearn St. | (512) 236 0642

New American goes global with Thai curry

300 W. 6th St. #100| (512) 236 1795

side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly din-

A husband and wife cook up delicious Europe-

shrimp, short rib Wellington and tacos, plus

Perfect for a date night at the Domain, Glo-

ner specials.

an-style dishes like pork schnitzel and paella.

an expansive wine list.

ria’s serves upscale Mexican cuisine and fea-

FINN & PORTER

FRANK

500 E. 4th St. | (512) 493 4900

407 Colorado St. | (512) 494 6916

GOODALL'S KITCHEN AND BAR

Ideally located steps from popular mu-

Chef Peter Maffei serves up fresh seafood

Bacon-infused bloodies, a dozen different

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

sic venues like Mohawk, Red Eye Fly, and

cuisine from Mexico’s interior. Dine al fresco on this charming Rainey Street patio.

Vibrant and comfortable surrounding patio.

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully

trained Chef Sarah McIntosh.

tures a spacious patio.

92 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com

HENRI’S CHEESE & WINE 2026 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 442 3373

a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and more.

HOBOKEN PIE 718 Red River St. | (512) 477 4256


Kalologie 360 spas combine restorative massage, rejuvenating medical-grade skin care, premium body treatments and laser hair removal...

Lamar Union,

512.233.0252

next to Cafe Medici & Alamo Drafthouse

1100 South Lamar Suite 2120,

Š 2015 Kalologie Spa Destinations LLC

Austin, TX 78704


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

Stubb’s, hit up Hoboken Pie for a late night

JACK ALLEN’S KITCHEN

KORIENTE

LA TRAVIATA

slice. Open every night until 2:30am.

7720 Hwy. 71 W. | (512) 852 8558

621 E. 7th St. | (512) 275 0852

314 Congress Ave. | (512) 479 8131

Savor country favorites from Chef Jack

Healthy, tasty Korean options like bulgo-

Authentic Italian in a cozy downtown set-

Gilmore on the covered patio.

gi and curry dishes all served up by the

ting; known for their wickedly rich and deli-

friendly staff.

cious Spaghetti alla Carbonara.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head

JEFFREY’S

to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3am on

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

LA BARBECUE

LAVACA TEPPAN

weekends for your post bar-hopping con-

This historic Clarksville favorite has main-

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

1712 Lavaca St. | (512) 520 8630

venience and stocked with classics like the

tained the execution, top-notch service and

Though it may not be as famous as that

Serving your favorite Japanese dishes along

Margherita as well as innovative pies like

luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that

other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is

with fun Sake twists to classic cocktails, like

the White Clam and special toppings like

makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which

the MoSakeJito and the Sake Colada.

fried eggplant and meatballs.

is owned by the legendary Mueller family, JOSEPHINE HOUSE

whips up classic barbecue with free beer and

LAUNDERETTE

HOPFIELDS

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

live music.

2115 Holly St. | (512) 382 1599

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Rustic, continental fare with an empha-

A gastropub with French inclinations, a

sis on fresh, local and organic ingredients.

LA CONDESA

Sawicki surprise diners at this east side gem

beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The

Serving lunch, happy hour, and dinner, the

400 W. 2nd St. | (512) 499 0300

with menu items like crispy pork ribs and a

wine list is excellent and the perfect pairing

shady porch is the perfect spot for a late-

Delectable cocktails, tasty tacos and ap-

birthday cake ice cream sandwich.

for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and

afternoon paloma.

petizers and delicious main courses, all

moules frites. JULIET RISTORANTE

Culinary magicians Rene Ortiz and Laura

inspired by the hip and bohemian Condesa

LENOIR

neighborhood in Mexico City.

1807 S.1st St. | (512) 215 9778

HOUSE PIZZERIA

1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800

5111 Airport Blvd. | (512) 600 4999

A Texas breeze feels Italian when you’re sit-

LA V

French-inspired prix-fixe meal in an in-

A choice pizza place for a spontaneous night

ting on one of the best patios in the city at

1501 E. 7th St. | (512) 391 1888

timate dining room and table that seats

out. Fresh and simple. Try the roasted olives

Juliet. Enjoy a curated wine list and twists

This elegant French restaurant boasts an

just 34 diners.

and the kale salad too!

on classic Italian dishes.

ever-changing menu of seasonal ingredients with an emphasis on simple, yet soul-

LIBERTY KITCHEN

ISLA

JUNIPER

ful, dishes. Paired with their extensive wine

507 Pressler, Suite 700 | (512) 840 1330

208 W. 4th St. | (512) 322 9921

2400 E. Cesar Chavez St. Ste. 304 | (512) 436 3291

list, it’s the perfect setting to celebrate any

American comfort food reigns at Liberty

Caribbean-focused fare shines at Isla with

Uchi alum Nicolas Yanes cooks up Northern

special occasion.

Kitchen, with fresh takes on classic plates

tropical tiki sips and bites.

Italian fare on the east side.

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious

like deviled eggs, seafood and burgers. LAMBERTS DOWNTOWN BARBECUE

ITALIC

KOMÉ

401 W. 2nd St. | (512) 494 1500

LITTLE BARREL & BROWN

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

4917 Airport Blvd. | (512) 712 5700

Not your standard barbecue fare, meats at

1716 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 582 1229

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy

Japanese comfort food made with fresh

Lambert’s have an Austin twist, like the

From the owners of Botticelli's, this little

Tiger presents simple, rustic Italian plates.

ingredients and served in inventive ways.

rib-eye glazed with brown sugar and mus-

resto serves New American/comfort food.

Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from Pastry

Daily lunch specials include three types of

tard. Tucked away in the historic Schnei-

With an impressive 24 seats, this restaurant

Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

ramen.

der Brothers Building in the Second Street

boasts the biggest bar on South Congress.

District.

94 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com


TWIST TOURS

3D MODELS | PHOTOGRAPHY | VIRTUAL TOURS

AUSTIN

for Buildings, Land, Spaces and Places

HIGHRISES.COM/AUSTIN ELLEN NOBLE Broker, ABR CRS

BUY - S ELL - LEASE 600 Congress Avenue, 14th Floor, Austin 78701

512-658-9999

512.831.1756 | office@twisttours.com | twisttours.com

featuring

3663 Bee Caves Road, Suite 4F, Austin, TX 78737 • 512.328.3631 • www.qualityframesart.com


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

LONESOME DOVE WESTERN BISTRO

experimental menu exciting for omnivores

OLIVE & JUNE

419 Colorado St. | (512) 271 2474

and vegetarians alike.

3411 Glenview Ave. | (512) 467 9898

The Austin outpost of Tim Love’s Fort

Celebrated Austin Chef Shawn Cirkiel cre-

Worth institution boldly fuses earthy game

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

ated this southern Italian-style restaurant

like wild boar and creative dishes like hama-

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 680 5045

with a menu that highlights local, sea-

chi tostadas.

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf

sonal ingredients and includes a handful of

Coast sensibility to East Austin by sling-

Northern Italian favorites, too.

LUCKY ROBOT

ing fresh seafood in the kitchen and at the

1303 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 8081

counter.

OLIVIA 2043 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 804 2700

A futuristic dining experience on South Congress, inspired by the vibrant culture

NORTH

A South Austin staple emphasizing fresh

and cuisine of Tokyo.

11506 Century Oaks Ter. | (512) 339 4440

and local produce. This famed brunch spot

Enjoy modern Italian cuisine in a sleek inte-

also offers an exciting and diverse menu,

rior at this Domain standout.

from foie gras to French toast.

2218 College Ave. | (512) 297 2423

NO VA KITCHEN & BAR

PARKSIDE

Two locations, same straight-up Southern

87 Rainey St. | (512) 382 5651

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

goodness, from moon pies to fried green

Subtle design elements make this space cohe-

This downtown spot is crowded, but the

tomatoes to corn muffins to the crème de la

sive and modern. Enjoy creative twists on clas-

happy hour — with half-price oysters and

crème: fried chicken.

sic, comforting dishes from a pork belly/sirloin

tasty cocktails — is a local favorite.

LUCY’S FRIED CHICKEN 5408 Burnet Rd. | (512) 514 0664 &

burger to seasonally topped flatbread pizza. MANDOLA’S ITALIAN MARKET

PÉCHÉ

4700 W. Guadalupe St. | (512) 419 9700

ODD DUCK

208 W 4th. St. | (512) 494 4011

Casual Italian fare and a well-stocked gour-

1201 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 433 6521

Enjoy Prohibition-style cocktails at Aus-

met grocery, alongside a deli, bakery, and

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mor-

tin’s first absinthe bar alongside standout

espresso bar. Grab a gelato and unwind on

tar, Odd Duck was the first venture from

dishes of smoked duck salad and citrus-

the patio overlooking the Triangle.

acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect sea-

dusted salmon.

sonal fare and drinks with a Texas influence MANUEL’S

at this South Lamar oasis.

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 &

PERLA’S SEAFOOD & OYSTER BAR 1400 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 291 7300

10201 Jollyville Rd. | (512) 345 1042

OLAMAIE

A South Congress staple, expect the fresh-

Definitely not your standard Tex-Mex,

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

est fish and oysters flown in daily from both

Manuel’s hits all the right notes for its up-

A menu that would leave any Southerner

coasts, carefully prepared with simple yet

scale Mexican cuisine, cleanly presented in

drooling, with a dash of contemporary

elegant flavors. Go early on a nice day to eat

a chic setting.

culinary concepts. The dessert menu of-

oysters and people watch on their fantastic

fers your classic apple pie, or alternative-

front porch.

METTLE

ly a more trendy goat’s cheese caramel

507 Calles St. | (512) 507 0396

ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and

PERRY’S STEAKHOUSE & GRILLE

Created by Rainey Street proprietor Bridget

order the biscuits (they’re worth every

114 W. 7th St. | (512) 474 6300

Dunlap, Mettle offers a diverse, often-

delectable bite).

Located downtown in the historic Norwood

96 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com

Tower, Perry’s is within easy walking distance of the Texas State Capitol and other downtown landmarks. This location features unique décor, patio seating and Perry’s award-winning menu. QUATTRO GATTI RISTORANTE 908 Congress Ave. | (512) 476 3131 Downtown Italian restaurant dishing up delicious antipasti and huge portions of Italian fare; great date night spot. QUI 1600 E. 6th St. | (512) 436 9626 Chef Paul Qui’s headquarters is one of the hottest new spots in town for an unparalleled dining experience set under an airy, beautiful backdrop. RAMEN TATSU-YA 8557 Research Blvd. Ste. 126 | (512) 339 0855 1234 S. Lamar Blvd. Japanese comfort food at its finest in Austin’s first brick-and-mortar, ramen-centric eatery. ROARING FORK 701 Congress Ave. | (512) 583 0000 Great spot for lunch with coworkers or an elegant night out with friends and family. RUSSIAN HOUSE 307 E. 5th St. | (512) 428 5442 Step into Russian House and you’ll forget that you’re even in Austin. Come here for a slow, relaxing evening to experience delicious Russian cuisine, and don’t miss out on their many infused vodkas!


Congratulations to all of our celebrity and professional dancers for helping us raise over $1 million! Title Sponsor Lexus of Austin | Lakeway Honorary Chairs Katie Jaffe & Andra Liemandt

Ballroom Sponsors Jeanne & Michael Klein, Rebecca Rooney, The DeRoeck Family Event Chairs Katrine Formby & Venus Strawn

Director & Emcee Sabrina Barker-Truscott


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

SALTY SOW

Set in a Tuscan-style villa, Siena captures

THE GROVE WINE BAR + KITCHEN

UNIT-D PIZZERIA

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

the essence of its namesake region.

6317 Bee Cave Rd. | (512) 327 8822 &

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 1922

800 W. 6th St. | (512) 236 1440

Pizza options abound in Austin, but Unit-D

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash.

SOUTH CONGRESS CAFÉ

Lively, popular Westlake wine bar and Ital-

uses an Italian-made pizza oven to fire up

The food menu, heavy with sophisticated gas-

1600 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 447 3905

ian restaurant. The wine list boasts more

pies that are simple, yet thoughtful.

tropub fare, is perfect for late-night noshing.

A south Austin hotspot, we recommend

than 250 wines by the bottle. VESPAIO

South Congress Café’s legendary brunch. SANTA RITA TEX-MEX CANTINA

The carrot cake French toast and migas are

TRACE

1610 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 441 6100

1206 W. 38th St. | (512) 419 7482 &

to die for.

200 Lavaca St. | (512) 542 3660

Daily rotating menus offer the best of the

At The W Austin, TRACE focuses on re-

season and the freshest from Vespaio’s

5900 W. Slaughter Ln. Ste. 500 | (512) 288 5100 Fresh ingredients, traditional recipes, and

SWAY

sponsibly- and locally-sourced ingredients

bountiful garden and local markets. This

outstanding margaritas combined with

1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999

from Texan farmers and artisans. Great out-

Italian-inspired restaurant is a longtime

bright décor, attentive service and solid

The culinary masterminds behind La

door seating and excellent service.

Austin favorite.

menu offerings.

Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor area, com-

TRIO

SAWYER & CO.

plete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300

4827 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 531 9033

unforgettable experience.

Wide selection of wines to accompany a

Bringing more Cajun and soul food options to

top-notch steak with amazing views of Lady

the east side. The mid-century modern design

SWIFT’S ATTIC

adds quirk to some seriously good food.

315 Congress Ave. | (512) 482 8842

Bird Lake.

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s Attic

TRULUCK’S

SEARSUCKER

draws from global inspirations and serves

400 Colorado St. | (512) 482 9000

415 Colorado St. | (512) 394 8000

up inventive cocktails in a historic down-

Enjoy nightly entertainment over steak or

Stylish Southern fare from San Diego ce-

town building.

fresh seafood. Truluck’s serves the freshest

lebrity chef Brian Malarkey. Go for the

crab, direct from their own fisheries, which

decadent small plates: duck fat fries with

THE BACKSPACE

tomato jam and prosciutto "dust," farm bird

507 San Jacinto St. | (512) 474 9899

lollipops with bleu cheese, and the “cowboy

Classic antipasto and exquisite pizzas hot

UCHI

caviar.”

out of the wood-fired brick oven straight

801 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4808

from Naples.

Chef Tyson Cole has created an inventive

SECOND BAR + KITCHEN

they incorporate into nearly every dish.

menu that puts Uchi foremost among sushi

200 Congress Ave. | (512) 827 2750

THE CARILLON RESTAURANT

Another venture from Chef David Bull, Sec-

1900 University Ave. | (512) 404 3655

ond offers a swanky bistro experience in the

Located inside the AT&T Conference Center

UCHIKO

heart of the 2nd Street District.

on the University of Texas campus, this res-

4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

taurant serves up sophisticated, American

The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and

SIENA RISTORANTE TOSCANA

fare that is always artfully presented. Per-

former home of Top Chef Paul Qui.

6203 CAPITAL OF TX. HWY. |

fect place for a date night.

(512) 349 7667

98 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com

spots in Austin.

VOX TABLE 1100 S. Lamar Blvd. # 2140 | (512) 375 4869 Across the street from the Alamo Drafthouse at South Lamar, Vox’s “new American fare” is a perfect pick for date night. Be sure to try out their brunch offerings. WINEBELLY 519 W. Oltorf St. | (512) 487 1569 Tapas on Oltorf in a cozy setting. The bistro’s small plates are spins on old favorites and the wine cocktails are a welcome surprise. WINFLO OSTERIA 1315 W 6th St. | (512) 582 1027 Classic Italian fare made simply and with locally-sourced ingredients. WINK 1014 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. E | (512) 482 8868 Rooted in the traditions of the slow food movement. Stop in for their incredible happy hour.


FAMILY LAW TRADITIONAL & COLLABORATIVE

RESPECT AND STRENGTH DURING A DIFFICULT TIME 2901 Via Fortuna, Building 6, Suite 450 ∙ Austin, Texas 78746 512 275 7880 ∙ www.Ikardwynne.com

“WATCH YOUR HOME OR BUSINESS FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD”™

$15.95 Monthly Alarm Monitoring Residential & Commercial no contract | no credit check Schedule an appointment with one of our design specialists to get a free quote for all of your security needs! Contact us at 512-331-2788 or 1-800-370-2762

FREE ADMISSION

O this learning, what a thing it is!

ON vIEw thROugh MAy 29 21st and guadalupe Streets

www.hrc.utexas.edu


style

KAREN MANDRACHIA

STREET FA SHION

in a Parts and Labour tank and Onzie yoga pants.

AMANDA ROMERO in Fabletics top and leggings.

JENN COATS in a Volcom sweater, lululemon shorts (discontinued!) and lululemon sports bra.

REY CARDENAS in shorts by Frank and an American Apparel tank. HANNAH

SOMERVILLE in Old Navy

jeans, Forever 21 shirt and a J.Crew sweater.

W H AT AU S T I N I S W E A R I N G T O. . .

Practice Yoga Austin

Looking for some workout motivation in the new year? Sometimes a great outfit is all you need to get moving. Take some inspiration from the always stylish yogis of Practice Yoga. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y D A N I E L C AVA Z O S

CAITLIN HATCH in leggings from Target and a band shirt from her boyfriend's closet.

JACOB GROOMER in shorts and a WRK-

KIELY RUTLEDGE

SHOP T-shirt.

in a Spiritual Gangster top and Pheel leggings.

TATIANA BECERRA in a Nike long sleeve shirt, Victoria Secret yoga pants and Nike tennis shoes.

100 JANUARY 2016

tribeza.com


Shown: the ultra restful Bolton bed and Flute side table.

DREAM EASY, THERE’S NARY A

SHINY BRASS

RAIL TO BE SEEN.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


January 2016 Interiors Issue  

We hope this issue helps you walk into the new year inspired. From the beautiful home on our cover, a collaboration between Mark Ashby Desig...

January 2016 Interiors Issue  

We hope this issue helps you walk into the new year inspired. From the beautiful home on our cover, a collaboration between Mark Ashby Desig...