Page 1

15 YEARS

T H E X X FAC TO R

How music mavens like Tameca Jones turned their passions into careers.

S H OT I N A U S T I N

A fashion-forward take on our favorite productions filmed in town.

N O. 175 |

MU S IC + F IL M

A retrospective celebrating 15 years as Austin’s leading arts + culture magazine.

15

YEARS


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C O N T E N T S : F E AT U R E S

MARCH

52 SHOT IN AUSTIN—

THE XX FACTOR

MAKE IT OR BREAK IT

15 YEARS

a fashion-forward take on

Learn how music mavens

As our city grows, so do the

Over the past 15 years, our

our favorite productions

Carolyn Wonderland, Tameca

challenges facing local bands.

magazine has worked with some

Jones, Leslie Nichols, Pooneh

Meet the companies ushering

of the country's best photog-

Ghana, Jenna Carrens and

in the new phase of Austin’s

raphers. Revisit some of our

Lizzie Buckley turned passion

modern music industry.

favorite photographs and learn

into careers in music.

P. 72

the stories behind them.

filmed in town.

P. 60

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

P. 80

P H OTO G R A P H BY DAG N Y P I A S EC K I


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CO NTE NT S : DEPARTM ENTS

Social Hour p. 24

Life + Style PRO FI L E I N S T Y L E S T Y L E PI C K

p. 116

p.120

F I N D M O R E AT

TRIBEZA.COM

T R IB EZ A TA L K : D E S T I N E D F O R G R E AT N E S S

BEHIND THE SCENES: WATCH US CREATE THE INTRO TO "MAKE IT OR BREAK IT."

Community + Culture COLUMN: KRISTIN ARMSTRONG p. PROFILE p.

TRUE FASHION:

33

TRIBEZ A TALK p.

G E T T H E LOO K FRO M

Food + Thought

36 38

“ S H OT I N AU S TI N "

For this month’s fashion feature,

DINING PICK p.

124 ON THE HOUSE p. 126 DINING GUIDE p. 128

we were inspired by some of Austin’s biggest film and television credits. Take a closer look at the pieces from the photoshoot.

D I N I N G PI C K: BU L L FI GH T

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGR AM @TRIBEZ A

M U S I C P I C K : S X S W LO C A L S H OWC A S E S

One of our most popular photos taken last month @hotelsanjose.

Arts + Happenings ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C ALENDAR S p. MUSIC PICK p. ART PICK p.

46 EVENT PICK p. 48

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

O N T H E C O V E R : TA M E C A J O N E S ;

A Look Behind... p. 140

P H OTOG R A P H BY J E SSI C A PAG E S ; H A I R + M A K E U P B Y B I L LY M E R C E R O F L I P S E R V I C E

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Editor’s L E T T E R

BEHIND

THE ISSUE

A

s the editor of TRIBEZA, every issue feels like a love letter to Austin. This month, however, feels especially heartfelt. First, there is the theme: The Music + Film Issue. As SXSW descends upon us, there is no better opportunity for locals and visitors alike to revel in our dynamic live music scene, witness the work of our extraordinary filmmakers and embrace Austin’s culture. Here on the pages of this month’s TRIBEZA, we pay homage to our music and film industries, and kickoff our 15th anniversary year. Since 2001, we have watched Austin grow from a hip town in the middle of Texas to a bonafide international hotspot. What happens here, not only in film and music, but also food, visual arts, fashion, technology, architecture, interior design, craftmanship, writing and literature is now in the global spotlight. Whether it’s an app developed by a local tech company, or brisket so revered that even the President of the United States "TRIBEZA has told the sto- makes a special trip to taste it, Austinites create things that ries of thousands of people change the course of arts, culture and industry. What a special time to call this city home.

Our intern James Ruiz snapped this behind the scenes photo during our shoot for "Shot in Austin".

— some famous, some not — but all forever shaping Austin arts and culture."

March also marks the unveiling of TRIBEZA’s new look. More than a year in the making, this thoughtful redesign by Art Director Ashley Horsley represents the next era in our magazine’s history. In addition to design changes, look forward to expanded style, arts and food coverage, as well as stories exploring how Austin’s creative class is tied to other cities. Over the next few months, we will unveil even more dynamic digital content, as well as a redesigned website and a new app. However, the one thing that will never change is our commitment to working with the best photographers, writers, illustrators, artists and designers, and telling stories in the most beautiful way we can.

For "Make It or Break It" photographer Adam Voorhes and prop stylist Robin Finlay smashed, burned and otherwise destroyed this acoustic Rogue guitar.

Katie Friel

katie@tribeza.com This vintage 1965 Ford Mustang was graciously loaned to us by Helena Stergiou for the Dazed and Confused portion of our fashion feature. It was quite literally the perfect accessory.

18

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

TAMECA JONES PHOTO BY JESSICA PAGES

Thank you for 15 extraordinary years — and cheers to many more!


A SPECIAL NOTE FROM OUR

Publisher

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TRIBEZA! I find it incredible that TRIBEZA is turning 15 years old. Time sure does fly while you are uncovering some of the many stories that make Austin great. I continue to be so very proud of the work we do, and the many great contributors we get to work with. We are so very lucky that some of the best writing and photography talent in Central Texas wants to have their work in TRIBEZA. Of course we could not do what we do without the support of our many advertisers to whom we are so thankful and appreciative. Several companies have been with us since the first year including: The Garden Room, Gottesman Residential Real Estate, Wally Workman Gallery, Urbanspace, Fonda San Miguel and Austin Fine Properties. No matter how long we have worked with our many advertising partners, we are thankful for the opportunity to work together.

"Time sure does fly while you are uncovering some of the many stories that make Austin great."

Similarly we could not get the magazine out to you, our readers and fans, without our 500-plus distribution partners who open their doors to TRIBEZA to be available to our readers every month as well as the many hotels who choose us as an in-room partner including the Four Seasons Austin, The Driskill, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin, South Congress Hotel and Hotel Ella. No doubt many of you have your regular spot to pick up your copy and I hope you will take a moment to say “thank you� to them. Over the last five years, we have continued to grow our online presence, and I am excited to report that we now have a social media following of over 45,000 fans across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Engaging this many people has been quite an accomplishment and I am pleased that it continues to grow every day!

As we move forward, expect to see us working hard to develop many more partnerships, and continue having many more conversations in the community about what makes Austin great. There is certainly no shortage of energy and enthusiasm, and we want to be even more engaged with our readers and fans via our digital platforms and events. Look for our website and e-newsletter to be refreshed to enable more interaction in the coming weeks. Thank you for your continued support and interest in TRIBEZA. Please never hesitate to drop me a line with comments or questions. I look forward to seeing you out and about in Austin.

George Elliman george@tribeza.com

20

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com


15

YEARS

A R T S + C U LT U R E M A R C H 2 016

N O. 17 5

PUBLISHER + PRINCIPAL

George Elliman

EDITOR

Katie Friel ART DIRECTOR

Ashley Horsley

Ashley Beall

DESIGNERS

SALES & OPER ATIONS MANAGER

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Dan Gentile Terrence Henry Sallie Lewis Sam Sumpter PHOTOGR APHERS

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DIRECTOR OF SALES

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Callie Dickey Olivia Leitch

AUSTIN SHADEWORKS

Chris Perez

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Sofia Sokolove

Looking Forward to Rock-'n'-Rolling with Tribeza and Austin for another 15 years

CHIEF STR ATEGIST

Miguel Angel Daniel Cavazos Chelsea Laine Francis Roger Ho Kate LeSueur Jessica Pages Dagny Piasecki Briana Purser Jenny Sathngam Hayden Spears The Voorhes Sarah Wilson Jackie Lee Young ILLUSTR ATORS

Joy Gallagher

REDESIGN BY

Ashley Horsley

Lexi Ross

Derek Van Wagner INTERNS

Dahlia Dandashi James Ruiz Joanna Steblay Ashley Lopez PRINCIPALS

Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres 706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2016 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

S U B SCRIB E TO TRIBEZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DETAIL S


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SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

Social HOUR T R I B E Z A I N T E R I O R S TO U R V I P K I CKO FF PA RT Y The cozy SUPPLY Showroom in the heart of downtown’s design district hosted TRIBEZA’s Interiors Tour Kick Off Party to inspire and prepare guests for the upcoming guided tour throughout Austin. The unique shop, which features products and work from a range of international designers, kept the party going with bites from Emmer & Rye and beverages from

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Shiner and Sourced Craft Cocktails.

AUSTIN PROPER S A L E S G A L L ERY GR A N D O P EN I N G Austin Proper Hotel & Residences invited guests, including TRIBEZA, DEN and The KOR Group, to celebrate the opening of the Austin Proper Sales Gallery. The building's 99 penthouses and residences were designed by renowned interior designer Kelly Wearstler. The party provided guests with Austin Proper’s own handmade cocktails and snacks from McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

4

5

6

Interiors Tour: 1. Brooklyn Decker & Jesse Stowell 2. Kim West, Callie Jenschke & Kristin Gish 3. Roni Koltuniak, Brian Kasper & Claire Zinnecker 4. Keith Kreeger & Camille Styles 5. Caroline Cecil & Sharon Lee 6. Robert Bentley & Rob Hicks Austin Proper: 7. Amy Willis, Jillian Knox Finley & Nikki Jensen 8. Taylor Tatum & Vanessa Mejia 9. Lesya and

7

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Katie Milam

24

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H S BY J EN N Y S AT H N G A M & M I G U EL A N G EL


SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

D O 5 12 B E S T O F 2015 SH OW

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2

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With the help of Goose Island Beer Co. and Jameson Cocktails, Do512 celebrated local photographers by showcasing photographs from the most epic Austin events of the year at SHDW Studios. A DJ set by Kid Slyce kept partygoers dancing as they enjoyed an open bar and hors d’oeuvres.

HOTEL VAN ZANDT'S D EB U T PA RT Y The recently-opened Hotel Van Zandt served music lovers well at their debut party. Housewarming cocktails, snacks for nibbling, continuous live music and an after party gave guests something to dance about at the Rainey Street district hotel.

H R C AU S T I N GAL A

4

5

6

The JW Marriott overflowed with gowns and glamour as the Human Rights Campaign Austin celebrated their 21st annual black tie gala. The extravagant event provided guests with crafted cocktails and delectable cuisine as they enjoyed a silent auction, live entertainment and speeches from notable figures. This year’s theme, "On the Shoulders of Giants", honored those who made significant strides for the LBGT community in 2015.

Do512: 1. Courtney Goforth & Ashley Gregg 2. Shane Bearrow & Corey Walk 3. Jesus Josh & Mandy Reyes HVZ: 4. Alex Visser, Jane Johnson & Caroline Crain 5.

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

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9

Keaton Kratzer & John Kratzer 6. Elizabeth & Taylor Vreeland HRC: 7. Ashley Kerr & Julie Hart 8. Amanda Cox & Michael Sneed 9. Lisa & Micah Rodriguez P H OTO G R A P H S BY DA N I EL C AVA ZOS , M I G U EL A N G EL & C H A D A DA M S


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SOCIAL HOUR | AUSTIN

M E R RY M E R RY M A RT I N I M IXER The Coppertank was filled with flair as party goers of the 12th annual Merry Merry Martini Mixer enjoyed music, gourmet bites and bottomless martinis late into the evening. This special event serves as Equality Texas’ largest fundraiser in Austin, and all proceeds from the night will be used to further public support for marriage equality.

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1

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U P TOW N E V E N T S L AU N CH PA RT Y Guests gathered at West Elm for Uptown Event’s celebration of their new coordination services. To commemorate Uptown’s expansion to lifestyle and travel planning events, attendees enjoyed wine tasting, a napkin folding lesson and a raffle, with drinks by Austin Cocktails and Aqua Custom Label Bottling.

BLACK FRET SE A SO N L AU N CH

4

Having already raised over $280,000 in music grants, nonprofit Black Fret kicked off its newest fundraising season with a bang at the Parish. Black Fret members enjoyed a lively evening of tunes from Sweet Spirit, Harvest Thieves and Walker Lukens, one of TRIBEZA’s 2015 People to Watch.

5

6

Martini Mixer: 1. Luis Valadez & Austin Foss 2. Mark Gilbert & Jonathan Pecora 3. Lauren Carol & Lauren Foreman Uptown Events: 4. Becky Poster, Audrey Bogert & Morgan Prejean 5. Meagan Fritts & Erika Whitehouse 6. Mustansir & Arwa Partapgharwala Black Fret: 7. Jennifer Trimble & Wes Cargal 8. Van Gill & Justin Schubert 9. Jim

7

8

9

& Malia Lewin

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M I G U EL A N G EL , L AU R A D O H ERT Y & DA N I EL C AVA ZOS


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Community + CULTURE C U LT U R A L D I S PATC H E S F R O M

PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON

AU S T I N ' S C R E AT I V E CO M M U N I T Y

K R I S T I N ' S CO L U M N

33

PROFILE

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T R I B E Z A TA L K

38


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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | CO M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

The MAGIC of MUSIC by Kristin Armstrong I L LU S T R AT ION B Y J OY G A L L AG H E R SO FEW PEOPLE TODAY actually sculpt

or paint or put ink to parchment in fine calligraphy. It seems like relatively few people own ballet shoes, play an instrument, or write poetry. If art is not part of our career or a longtime hobby, we can almost forget about it. Yet our soul yearns for it. Have you recently looked at a bright orange sunset and felt a pull in your chest? Or heard an old song that strums you right back in time? Or read a paragraph in a book that was so stunningly fine you had to read it again, and fold the corner of the page? Or watched a scene in a film, acted with such precision and perfection, that you forgot it was a movie, and realized you were holding your breath? That feeling is the same as the rumbling of a hungry stomach, except it’s your spirit that’s starving. I know there is a part of me that only art can access. I remember being in a terrible place at a certain time in my life when I was miserable, withered and shaky. I tried everything: therapy, friends, running, more running, wine, more wine — you name it. Nothing, not sweat nor tears, could drain the ache F O R A L I M I T E D - E D I T I O N P R I N T, C O N TA C T J O Y G A L L A G H E R @ G M A I L . C O M

tribeza.com

| MARCH 2016

33


K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | CO M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

MUSIC DEFINES US BY ERAS, Y E T S I M U LTA N E O U S LY F R E E S U S F R O M T I M E A N D A G E . I T TA K E S U S B A C K A N D I T C A R R I E S U S F O R W A R D, A N D Y E T I T H E L P S U S RO OT M O R E D E E P LY I N T H E P R E S E N T.

residing in the pit of me. That was until a dear

phones, and available live all over our mu-

ously frees us from time and age. It takes

artist friend suggested I borrow some time in

sical city. We have certain music we like to

us back and it carries us forward, and yet

her studio. I put a paintbrush in my hand and

run with. Music we like to play as we pour

it helps us root more deeply in the present.

a large canvas on the easel — and set myself

a glass of wine, chop vegetables and start

We need music. If you have taken it for

free. I painted for hours, angry lashes of red

cooking. Music for dinner parties. Music by

granted or forgotten your favorites, return

and depths of brooding blue. I didn’t notice

the fire. Make-out music. Pool party tunes.

to it like a lost love. Dust off your old turn-

the passage of time or the tears on my face,

Travel playlists for headphones on the air-

table and cherished albums, there is noth-

because at long last, I was finally letting go.

plane. Road trip music. Get psyched or get

ing like the soothing hum of needle scratch.

A clot broke free and it was like circulation to

focused or get calm before big event mu-

Make the playlist or command Pandora to

my soul was restored.

sic. Getting dressed to go out music. Need

blend one to match your mood. Turn it up

This is what I mean about art. We were

to fall asleep music. Need to remember my

loud in the car and sing like no one is listen-

created to long for beauty. We were created

youth music. Need to remember someone I

ing. Rock out in the shower. Dance around

to create. We were created to pause and en-

love music.

your kitchen. Spice up your workout or your

joy, and tend to the place inside us that requires tending.

34

Music is art because it is a creative medi-

sex life. Chill out on a rainy afternoon. Stop

um that causes us to transcend. It opens our

saying you are going to go see live music,

Music is one of the most accessible forms

hearts and minds, it liberates stored memo-

and actually go see live music. Find your

of art available to us today. It’s in our car, our

ries, and it connects us to ourselves and to

art, and your rhythm, again.

homes, our workplaces, our computers, our

others. It defines us by eras, yet simultane-

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com


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A CO N V E R S AT I O N W I T H

Keith MAITLAND by Sofia Sokolove Photograph by Sarah Wilson

A N AUS T I N F I L M M A K E R J UG G L E S T H E PR E M I E R E OF T WO H IG H PROF I L E D O CU M E N TA R I E S DU R I NG T H IS Y E A R ' S SX S W

T

his year at South by Southwest, Austinbased filmmaker Keith Maitland is premiering two very different films. Tower is

a mostly animated documentary about the 1966 UT Tower shooting that combines eyewitness interviews with historical footage. The harrowing story has intrigued Maitland since the seventh grade, when he first heard about the shooting from his history teacher, an eyewitness. Meanwhile, A Song For You: The Austin City Limits Story is a celebration of 40 years of the Austin-based PBS music series. We sat down with the Emmy-nominated Maitland on a sunny February day at the “compound” (as his wife and co-director of photography, Sarah Wilson, calls their expansive east side office/home/studio property). Though both of Maitland’s films are premiering in less than a month, and the couple’s three-month-old, Theo, is napping a few feet away, the filmmaker is surprisingly at ease as we chat about work, inspiration and the state of filmmaking in Austin.


P R O F I L E | CO M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

It’s been quite a year for you. Can you catch us

out thinking, ‘These are the two things I want

felt like when I graduated, to have the kind of

up on it?

to make films about?’

career I wanted, I couldn’t stay in Austin, so I

It’s really just been a process of juggling these two

No. Tower was my film. The ACL film was started

went to New York and was there for almost 10

[films]. They’re kind of the two biggest [ways]

by [PBS], and they did a search for a filmmaker.

years. Austin is a destination now. When I grad-

that Austin in the ‘60s, and then in the ‘70s, inter-

I pitched to them an idea about focusing on their

uated it was New York or Los Angeles. Now it’s

acted with the rest of the world. Back when Austin

past, present and future. And I just saw that film

New York or LA or Austin.

was a sleepy little college town, these were the two

as an opportunity to see a ton of music. I was like,

things that broke it out. [Tower] is a story that I

‘Look, if this means I get to go hang out with Wil-

SXSW Film played a big role in establishing

wanted to tell for a long time… and I knew that

lie Nelson then yes, I wanna do it.’

Austin as a film town. There are great film festivals all over the country

I wanted to tell the story from the perspective of people that were there, and I knew that I wanted

Was there anything that especially struck you

and all over the world, but there’s only a handful

to work in this animation style because it would

during your interviews with local artists?

of festivals that actually engage with the indus-

allow us to transcend time and place and put view-

We talked with Shakey Graves, and he grew up

try, that bring in agents, producers, executive

ers right into the pocket of the story, with a real

here in Austin, and Gary Clark Jr., and they spoke

producers, studios. SXSW is one of those places.

sense of immediacy.

about what it was like growing up in a town full

To take these two films that are so Austin

of music and kind of coming of age just as it felt

based and that I think both have an audience of

like the town came of age.

people across multiple generations here in Aus-

Tower isn’t a typical documentary. How would you describe it?

tin that care about these stories, [and] to be able And even if the scene is changing, ACL is actually something that hasn’t really changed

to present them here in town, it’s thrilling.

a mostly animated documentary. There have been

in that sense.

That’s great. Congratulations.

one or two of those before, but it mixes animation

Totally. A lot of people talked about that loyalty,

Thank you. Just to get to do this kind of work is

with archival footage seamlessly, which I don’t

continuity. A lot of [the film] is young artists re-

a privilege. On Tower in particular it’s so mean-

know if I’ve ever seen that anywhere else. There’s a

alizing they’ve kind of joined this pantheon of in-

ingful to me. When you turn on the news and

wealth of archival footage from that day. In some

credible performers like Ray Charles and Johnny

you see that kind of conversation [about shoot-

instances, the people who are our characters in

Cash who graced that stage.

ings] continuing seemingly more and more

It definitely breaks the form of documentary in certain ways. It bends it at the minimum, being

the film, there’s footage of them from 1966, but it’s usually from a distance. [For the film,] we shot these animated recreations that are like the close-

You’re a younger filmmaker in Austin. What’s the pulse out there?

frequently, an opportunity to understand the impact of that, what it means to people who go through it, [that’s] what drove me to want to

You’re being generous by calling me younger; I

make the film. The film Tower is not set out to

just turned 40 last month. I think Austin has an

solve the problem of school shootings. But if I

the animation equally.

incredible scene for independent filmmakers in

could spark a dialogue that inspires a conversa-

that there are a lot of us here, and it’s a pretty

tion, maybe there are smarter people out there

You said that ACL and the UT Tower shooting were the first things to happen in Austin that brought the city national attention. Did you set

supportive network of individuals. We all share

than me who can take something from that and

gear, we share producers, we share editors, we

work towards figuring out a way to start solving

socialize. You know, I went to the University of

this problem.

Texas at Austin and I graduated in 1998, and I

This interview has been edited and condensed.

up of that same scene, and we cut back and forth between them, treating the archival footage and

tribeza.com

| MARCH 2016

37


T R I B E Z A TA L K | CO M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Tribeza TALK

DES T I N E D FOR G R E AT N E S S

One of Austin’s favorite cinema creators gets on-screen treatment with the documentary Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Louis Black, co-founder of SXSW and

A N I NSI DE R ' S GU I DE TO

The Austin Chronicle, and Karen Bernstein go deep with

AUS T I N ' S H I DDE N G E M S

interviews and archival footage to chart the director’s path from his Slacker debut in 1991 to preparations for Everybody Wants Some, Linklater’s latest feature, which will kick off the SXSW Film Festival. For more informa-

by Nicole Beckley

tion, visit linklaterdoc.com

HOUSE, MADE If home is where the heart is, there’s a lot of heart beating through L’Estelle House. For over 20 years, the Rainey Street property has been owned by Craig Nasso, who originally planned the site for an apartment, architecture studio, and someday a family house. Sensing the shift from neighborhood to entertainment district, Nasso and his wife, Holly, decided to turn the space into a kitchen and outdoor dining space. This past New Year’s Eve marked L’Estelle’s first official day. “I want the experience to be like, homestyle — like you’re coming into our yard, which is a real yard of a real couple,” explains Holly. “But I want the vision and execution of what people are having to hit them in a really deep place.” To do this, the Nassos enlisted Melvin Mendez to serve as the in-house chef, creating Gruyere PHOTO BY JESSICA ATTIE

and prosciutto-stuffed empanadas, brunch

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

pizzas, and for SXSW, easy-to-carry items like beignet biscuits with strawberry jam. The jam comes courtesy of the eatery’s namesake,

AMP IT UP

Austin’s day of philanthropic giving, Amplify Austin, celebrates its fourth year on March 8, with over 500 nonprofits participating, including Girls Rock Austin, Austin Film Society and Health Alliance For Austin Musicians. Over the course of 24 hours, generous Austinites ban together for the city-wide event. Over the past three years, locals have donated more than $16 million to causes.

Craig’s mother, Estelle Rainey, who specializes in cakes and preserves. “Total homestyle goodness,” Holly says. For more information, visit lestellehouse.com

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N , V I S I T A M P L I F YAT X . I L I V E H E R E I G I V E H E R E . O R G


Congratulations on an inspiring 15 years! Here’s to many more.

now open at

38TH & L AMAR | SOUTH CONGRESS | THE DOMAIN KENDRASCOT T.COM


T R I B E Z A TA L K | CO M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

With the release of the sci ficomedy Lazer Team, two Austin enterprises are making waves in the film distribution world. After

TEAMING UP

turning to fans to crowdsource funding for the movie, production studio Rooster Teeth partnered with in-theater distribution startup Tugg to play it on over 500 movie screens worldwide. The film was officially released on January 27.

FRESH HARVEST “Some of my favorite songs I’ve written in 20 minutes,” musician Cory Reinisch says. Reinisch and his band Harvest Thieves crafted 12 tracks

PAT RON SAINTS

for their first full-length album, Rival. Though some songs took months to write, at least one came pretty easily. “One night I came home after work and just said, 'I’m not going to bed, I’m not

Max Frost. Mother Falcon. Shakey Graves. Gina

even going to work tomorrow until I have some-

Chavez. Over the past three years these celebrated

thing written, a full, front to back song',” Rein-

Austin artists have been among those honored with

isch says. Less than half an hour later the result

financial grants from Black Fret, a nonprofit de-

was “I Killed Laura Palmer,” a song that plays out

voted to supporting and promoting local musicians.

in a dreamy reverberating waltz, with haunting backing vocals from keyboardist Annah Fisette. Moving to Austin for the music scene in 2007, Reinisch played with bandmate Dustin Meyer in the now-defunct Guns of Navarone before the two created Harvest Thieves in 2013. An official artist at this year’s SXSW, expect to catch the band’s brand of bourbon-soaked Americana at a variety of venues during the festival. For more information, visit harvestthieves.com

“THEY BELIEVE IN ARTISTS ENOUGH TO HELP FUND THEIR CAREERS AND CREATIVITY AND

“They believe in artists enough to help fund their careers and creativity and their business, cause it is a business,” 2015 recipient (and our March cover star) Tameca Jones says of the organization. Founded in 2013 by Austin Music Foundation leaders Colin Kendrick and Matt Ott, Black Fret’s vision brings together music patrons to help provide some deeper pockets for deeply talented local performers. The slate of 2016 grant nominees

THEIR BUSINESS,

will be announced in early March, with spots also

CAUSE IT IS A

from the Austin Music Awards on March 16.

allotted to the top two “Best New Artist” picks

BUSINESS.” - TA M E C A J O N E S

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N , V I S I T B L A C K F R E T. O R G

40

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com


D E S I G N PO R T R A I T.

Tufty-Time, seat system designed by Patricia Urquiola. www.bebitalia.com

B&B Italia Austin: 1009 West 6th Street, Suite 120 Austin, TX 78703 Tel: 512 617 7460 - bebaustin@internum.com


Blanton Museum of Art / The University of Texas at Austin / MLK at Congress / Austin, TX 78712 / 512.471.7324 / www.blantonmuseum.org

@blantonmuseum


Arts +

HAPPENINGS W H E R E T O G O A N D W H AT TO DO IN M ARCH

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BLANTON

by Sam Sumpter

E N T E R TA I N M E N T & A R T S C A L E N DA R

44

MUSIC PICK

45

ARTS PICK

46

EVENT PICK

48


C A L E N DA R S | A RTS & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC MELANIE MARTINEZ

March 3, 7pm Emo’s East RIHANNA

March 4, 7:30pm Frank Erwin Center VOCALOSITY

March 4, 8pm The Long Center SING! THE AUSTIN VOCAL ARTS FESTIVAL

March 4, 9am The Long Center

THE BEACH BOYS

March 5, 8pm The Long Center

GARY CLARK JR.

March 5, 8pm ACL Live at Moody Theater XXYYXX

March 6, 9pm Vulcan Gas Company 2ND ANNUAL AUSTIN MUSIC INDUSTRY AWARDS

March 7, 11am The Palm Door on Sixth VANCE JOY

March 8-9, 7pm Stubb’s Outdoors VIDEO DANCE PARTY: 80’S

March 11, 10:30pm The Highball CAZZETTE

March 12, 9pm Kingdom Nightclub

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

WOMEN IN JAZZ - AN UNFORGETTABLE TRIBUTE TO GREAT DIVAS

March 13, 7pm One World Theater

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS

THE REALISTIC JONESES

March 31, 8pm Stubb’s Outdoors

February 25-March 26, 8pm Hyde Park Theatre

FILM

STRANGE BREW 5

March 14, 2pm Hotel Vegas

SXSW MUSIC FESTIVAL

March 15-20 Various locations

KARAOKE UNDERGROUND: SXKU

March 20, 7pm Spider House Cafe & Ballroom

PATTY GRIFFIN, SARA WATKINS AND ANAÏS MITCHELL

March 22, 8pm Bass Concert Hall BLUE BEAR

March 24, 9pm Mohawk Austin VINCENTE AMIGO

March 23, 8pm The Long Center

THE KINGDOM OF DREAMS AND MADNESS

MOVIES IN THE PARK: THE SANDLOT

CABARET

March 10, 7pm-9pm Northwest District Park

March 29-April 3, showtimes vary Bass Concert Hall

TEXAS FILM AWARDS

COMEDY

March 10, 6-10pm Austin Studios, Stage 7

SXSW FILM FESTIVAL

March 11-15 Various locations LAUGHTER AND REFLECTION WITH CAROL BURNETT

March 12, 7-8:30 The Long Center

March 26, 7pm Paramount Theatre

March 13, 3pm The Marchesa Hall & Theatre

STAR TREK: THE ULTIMATE VOYAGE

RUN FREE: THE TRUE STORY OF CABALLO BLANCO

March 28, 6:30pm Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar

March 27, 7pm The Mohawk

KURT METZGER

March 2-5, showtimes vary Cap City Comedy Club RAMIN NAZER

March 4-5, showtimes vary The Velveeta Room MONOLOGUE JAM: SOLO COMPETITIVE IMPROV

March 5, 10pm The Institution Theater LISA LANDRY

March 9-12, showtimes vary Cap City Comedy Club GABRIEL IGLESIAS: FLUFFY BREAKS EVEN

THEATER

DAUGHTER

March 28, 8pm The Mohawk

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

March 4-May 15, showtimes vary ZACH Theatre

FILMS FOR THE FOREST

MAGMA

February 26-March 6, showtimes vary Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

March 1, 7pm Alamo Drafthouse Village

JERRY JEFF WALKER 2016 BIRTHDAY BASH

March 26, 8pm The Long Center

TWELFTH NIGHT

MEDEA

February 17-May 6, showtimes vary The Long Center

March 12, 7:30pm Frank Erwin Center ROD MAN

March 17-19, showtimes vary Cap City Comedy Club


MUSIC PICK

DAVE ATTELL

2016 PIRELLI WORLD CHALLENGE

CHAD DANIELS

BIG HAIR COUNTRY FAIR

March 25-26, showtimes vary Cap City Comedy Club

March 25-26, showtimes vary The Velveeta Room

CHILDREN DR. SEUSS FILM FESTIVAL

March 3, 3:30pm Yarborough Branch, Austin Public Library EXPLORE UT

March 5, 9am UT Campus

IT’S MY PARK DAY

March 5, 8am Various Austin parks MOSSFEST

March 6, 10am-4pm Zilker Hillside Theater SPRING BREAK FARM CAMP

March 14-18, 9-3pm New Farm Institute

WORKSHOPS: SOAP MAKING KITCHEN LAB

March 20, 2:30pm The Thinkery

FLASHLIGHT EASTER EGG HUNT & MOVIES IN THE PARK

PHOTO COURTESY OF MOBLEY

March 24, 7:15pm Old Settlers Park

OTHER ONE PAGE SALON: A MONTHLY GATHERING OF WRITERS & CREATORS

March 1, 7pm The North Door

March 4-6, hours vary Circuit of the Americas

March 5, 6-10:30pm Hotel Ella

RUN FOR A PURPOSE 5K AND KIDSK

March 6, 8-10am Lakeway Swim Center

ZILKER PARK KITE FESTIVAL

March 6, 10-5pm Zilker Park

ATX STARTUP CRAWL

March 10, 5-10pm Capital Factory

SXSW INTERACTIVE FESTIVAL

MOBLEY

S X S W: GO I N G LO C A L

Various Locations M A R C H 1 5 -2 0

March 11-15, hours vary Various locations

For some, SXSW means standing in line for hours to score free drinks

RODEO AUSTIN

opportunities for both serious exposure and serious competition.

March 12-26, hours vary Travis County Expo Center SOUTHWEST X KICKFEST

March 13, 1-6pm Norris Conference Center

ST. PATRICK’S DAY FESTIVAL

March 17, 6am Fado

and a glimpse at Lady Gaga. For local artists, it’s a hectic week filled with “South By kind of wakes us up and puts some wind in our sails to be even more creative,” says Mariclaire Gamble, frontwoman of Austin electro rock pop outlet MCG. “It’s like a double-edged sword; you feel small again, but it’s kind of inspiring at the same time.” As artists fight for stages and spectators, Austinites have the chance to show their favorites some love and enjoy some outstanding performances in the process. “I perform the same way regardless of who’s there and how many peo-

BALLOONS OVER HORSESHOE BAY RESORT

March 25-27, hours vary Horseshoe Bay Resort ARTIST TALK WITH MARCO BREUER

March 31, 7pm University of Texas Harry Ransom Center

ple,” says Mobley, a local musician with an electrifying stage presence, impressive ability to bounce between instruments, and sound that’s arguably better than anything on the radio. “I see that as my job; regardless of the mindset you came in with, you leave having had an enjoyable time [while] I’m on stage.” Find out more about MCG and Mobley and get details on where to catch them during SXSW at Mcgtheband.com and Mobleywho.com. Find a list of Official Showcasing Artists from Austin at SXSW.com. tribeza.com

| MARCH 2016

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A R T S P I C K | A RTS & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts

ARTS PICK

MARCH 11 B SCENE: COME AS YOU ARE Blanton Museum of Art 6pm

ONGOING

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY Becky Joye: Hunting for Mysteries March 5-26 RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART Poetry on the Plaza Through March 31

Seen and Unseen

The Crusader Bible: A Gothic

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

Through April 3

Sally Weber: Elemental

C O M E A S YO U A R E : A RT O F T H E 19 90 S

Blanton Museum of Art

T H R O U G H M AY 1 5

Mood rings and JNCO jeans, Tamagotchis and Tickle Me Elmo, Bill Clinton’s impeachment and O.J. Simpson’s trial, needless to say, the 1990s were an interesting time. And while there are certain parts of history (and a few haircuts) we’d like to forget, Come as You Are: Art of the 1990s, the Blanton Museum of Art’s newest exhibition, celebrates the incredible art produced during this decade. The exhibition, which is named for the Nirvana song, Come as You Are, features the work of 45 American artists who emerged during the nineties. "Everyone comes at this [era] from a different experience — whether you were into grunge or hip hop or alt rock or pop, whether you made your name on Wall Street or just the streets … even if you were a child of the nineties and don’t have much of a relationship to that decade,” explains Blanton Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Evan Garza. “The perspectives in the exhibition are so diverse that the points of entry into the content of the show are seemingly infinite.” Come as You Are: Art of the 1990s is on display through May 15. For more information about the exhibition, visit Blantonmuseum.org.

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MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Through March 3

Masterpiece

Through March 3

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

CAMIBAART ART GALLERY

Through April 12

Rebecca Rothfus Harrell: geo + precision + space Through March 12

Milt Kobayashi: New Works

THE CONTEMPORARY

AUSTIN - JONES CENTER Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia

UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN &

Through April 17

Jesus Morales: A Tribute

BULLOCK MUSEUM

MUSEUM

Through March 13

Life and Death on the Border:

BONE BLACK PRINT STUDIO &

Through April 23

GALLERY

Francine K. Affourtit: Into the Fold

1910-1920

THE COURTYARD GALLERY:

Through March 13

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

LADYBIRD JOHNSON

Through April 30

WILDFLOWER CENTER Crystal Orland: Passion for Nature

John Stoney: Medium

THE CONTEMPORARY

Through March 20

AUSTIN – LAGUNA GLORIA

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY

Through May 22

Obras: Curated by Lea Weingarten Through March 23 Donald Moffett Through March 26

Lise Haller Baggesen: Mothernism

MEXIC-ARTE MUSEUM Obra Grafica: Selections from the Mexic-Arte Museum Print Collection Through May 29

PHOTO BY AL E X BAG , COU RTE SY OF TH E B L ANTON

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER


402 Crockett

2843 Shoal Crest

1115 West 11th

1210 W 13th

Selling Austin luxury properties, from the Classic to the Contemporary. Contact us to schedule a tour.

UNDER CONTRACT

John Teinert, Broker 512.731.8884 (cell) john@austinfineproperties.com austinfineproperties.com


E V E N T P I C K | A RTS & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES MUSEUMS THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

S PARE THE ROCK , S POIL THE CHILD: K U T X L I V E

Four Seasons Austin M A R C H 16 , 2 0 16

For most, SXSW serves as an awesome opportunity to get out and enjoy Austin’s music scene in full force. Parents, however, can’t drop everything and spend a week dragging their kids to bars in search of amazing bands. Fortunately, this year’s fest boasts plenty of events where bringing the kids isn’t just allowed, but encouraged. In some cases, they’re actually the target demographic. One such event is the kid-friendly portion of KUTX Live at the Four Seasons on March

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org BULLOCK MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com

16, which will feature sets by Suz Slezak of David Wax Museum and Red Yarn (Austin na-

ELISABET NEY MUSEUM

tive Andy Furgeson), whose unique show combines folk music and puppetry to entertain

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney

children and adults alike. “I try to make it appealing for kids and grown-ups,” Furgeson says. “The most wonderful shows I perform are when parents are singing along too. That’s kind of a magical experience when that all clicks.” The Spare the Rock sets will take place at 8:30 and 9:30 am on March 16 on the lawn of the Four Seasons. Admission is $10 or $5 for ages 12 and under. Find more kid-friendly events at sparetherock.com.

48

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: W–F 10–4:30, Sa–Su 1–4:30 umlaufsculpture.org

IMAGE COURTESY OF KUTX LIVE

EVENT PICK


A RTS & E N T E RTA I N M E N T | M U S E U M S & G A L L E R I E S

GALLERIES ART AT THE DEN 317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5

CO-LAB PROJECTS: N SPACE

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd.

T-F 10-5

905 Congress Ave. at Nelsen

GALLERY

(512) 477 9328

360 Nueces St., #50

space12.org

Partners

Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3

(512) 215 4965

(512) 300 8217

flatbedpress.com

Hours: W-Sa 11-6

Hours: W 5:30-8 co-labprojects.org CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only

GALLERY 702

LORA REYNOLDS

lorareynolds.com

702 San Antonio St.

LOTUS GALLERY

(737) 703 5632

1009 W. 6th St., #101

Hours: Tu-Su 10-6

(512) 474 1700

gallery702austin.com

Hours: M–Sa 10-6

GALLERY BLACK

lotusasianart.com

LAGOON

MASS GALLERY

4301-A Guadalupe St.

507 Calles St.

(512) 371 8838

(512) 535 4946

837 W. 12th St.

Hours: Sa 1-5

Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5

(512) 477 4929

galleryblacklagoon.com

massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS

co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY

Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4

(512) 524 7128

208 E. San Antonio St.

1101 W. 6th St.

Hours: M-Sa 10-5

GALLERY

(512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4

STUDIO 10

234 W. Main St.

1011 West Lynn

(830) 990 8160

(512) 236 1333

Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3

Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5

artisansatrockyhill.com

TESTSITE 502 W. 33rd St.

DOUGHERTY ARTS

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3

GALLERY

(512) 454 6671

916 Springdale Rd. #103

Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3

(512) 524 1488

galleryshoalcreek.com

Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6

VISUAL ARTS CENTER

modernrocksgallery.com

2300 Trinity St.

By Appt. Only

(512) 974 4000

austingalleries.com

Hours: M-Th 10-9,

AUSTIN ART GARAGE

austintexas.gov/department/

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE

GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez

MONDO GALLERY

Austin, TX 78702

4115 Guadalupe St.

dougherty-arts-center

(512) 826 5334

Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6

EAST SIDE GLASS

Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5

mondotees.com

grayduckgallery.com

F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2

STUDIO

3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY

eastsideglassstudio.com

(512) 974 4025

pumpproject.org

FAREWELL BOOKS

F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2

Hours: M–Th 10–9,

913 E. Cesar Chavez St.

austintexas.gov/department/

(512) 473 2665

doughertygallery

Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7

AT BOLM

5305 Bolm Rd., #12

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY

(512) 477 6007

bigmedium.org CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571

LA PEÑA

Tu-Sa 12-6

COMPLEX

1110 Barton Springs Rd.

Hours: Tu-Sa By appt. only

farewellbookstore.com

(512) 939 6665

PUMP PROJECT ART

227 Congress Ave., #300

ROI JAMES

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART

2324 S. Lamar Blvd

Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3

(512) 428 4782

lapena–austin.org

1137 W. 6th St.

LINK & PIN

Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6

2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102

russell–collection.com

Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

(512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

(512) 478 4440

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St.

ROCKY HILL

studiotenarts.com

AUSTIN GALLERIES

1110 Barton Springs Rd.

agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT

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Il Monastero was Skaaren’s home when he rewrote the screenplays for Top Gun, Beverly Hills Cop II, Beetlejuice and Batman.

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Vintage Mustang provided by Helena Stergiou tribeza.com

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THE

FA C T O R BY NICOLE BECKLEY P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J E S S I C A PAG E S H A I R + M A K E U P B Y B I L LY M E R C E R & B E T H A N Y R E N F R O O F L I P S E R V I C E

THESE SIX WOMEN ARE WORKING TO KEEP AUSTIN’S MUSIC INDUSTRY ALIVE AND WELL

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TA M E C A J O N E S MUSICIAN Tameca Jones is explaining the tattoo on her

8 Million Stories. “I remember my first time

right arm, an illustrated version of herself as

performing, I was so nervous, I drank Jack and

a sort of “Queen of Bees” surrounded by hives

Cokes,” Jones says, “I had to get a little warm to

and flowers. “I have one on my back [of a] a

chill out.”

mermaid on a rock, and that’s me too,” Jones

Since striking out solo Jones has come into

says. The musician has always had big dreams

her own, logging time at the Continental Club’s

for herself — starting from an early perfor-

Gallery and C-Boy’s, playing the Austin City

mance singing a Mariah Carey song at her mid-

Limits Music Festival and turning heads at last

dle school talent show. “I was a star for a little

year’s Austin Music Awards. “It’s like oxygen, it

bit,” Jones says, “People were coming up to me

just feels good to be onstage,” Jones says. “Bar-

in the hallways, like, You’re amazing ’ I was

ing your soul to people and being authentic,

like, I could get used to this.’”

that’s number one for me.”

Realizing that raw vocal talent alone wouldn’t

Jones is set for another kind of soul baring,

necessarily bring a record contract straight to

involving the throwback soul sound along with

her door, Jones went to Baylor to pursue enter-

some 80s-inspired synth, on her new album

tainment law, but left when she got pregnant

due this spring. “Sometimes I go to sleep and

with twins. The Austin native returned to the

dream of songs and I wake up and just catch

area to settle with her parents and make a real

the tail end of them,” Jones says, “I just have a

go at music. In 2005, she answered a Craig-

lot of music flowing through me.” Good thing

slist ad and became a vocalist with the band

she’s a mermaid.

“BARING YOUR SOUL TO PEOPLE AND BEING AUTHENTIC, T H AT ’ S N U M B E R ONE FOR ME.”

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“ M Y P H OTO S M I G H T N OT A LWAY S B E T H E S H A R P E S T O R P E R F E C T, O R M I G H T L O O K A B I T C R A Z Y, B U T I T H I N K P E O P L E L I K E T H A T. ”

P O ONEH GHANA P H OTO G R A P H E R In the beginning, there was music. “I started

like JEFF The Brotherhood and Cage The El-

coming to shows when I was 14,” photographer

ephant. “It’s the perfect combination of getting

Pooneh Ghana says. “My first ever cool show was

to hang out with your friends and take photos

The Strokes and The Sounds at the old Austin Mu-

that you know the fans want to see,” Ghana says

sic Hall, and that was just life-changing for me.”

of traveling on tour. “Anyone can get a shot of

Growing up in San Antonio, Ghana felt

a band on stage, but they want to see like Cage

the pull of Austin, traveling up for shows and

the Elephant, backstage, sweating, half-naked

meeting with friends she bonded with online

after a show. I think that’s more interesting.”

through an Arctic Monkeys forum. In 2008,

For Ghana, the aim is always to capture

Ghana made the move to attend the University

something raw that feels true to the individu-

of Texas at Austin, and started to get noticed for

al performer. “I want it to be different,” Ghana

the unique concert photos she was capturing. “I

says, “I try not to think so technically about it.

had a Polaroid and I was taking it to shows a lot

My photos might not always be the sharpest or

and just shooting bands for fun,” Ghana says.

perfect, or might look a bit crazy, but I think

She’d often meet the bands and shoot candids,

people like that.”

posting to her Flickr page. “The fan girls would find it and go crazy,” Ghana laughs. Ghana began shooting for Austinist and other outlets and going on tour with bands

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With her SXSW agenda packed with projects for Tumblr, VICE, and Live Nation she’s keeping plenty busy. Ghana laughs, “I haven’t slept in like six years; it’s okay.”


“I WENT BACK AND

LESLIE NICHOLS

LO O K E D T H R O U G H

PRODUCER, AUSTIN CITY LIMITS

THE LIST OF ALL THE ARTISTS I HAD

With a 40 year history that includes perfor-

coming to work for me And I think I waited half

mances from Johnny Cash, Stevie Ray Vaughan,

a second before I responded, sure, absolutely,”

Loretta Lynn, Radiohead, Coldplay, Foo Fight-

Nichols says.

ers, and hundreds of the biggest names in mu-

Spending her early years in the small refin-

WORKED WITH

sic, KLRU’s Austin City Limits is one of the

ery towns of east Texas, growing up on gospel

city’s most indelible institutions. “I went back

and country music, Nichols came to Austin for

A N D W H O’ D CO M E

and looked through the list of all the artists I

UT’s Radio-Television-Film program, graduat-

had worked with and who’d come through the

ing in 1990. At that time “Antone’s was actually

THROUGH THE

show and it was kind of mind-boggling,” pro-

on Guadalupe, I think it’s an EcoCleaners now,”

ducer Leslie Nichols says.

Nichols laughs. If Austin’s grown since then, so

Starting at KLRU in 1996 as a receptionist

too has the reach of Austin City Limits. During

and production coordinator, Nichols got to

Nichols’s 16-year tenure, the show has won a Pea-

KIND OF MIND-

know the ACL team, lending an extra hand

body Award and the National Medal of Arts, and

when they needed it. “I would help with hospi-

moved from its UT Austin perch to the state-of-

BOGGLING,”

tality or I even drove a 15 passenger van for the

the art Moody Theater in the W downtown.

SHOW AND IT WAS

andt tribute show, just because

Over the years, Nichols has met countless fa-

they were short on people,” Nichols recalls.

mous musicians, but only one left her speechless:

When the show was looking to expand, “Ter-

Dolly Parton. “I couldn’t even get out hello

ry Lickona [executive producer of Austin City

really has more charisma than anyone else I’ve

Limits] came to my office and asked the fateful

ever met,” Nichols says, “You know Dolly’s got to

question, which was, how would you feel about

get that all the time. She just smiles and goes on.”

Townes

an

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JENNA CARRENS & LIZZIE BUCKLEY AT T E N D A N C E R E CO R D S “I loved band,” Jenna Carrens says. “In middle school, when I joined, it was the first time I felt like myself.” Playing percussion in middle and high school in the southeast Texas town of Port Neches, Carrens found community and friendship with her peers, experiences she tapped while forming Attendance Records. After finishing the creative writing program at St. Edward’s University, Carrens turned her attention to creating a program that would connect middle and high school students with artists and musicians, and open up the songwriting and album-creation process. Through in-school writing sessions, students would compose work that would ultimately get recorded by local bands, including The Eastern Sea and Walker Lukens. Joining as an intern, and now serving as Attendance Records’ Program Director, Lizzie Buckley met Carrens through a musician friend and signed on to assist with the 60 or so students served each year, while also getting her therapist license at St. Edward’s. “It’s a good tool for when you’re working with people in a deep way, such as songwriting. When you have to be creative with somebody you also have to connect with them,” Buckley says. To celebrate their fifth year, Attendance Records will be producing a compilation album, due in June, featuring a number of local and national bands performing the kids’ original songs. Since 2011 Attendance Records has pressed two vinyl albums and released CDs, digital downloads, and screenprinted shirts, JENNA CARRENS

all designed by students. “The end of the year is so amazing,” Carrens says, “Especially when you have students who, it takes a lot for them to write and express themselves, that comes out throughout the year. And then to hear those songs performed by a band is so cool.”

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“ W H E N YO U H AV E TO B E C R E AT I V E W I T H S O M E B O DY Y O U A L S O H AV E TO CONNECT WITH THEM.” LIZZIE BUCKLEY

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CAROLYN WONDERL AND MUSICIAN

70

On a Friday night at One-2-One Bar, Caro-

stink up the place for a while and then you start

lyn Wonderland raises a toast to the crowd.

to get a little better at it,” Wonderland says.

“Cheers to you — the adventurous, the kind and

In 1999 Wonderland came to Austin, and

the groovy, who’ll take a chance on live music,”

over the past 1 years she’s become a fixture

she says, throwing back a drink before launch-

of the local music scene and community, serv-

ing into a set that will find her playing guitar,

ing on the board of the women-run Housing

lap steel and trumpet, whistling and showcas-

Opportunities for Musicians and Entertain-

ing her expansive vocal talent.

ers (HOME). “Our main goal is to make sure

Growing up in Houston, music was always a

that Lavelle White is housed,” she says, a mis-

part of Wonderland’s life. Her mother, a singer,

sion that’s made more personal given Wonder-

kept guitars around, as well as a piano, found

land’s own time spent without housing in the

at a flea market. “I liked the guitar because I

early 2000s.

could walk around with it and go see folks,” Won-

Rooted in the Austin scene, Wonderland

derland says, “My mom’s Strat has so many dings

keeps her ear out for talented performers —

on it from me just throwing it on my back and

lately, Jackie enson. “Holy cow, the stuff that

going up to the -Eleven, like who wants to play ”

she does is so cool and not typical,” Wonderland

At 15, Wonderland started hanging out at

says. “Go take a chance on bands,” she encour-

blues jams, learning from performers like

ages, “If you can do that once a month, you’d be

Joe “Guitar” Hughes, Trudy Lynn and Lavelle

surprised how much more fun you’re going to

White. “They were very generous; they let you

have.” Cheers to that.

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“ M Y M O M ’ S S T R AT HAS SO MANY DINGS ON IT FROM ME JUST THROWING IT ON MY BACK AND GOING UP TO THE 7-ELEVEN, LIKE WHO WA N T S TO P L AY ? ”


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A U S T I N M AY B E T H E “ L I V E M U S I C C A P I TA L O F T H E W O R L D,” B U T A S O U R CITY GROWS, SO DO THE CHALLENGES FA C I N G LO C A L B A N D S . H E A R H O W SOME INTREPID PEOPLE ARE USHERING IN THE NEXT PHASE IN AUSTIN’S M O D E R N M U S I C I N D U S T R Y.

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MAKE IT OR BREAK IT BY DAN GENTILE

INTRO PHOTOGRAPH BY THE VOORHES

PORTRAITS BY DANI E L C AVA ZOS

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Despite the doom and gloom of music census reports and ven-

huge national acts like Dirty Projectors. “Or, have a team of

ue obituaries, it has never been easier to listen to Austin-made

people to take that off your plate.”

music at home via Spotify, vinyl, or even cassette. This is even more extraordinary given the lack of management companies,

THE AFFORDABILITY ISSUE

booking agents and PR firms that keep Austin’s music scene

When a musician earns $20 a show and can’t rent a room

from integrating into the larger national industry. Instead,

for less than $500 a month, they can’t afford the behind the

most of the credit is due to a few scrappy record labels and

scenes team that turns an album into a career. It’s created

music companies.

a system where some bands simply cannot compete on the same level as their coastal contemporaries. And so, Austin

LESS SLACKER, MORE SERIOUS

musicians have opted instead for a fierce DIY ethos and un-

“There’s over 30 record labels in Austin, which considering

paralleled live chops. But when a musician leaves the stage,

that we’re a small market, should show that there’s a music

doing-it-yourself can sometimes mean doing it wrong.

scene in this town that’s not going to die, no matter what

Local nonprofit Punctum Records combats this with a

venue closes,” says Nathan Lankford, the founder of Austin

cohesive artist development approach. Their fake-it-til-you-

Town Hall, a music blog and label that has released jangly

make-it mentality is centered around a polished presentation,

rock albums from Shivery Shakes and Literature.

serious work ethic, and social media wizardry that can turn a

Labels can’t motivate musicians to wade through

five dollar Facebook ad into a packed club. Their roster ranges

iTunes license agreements instead of taking a dip in the

from the swampy Americana of RF Shannon to the garage rock

Greenbelt, but record companies do offer a safety net of

afterglow of ex-Strange Boys singer Ryan Sambol, both artists

industry due diligence — and a crucial element of outside

poised to expand outside Austin given the right resources.

accountability.

“In the microcosm of Austin, there are a lot of people put-

“[Musicians] can have the slacker thing as an image, but

ting out really great art, but it’s staying in one place. We’re

in day to day life [they] need to be much more serious to-

trying to figure out how to use the infrastructure of the mod-

wards a music career if [they] want it to work,” says Brian

ern independent music industry to move artists into the na-

Sampson, owner of Western Vinyl, which has released al-

tional conversation,” says Andrew Stevens, assistant director

bums from bands like Balmorhea and the debuts of now-

at Punctum and member of anywhere from six to 10 bands. CONTI NU E D ON PAG E 7 9

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Vinyls and cassettes put out from local Holodeck Records


Chloe Lula and Adam Jones of Holodeck Records.

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y J A C K I E L E E YO U N G

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The crowd at Levitation 2015.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y B R I A N A P U R S E R

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Punctum Records Director Dan Rudmann and Assistant Director Andrew Stevens.

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P H O TO G R A P H B Y R O G E R H O

CREATING MORE THAN MUSIC

for psych rockers through their festivals. Originally known

Making an Austin band as viable as one from New York City

as Austin Psych Fest, Levitation has grown from a one-day

is problematic in flooded genres like indie rock, but it can

party anchored by local rockers The Black Angels into a four

happen organically in smaller niches. One local success sto-

city series of internationally renowned events with headlin-

ry is Holodeck Records, a label of electronic bands that has

ers like The Flaming Lips.

gained an international reputation for a raw sound indebted to vintage synthesizers and 80s horror film scores. Fans outside of Austin don’t have trouble finding Holo-

spread the psychedelic gospel of Austin music. “The Rever-

deck artists online, but their physical releases have become

beration Appreciation Society label really sprung out of our

rare commodities, with some cassettes fetching as much as

merchandising operations for the festival. We were selling

$30 at shops in Germany and Japan. The reseller mark-ups

T-shirts and posters, then saw an opportunity to reinvest

might imply a profit, but the reality of a boutique label is

that money and put out music,” says James Oswald, media

that each release funds the next. “It’s not like I have a ton

director at RAS, who has now overseen 26 releases from the

of resources to offer these artists, I’m lucky that they’re

likes of Holy Wave and Ringo Deathstarr.

working with me,” says Adam Jones, founder of Holodeck

Left: Vinyls from Westen Vinyl. Right: Mac DeMarco crowdsurfing at Levitation Fest

Now integrated into the national music landscape, the next step for the Levitation crew was to form a label to

and member of darkwave bands Troller and SUR I E. “Ev-

NOT EVERYTHING HAS CHANGED

erything’s really small-time, no one’s making any money or

Despite changes in the industry, the one thing that remains

getting famous, we’re all just grinding away.” But that grind

is a creative class filled with working musicians. “The one

is creating commodities, and is shifting the music industry

resource that I never have too little of is content to put out,”

away from record deals as the primary way to make money.

says Adam Jones of Holodeck. “I don’t feel like there’s any

What Holodeck manages to do organically for the elec-

shortage of talent or musicians, or that there ever will be in

tronic scene with albums, Austin-based Levitation has done

the foreseeable future.” tribeza.com

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SINCE 2001, TRIBEZA has been lucky enough to work with the best photographers in Austin and beyond. Here, we look back at some of our most iconic images, and learn the inspiration behind them.


B L A N K C A N VA S / A P R I L 2 0 1 0 / DA N W I N T E R S


RYA N B I N G H A M I N T H E O P E N R OA D / M A R C H 2 0 1 3 / DA N W I N T E R S


LAUREN SMITH FORD Editor + Creative Director, 2006-2013 While watching Boyhood for the first time, I was particularly struck by the actress who played Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) high school girlfriend, Zoe Graham. Then, when I read up on her and learned she is a smart as a whip, feminist, art school student who grew up in Austin, I knew we had to collaborate with her. I pitched a style shoot to Zoe, the great Dan Winters and the incredible talent, Antonio Bond of Transplants Floral, and we worked together on one of my most memorable collaborations.

ZO E / A P R I L 2 0 1 5 / DA N W I N T E R S

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STEPHEN AREVALOS Art Director, 2003-2011 One of my favorite sets of images was a series of Kenny Braun’s surf culture photos that ran as part of a larger photo essay on black and white art. The complete series of photos was later published in his 2014 book, Surf Texas.

T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S / J U N E 2 0 0 8 / K E N N Y B R A U N

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MAD MEN / APRIL 2008 / MICHAEL THAD CARTER

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CASEY DUNN Photographer I came back from New York in 2006 and TRIBEZA literally gave me my first assignment in Austin. It is pretty amazing to look back at the images we have created together — I had no idea that it would be a collaboration that would last a decade. Austin is lucky to have a publication that puts so much focus on photographers and photography. It is awesome to still see a mix of newer talents and the great Austin photographers from the previous generation like Kenny Braun and Dan Winters.

T H E B A LCO N E S H O U S E / O C TO B E R 2 0 1 1 / C A S E Y D U N N

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F U N H O U S E / O C TO B E R 2 0 1 4 / C A S E Y D U N N

ASHLEY HORSLEY Art Director No house shoot has ever been more entertaining than the “Fun House� shoot we did with Casey Dunn and stylist Adam Fortner. Even though the house was incredible, the owners, their three rambunctious children and two Lab puppies were the real stars of the show. My favorite shot was when one of the dogs, Sweetie, climbed up on the stand up paddle board all on her own, and the kids immediately cannonballed into the pool beside her. tribeza.com

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KATIE FRIEL Editor 2015 - Present For the 2015 Architecture Issue, Terrence Henry had written an amazing piece about the rise of tiny homes in Austin and Whit Preston had taken these beautiful photographs of the space. When we looked at everything all laid out, we knew the cover needed to be dramatic, timeless and intriguing. We needed Casey Dunn. Amazingly, when I got him on the phone, he told me he actually had a very small break in his schedule and turned it around in just two days. This also marked Casey’s fifth consecutive cover for the Architecture Issue.

U P S I D E TO D O W N S I Z I N G / CO V E R S H OT / O C TO B E R 2 0 1 5 / C A S E Y D U N N

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I T ’ S I N T H E D E TA I L S / N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 3 / C A S E Y D U N N


LAUREN SMITH FORD Editor + Creative Director, 2006-2013 One of the best things about working at the magazine was being able to give young creatives the opportunity to get their talent out there. I still remember Wynn Myers coming in to show her book before she had been published anywhere and hiring her to shoot almost our entire first ever Makers Issue. Wynn is now shooting major ad campaigns and going to have a huge career. Or, how I knew I was going to hire a fresh faced designer just out of Parsons named Avalon McKenzie the day I met her. After making big contributions to TRIBEZA, she went on to work for Free People and Whole Foods. There are so many other TRIBEZA alumni who have gone on to great careers in New York, LA and beyond, like Stephen Arevalos, TRIBEZA art director from 2003-2011, who is now the designer for Neiman Marcus’ The Book.

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THE MAKERS / NOVEMBER 2012 / WYNN MYERS


R A N C H R E F U G E / CO V E R S H OT / J U N E 2 0 1 4 / W Y N N M Y E R S

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MATT RAINWATERS Photograher I had been a fan of The Black Angels for a long time, so I wanted to take my time with them and see how things would develop. The studio session went great, then someone mentioned grabbing a beer next door at Shangri-La. We had a a few beers on the patio, and I snapped pics while we chatted. At some point we went inside to grab another round, and I thought it would be fun to put them in the photo booth. Seven film strips later there were shots and beers flying all over the photo booth and I knew that was a wrap. Getting to be part of that was pretty special.

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T H E R OA D TO P S YC H F E S T / M A R C H 2 0 1 3 / M AT T R A I N WAT E R S

ASHLEY HORSLEY Art Director I love The Black Angels, so naturally, I was excited about this piece from the beginning. As a designer, I find myself being inspired directly by the photographs themselves, and this story was no different. Matt Rainwaters’ portraits of Christian and Alex could not have been more perfect for this piece and in turn inspired many options for my design — including this hand-lettered intro I created that was never published.

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STILL FROM LET’S RIDE FILM / JUNE 2015 / KYLE OSBURN

KATIE FRIEL Editor, 2015 - Current My first photoshoot with TRIBEZA was arguably a bit ambitious. For the June 2015 Outdoors Issue, all I knew is I wanted to photograph women on motorcycles. Little did I know that the 18-hour day required us to wake up at 4 am, move a 10-person crew to a ranch in Wimberley and then photograph multiple women in many different outfits as they rode Harleys down dirt roads and jumped in swimming holes. At one point, I watched as photographer Matt Rainwaters rode his skateboard — fast— alongside the five roaring motorcycles while cinematographer Kyle Osburn filmed him from the back of an open Jeep Cherokee. It was chaos, pure, magical chaos that makes you thank your lucky stars that this is your job.

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L E T ’ S R I D E / CO V E R S H OT / J U N E 2 0 1 5 / M AT T R A I N WAT E R S

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M A K I N G S O U P F R O M A I R / M AY 2 0 1 5 / K AT E L E S U E U R

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KATE LESUEUR Photographer For some time, I had been wanting to create a series of photographs inspired by Dutch paintings. I was super thankful for the opportunity to make it happen. It was shot in the back stairway area of the Waller Ballroom — the small space and the way it was lit was a dream.

E A R T H LY D E L I G H T S / M AY 2 0 1 5 / K AT E L E S U E U R


KENNY BRAUN Photographer I remember showing up to a Ballet Austin rehearsal when they were still in the old firehouse location on Guadalupe. I was told Stephen had 10 minutes for his portrait. I went into the space, placed him and the other two dancers next to the windows and shot a roll of film (12 exposures). Short and sweet.

S T E P H E N M I L L S / CO V E R S H OT / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 4 / K E N N Y B R A U N

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P E R S P EC T I V E: B I L L B U N C H / J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 / K E N N Y B R A U N

“It was December 2012 and I had never met Bill Bunch, but told him I had an idea of photographing him in the water at Barton Springs. He said yes and luckily it was a warm December day and we shot for about 20 minutes. I gave him a little direction of what I was looking for and he completely nailed it.� - Kenny Braun tribeza.com

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S C R U M P T I O U S S T Y L E / M AY 2 0 1 3 / L E A N N M U E L L E R

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LAUREN SMITH FORD Editor + Creative Director, 2006-2013 It took a little convincing, but I was thrilled when director Jeff Nichols agreed to do a style shoot and interview with us right after the release of his award-winning film Mud. We took over a few of his favorite east side neighborhood spots and even flagged down a guy driving by in a ‘70s convertible to let us photograph Jeff with it in exchange for $20 and a beer. I love the way LeAnn Mueller captures people, the energy she brings to her images, and how everything she turns in is intriguing and unexpected, so watching her work her photo magic over tacos and Tecates at El Azteca with one of the greatest directors in the world is an experience I’ll never forget.

THE MAN BEHIND MUD / APRIL 2013 / LEANN MUELLER


1 0 TO WATC H / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 / T H E VO O R H E S

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ASHLEY HORSLEY Art Director No matter what the shoot, watching Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay work is like watching magic happen. Collaborating with the talented husband and wife duo for this “Qui Cocktails” shoot was one of the most incredible sets I’ve worked on. They took my vision and made it even better than I had imagined. Plus they are always game to set things on fire.

D R I N K YO U R D E S S E R T / M AY 2 0 1 4 / T H E VO O R H E S

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KATIE FRIEL Editor, 2015 - Present Shooting with Steve is pretty much the most fun ever. For this shoot, we knew it was going to involve multiple locations, multiple looks and multiple models, not to mention the entire editorial team, a stylist and some of the staff from Austin Pets Alive! Despite the chaos, Steve remained the epitome of cool, and captured what felt like a true love story. Models Argus and Michael were strangers when the day started, but by the end it felt like a real connection was developing. The result are I LOV E YO U S O M U C H / F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 6 / S T E V E N V I S N E A U

these bright, beautiful images that really do capture the magic of being in love.

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H O M E B O D I E S / T R I B E Z A DA L L A S 2 0 0 8 / S T E V E N V I S N E A U

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15

YEARS A LOOK BACK AT SOME OF OUR FAVORITE COVERS FROM 2001-2016

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Thank You W E ’ D L I K E TO E X T E N D S P EC I A L T H A N K S TO A L L T H E LO C A L B U S I N E S S E S W H O H AV E S U P P O R T E D U S OV E R T H E PA S T 15 Y E A R S . W E A R E S O G R AT E F U L FO R YO U R CO N T I N U E D S U P P O R T.

15 YEARS

Urbanspace Real Estate + Interiors Gottesman Residential Real Estate Fonda San Miguel

Wally Workman Gallery The Garden Room Austin Fine Properties

13 YEARS

The Blanton Museum of Art California Closets Engel & Völkers Austin Diane Dopson Properties

Texas Sun & Shade Copenhagen Imports Scott + Cooner The Salt Lick

Four Seasons Austin Four Hands Home Jeffrey’s Julian Gold

The Hills Fitness Center Westlake Dermatology Wilson & Goldrick

12 YEARS

34th Street Cafe Austin Shadeworks Kumara Wilcoxon The County Line

11 YEARS

Kendra Scott Jewelry NEST Modern Umlauf Sculpture Garden

10 YEARS

Manuel’s Shabby Slips By George tribeza.com

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www.eswealth.com | 512.250.2277 Jenny Fleming, CPA

Sara Seely, CFA


(DOWN)TOWN P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y T R AV I S H A L L M A R K

JUDE GALLIGAN Hundreds of people are moving to Austin each day, and downtown is one of the major hubs of growth for the city. Local real estate expert Jude Galligan discusses smart urban growth and what to expect this year as the skyline continues to evolve.

Your blog keeps Austin updated on the latest news in downtown. What is the most exciting development happening right now?

From my point of view, the most exciting development is the Waller Creek District Master Plan. Decades in the making, this transformative project came to life after designers competed for the contract. It is finally coming to downtown, bringing an imaginative chain of parks, trails and connectivity to the eastern half of downtown. What’s unique about living in downtown Austin compared to other cities?

Few cities have kept pace with Austin’s growth. It has an undeniable entrepreneurial spirit and creative energy that can be felt just by walking the streets of downtown. This has paved the way for smart urban growth projects - such as repurposing historic structures

GALLIGAN IN HIS D OW N TOW N S PAC E .

into functional spaces from residences and offices to grocery stores and event spaces. I think the Seaholm Power Plant development is doing a great job of mixing all of these. Describe a perfect Saturday living in downtown Austin.

My perfect Saturday would be spent on foot, first waking up to a view of downtown then walking to Royal Blue Grocery to grab a breakfast taco and coffee. After people watching for a while, I’d walk the Lady Bird Lake Hike & Bike trail en route to the Farmers’ Market at Republic Square to pick up some fresh produce from the local vendors. In the afternoon, I’d catch a movie at The Alamo Drafthouse Ritz with a friend before eating at the Whole Foods Flagship on Lamar. I like ending my Saturdays with a nightcap in the Rainey Street district before heading back home.

Jude Galligan is the Broker-Owner of REATX Realty and Publisher of DowntownAustinBlog.org and AustinTowers.net. He has closed more sale transaction sides of downtown condos than any other REALTOR® in Austin in 2014 and 2015 (source: MLS). Jude Galligan has served on the Downtown Commission, the Waller Creek Citizens Advisory Commission, and currently serves on the Downtown Austin Neighborhood Association Board of Directors and the Downtown Austin Alliance Board of Directors.

REATX.COM/DOWNTOWN | 512.236.8898 | HELP@REATX.COM

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On view at the Jones Center: February 13 – April 17, 2016

MARK MOTHERSBAUGH: MYOPIA Also on view at the Betty and Edward Marcus Sculpture Park at Laguna Gloria: February 13 – May 22, 2016 LISE HALLER BAGGESEN: MOTHERNISM

Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. Mark Mothersbaugh, 1964 – Monument to the conquerors of space (detail), 2012. Ink jet on paper. 43 x 65 3/10 inches. Courtesy the artist.

Mark Mothersbaugh Support: American Genre Film Archive, Horizon Bank, Vision Fund Leaders and Contributors This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department; a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts; a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities; and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Art Works.


Life + STYLE H O W W E L I V E R I G H T N OW

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PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

Mark MOTHERSBAUGH DE VO ' S L E A D SI NG E R B R I NG S H IS W I L D WOR L D TO L I F E AT T H E CON T E M P OR A RY JON E S CE N T E R by Katie Friel Photographs by Jennifer Whitney

H

ow you know of Mark Mothersbaugh depends largely on your age. Baby Boomers and Gen X-ers were likely introduced to him as the lead singer of DEVO, the progressive art movement/band that asked us to “Whip It.” Millennials probably encountered his work during the opening credits of Nickelodeon’s Rugrats for which he composed the theme song for the television show and scored the subsequent feature films. Today’s children (and a few parents) have seen Mothersbaugh on another Nickelodeon show, Yo Gabba Gabba, where he teaches viewers how to draw. When I first meet Mark Mothersbaugh, he’s standing between a large bird call machine and a sculpture he lovingly refers to as the "My Little Pony butts.” A prolific artist and musician, the Los Angeles-based Mothersbaugh is in town to oversee the installation of “Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia,” his new exhibition at The Contemporary Austin - Jones Center. The show, which runs through April 17, showcases a variety of work from the artist’s four-decade long career. Instantly recognizable by his silver-framed glasses, Mothersbaugh has the infectious energy of someone who does not — or perhaps cannot — stop creating. “I have this desire to try and make

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Pure Barre...where elegance meets strength The local Pure Barre studios (Arboretum and Westlake) are producing lifted seats, toned thighs and burning fat in record breaking time. This full body workout combines elements of dance, pilates and yoga set to upbeat music that keeps you going. The workout accomplishes high end results with clients seeing changes in 10 classes or less, yet it is gentle on your joints. It is simply INTELLIGENT EXERCISE! So for the perfect gift that will give your bestie a head turning seat, lean thighs and mental clarity, get her classes at the barre! Take advantage of two new client specials... 4 classes for $40 in 14 days or 30 days unlimited for $100.

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PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

"I try to figure out why things happen or why they are the way they are. I feel like I’m kind of a reporter."

sense of the things I see around in me in life that are seemingly senseless,” he says. “And I try to figure out why things happen or why they are the way they are. I feel like I’m kind of a reporter.” Standing among his works, there is a feeling that viewers are not supposed to be passive observers, but instead active participants in Mothersbaugh’s world. It is a world shaped by myopia, or nearsightedness. Until the second grade, Mothersbaugh lived with the condition untreated, and his vision became so bad that by the time he was diagnosed, he was legally blind. Explains Mothersbaugh, “I had this teacher that hated me, I drove her crazy… She would go, ‘Mark can you add the numbers on the board?’ And I’d go, ‘What’s a board?’ cause I couldn’t see anything.” Just a few days after getting his first pair of glasses at age seven, Mothersbaugh began to draw, and never stopped. Tens of thousands of those drawings are now on display at the Jones Center, along with colorful tapestries, Mothersbaugh-made machines, eerie Photoshop-manipulated portraits, bold sculptures and roly-poly little figurines. Says the artist, “By putting all these different materials and elements together, you go, ‘I see. He’s about ideas and observing the planet from one perspective'.” And what a thrilling perspective it is. Myopia runs now through April 17. To see a full list of special programs, please visit thecontemporaryaustin.org

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Motherbaugh's brightlycolored Los Angeles studio is filled with artwork, inspiration and even those iconic red hats made famous by DEVO.

+

[see Mark's full studio tour on Tribeza.com]


STYLE PICK | LIFE + STYLE

Blurred LINES

PRIOR TO LAUNCHING her line, Esby Ap-

parel, North Carolina native Stephanie Beard spent 10 years in New York City as a menswear designer for brands like Levi’s, Tommy Hilfiger and Converse. These experiences were formative for Beard, and prompted a lifelong passion to create a look all her own. “I always wanted to start my own line,” says Beard, who opened Esby in February 2014, following her move from New York. The line is lifestyle-driven, with an emphasis on comfort, wearability and quality. Furthermore, Beard designs womenswear with a menswear mentality, meaning that with each collection, the pieces therein are quality made for endless wear and versatility. Esby’s all natural fibers and fabrics are sourced from around the world, be it a hand woven, hand dyed ikat from India or a buttery soft jersey stripe from Japan. The fabrics are pre-washed and shrunk so that customers get a true fit, and the line is produced in New Orleans and Dallas. In Beard’s eyes, Esby is a true lifestyle brand, and one that she hopes will continue to grow as years pass. Pillows and other home goods are being introduced and eventually she will launch menswear and childrenswear. “We’re trying to outfit our customer from head to toe,” she says. For the retail shop, Esby found a sunlit home in an old auto body shop off of South First. The space has since been converted with white painted walls, a glass garage door, and a back partition where the line is designed. “It’s just as much of a workspace as it is a boutique,” says Beard. Throughout the space, there’s a mix of vintage and new furniture, with raw elements scattered here and there, including a glass-topped table that sits on cinderblocks. “Everything is kind of unique and interesting aesthetically,” she says. This clean, neutral showroom is a fitting backdrop for Esby’s lovingly-made merchandise, which hangs from striking copper hangers, waiting to be taken home and worn for years to come.

A N E W YOR K E X PAT IS B R I NG I NG F R E SH PE R SPEC T I V E TO T H E C A PI TA L CI T Y ’ S A PPA R E L S CE N E by Sallie Lewis Photographs by Chelsea Laine Francis

Esby designs for longevity and quality.

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Food +

THOUGHT A G LO B A L PERSPECTIVE ON OUR

PHOTO BY HAYDEN SPEARS

LO C A L D I N I N G S C E N E

DINING PICK

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DINING GUIDE

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

BULLFIGHT A I R P OR T B OU L E VA R D W E LCOM E S A NOT H E R FO ODI E G E M by Karen Spezia | Photographs by Hayden Spears AUSTIN IS BURSTING at the seams. Not just its burgeoning population, but its dining scene, too. New restaurants sprout like toadstools to satisfy the hunger of our growing city. Downtown alone can’t contain Austin’s voracious appetite, so new dining hubs have emerged in some unlikely places like Airport Boulevard. Recently, this formally underdeveloped road wedged between railroad tracks and I-35 has transformed into a buzzing restaurant row. Gone are beloved dives like the Stallion Grill and Tamale House, replaced by choice newcomers like House Pizzeria, Kome Sushi and Sala & Betty. There’s a shiny new In-NOut Burger, straight from California. Even Burnet Road’s iconic The Omelettry crossed town to relocate here. Now there’s Bullfight, a Spanish tapas bar by executive chef Ryan Shields and Austin restaurateur Shawn Cirkiel, whose string of hits includes Parkside, The Backspace and Olive & June. With Bullfight, they’ve taken inspiration from Spain and given it a Texas twist. Like at any good tapas bar, start with a drink. The El Torero is a sultry blend of Bulleit Rye, apple liqueur, vino tinto and lemon. For a lighter libation, white sangria mixes crisp white wine, brandy, apple

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cider and white peaches. The classic gin and tonic is given special attention with house-crafted tonic and rare Spanish Xoriguer gin from the tiny Spanish island of Minorca. There’s also an extensive sherry selection and a wine list loaded with Spanish gems. Tapas bars encourage small bites and sharing — and Bullfight is no exception. As we sipped on our drinks, our group noshed on a variety of sharable snacks. Savory jamón croquettes and crispy squid came tucked in paper cones, a nod to the ubiquitous Spanish street vendors. We ordered a tray of hand-sliced Ibérico ham and an assortment of Spanish cheeses including not only the standard Manchego, but also Garrotxa, Ibores, alde n, Cana de Oveja and aged Mah n. Next we dove into a chilled bowl of classic tomato gazpacho, laced with shaved veggies and toasted almonds. Clams were roasted with creamy white beans and earthy chorizo. Seared, plump scallops came with two sauces: hazelnut romesco and a grilled scallion salsa verde. Green garbanzo beans, shallots and Idiazabal cheese made a fancy toast atop grilled bread. The showstopper was a tangle of garlic-roasted mushrooms topped with a jamón cured egg, its velvety yolk coating the fungi to create an umami explosion. We also clamored over succulent pork ribs seasoned with peppers and a bitter orange glaze. Just the tip of the iceberg, Bullfight’s menu is extensive, especially its fish options like classic seafood paella. Dessert choices are more limited, but we happily shared the silky Crema Catalana, studded with crunchy honeycomb candy and poached apple slivers. Architect Michael Hsu designed Bullfight, which features a small but welcoming bar, an open kitchen, and an outdoor courtyard. The minimalist space resonates with the clatter of joyful nibblers and imbibers, filling newly minted Airport Boulevard with the sounds of Austin’s expanding food landscape.

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ON THE HOUSE | FOOD + THOUGHT

Austin FINE DINING isn't DEAD C A N A CI T Y OB S E S S E D W I T H TACO S , B A R B E CU E A N D B E E R A L S O A S PI R E T O N E W CU L I N A RY H E IG H T S ?

by Terrence Henry Photographs by Kate LeSueur

I

Dish featuring squid rice cake served on a Keith Kreeger plate from The Tasting Room at Qui.

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t was a rough start to 2016 for fine dining in Austin, with the New Year’s Eve closure of two of the city’s upscale restaurants, Congress and LaV. David Bull, the executive chef at Congress, says that after five years at the top, it made sense for the company behind it to focus on expanding its more casual sibling, Second Bar + Kitchen (where he is also executive chef and partner). That concept will soon have two more locations in town, one at the Domain and one at the airport. “We are continuing to grow and evolve as a company,” Bull says. “The closure of Congress was simply the next chapter in the evolutionary process.” At LaV, the owner said it was no longer “fiscally feasible” to stay open (its marquee chefs and wine director had already left months earlier). But before the white tablecloths had even been folded into perfect corners one last time at Congress, or before someone from Restoration Hardware's corporate office has the chance to scout LaV for their next showroom (furniture included!), the collective hand-wringing over the closures had already begun. ‘Shutter Week,’ as one blog christened it, sent a shudder of doubt


PHOTO BY JESSICA PAGES

What started as a trailer serving some of the best sushi in town will soon be a brick-andmortar that aims to compete with the best sushi restaurants in the world, Otto Phan's Kyoten Sushiko.

through the city’s epicurean spine. Fear not — Austin's fine dining scene isn't dying, it's simply moving in a different direction. Fading are the influences of the French and Italian; instead the sirens will be Japanese (Paul Qui's forthcoming Otoko and the omakase counter at Otto Phan’s Kyoten Sushiko), and a Texas take on “New Nordic” cuisine found in a new, bigger version of Bryce Gilmore’s Barley Swine on Burnet Road. While diners eagerly await the opening of these new concepts, Austin already has a venue blending pristine ingredients and local influence, a place that should be regarded as the best dining experience in town, but is hardly ever talked about: The Tasting Room at ui. That could be because it’s hardly ever open. While main dining room patrons at Qui are busily Instagramming their cheddar cheese ice cream sandwiches, there is a hidden magic happening in the kitchen behind them. Twice a week, two times a night, at a counter that seats just six, a team of chefs led by Jorge Hernandez are taking three-star Michelin ingredients (caviar, foie gras and truffles) and twisting them into unexpected combinations right in front of diners. The experience lasts several hours, and stands up to similar experiences at more well-

known restaurants in Chicago, San Sebastian, Paris and Copenhagen, while still managing to make it an only-in-Austin experience. (Your final dessert might be a riff on pecan pie.) Yes, it comes with a cost ($120 per person, before tax and tip, occasionally less based on demand), but considering the level of execution, flavor and service, and the fact it’s in our own backyard, “fine dining” doesn’t get much more accessible for the price. The Tasting Room at ui, along with Barley Swine, Olamaie and newcomers like Otoko and Kyoten Sushiko, all represent a new wave for upscale dining in the city, one that’s focused more on adventure, experience and ingredients instead of formality, decadence and master sommeliers. The fertile ground for this fine dining movement in Austin has many founding farmers, but chief among them is Tyson Cole of Uchi and Uchiko. By setting a standard for small portions, with big, bold flavors, utilizing pristine ingredients, Cole helped Austin shake off a staid steakhouse history and embrace a forward-thinking style with Japanese roots. He was anointed one of the Best New Chefs’ in the country by Food & Wine magazine in 2005. One of the only other

“Austin is a special place that creates its own definition of ‘fine dining.’ The rest of the country has been behind in recognizing the creative quality of the restaurants here.” - David Bull Austinites to earn the honor at that point was Bull, then at The Driskill Grill, who had won the award two years before. “I think we are blessed to live in a city that continues to support its own,” Bull says, “A city that continues to evolve and grow – Austin is a special place that creates its own definition of fine dining.’ The rest of the country has been behind in recognizing the creative quality of the restaurants in Austin.” This should be a source of immense pride, and even a little Texas swagger. Yet to most outsiders, perhaps even to locals, the Austin food scene is one of barbecue, beer and tacos. Tourists are flocking here to wait in line at Franklin Barbecue, not the Tasting Room at ui. But if they wanted to see the best our city can do, they shouldn’t miss either one.

THE TASTING ROOM AT QUI, WHICH SERVES JUST A FEW DOZEN GUESTS A WEEK , ECHOES THE LUXURY AND PRECISION OF HIGHEND DINING WITHOUT THE PRETENSION OR FORMALITY OF IT.

1 6 0 0 E 6 T H S T. (512) 436 9626 Q U I AU S TI N .COM

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24 DINER

APIS

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

23526 Hwy. 71 West | (512) 436 8918

As the name suggests, this dinner

Situated on six acres in the Texas Hill

promises delicious plates 24/7. Head

Country, the menu at Apis pays hom-

over any time of the day or night to

age to the honeybee through the in-

satisfy cravings. Menu highlights

novative use of fresh produce and honey

5520 Burnet Rd. #101 | (512) 284 8352

include roasted chicken, burgers,

provided by the restaurant’s own apiary.

Taco Flats on Burnet Road is doing more than sling-

breakfast served around the clock,

ing tacos. Their Tuna Tostadas (shown on the left)

and one of a kind milkshakes like

APOTHECARY CAFÉ AND WINE

were recently covered on Food Network’s Burgers,

roasted banana and brown sugar.

Brews & Que with Chef Michael Symon. Taco Flats

BAR

An extensive gluten free menu is also

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 371 1600

available.

Apothecary’s soothing ambiance and

TACO FLATS

built a reputation in Austin for making traditional Mexican tacos on homemade tortillas, a craft agave based cocktail program and an extensive beer list. Reclaimed woods, custom furniture and light fix-

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

Long communal seating, a large U-shaped bar and

Consistently

an open style kitchen will remind you of trendy

fare that toes the casual/fancy line

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

neighborhood bars in Mexico City.

— great for weeknight dinners and

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria of-

weekend indulgences alike. Order the

fers delicious Italian cuisine, like saf-

chicken piccata.

fron risotto with seafood.

ALCOMAR

AUSTIN LAND AND CATTLE

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161

1205 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 18133663

This seafood spot is a top choice for

Austin’s only independent and family-

lunch or dinner. The newest concept

owned steakhouse has served beef

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

from the folks behind El Chile and

aged the same way for over 17 years.

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the

El Chilito, Alcomar serves up some of

Make sure to order a fresh seafood

the city’s most delicious Latin Ameri-

appetizer; you won't regret it.

Rosedale neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas, incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino),

satisfying

American

ASTI TRATTORIA

can-inspired dishes. BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE AND ANDIAMO ITALIANO

BEER GARDEN

2521 Rutland Dr. | (512) 719 3377

79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656

This neighborhood restaurant located

Banger’s brings the German biergar-

cocktails, local beers on tap, and boutique

in an unassuming North Austin strip

ten tradition stateside with an array

wines from around the world.

mall offers delectable, homemade Ital-

of artisan sausages and more than 100

ian fare.

beers on tap.

and locally sourced, seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

spot for drinks and bites with friends.

tures create a laid back interior with good energy.

GUSTO

128

excellent wine selection make it a great 34TH STREET CAFÉ


FONDA SAN MIGUEL 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 Celebrating 40 years in Austin, Fonda San Miguel offers exquisite Interior Mexican cuisine in a rich environment to stimulate all the senses. Stunning fine art, lush tropical plants, sparkling light from traditional tin chandeliers…at Fonda San Miguel, your celebration comes alive. 459-4121 or www. fondasanmiguel.com for details. BENJI'S CANTINA

CAFÉ NO SÉ

716 W. 6th St. | (512) 476 8226

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

Rooftop dining on West Sixth. Benji’s

South Congress Hotel’s Caf No S bal-

offers a fresh, innovative approach to

ances rustic decor and a range of sea-

Tex-Mex.

sonal foods to make it the best place for weekend brunching.

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

EDEN EAST

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

CAFÉ JOSIE

755 Springdale Rd. | (512) 428 6500

A cozy, French bistro serving up

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

Communal wood tables rest under a ma-

breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Innovative and flavorful plates with

jestic elm tree, fashioned into a 'living

fresh ingredients, served in a quaint BOTTICELLI’S

and intimate atmosphere.

1321 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 916 1315

chandelier' at this farm-to-table restaurant on Springdale Farm. Menus are inspired by the fresh, seasonal ingredients and rotate

An inviting trattoria with warm Tus-

CANTINE

can colors, featuring a small bar up

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 628 0348

front and cozy booths in back.

From the owners of Asti and Fino, a

sure to make one for Friday or Saturday. It

chic and rustic Italian restaurant offer-

will be a magical night!

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

weekly. Reservations are required, so be

ing pizzas, cocktails and more.

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189 13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

CENTRAL STANDARD

Argentinean specialties like meat sand-

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942-0823

wiches on baguettes, empanadas and

Between their full dinner menu, im-

tasty pastries. Intimate patio seating.

pressive raw bar and craft cocktail offerings, Central Standard at the South

MANUEL'S

BUFALINA

Congress Hotel is the perfect place to

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

1519 E. Cesar Chavez | (512) 524 2523

spend a night on the town.

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for

Wood-fired pizza with an elegant, trendy vibe; Insider tip: Get the Fresca pie. BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

high-quality Regional Mexican food, fresh pressed cocktails, margaritas, and tequilas. Try the Chile Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s famous mole.

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners

Located downtown at the corner of 3rd

to Spain for classic tapas and an ex-

and Congress Avenue, and in the Arbo-

tensive wine list.

retum on Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town, plus a live music brunch on Sundays. tribeza.com

| MARCH 2016

129


CHINATOWN

An East Austin haven for vegans and veg-

tan style pizza from two specially designed

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

etarians.

brick ovens.

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in

CRAVE

EAST SIDE KING

a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and more.

town. Fast service in the dining room and

340 E. 2nd St. | (512) 469 0000

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 422 5884

Vibrant and comfortable surrounding patio.

delivery is available.

A classic American grill with a chic atmo-

Chefs Paul

107 W 5th St | (512) 343 9307

A charming French-Vietnamese eatery with

sphere and a wide selection of diverse dining

Timrek offer out-of-this-world pan-Asian

EMMER & RYE

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

choices. Grab an intimate corner table and

food from across town trailers.

51 Rainey St. #110 | (512) 366-5530

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

enjoy lunch, dinner or happy hour!

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive

Named after two types of grains, Emmer EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM

& Rye brings their farm-to-table menu, in-

caviar and oyster menu, sharp aesthetics,

DAI DUE

1100 E. 6th St. | (512) 467 4280

house fermentation and dim sum to diners

and excellent service make it a refreshing

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 0688

When you step inside, it’s like stepping into

craving wholesome and innovative cuisine.

indulgence on West Sixth Street. Indoor and

Dai Due’s breakfast, lunch and dinner

a completely different era. Enjoy delicious

outdoor seating is available.

menus change frequently, offering guests a

vintage cocktails, 1930s- and 1940s-in-

EPICERIE

fleeting but delectable taste of the season’s

spired music, and cuisine by Fermin Nunez.

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

CONTIGO

best local offerings. There’s a reason Dai

On nice nights, head back to the small out-

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and

2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

Due was named one of Bon Appetit’s Best

door patio.

French sensibilities by Thomas Keller-trained

Ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant take

New Restaurant.

Chef Sarah McIntosh. EASY TIGER

on bar fare. Take your pick from the exquisite cocktail menu and grab a spot on the

DARUMA RAMEN

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

FABI + ROSI

expansive outdoor patio.

612-B E. 6th St. | (512) 369 3897

A delicious bakeshop upstairs and beer gar-

509 Hearn St. | (512) 236 0642

From the owners of the popular Kome on

den downstairs. This downtown restaurant

A husband and wife team cook up delicious

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

Airport Boulevard, Daruma features rich

is the kind of place where you can relax while

European-style dishes like pork schnitzel

315 Congress Ave. Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

chicken broth-based ramen and a simple,

sipping a local brew on the patio as the smell

and paella.

Belly up to the counter at this 24-seat space

veggie-friendly menu.

of croissants and freshly baked pretzels waft over you from upstairs.

for an intimate dining experience that’s modern yet approachable.

DRINK.WELL.

FINN & PORTER 500 E. 4th St. | (512) 493 4900

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

EL ALMA

Chef Peter Maffei serves up fresh seafood

COUNTER CAFÉ

Located in the North Loop district, Michael

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

and steaks in a sleek and modern space. En-

626 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 708 8800

and Jessica Sanders bring craft cocktails

Chef-driven, authentic Mexican cuisine

joy new and innovative cocktails in the Finn

1914 E. 6th St.

and American pub fare to drink.well. with

with unmatched outdoor patio dining.

& Porter Loft Bar.

It’s nothing fancy, but this tiny shotgun-style

a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try

diner has some of the city’s best breakfast

include fried chickpeas and house-made

EL NARANJO

FOGO DE CHAO

offerings. Both the pancakes and the ham-

Twinkies.

85 Rainey St. | (512) 474 2776

309 E. 3rd St. | (512) 472 0220

Husband and wife team Iliana de la Vega and

An authentic Brazilian steakhouse that shares

DUE FORNI

Ernesto Torrealba serve up authentic cuisine

the gaucho way of preparing meats. Enjoy a

COUNTER CULTURE

106 E. 6th St. Ste. 106 | (512) 391 9300

from Mexico’s interior. Dine al fresco on this

fine dining experience unlike any other.

2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

Due Forni serves up Roman and Neapoli-

charming Rainey Street patio.

burger are legendary.

130

ui, Moto Utsunomiya and Ek

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com


FOODHEADS

GALAXY CAFÉ

get a craft beer and elevated bar food. Get

HOPFIELDS

616 W. 34th St. | (512) 420 8400

4616 Triangle Ave. | (512) 323 9494

the namesake: The Haymaker is an open-

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Fresh and inspired sandwiches, soups and

1000 W. Lynn St. | (512) 478 3434

faced roast beef sandwich, topped with fla-

A gastropub with French inclinations, a beau-

salads in a charming, refashioned cottage

Features menu options that surpass the typi-

vorful slaw, tomatoes, a fried egg, decadent

tiful patio and unique cocktails. The wine list

and porch.

cal café, combining deli style favorites with

gruyere sauce, and — wait for it — French

is excellent and the perfect pairing for the res-

comfort food. Bonus points for serving break-

fries.

taurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

fast until 4pm on weekends. HENRI’S CHEESE & WINE

HOUSE PIZZERIA

Small, neighborhood restaurant in Hyde

GERALDINE'S

2026 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 442 3373

5111 Airport Blvd. | (512) 600 4999

Park serving thoughtful, locally-sourced

605 Davis St. | (512) 354 1480

Equal parts charcuterie, cheese, and wine

A choice pizza place for a spontaneous night

food at reasonable prices. Come early for

Located inside Rainey Street's Hotel Van

shop, Henri’s offers a cozy space to explore

out. Fresh and simple. Try the roasted olives

Dollar Oyster Tuesdays.

Zandt, Geraldine's creates a unique, fun

new wines or take a bottle home.

and the kale salad too!

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

experience by combining creative cocktails, FORK & VINE

shareable plates and a scenic view of Lady

HILLSIDE FARMACY

ISLA

3010 W. Anderson Ln. | (512) 489 7000

Bird Lake.

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

208 W. 4th St. | (512) 322 9921

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully

Caribbean-focused fare shines at Isla with tropical tiki sips and bites.

New American goes global with Thai curry shrimp, short rib Wellington and tacos, plus

GLORIA’S

restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a per-

an expansive wine list.

3309 Esperanza Crossing Ste. 100 | (512) 833 6400

fect porch for people watching on the east

300 W. 6th St. #100 | (512) 236 1795

side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly din-

ITALIC

FRANK

Perfect for a date night at the Domain, Glo-

ner specials.

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

407 Colorado St. | (512) 494 6916

ria’s serves upscale Mexican cuisine and fea-

Bacon-infused bloodies, a dozen different

tures a spacious patio.

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy HOBOKEN PIE

Tiger presents simple, rustic Italian plates.

718 Red River St. | (512) 477 4256

Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from Pastry

GOODALL'S KITCHEN AND BAR

Ideally located steps from popular mu-

Chef Mary Katherine Curren

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

sic venues like Mohawk, Red Eye Fly, and

FREEDMEN’S

Modern spins on American classics and lo-

Stubb’s, hit up Hoboken Pie for a late night

JACK ALLEN’S KITCHEN

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

cally-sourced veggie sides inside Hotel Ella.

slice. Open every night until 2:30am.

7720 Hwy. 71 W. | (512) 852 8558

smoke imbues the flavors of everything at

GOURDOUGH’S

HOME SLICE PIZZA

Freedmen’s from the barbecue, to the des-

1503 S. 1st St.

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

serts, to even their cocktail offerings.

Gourdough’s Public House is famous for

For pizza cravings south of the river, head

JEFFREY’S

serving enormous donuts with imaginative

to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3am on

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

FUKUMOTO

twists. Order up the Mother Clucker, a donut

weekends for your post bar-hopping con-

This historic Clarksville favorite has main-

514 Medina St. | (512) 770 6880

topped with a fried chicken strip and honey

venience and stocked with classics like the

tained the execution, top-notch service and

Tucked between Fifth and Sixth streets,

butter.

Margherita as well as innovative pies like

luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that

the White Clam and special toppings like

makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

artisan hot dog options, and one of the best beer lists in town.

Housed in a historic Austin landmark,

Savor country favorites from Chef Jack

Fukumoto serves up fresh sushi made with high quality seafood, local produce and an

HAYMAKER

inventive menu.

2310 Manor Rd. | (512) 243 6702 Comfort food meets sports bar meets beer pub in Cherrywood, an easygoing place to

132

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

fried eggplant and meatballs.

Gilmore on the covered patio.


NOW OPEN!

ON VIEW THROUGH MAY 29 21st and Guadalupe Streets

www.hrc.utexas.edu


JOSEPHINE HOUSE

LA CONDESA

L'ESTELLE HOUSE

MANDOLA’S ITALIAN MARKET

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

400 W. 2nd St. | (512) 499 0300

88 ½ Rainey St.

4700 W. Guadalupe St. | (512) 419 9700

Rustic, continental fare with an empha-

Delectable cocktails, tasty tacos and ap-

This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses

Casual Italian fare and a well-stocked gour-

sis on fresh, local and organic ingredients.

petizers and delicious main courses, all

traditional French and Southern cuisine.

met grocery, alongside a deli, bakery, and

Serving lunch, happy hour and dinner, the

inspired by the hip and bohemian Condesa

Think late night Parisian-style burgers with

espresso bar. Grab a gelato and unwind on

shady porch is the perfect spot for a late-

neighborhood in Mexico City.

frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for

the patio overlooking the Triangle.

afternoon paloma.

Sunday brunch. LAMBERTS DOWNTOWN BARBECUE

MANUEL’S

JULIET RISTORANTE

401 W. 2nd St. | (512) 494 1500

LIBERTY KITCHEN

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 &

1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800

Not your standard barbecue fare, meats at

507 Pressler, Suite 700 | (512) 840 1330

10201 Jollyville Rd. | (512) 345 1042

A Texas breeze feels Italian when you’re sit-

Lambert’s have an Austin twist, like the rib-

American comfort food reigns at Liberty

Definitely not your standard Tex-Mex, Manu-

ting on one of the best patios in the city at

eye glazed with brown sugar and mustard.

Kitchen, with fresh takes on classic plates

el’s hits all the right notes for its upscale Mexi-

Juliet. Enjoy a curated wine list and twists

Tucked away in the historic Schneider Broth-

like deviled eggs, seafood and burgers.

can cuisine, cleanly presented in a chic setting.

on classic Italian dishes.

ers Building in the Second Street District. LITTLE BARREL & BROWN

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

JUNIPER

LA TRAVIATA

1716 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 582 1229

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 680 5045

2400 E. Cesar Chavez St. Ste. 304 | (512) 436 3291

314 Congress Ave. | (512) 479 8131

From the owners of Botticelli's, this little

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf

Uchi alum Nicolas Yanes cooks up Northern

Authentic Italian in a cozy downtown set-

resto serves New American/comfort food.

Coast sensibility to East Austin by sling-

Italian fare on the east side.

ting; known for their wickedly rich and deli-

With an impressive 24 seats, this restaurant

ing fresh seafood in the kitchen and at the

cious Spaghetti alla Carbonara.

boasts the biggest bar on South Congress.

counter.

4917 Airport Blvd. | (512) 712 5700

LAVACA TEPPAN

LONESOME DOVE WESTERN BISTRO

MOONSHINE PATIO BAR + GRILL

Japanese comfort food made with fresh in-

1712 Lavaca St. | (512) 520 8630

419 Colorado St. | (512) 271 2474

303 Red River St. | (512) 236 9599

gredients and served in inventive ways. Daily

Serving your favorite Japanese dishes along

The Austin outpost of Tim Love’s Fort

Both a popular dinner and brunch spot,

lunch specials include three types of ramen.

with fun Sake twists to classic cocktails, like

Worth institution boldly fuses earthy game

Moonshine’s decadent Southern comfort

the MoSakeJito and the Sake Colada.

like wild boar and creative dishes like hama-

food is a downtown favorite.

KOMÉ

KORIENTE

chi tostadas.

621 E. 7th St. | (512) 275 0852

LAUNDERETTE

Healthy, tasty Korean options like bulgogi

2115 Holly St. | (512) 382 1599

LUCKY ROBOT

11506 Century Oaks Ter. | (512) 339 4440

and curry dishes all served up by the friendly

Culinary magicians Rene Ortiz and Laura

1303 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 8081

Enjoy modern Italian cuisine in a sleek inte-

staff.

Sawicki surprise diners at this east side gem

A futuristic dining experience on South

rior at this Domain standout.

with menu items like crispy pork ribs and a

Congress, inspired by the vibrant culture

birthday cake ice cream sandwich.

and cuisine of Tokyo.

Though it may not be as famous as that other

LENOIR

LUCY’S FRIED CHICKEN

Subtle design elements make this space co-

Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is argu-

1807 S.1st St. | (512) 215 9778

5408 Burnet Rd. | (512) 514 0664 &

hesive and modern. Enjoy creative twists on

ably just as delicious. This trailer, which is

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-

2218 College Ave. | (512) 297 2423

classic, comforting dishes from a pork belly/

owned by the legendary Mueller family,

inspired prix-fixe meal in an intimate dining

Two locations, same straight-up Southern

sirloin burger to seasonally topped flatbread

whips up classic barbecue with free beer and

room and table that seats just 34 diners.

goodness, from moon pies to fried green to-

pizza.

LA BARBECUE

NORTH

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

live music.

87 Rainey St. | (512) 382 5651

matoes to corn muffins to the cr me de la cr me: fried chicken.

134

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

NO VA KITCHEN & BAR


ODD DUCK

PÉCHÉ

Japanese comfort food at its finest in Aus-

SEARSUCKER

1201 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 433 6521

208 W 4th. St. | (512) 494 4011

tin’s first brick-and-mortar, ramen-centric

415 Colorado St. | (512) 394 8000

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mor-

Enjoy Prohibition-style cocktails at Austin’s

eatery.

Stylish Southern fare from San Diego celeb-

tar, Odd Duck was the first venture from

first absinthe bar alongside standout dishes

acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect sea-

of smoked duck salad and citrus-dusted

ROARING FORK

small plates: duck fat fries with tomato jam

sonal fare and drinks with a Texas influence

salmon.

701 Congress Ave. | (512) 583 0000

and prosciutto "dust," farm bird lollipops with

Great spot for lunch with coworkers or an

bleu cheese, and the “cowboy caviar.”

at this South Lamar oasis. PERLA’S SEAFOOD & OYSTER BAR

rity chef Brian Malarkey. Go for the decadent

elegant night out with friends and family.

OLAMAIE

1400 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 291 7300

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

A South Congress staple, expect the fresh-

RUSSIAN HOUSE

200 Congress Ave. | (512) 827 2750

A menu that would leave any Southerner

est fish and oysters flown in daily from both

307 E. 5th St. | (512) 428 5442

Another venture from Chef David Bull, Sec-

drooling, with a dash of contemporary cu-

coasts, carefully prepared with simple yet

Step into Russian House and you’ll forget

ond offers a swanky bistro experience in the

linary concepts. The dessert menu offers

elegant flavors. Go early on a nice day to eat

that you’re even in Austin. Come here for a

heart of the 2nd Street District.

your classic apple pie, or alternatively a more

oysters and people watch on their fantastic

slow, relaxing evening to experience deli-

trendy goat’s cheese caramel ice cream.

front porch.

cious Russian cuisine, and don’t miss out on

SIENA RISTORANTE TOSCANA

their many infused vodkas!

6203 Capital of Tx. Hwy. | (512) 349 7667

Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits (they’re worth every delectable bite).

SECOND BAR + KITCHEN

PERRY’S STEAKHOUSE & GRILLE

Set in a Tuscan-style villa, Siena captures the

114 W. 7th St. | (512) 474 6300

SALTY SOW

OLIVE & JUNE

Located downtown in the historic Norwood

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

3411 Glenview Ave. | (512) 467 9898

Tower, Perry’s is within easy walking dis-

Salty Sow serves up creative signature

SOUTH CONGRESS CAFÉ

Celebrated Austin Chef Shawn Cirkiel created

tance of the Texas State Capitol and other

drinks,

1600 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 447 3905

this southern Italian-style restaurant with a

downtown landmarks. This location fea-

Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy with

A south Austin hotspot, we recommend

menu that highlights local, seasonal ingredi-

tures unique décor, patio seating and Perry’s

sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for

South Congress Caf ’s legendary brunch.

ents and includes a handful of Northern Ital-

award-winning menu.

late-night noshing.

The carrot cake French toast and migas are

QUATTRO GATTI RISTORANTE

SANTA RITA TEX-MEX CANTINA

OLIVIA

908 Congress Ave. | (512) 476 3131

1206 W. 38th St. | (512) 419 7482 &

SWAY

2043 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 804 2700

Downtown Italian restaurant dishing up

5900 W. Slaughter Ln. Ste. 500 | (512) 288 5100

1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999

A South Austin staple emphasizing fresh

delicious antipasti and huge portions of Ital-

Fresh ingredients, traditional recipes, and

The culinary masterminds behind La

and local produce. This famed brunch spot

ian fare; great date night spot.

outstanding margaritas combined with

Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a mod-

bright décor, attentive service and solid

ern twist. An intimate outdoor area, com-

menu offerings.

plete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an

including

essence of its namesake region.

a

Blueberry-Lemon

to die for.

ian favorites, too.

also offers an exciting and diverse menu, from foie gras to French toast.

QUI 1600 E. 6th St. | (512) 436 9626 Chef Paul

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

hottest new spots in town for an unparal-

4827 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 531 9033

SWIFT’S ATTIC

This downtown spot is crowded, but the

leled dining experience set under an airy,

Bringing more Cajun and soul food options

315 Congress Ave. | (512) 482 8842

happy hour — with half-price oysters and

beautiful backdrop.

to the east side. The mid-century modern

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s Attic

design adds quirk to some seriously good

draws from global inspirations and serves

food.

up inventive cocktails in a historic down-

ui’s headquarters is one of the

tasty cocktails — is a local favorite. RAMEN TATSU-YA 8557 Research Blvd. Ste. 126 | (512) 339 0855 1234 S. Lamar Blvd.

136

unforgettable experience. SAWYER & CO.

PARKSIDE

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

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TACOS AND TEQUILA

THE OASIS

former home of Top Chef Paul

507 Pressler St. | (512) 436 8226

6550 Comanche Trail | (512) 266 2442

bacon tataki!

Chef Alma Alcocer is serving up a taste of

Popular spot situated on Lake Travis with

the Southwest in this modern, industrial

breathtaking views.

ui. Try the

609 W. 6th St. | (512) 542 3380 This cute downtown caf serves a mean morn-

UNIT-D PIZZERIA

ing shrimp and grits — your perfect hangover

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 1922

remedy. Also an array of delicious pastries,

THE TOWNSEND

Pizza options abound in Austin, but Unit-D

fresh brewed coffee and killer sandwiches for

TAKOBA

718 Congress Ave. | (512) 887 8778

uses an Italian-made pizza oven to fire up

lunch.

1411 E. 7th St. | (512) 628 4466

Nibble on charcuterie and cheese or sip one

pies that are simple, yet thoughtful.

Bold, authentic flavors with ingredients im-

of their handsome cocktail creations curat-

ported straight from Mexico; cozy outdoor

ed by Justin Elliott.

space.

WINEBELLY VESPAIO

519 W. Oltorf St. | (512) 487 1569

1610 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 441 6100

Tapas on Oltorf in a cozy setting. The bistro’s

TRACE

Daily rotating menus offer the best of the

small plates are spins on old favorites and

THE BACKSPACE

200 Lavaca St. | (512) 542 3660

season and the freshest from Vespaio’s

the wine cocktails are a welcome surprise.

507 San Jacinto St. | (512) 474 9899

At The W Austin, TRACE focuses on respon-

bountiful garden and local markets. This

Classic antipasto and exquisite pizzas hot

sibly- and locally-sourced ingredients from

Italian-inspired restaurant is a longtime

WINFLO OSTERIA

out of the wood-fired brick oven straight

Texan farmers and artisans. Great outdoor

Austin favorite.

1315 W 6th St. | (512) 582 1027

from Naples.

seating and excellent service.

seating.

Classic Italian fare made simply and with VIA 313 PIZZERIA

locally-sourced ingredients.

THE CARILLON RESTAURANT

TRIO

6705 Highway 290 | (512) 584 8084

1900 University Ave. | (512) 404 3655

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300

Detroit-style pizza that comes in squares,

WINK

Located inside the AT&T Conference Center

Wide selection of wines to accompany a

topped with classic ingredients and served

1014 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. E | (512) 482 8868

on the University of Texas campus, this res-

top-notch steak with amazing views of Lady

in a no-frills environment. Expect the same

Rooted in the traditions of the slow food

taurant serves up sophisticated, American

Bird Lake.

at their trailers at the

movement, Wink is truly a farm-to-table

place for a date night.

iolet Crown Social

Club and Craft Pride.

fare that is always artfully presented. Perfect TRULUCK’S

meal. Stop in for their incredible happy hour, or stay a little longer with the 5- or

400 Colorado St. | (512) 482 9000

VINO VINO

THE CLAY PIT

Enjoy nightly entertainment over steak or

4119 Guadalupe St. | (512) 465 9282

1601 Guadalupe St. | (512) 322 5131

fresh seafood. Truluck’s serves the freshest

Two words: mussels and fries. This clas-

WU CHOW

Zip in for a buffet-style lunch or settle in

crab, direct from their own fisheries, which

sic, dimly-lit wine joint offers exceptional

500 W. 5th St. #168 | (512) 476-2469

for a long dinner of contemporary Indian

they incorporate into nearly every dish.

shared plates and has the some of the friend-

Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s Chinese cui-

liest service around.

sine options with traditional dishes sourced

cuisine. UCHI

7-course chef’s tasting menu.

from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t

THE GROVE WINE BAR + KITCHEN

801 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4808

VOX TABLE

6317 Bee Cave Rd. | (512) 327 8822 &

Chef Tyson Cole has created an inventive

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. # 2140 | (512) 375 4869

800 W. 6th St. | (512) 236 1440

menu that puts Uchi foremost among sushi

Across the street from the Alamo Draft-

Z’TEJAS GRILL

Lively, popular Westlake wine bar and Ital

spots in Austin.

house at South Lamar, Vox’s “new American

1110 W. 6th St. | (512) 478 5355 &

fare” is a perfect pick for date night. Be sure

9400-A Arboretum Blvd. (512) 346 3506

to try out their brunch offerings.

Austinites wait hours to get into either the

ian restaurant. The wine list boasts more than 250 wines by the bottle.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and

138

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com

miss their weekend dim sum menu.

funkier downtown locale or the northern spot.


A LOOK BEHIND...

The XX FACTOR PHO T O G R A PH E R J E S S IC A PAG E S S H A R E S H E R FAVOR I T E OU T TA K E S F ROM T H I S MON T H ' S WOM E N I N M US IC F E AT U R E .

140

MARCH 2016 | tribeza.com


Shown: The Keypiece Communication desk, George and Lead chairs.

HOME OFFICE

IS THE NEW

BLACK.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


w w w. a l l e n s b o o t s . c o m

Boot Style: L2377-2

March 2016 Music + Film Issue  

Here on the pages of this month’s TRIBEZA, we pay homage to our music and film industries, and kickoff our 15th anniversary year. Since 2001...

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