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A L O C A L C O M P A N Y P R O V I D I N G A L U X U RY E X P E R I E N C E I N R E S I D E N T I A L R E A L E S TAT E

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Gottesman Residential Real Estate | 512.451.2422 | gottesmanresidential.com tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2019

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| DECEMBER 2019

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LANTANA PLACE 20/20

7415 Southwest Pkwy, Austin, TX 78735 @LantanaPlace #LantanaPlace LantanaPlace.com 6 DECEMBER 2019 |

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A New Vision For Austin.

January 9, 2020

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Austin Chamber of Commerce 4:30 pm

Grand Opening Celebration Lantana Place Retail & Restaurant Partners Live Music | Bites | Sips | Giveaways 5:00 - 7:00 pm tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2019

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experience THE MAGIC

DECEMBER Z I L K E R PA R K  AU S T I N , T E X AS

55 YEARS OF

2019 LIVE AT THE TRAIL JACKIE VENSON MON, DEC 10 GRAND OPENING NIGHT ALESIA LANI DEC 10-23 NOTABLE ACTS CROY AND THE BOYS EMILY GIMBLE • WOOD & WIRE • MORE! FOR DATES & FULL LINEUP: LIVEATTHETRAIL.COM FRI, DEC 6 NIGHT LIGHTS PREVIEW PARTY

BRING A CAN. FEED A FAMILY. T I C K E T S O N S A L E N O W at A U S T I N T R A I L O F L I G H T S . O R G

8 DECEMBER 2019 |

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MAGIC AND MEMORIES 90 FT. FERRIS WHEEL 70 DISPLAYS & TUNNELS LIT TUNNELS YULE LOG 6 THEMED NIGHTS 30 FOOD TRUCKS S’MORES TONS OF PHOTO OPS ALWAYS FREE! PHOTOS WITH SANTA NEW THIS YEAR!

TRAIL OF FLIGHTS WINE BAR DREIDEL DISPLAY NEW LIVE ENTERTAINERS ENHANCED DISPLAYS


SOLD | Pemberton Heights

SOLD | Mount Bonnell

SOLD | Bouldin Creek

SOLD | Tarrytown

SOLD | Pemberton Heights

SOLD | Westlake

Nicole’s Best of 2019 Nicole Kessler Broker Associate

nicolekessler.com

© Compass 2019 ¦ All Rights Reserved by Compass ¦ Made in NYC. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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| DECEMBER 2019

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I’ve made a move! My business is now backed by powerful Compass tools and technology.

Chris King Realtor ÂŽ

Are you looking to make a move? Let me help you

440.708.3381

find your new home for the holidays.

chris.king@compass.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

10 DECEMBER 2019 |

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12 DECEMBER 2019 |

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City on the Rise NATIIVO AUSTIN, POWERED BY AIRBNB, IS THE FIRST PROPERT Y DESIGNED, BUILT AND LICENSED FOR HOMESHARING.

C

oming Fall 2021 to the historic Rainey Street District, Natiivo Austin, powered by Airbnb, will be a standout among the thriving community as the first building purposefully built, designed, and licensed for homesharing. This unique concept is entirely new to the market, let alone Austin, blending the amenity of hotel stays with the benefit of homeownership. Each of the 249 fully-furnished units offers buyers the ability to stay and enjoy their space themselves or list it independently on Airbnb or through the building’s concierge team. Natiivo Austin is co-developed by Newgard and Pearlstone Partners development firms and is the first of two planned Natiivo properties with Natiivo Miami scheduled to open in 2022.

Natiivo Austin construction is well underway for the 33-story building, which will stand on East Avenue at the southern end of the Rainey Street District, mere steps from both the nightlife and outdoor recreation the area offers. Not only are bars, restaurants, and iconic city sights within walking distance, the building promises its residents access to a spacious fitness center (complete with yoga and Peloton bike studio), 24-hour concierge and valet, 10th-floor communal outdoor terrace, and 7,000 square foot rooftop deck and pool—and that’s just to name a few of the near endless list of amenities and services included with Natiivo Austin. With architecture by STG Design and interiors by INC, the building itself is something

to behold. From the thoughtfully incorporated parking podium and glassy exterior to its modern styling and hand-selected local furnishings, these spaces are inspired. Natiivo Austin’s 15 individual floor plans range from studios to two-bedrooms and start on the 11th floor, each with spectacular views of Austin in every direction. For those already in the market or those now wanting to be, units start in the $500s and have already proven popular with just over half of the inventory reserved in a matter of months. Visit natiivoaustin.com or the Natiivo Austin Sales Center at 219 W 4th St. to own your piece of the city.

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| DECEMBER 2019

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40 2019

CELEBRATING

FORTY YEARS AUSTIN ° TEXAS

1601 West 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas • 512- 458- 5407 Monday through Saturday 10:00am-5:30pm www.GardenRoomBoutique.com

follow us on instagram @gardenroomatx


CONTENTS

DECEMBER / PEOPLE

DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 22 Kristin’s Column p. 32 Community Profile p. 34 Tribeza Talk p. 38 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 42 Music Pick p. 43 Art Pick p. 44 Event Pick p. 46 Karen’s Pick p. 90 Dining Guide p. 92 A Look Behind p. 96 FEATURES

People of the Year p. 61 Holiday Entertaining p. 76 Gift Guide p. 82 LEFT Gabe Erales photographed by Minta Maria Smail at his restaurant Comedor.

ON THE COVER Kai Shappley photographed by Minta Maria Smail.

16 DECEMBER 2019 |

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524 NORTH LAMAR 512 472 59 51 1400 SOUTH CONGRESS 512 4 41 8600 BYGEORGEAUSTIN. COM

AC N E S T U D I O S

BOGLIOLI

G O L D E N G O O S E D E LU X E B R A N D N I L I LOTA N

B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I

I SA B E L M A R A N T

OFFICINE GÉNÉRALE

LO E W E

PROENZA SCHOULER

T H E E L D E R S TAT E S M A N

T H E R OW

CELINE

CO

D R I E S VA N N OT E N

MAISON MARGIELA R AQ U E L A L L E G R A

ULLA JOHNSON

MARNI

NAK ARMSTRONG

S I E S M A RJA N

S TO N E I S L A N D

Z E R O + M A R I A C O R N EJ O tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2019

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EDITOR'S LETTER

suzanne@tribeza.com

18 DECEMBER 2019 |

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y M I N TA M A R I A S M A I L

I

f there is a national theme for 2019, it might very well be inclusion. While we still have a long way to go on many fronts, important cultural shifts are afoot. Leave it to Austin to have not one but many heartwarming, game-changing examples of how society is evolving in positive ways. With that spirit in mind, we embarked on choosing the seven magnificent people in our annual roundup of local leaders making the city a better place. From extending everyday MexicanAmerican food products to those with grain-restrictive diets to expanding civil On location with Kai rights protections for the LGBTQ community, these pioneers are doing work Shappley for her portrait with Minta Maria Smail. that not only benefits Austinites but culture at large. Putting the feature together was a colorful, citywide adventure. Photographer Minta Maria Smail asked each subject to include a natural element in his or her portrait, whether it be an outdoor space or a beloved object, and, boy, did everyone deliver. CEO and civic leader Nathan Ryan took us to McKinney Falls, a hidden gem of a state park just 20 minutes from downtown. Artist Denise Prince shared her favorite shooting location, “The Fed,” a Georgian Revival mansion that houses the Texas Federation of Women’s Clubs Headquarters and a treasure trove of relics. Our favorite: two mahogany-and-glass cabinets filled with dolls in the image of every first lady of the state wearing her inaugural gown. And 9-year-old civil rights advocate Kai Shappley took us to a neighborhood playground, where we delighted in finding fossils and feathers in the surrounding brush. Shappley is the youngest person ever to grace the cover of Tribeza. With a starring role in an Emmy-winning short documentary and visits to Capitol Hill to petition for civil rights, she is one of myriad young activists this year whose age belies their accomplishments leading global efforts toward meaningful change.  No December issue would be complete without a little dazzle, so we’ve sprinkled in a few holiday stories to delight the senses. I’m thrilled to be part of the Tribeza team and bring all the extraordinary things about Austin to life within these pages. Suzanne Kilpatrick


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

D E C E M B E R 2 01 9

18 YEARS

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Suzanne Kilpatrick ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Aaron Parsley

EDITOR-AT-L ARGE

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVENTS MANAGER

Vanessa Blankenship

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Shaleena Keefer

ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres INTERN

Luna Estrella

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Jess Archer Nicole Beckley  Hannah J. Phillips Tobin Levy Laurel Miller Margaret Williams  COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Mia Baxter Warren Chang Holly Cowart Denise Prince Erin Reas Breezy Ritter

ILLUSTR ATORS

Hannah-Michelle Bayley RF. Alvarez

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

N O. 2 2 0


Thank You for Another Amazing Year WI S H I NG YOU A N D YOU R FA M I LY HA P PY HO L I DAYS

Kumara Wilcoxon GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISOR, #1 PRODUCER COMPANY-WIDE

512.423.5035 • Kumara@sothebysrealty.com • KumaraWilcoxon.com


SOCIAL HOUR

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ROX ATELIER NAUGHTY AND NICE SOIRÉE

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Rox Atelier hosted the second Naughty and Nice Soirée and trunk show on September 28 at its South Lamar salon. The show featured designs from Masha Osoianu and styling by hair artists Roxanna Schageman and Noemi Longoria. The free event offered complimentary wine, Champagne and delicious bites, as well as raffles of Kevin Murphy hair products and a $200 gift card.

WATERLOO GREENWAY CONSERVANCY BENEFIT

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The eighth annual Waterloo Greenway Benefit Concert + Dinner took place on October 9 at Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater. Attendees dined on a multicourse dinner prepared by acclaimed chef Tim Love and enjoyed a concert from songwriter King Princess. The evening helped raise funds for the conservancy’s mission

NORTHSIDE AMPLIFIED On October 10, NORTHSIDE Amplified showcased Austin’s top local bands, including Mobley, Shy Beast, Swimming With Bears and The Texas K.G.B. Hosted by Black Fret and KUTX 98.9, the shows took place on two grand stages. Before the concerts, guests got the chance to mingle with artists at a preshow meet-and-greet at the Capital One Café. ROX ATELIER NAUGHTY AND NICE SOIRÉE: 1. Lauren DeWalt & Valerie Jacobs 2. Jeff & Roxana Schageman 3. Sara Laufs, Noemi Longoria & Jessica Jones WATERLOO GREENWAY CONSERVANCY BENEFIT: 4. King Princess 5. Russell & Rosemary Douglass 6. Rachel Medrano & Myles Herzog 7.Kley Reynolds, Lindsay Smith, Janet Allen & Geri Hooks NORTHSIDE AMPLIFIED: 8. Emma Leigh Roberts & Matt Ott 9. Mobley

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B R E E Z Y R I T T E R , L A U R E N S L U S H E R A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

of providing free family programs and natural spaces to the public.


SOCIAL HOUR

AUSTIN UNDER 40 AWARDS NOMINATIONS KICKOFF To introduce the 2020 Austin Under 40 Awards season, the Austin Under 40 committee hosted a kickoff party at The Austin Winery on October 17. During the event, invitees submitted nominations for award recipients to be announced during next year’s black-tie gala, which benefits the YWA Foundation and Austin Sunshine Camps.

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INTEGRAL CARE FOUNDATION’S BRIDGING THE GAP GALA The Integral Care Foundation (formerly the New Milestones Foundation) held its 18th annual Bridging the Gap Gala on October 17. Keynote speaker Brian Cuban discussed addiction recovery and how he became a bestselling author and attorney. Proceeds went toward improving and expanding Integral Care’s services for those dealing with substance abuse, mental illness and developmental disabilities.

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The fifth annual Catrina Gala Dinner welcomed Austin socialites in festive attire to commemorate Mexic-Arte Museum’s beautiful exhibitions, educational programs and cultural events. The celebration was held on October 20 at Fonda San Miguel, which received special recognition, as did Sergio Bustamante, who received the Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts Award.

AUSTIN UNDER 40 AWARDS NOMINATIONS KICKOFF: 1. Ross McLauchlan 2. Patrick Sims Jr., Lauren Kaufman & Derek Steffan 3. Genevieve McGreevy & Nina Seely INTEGRAL CARE FOUNDATION’S BRIDGING THE GAP GALA: 4. Sarah Churchill Llamas, David Evans & Hal Katz 5. Leo Patera & Karen Ranus CATRINA GALA DINNER: 6. Sergio Bustamante, Kandace Eakin & Dennis Eakin 7. Sylvia Orozco & Jose Martinez 8. Amelia Rodriguez-Mendoza & Soll Sussman 9. Pablo Marentes Gonzalez, Frank Cardenas, Rina Garcia Lazo & Damara Michaus Garcia Lazo

24 DECEMBER 2019 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H R I S L A M M E R T, R AC H A E L H A L L A N D C H R I S C A S E L L I

CATRINA GALA DINNER


Anna Lee Moreland Properties

Beth Carter Compass

Beth Drewett Moreland Properties

Charlotte Lipscomb Compass

Chris Long Compass

Cindy Goldrick Wilson & Goldrick

Eric Copper Austin Portfolio Real Estate

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Crystal Olenbush AustinRealEstate.com

Dara Allen Compass

Darin Walker Kuper Sotheby’s

Diane Humphreys Moreland Properties

Eric Moreland Moreland Properties

Gary Dolch Compass

Jana Birdwell Kuper Sotheby’s

Greg Walling Moreland Properties

Buying + selling luxury real estate is that much better working with a trusted, proven professional. Meet Austin’s best of the best.

Jeannette Spinelli Austin Portfolio Real Estate

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WWW.ELITE25AUSTIN.COM Kevin Burns Urbanspace

Kathryn Scarborough Engel & Volkers

Kumara Wilcoxon Kuper Sotheby’s

Kathleen Bucher Austin Portfolio Real Estate

Laura Gottesman Gottesman Residential Real Estate

Leah Petri Gottesman Residential Real Estate

Leslie Davenport Gottesman Residential Real Estate

Megan DeLeeuw Cavazos Gottesman Residential Real Estate

Michelle Jones Compass

Will Steakley DEN Property Group

Nicole Kessler Compass

Shannon Windham Gottesman Residential Real Estate

Stephanie Panozzo Compass

Susan Griffith Kuper Sotheby’s

Trey Phillips Moreland Properties

Wade Giles Moreland Properties

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| DECEMBER 2019

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SOCIAL HOUR

SWAN SONGS SERENADE On October 20, Swan Songs hosted its annual fundraiser, Swan Songs Serenade, which featured a remarkable performance by Marcia Ball and special guests Lou Ann Barton, Shelley King and Sarah Brown. The evening included a VIP reception, silent and live auctions, and a seated dinner. Swan Songs works with individuals who are terminally ill, using music to bring them comfort and joy.

AFF FILM & FOOD FUNDRAISING PARTY The 17th annual Film & Food Fundraising Party took place at the historic Driskill hotel on October 23, bringing filmmakers, producers and foodies from across the globe together to honor the art of filmmaking and screenwriting. Party-goers sipped on cocktails, feasted on cuisine from Austin’s top chefs and enjoyed exciting auctions. Proceeds benefited the Austin Film Festival’s Young Filmmakers Program.

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TBF FIRST EDITION LITERARY GALA

SWAN SONGS SERENADE: 1. Dr. Carla Cheatham & Donna Stockton 2. Susan James 3. Bill Strawn, Venus Strawn, Nina Seeley & Frank Seeley AFF FILM & FOOD FUNDRAISING PARTY: 4. Patrick Dugan, Dillon Randolph & Alex Dugan 5. Greg & Jeanie Garrett 6. Paulina Porizkova & Ed Solomon TBF FIRST EDITION LITERARY GALA: 7. Steve Harrigan 8. Darryl Tocker, Maya Smart, Rachel Tocker & Barbara Tocker 9. Marc Winkelman & James Milliken

26 DECEMBER 2019 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C A R R E L L G R I G S B Y, LY N N E M A R G O L I S A N D B O B DA E M M R I C H

The Texas Book Festival’s First Edition Literary Gala, held on October 25, brought well-known authors Stephen Harrigan, Laila Lalami, Sharon Robinson and Alexander McCall Smith to Austin’s Four Seasons to speak about their renowned published works. Profits from the evening went to help keep the beloved literary festival free for the public and support programs like Reading Rock Stars and Real Reads.


11812miramesa.com

Stunning Sanctuary 11812 Mira Mesa Drive, Austin 78732 4 BD

|

4 BA 3 HB

|

5,369 SF

|

.34 AC

|

$1.695M

This custom-built home is a rare combination of privacy, high-end finishes, and luxury living. Large picture windows showcase the beautiful green space behind the home. The are three levels are accessible by the elevator with two master suites, one on the first floor and one on the second floor, both with fireplaces. A large island with a hand-selected Blue Bahia granite top and dining area sits in front of a picture window with unobstructed views. There is a large walk-in pantry, two dishwashers, 6-burner gas Wolf cook top, and Sub-Zero refrigerator. The private back yard has custom tiered landscaping, an infinity pool, and hot tub with lounge areas and an outdoor fireplace. Panoramic, protected views. Being on a quiet cul-de-sac adds to the retreat feel of this property.

Heather Witbeck

Monica Pizanie

heather.witbeck@compass.com

monica.pizanie@compass.com

512.920.2521

512.905.8939


SOCIAL HOUR

ALEXA JAMES BABY POP UP Alexa James Baby welcomed NYC brand Les Gamins and Ft. Worth-based favorite Hey Gang to their boutique for a special pop up on October 26. Adults shopped and sipped on cocktails while their little ones enjoyed live music by Mr. Will and snacked on treats and fresh juices by Yumi.

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THE CATHEDRAL LAUNCH PARTY WITH ATXGALS

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BARKITECTURE

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Hosted by Animal Lovers of Austin on October 27, Barkitecture showcased incredible doghouses crafted by some of Austin’s best architects, interior designers and builders. Guests took part in a costume contest, perused local vendor booths and learned about adoption and animal advocacy opportunities. Through a silent auction, lucky attendees got to take home these one-of-a-kind doghouses for their K-9 companions.

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ALEXA JAMES BABY POP UP: 1. Yvette Farrell & Karina Drake 2. Benji Orlansky THE CATHEDRAL LAUNCH PARTY WITH ATXGALS: 3. Robin Rotman & Vikki Yaffe 4. Kristin Freeman & Ashley Gierke 5. Nick Goodin & Sarah Wolf 6. Nathan McEwen, Danielle Brown & Samantha Diaz BARKITECTURE: 7. Celena Breir 8. Jennifer Baldwin

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28 DECEMBER 2019 |

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C AT H E D R A L L A U N C H PA R T Y P H OTO G R A P H S B Y E R I N R E A S

Art lovers dressed in Dia de los Muertos attire gathered on October 26 to celebrate the opening of The Cathedral, a new coworking space for Austin’s creative community. The renovated 1930s church located in East Austin is now the official home of female-focused arts organization atxGALS, which featured artwork during the bash.


Partnering with architects, builders and clients, Stephanie doesn’t just sell luxury real estate­—she­defines­the­market.

1602 Pease Road Under Contract |

Listed at $4,000,000

Broker Associate 512.750.7808 |

| stephaniepanozzo.com

2900 Townes Lane Active

3409 Taylors Drive Sold | Listed at $4,199,000

2900 Townes Lane

|

Listed at $4,950,000

Available

| Listed at $4,950,000

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2019

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Easily increase your property’s market value with home improvement services. Exclusive to Compass, our Concierge program is designed to prepare your home for the market. From deep-cleaning to cosmetic improvements, let’s work together to assess every opportunity to elevate your home’s value. No hidden fees, no interest charged, ever.

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Tracy Picone is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

The attorneys at Wynne & Wynne believe there is a way to handle family law cases by taking the high road. Our approach reduces collateral damage to all parties creating a greater opportunity for success after a difficult life transition.

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Weddings + Events | springdalestation.com


COMMUNITY + CULTURE

HORN OF PLENTY How Olympia Auset and Martha Pincoffs are feeding their communities, p. 34.


32 DECEMBER 2019 |

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I

AM TOTALLY INEPT WITH SOCIAL media. So when someone suggested I try some of the online dating apps, I laughed in her face. Shake it up, she said. Put yourself out there. Why not? What do you have to lose? I decided to try it as sort of an experiment, a way to peek into what most single people seem to be doing nowadays to meet people. I figured it would be good fodder for my writing, anyway. You can swipe or X people you have zero interest in, which feels semi-cruel and shallow, until you realize that people are doing the same damn thing to you. I imagine this would be a lot more fun if I was in a different age bracket, rather than just looking for people who didn’t look too old, too unhealthy, too short, too … not my type. You can get totally sucked in and lose track of time X-ing people, which is unproductive and slightly depressing. The best thing to come from this experiment was the brilliant idea that I could start my own company, a service for middle-aged men so they could get help making their online dating profiles. Here’s what I would say to my clients so far. Stop with the photos taken in the front seat of your car. Do not post a bathroom mirror selfie with bad lighting at a bad chin angle, showcasing pleated pants. Do not post a pic taken in your messy kitchen with dirty dishes and cheap cabinets in the background. You don’t notice this, but we do. No more photos with your cat, your mother, your old girlfriend or smoking cigarettes. Even pics with your kids are kind of creepy, like the guy who borrows a puppy to go to the park. We are happy you are fit and work out, but please do not post a selfie wearing a tank top, mid-f lex in the gym

mirror, with your headphones on. There are better ways to prove you go to the gym. Please watch your grammar, and for the love of God, do not confuse “there,” “their” and “they’re.” I didn’t realize proper spelling was a rarity or an aphrodisiac, but it is definitely both. At least to me. Do not post only photos wearing a baseball hat or a cowboy hat, we already know you are bald—own it. Do not lie about your height. We will know. I would also say, do not post pics of you and your wife, looking for a third party—there have to be special sites for that.

“No more photos with your cat, your mother, your old girlfriend or smoking cigarettes. Even pics with your kids are kind of creepy, like the guy who borrows a puppy to go to the park.” At least three men listed cunnilingus under “special skills.” This is not a compliment you give yourself; I’m just saying. Plus, it’s crass. Gentlemen have lots of skills, most of which they do not talk about. And please, if you are newly divorced, do not even make a profile for several years. There should be a mandatory waiting period, like for guns. One guy I went out with called his exwife his wife four times at dinner. Yes, FOUR. I have also considered this experiment as a pro bono portion of my therapy practice. Only

one session, though, because I had to retire from helping people heal who are not my actual clients. I’m not doing that, ever again. The only guys I was brave enough to actually meet in person so far were men I already knew, or knew of, or had been vetted and preapproved by an outside party/friend in common. I guess I spent so many years talking to my kids about Stranger Danger that part of me is still leery. It was hilarious to me to hear what these men had to say about their online experience. The consensus from my limited data collection on the male perspective of dating apps is that women post photos that are many years younger, many pounds lighter, wearing huge sunglasses or taken from far away. One guy I went out with lied about his age by six years. He said he was getting tired of “meeting grannies.” Maybe I will start lying about my age, making myself six years older, so men think I look amazing in person. I think it’s about time to take my profiles down, now that this essay is written. Time to close up shop and X myself out. It wasn’t an entirely failed venture. It did lead to some funny stories and a pretty amazing conversation with my kids, who are mandating that I be done. My daughter got her serious face on and said, “Mom. Why would you think that you, of all people, would meet someone on a screen? You are an outside person. Running. Hiking. Traveling. Having fun with your kids and your friends. You have a graduate degree and speak three languages and can run 50 miles. WHAT are you doing? Your guy is not on a screen either. He’s out there living his amazing life. Go have real fun doing all the things you love and you will find each other there.” That sounds totally meant to be. 

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| DECEMBER 2019

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Listening In: Olympia Auset and Martha Pincoffs talk food epiphanies, vegan burgers and the mysteries of the organic pineapple By Margaret Williams Photographs by Jessica Pages with assistance from Katie Leacroy

34 DECEMBER 2019 |

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A

few months back, Oly mpia Auset a nd Martha Pincoffs made their way through the Sustainable Food Center’s expansive East Austin garden. Weather-wise, it happened to be one of those manic spring days. As the women took their winter coats on and off, they began to talk food accessibility, quickly realizing their uncanny alignment with, and passion for, disrupting food systems that lead to food deserts. Defined by the USDA as “parts of the country vapid of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods,” these produce desolate areas are often experienced only by their residents.

Auset, a millennial Los Angeleno, is a disarming mix of deliberation and joy, and as she talks about Süprmarkt, the affordable organic grocery she founded in 2016, one can’t help but feel hopeful. Her organization serves low-income communities in Los Angeles with its pop-up markets and subscription service and over the past three years has provided more than 25,000 pounds of 100% organic produce, nuts and seeds to South L.A. locals. She says the impetus for founding Süprmarkt was a mix of factors, but seeing family and friends fall prey to easily preventable diseases like diabetes, along with her own limited access to healthy foods, played a big role. Pincoffs, a native Austinite and self-described connector of people, ideas and institutions, has a long list of accomplishments in the local food and farming movement. Her Hot Dang line of grain burgers was once available only at a local farmers market but is now stocked at grocery stores across the country. The mother of two is also the president of the Texas Center for Local Food and on the board of Austin’s Sustainable Food Center, whose mission is to create a sustainable and equitable food system in Central Texas. And she still manages to find time to cook! In fact, she founded the 30 at Home cooking challenge—and sticks with it every January. Lately, Pincoffs has been channeling her energies towards Waking Giants, where she and co-founder Sera Bonds provide actionable resources for those wanting to better understand social justice issues like immigration and public health. Happily, Pincoffs is the best kind of leader and activist, one who doesn’t take herself too seriously, as evidenced by Waking Giants’ tongue-in-cheek Keanu Reeves prayer candle being sold as part of its Holiday Survival Kit. Who says you can’t save the world and have a sense of humor? Certainly not either of these ladies.

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COMMUNITY PROFILE Olympia Auset and Martha Pincoffs catching up in Sustainable Food Center's East Austin Garden.

OLYMPIA AUSET: This is an impressive garden. MARTHA PINCOFFS: I love the way it smells. How did you get into food? What made you start thinking about it? OA: My food epiphany really started to happen my first year in college. I was going to these dialogue sessions, and we would talk about the banking system, why there are wars, the pharmaceutical industry. And I started to

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understand how important food is, how it’s directly linked to our human potential and how it can be a control mechanism. I went vegan. I also learned about the work of Will Allen, who’s growing 1 million pounds of food on 3 acres year-round in Milwaukee in the freezing cold. I started working with a community garden near me, Common Good City Farm. When I graduated, I knew I wanted to build a food infrastructure.

I was living on the border of Inglewood in L.A., and I would be on the bus two hours every time I needed produce. When you make a commitment to eat fresh fruits and vegetables, it becomes clear that there’s none around. I was educating my friends about eating healthy, but their biggest pushback was like, “Oh, it’s too expensive.” I was having friends, family members, pass away from preventable diseases. I


was working with raw-food manufacturers, and I would see where the produce came from. It was like, “Oh, it doesn’t have to be this expensive.” It was a culmination of things. MP: I started a vegetarian burger company years ago. The whole line’s vegan now. I worked through all of the grocery stores and saw the margin that Whole Foods charges against the margin that H-E-B charges against the margin that delivery-to-door charges. It fascinated me to watch the economics of it play out. OK, so Süprmarkt? It’s a farmers market? OA: It’s a pop-up grocery service. Every Sunday, we do a location where there’s limited access to food. We sell produce, nuts, dates, and we keep everything affordable. We also have a subscription service. It’s designed around the average EBT [Electronic Benefits Transfer] for a single person. The idea is, you can potentially spend half of your EBT and have produce in your fridge every week. I get frustrated at the store. If you want organic pineapple, it’s like eight bucks. The model has been built out to expand the popularity of organic foods, and they’re gonna try to get as much money as they can. But also sometimes we feel entitled to these foods from across the planet. MP: Right, and they travel. I’ve always thought there was a better way, and one of the things that I really love that we have access to here is Double Dollar [a financialmatching program allowing benefit holders increased produce purchasing power] for fresh fruits and vegetables. OA: OK. Oh, for California, it’s Market Match.  MP: It’s a good way to grow access. And the economics of it are in such nice alignment, because the money goes directly to the farmer. OA: Yeah, 200 bucks a month for food in L.A.

is not enough, really, especially if you’re gonna be eating fresh. With that amount, you’re eating just processed food, because that’s what you can afford. So being able to double your dollars— MP: It’s a big deal. Policy has to change if we’re gonna change food, because the seed company’s

“Austin has seven

ZIP codes that don't have grocery stores. One in five kids is on free and reduced lunch in our schools. It's a great city in so many ways, but we have some real places we could do a whole lot better.” now owned by the pill company. How did you start Süprmarkt? OA: The first Süprmarkt was a large dinner in my friend’s mom’s house. She gave us $300 for the dinner, and we used $100 on food. The next month, we went out to a community park in our area. We didn’t even have a table. We just got some produce, and—it was like so rinky-dink. If you look at our first Instagram pictures, we

were just out there. Do you still have the burger company? MP: It’s not mine anymore, but it’s out in the world and growing. I heard they got into Walmart. OA: Oh. MP: Which is crazy. Then I ran a fermentedvegetable company, which was really cool, because I learned all about the healing powers of food.  I didn’t really pay attention to [food] until I turned 30, and then I started cooking, and it made me curious about “Where does this come from, and why does it matter, and how does it make my body feel, and how is the person treated that raised it?” It pulled the whole world of justice and creativity and care altogether for me. Now I work on projects with companies, politicians and individuals to try and drive the change forward from that place where private, public and nonprofit meet so we can scale. Because solutions like yours need to scale. OA: What is it like for you here?  MP: Austin has seven ZIP codes that don’t have grocery stores. One in five kids is on free and reduced lunch in our schools. It’s a great city in so many ways, but we have some real places we could do a whole lot better. That’s where I think business has a place to participate. I think that there are some really conscious companies that really sincerely wanna be good citizens in the world, and they can do more. And then to meet people like you doing really radical stuff—the entire community is served by the work that you do. This story is part of our series “Listening In,” where we pair SXSW speakers and artists and then happily eavesdrop on the exchange. Find the complete series at  tribeza.com/listening-in.

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TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Y U L E T I D E L O AV E S Add some new favorites to your holiday baking routine with recipes from David Norman’s debut cookbook, “Bread on the Table.” The proprietor and “head doughpuncher” of Easy Tiger Bake Shop & Beer Garden shares bread-making tips for classic French breads, Italian ciabattas, and traditional Scandinavian Christmas loaves. Pass the butter.  EASYTIGERUSA.COM/BREAD-ON-THE-TABLE

T I M E L E S S G O O D S Product designer for some of Austin’s best creatives, hoteliers and restaurants, John Humphreys recently relaunched his website Texas Rover Company under an eponymous name. Since 2015, Humphreys has released thoughtfully designed goods, including the Humphreys Chair, a durable wood-and-leather camp-style chair in a variety of colors. The new site will bring a larger range of products at a more accessible price point to market. “I love figuring out how things work, how they’re made, what they’re made of,” Humphreys says. While traveling in Ontario, Canada, the El Campo native came across the chair that inspired him to design his own. “I had a waterproof notebook, and on the plane I drew out a bunch of things that I wanted to make,” Humphreys says. The leather duffle Balmorhea Bag and solid brass Machine Pen soon followed. In early 2020, expect a wood, brass and concrete adjustable floor lamp. “We make timeless things,” Humphreys says, “so they don’t fade.”  HUMPHREYSBRAND.COM

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Leading the Way Opening in the spring of 2020, enterprising UT Austin students can engage with new programs through the Kendra Scott Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership Institute. Designed to help bolster female business leaders, the institute will offer leadership training, internship programs, workshops and chances to learn from the Kendra Scott design process. Baring the name of the billion-dollar jewelry company, the institute was formally unveiled in September. KSINSTITUTE.UTEXAS.EDU

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J A R E D T E N N A N T, A M A N DA H A R T F I E L D A N D CO U R T E S Y O F TAO S S K I VA L L E Y.

Dashing Through the Snow Good news for ski lovers. For the second year, Taos Air is offering direct flights from Austin to Taos, New Mexico, for the winter season, running December 19 through March 29, 2020. After hitting the slopes in the expansive Taos Ski Valley, post up in front of a fireplace at the historic Taos Inn and get a taste of chef Nité Marquez’s recently reimagined menu at the inn’s iconic restaurant, Doc Martin’s. TAOSINN.COM

ABSOLUTE CONFECTION Parisian pastry chef Julie Myrtille has been serving up delectable baked goods, like almond croissants, madeleines and macarons, at Austin farmer’s markets since 2016. This month, she celebrates the grand opening of her first storefront, at Springdale General, on December 4. Stop in to admire the pendant lights made from re-purposed brioche molds and to pick up cakes, cookies, and Myrtille’s signature cannelés. JULIEMYRTILLE.US

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| DECEMBER 2019

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ARTS + HAPPENINGS

STARRY NIGHT ACL Radio closes out the year with Icelandic rock band Kaleo, p. 43.

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment BOB SCHNEIDER & THE MOONLIGHT ORCHESTRA

December 6 ACL Live at The Moody Theater FESTIVAL OF TEXAS FIDDLING

December 6 & 7 Twin Sisters Dance Hall ASO: CHRISTMAS IN THE COMMUNITY

December 6 – 18 Various Locations

A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS

December 7 Stateside at the Paramount DAVID ARCHULETA

December 7 One World Theatre

BRUCE ROBISON & KELLY WILLIS W/ PATTY GRIFFIN

December 14 Paramount Theatre EMAROSA

December 18 Stubb's BBQ KEVIN FOWLER

December 19 Gruene Hall

ROBERT EARL KEEN W/ SHINYRIBS

December 20 & 21 ACL Live at The Moody Theater MOTOWN CHRISTMAS W/ TJE AUSTIN & FRIENDS

December 21 Geraldine’s

MARIACHI SOL DE MÉXICO DE JÓSE HERNÀNDEZ

JONAS BROTHERS

December 22 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

A$AP FERG

FLACO JIMENEZ’S BLUE CHRISTMAS DANCE PARTY

December 7 Frank Erwin Center

December 8 ACL Live at The Moody Theater HANSON

ELF MOVIE PARTY

Through December 25 Alamo Drafthouse - Ritz OTHER WORLDS FILM FESTIVAL

December 5 – 8 Galaxy Highland Theatre EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE!

December 6 AFS Cinema

AUSTIN MUSIC VIDEO FESTIVAL

December 10 – 14 Various Locations

MOVIES IN THE PARK: HOME ALONE

December 12 Zilker Park

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS SERIES

December 20 – January 1 AFS Cinema

THEATER

STEELY DAN

December 8 Emo’s Austin

December 29 & 30 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

GRAHAM REYNOLDS RUINS THE HOLIDAYS

December 9 & 10 Long Center IL DIVO

December 11 ACL Live at The Moody Theater MOLLY BURCH’S HOLIDAY PARTY

BOB SCHNEIDER’S NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY

December 31 Paramount Theatre MAGNA CARDA

December 6 Antone's Nightclub A NIGHT ON FIRE W/ TAMECA JONES

December 13 Barracuda

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December 25 Antone’s Nightclub

FILM

December 31 Antone’s Nightclub

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SHE LOVES ME

Through December 21 Austin Playhouse A CHRISTMAS CAROL

Through December 29 ZACH Theatre

THE SANTALAND DIARIES

Through December 29 ZACH Theatre

NEXT TO NORMAL

December 5 – 21 Ground Floor Theatre

THE BUTCHER OF BARABOO

December 6 – 21 Hyde Park Theatre

BALLET AUSTIN: THE NUTCRACKER

December 7 – 23 Long Center

DEAR EVAN HANSEN

December 10 – 15 Bass Concert Hall

OF MICE & MUSIC — A JAZZ TAP NUTCRACKER

December 12 – 22 Long Center

A DRAG QUEEN CHRISTMAS

December 19 ACL Live at The Moody Theater CIRQUE MUSICA: HOLIDAY WISHES

December 24 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park RUDOLPH THE REDNOSED REINDEER: THE MUSICAL

December 29 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

COMEDY JOHN LEGUIZAMO

December 4 Bass Concert Hall

JONATHAN VAN NESS

December 5 ACL Live at The Moody Theater BENITO SKINNER

December 5 Stateside at the Paramount

JOSH WOLF

December 5 – 7 Cap City Comedy Club WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY?

December 12 ACL Live at The Moody Theater A JOHN WATERS CHRISTMAS

December 15 Paramount Theatre

BLOOD & HOLLY: A WEST TEXAS FAMILY CHRISTMAS

December 20 Paramount Theatre

DOUG BENSON’S NEW YEAR’S EVE COMEDY PARADE

December 31 Cap City Comedy Club

FAMILY HOLIDAY HEROES

December 7 – 14 ZACH Theatre

A CHRISTMAS CAROL - REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED

December 7 – 15 Austin Scottish Rite Theater MUSIC OF THE WHITE STRIPES FOR KIDS

December 15 The Mohawk

SESAME STREET LIVE! LET’S PARTY!

December 17 & 18 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park NYE KIDS/TEEN NIGHT OUT

December 31 Horseshoe Bay Resort

P H OTO G R A P H B Y A L E X A N D R A VA L E N T I

MUSIC


OTHER BLUE GENIE ART BAZA AR

Through December 24 Blue Genie Art Bazaar

LOVE CHILD HOLIDAY MINI MARKET

December 8 South Congress Hotel

A SÁNCHEZ SHAKE UP

December 9 Empire Control Room

HILL COUNTRY HOLIDAY VILLAGE

AUSTIN TRAIL OF LIGHTS

Through December 24 Hill Country Galleria

December 10 – 23 Zilker Park

MIRACLE ON 5TH STREET

ARMADILLO CHRISTMAS BAZA AR

Through December 29 The Eleanor

CHRISTMAS LIGHT SHOW

Through January 5 Mozart's Coffee Roasters

TWISTED CHRISTMAS

December 6 – 21 Scream Hollow Wicked Halloween Park

JINGLE BELL RUN 5K

December 7 Hill Country Galleria

December 13 – 24 Palmer Events Center

UP & DOWN TOUR W/LITTLE CITY & INDEPENDENCE BREWING CO.

December 14 Little City Coffee Roasters THE AUSTIN COCKTAIL FEST

December 14 Austin American-Statesman

DOWNTOWN HOLIDAY STROLL

SOLSTICE FESTIVAL & CRAFT MARKET

December 7 Congress Avenue

December 21 Eden East

GERMAN-TEXAN HERITAGE SOCIETY CHRISTMAS MARKET

PUNK YOGA

December 7 German Free School of Austin SANTA LOUNGE & MARKET

December 7 W Austin

CHERRYWOOD ART FAIR

December 7 & 8 Maplewood Elementary

December 23 The Mohawk

AUSTIN’S NEW YEAR

December 31 Auditorium Shores

FOSTER ATX: UNTITLED, A NEW YEARS EVE EXPERIENCE

December 31 800 Congress

MUSIC PICK

ACL Radio’s Starry Night: Kaleo By Vanessa Blankenship ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER, DECEMBER 16

Since releasing its Atlantic Records debut album, A/B, in 2016, the Icelandic rock band Kaleo has quickly become a global phenomenon known for captivating performances. The four-member group consisting of lead vocalist and guitarist JJ Julius Son, drummer David Antonsson, bassist Daniel Kristjansson and lead guitarist Rubin Pollock won the hearts of fans across the world thanks to their mix of blues and rock-and-roll songs. Kaleo’s hit single “Way Down We Go” became certified platinum and reached No. 1 on Billboard’s Alternative Songs chart after its release. Since gaining international fame, the band moved briefly from its hometown of Mosfellsbær, Iceland, to Austin, wanting to be in a city renowned for its appreciation of live music. “They felt like this was the place to really establish their career,” says Austin City Limits Radio program director Emily Parker. “I think KGSR, and now Austin City Limits Radio, has been a big part of that. We were one of the first stations to jump behind them.” On December 16, watch Kaleo headline ACL Radio’s Starry Night at ACL Live at The Moody Theater, which will also feature opening performances from Devon Gilfillian and Adam Melchor. During the annual end-of-year celebration attendees can expect fun, holiday cheer from the ACL Radio team, who will be dressed up in Christmas attire. Not to mention, the concert gives back to the community. In 2018, the event raised more than $2,300 for local PBS station KLRU. “It feels less like a holiday show and more like a true party for everybody that is involved,” says Parker.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts THESE LESSONS Through December 14 MASS Gallery SARAH FOX: BRUISERS Through December 15 grayDUCK Gallery ELIZABETH CHILES POP UP EXHIBIT Through December 16 The LINE Austin

ART PICK

“Fashion Forward” By Holly Cowart BULLOCK TEX A S STATE HISTORY MUSEUM, DECEMBER 21 – APRIL 12

Fashion is a staple in every society. It can represent distinct locations, chronicle global trends and inspire unexpected collaborations between cultures. And while you may more readily think of Italian runways or the streets of Paris when it comes to the style influencers of the world, you might not realize the significant role high fashion has played in your own backyard. If this sounds like you, make your way to the Bullock Texas State History Museum for its upcoming showcase “Fashion Forward.” Exhibiting from the esteemed Texas Fashion Collection housed at the University of North Texas, you’ll walk through a gallery of groundbreaking garments. Focusing on the 20th century, additions include Christian Dior’s decadent New Look, which premiered in Paris in 1947, and the chic yet intentionally comfortable creations of Geoffrey Beene and Giorgio Armani. Japanese designer Hanae Mori makes an appearance as well, whose signature silk gowns and butterfly patterns first reached the U.S. via Texas retailers. Each couturier is also a recipient of the Neiman Marcus Award for Distinguished Service in the Field of Fashion. Founded in Dallas in 1907, the company was among the first to create a prize acknowledging style industry icons regardless of position or nationality. Further cementing Texas as a fashion hub are the four sons of Neiman Marcus co-founder Herbert Marcus. Their initial contributions were the beginning of the now 20,000-piece collection at UNT. From this impressive slate of game-changing outfits, we get a fascinating glance into the evolution of Texas style. Expect interactive workshops and educational opportunities for all ages throughout the show’s four-month stay, including an opening reception on January 10.

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RUTH KEITZ Through December 20 Ao5 Gallery POLISH POSTER ART: FROM CITY STREETS TO GALLERY WALLS Through December 27 Austin Central Library LILY COX-RICHARD: SHE-WOLF + LOWER FIGS. Through December 29 Blanton Museum of Art MODERNIST NETWORKS Through January 5 Harry Ransom Center BETELHEM MAKONNEN & STEPHANIE CONCEPCION RAMIREZ Through January 9 Women & Their Work SMALL ART BY AUSTIN December 5 – January 2 Old Bakery & Emporium

EXAMPLE GEOMETRY December 6 – January 19 Dimension Gallery ART FROM THE STREETS December 7 & 8 Austin Convention Center ASHLEY BENTON + CHRTISTOPHER LEE GILMER December 7 – January 5 Wally Workman Gallery LOOKING OUT, LOOKING IN December 7 – January 11 Davis Gallery 3X5X7 December 12 – 15 Austin Center for Architecture FASHION FORWARD December 12 – April 12 Bullock Texas State History Museum MIX ‘N’ MASH December 13 – February 9 Mexic-Arte Museum UNSEEN PRINTS December 13 – March 1 Mexic-Arte Museum THE ARTIST AT WORK December 14 – June 28 Blanton Museum of Art POP-UP EXHIBITION: FANTASTIC BEASTS December 19 Blanton Museum of Art WAEL SHAWKY: CABARET CRUSADES III: THE SECRETS OF KARBALA December 21 – April 19 Blanton Museum of Art

I M AG E S CO U R T E S Y T E X A S FA S H I O N CO L L E C T I O N , T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N O R T H T E X A S .

SALVADOR DALÍ EXHIBITION Through December 10 Ao5 Gallery


WWG

Wally Workm a n Ga llery

CHRISTOPHER LEE GILMER 1202 West 6th Street · wallyworkmangallery.com · 512.472.7428 Image: Unicorn Kiss (detail), oil on canvas, 40 x 32 in.


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com

EVENT PICK

The Moth By Holly Cowart PAR AMOUNT THEATRE, DECEMBER 12

We’ve all had those nights—surrounded by our closest friends, the hours slipping away, pockets of silence easily replaced with long tales, laughter and even tears. These moments of intimacy and connection are the type that stick with us, the ones we wish we could re-create. At least that was the idea behind The Moth, founded in 1997 by revered novelist George Dawes Green. Inspired by memories of storytelling with friends in his Georgia hometown, Green was looking for a similar creative outlet after moving to New York City. What started as a small gathering in his living room soon snowballed into large venues and even larger crowds, eventually reaching other countries and featuring well-known figures. To this day, everyone is welcome to participate, be it inmate or astronaut, with more than 500 shows produced every year. On December 12, five new narrators will take the Paramount Theatre dais for another installation of The Moth Mainstage. No notes, no judgement—just the passing down of personal experiences through the powerful art of live storytelling. While each show relates to an overarching theme, the stories take unexpected turns as they’re transformed by the unique perspectives of the speakers. Ever wondered what it’s like to leave everything you know on a boat in search of refuge? What about the pulse-racing tasks of the chief of disguise at the CIA? Just learning that position even exists? Well, you’re now officially part of The Moth community, and there’s plenty more where that came from. All you have to do is listen.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y S A R A H S TAC K E

MUSEUMS


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A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8–5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: W–Th 12–6, F-Su artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu-Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com

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AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org CAMIBAart 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS 1023 Springdale Rd., Ste. 1B (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery

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FLATBED PRESS & GALLERY 3701 Drossett Dr. Hours: Th 10–5 flatbedpress.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: F-Su 12–4 linkpinart.com

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org

MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 209 W. 9th St., #200 (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 sites.utexas.edu/utvac WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Conjure holiday magic of yore strolling through town and shopping local with some of our favorite retailers.

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HELLE MARDAHL HAND BLOWN GLASS VESSELS Hand-blown in Europe and Denmark by master craftsmen and designed with unmatched aesthetics and quality. No two pieces are identical, making these the perfect, truly unique gifts for anyone on your list. bygeorgeaustin.com

PASCAL PEARL EARRINGS Make a striking wardrobe update in these feminine pearl drop earrings. A lightweight statement inspired by oyster shells, the Pascal Pearl Earrings are a perfect etherial statement for any holiday look. RAHYA.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

GIFT CERTIFICATES Good things come in spa packages. Give the gift of relaxation with gift certificates to the LakeHouse Spa or Lake Austin Spa Resort. Purchase a discounted half- or full-day away package on or after Black Friday and receive a complimentary bonus spa gift certificate! 512.372.7345 store.lakeaustin.com/ Gift-Certificates/.

#1 DESTINATION SPA RESORT IN NORTH AMERICA Treat yourself or that special person in your life to the ultimate holiday escape to Lake Austin Spa Resort, voted #1 Destination Spa Resort in North America in Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards 2019. Nestled on 19-lakefront acres in Central Texas’ legendary Hill Country, this award-winning destination spa resort offers the luxury of a world-class spa and the warmth of a best friend’s lake house.

RESORT OFFERS & PACKAGES Whether you’re in search of a special occasion trip, a romantic getaway, a girls’ trip, or just a much-needed staycation—we have an array of allinclusive special offers sure to fit your needs. 800.847.5637 | lakeaustin.com.

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PHASES CUPS Simple yet striking-these white dipped ceramic cups are perfect for your morning espresso or mulled wine with friends this fall. Cups are available individually or in sets of 6. lootfinergoods.com

BRASS BAR SET Shake it up! Show off your bartending skills with this polished brass set. It's the perfect way to elevate your holiday bar cart. Although, buyer beware your guests will definitely be asking for another round!

NINE BANDED WHISKEY Founded by Austin entrepreneurs, Nine Banded Whiskey set out to make a whiskey that’s as good as it gets without any pretense. A whiskey that tastes like nothing other than damn good whiskey. They’re made in Austin, Texas, and they distill the heart that flows freely in this town right into their whiskey. Then they add limestone filtered water, sourced directly from an ancient spring in the Texas Hill Country. It’s smooth. It’s real. It doesn’t taste like anything else because it can’t be made anywhere else. They don’t care how you drink it, they just care that you enjoy it. For more information go to ninebandedwhiskey.com. Pick up a bottle at Spec's, Twin Liquors or Total Wine.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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THE POPOVER BY GOOD COMPANY The second style added to the Good Company shirting line! Cotton, made in LA, effortlessly chic. fabrics vary. Price $168.

GOOD COMPANY HAND TOWELS A unique and handcrafted gift. These hand towels are made in LA and embroidered in Austin at Good Company Home. Price $38.

OLIVE WOOD SPOONS Perfect housewarming gift or stocking stuffer. Grab these beautifully handcrafted olive wood spoons at the new Good Company Home Store located at 904 W. 12th St. Prices start at $9.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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AT CASTLE HILL Joy at Castle Hill has a curated selection of gifts from around the world with an emphasis on beautiful things that bring happiness to all. Farmhouse Pottery’s serenely perfect handblown balsam trees are a sophisticated way to bring nature into your home this holiday season. Mix and match the woodland pieces with the pottery to celebrate Mother Nature’s diversity. Inspired by adventuresome Texas women, Petra Jewelry combines natural materials from the

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FEATURES

STANDING TALL Denise Prince at the Texas Federation of Women’s Clubs Headquarters, p. 62.

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Head for the Holidays Visit Domain NORTHSIDE for the best holiday shopping has to offer. Featuring 7 for all Mankind, Apple, Amazon Books, AWAY, Bonobos, Drybar, Erin Condren, Lively, Nina Berenato, PAIGE, Paper Source, DOMAINNORTHSIDE.COM Peloton, Sephora, Warby Parker, + many more. 60 @DO M ADECEMBER I N N O R T2019 H S I|Dtribeza.com E


The Magnificent 7 From a 9-year-old civil rights advocate to a groundbreaking artist, these Austinites had a starring role in making the community around us a better place in 2019. Photographed by Minta Maria Smail. tribeza.com

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Even if you’re not familiar with Denise Prince’s work, chances are you have been touched by it. If you were in North Austin in April, you may have seen her standing on Burnet Road beneath a billboard featuring the words “Captivating Not Captive” and two gloriously unlikely models in repose. Prince was dressed as a wizard, reciting a manifesto on beauty. The proclamation, like the images on the billboard, were of her own creation.

Struggle on the Hard Earth” was screened at the LA Fashion Film Festival. She found a fan in acclaimed photographer Ryan McGinley and a mentor in photographer  Stephen Frailey, chair of the Photography Department at the School of Visual Arts and co-chair of its MPS Fashion Photography Program in New York. Prince also participated in major group shows in Italy, Norway, Slovakia, Finland and Brooklyn, and she was one of 10 artists

Few local artists have been more prolific and intrepid than Prince in their exploration of the universal themes that are the underpinnings of our lives, including beauty. Through an array of mediums, including film, photography, painting and performance, she started presenting alternative interpretations of what it means to be beautiful before it was de rigueur. It’s largely because of this work that the 51-yearold has enjoyed a much-deserved banner year. Prince has long been celebrated at Austin’s Women & Their Work gallery and is a regular recipient of the City of Austin’s grants for public works. This year she was one of 25 artists selected to participate in “New Monuments for New Cities,” the inaugural project of the High Line Network Joint Art Initiative, a collaboration among infrastructure-reuse projects across North America. She also secured representation at the gallery MARYMARY Projects in Tribeca. “I feel as though, finally, I’ve arrived fundamentally,” says Prince. And there is more: Earlier this year, Prince’s video  piece “The Lollipop Girls

career is trying to make my own language.” Prince’s billboard was part of her “Captivating Not Captive” series, which began 10 years ago as a reimagining of a Missoni catalog. She replaced the fashion house’s heavily retouched models with individuals who have undergone physical trauma. They are mesmerizing portraits of ineffable qualities, highlighting the constructed nature of aesthetics and disrupting beauty norms in the process. Though Prince regularly delves into the most difficult of human emotions, she has a rare gift for transforming  inner tumult into buoyant expressions of empathy and insight, turning quotidian concerns into magical, wholly extraordinary experiences, as she did in 2016 with “L’enfant Terrible,” a multimedia happening. The event, hosted at an

commissioned by Vogue to reimagine the “Last Look” section of the September issue. It is as though culture, at large, is finally catching up with her. Or at least trying.  Prince has an acute awareness of the genesis of her creations. Her preoccupation with beauty as it relates to fashion stems from a childhood encounter with a billboard. “I remember seeing this image of a very attractive woman and having the realization that she was being treated as an object and setting a standard I couldn’t live up to,” says Prince, who grew up in Dallas. “It was a very powerful, very intense moment for me. The billboard I did on Burnet Road was a response to that. I became obsessed with commercial language, which had such a singular narrative and was so unmoored from reality. I think what I’ve been doing my whole

East Side venue, was inspired by Ludwig Bemelmans’ book “Madeline” and about the loss of childhood innocence.  For L’enfant, Prince installed 12 twin beds in the courtyard and choreographed a dance for 12 girls in 1950s dressing gowns. There was also a kissing booth and original photography, featuring the same children dressed as adults, handing out candy cigarettes and “prescription” bottles filled with sweets. The evening was a perfect example of the way Prince works. She cultivates single ideas into grand expressions of wonder. For her, going big is not an option but an inherent trait. Life as an artist is never easy, but for one of Austin’s most indefatigable creators it’s finally paying off. -TOBIN LEVY

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Gabe Erales never meant to become a chef. And yet today, he's at the helm of Esquire's Best New Restaurants of 2019 and is a rising star at the intersection of two global food trends. His résumé reads like a roll call of local and international culinary giants—from Noma in Copenhagen to Fonda San Miguel and Dai Due in Austin. Mixing influences from both authentic Mexican cuisine and the farm-to-table movement at Comedor, Erales upholds the ancient tenets of Mexican tradition by preaching the modern revival of masa. Chatting at the sleek new restaurant’s communal high-top, he pauses midconversation to taste the daily delivery of corn.  “Give it 10 more minutes,” he tells his team before returning to the hermeneutics of heritage corn. His hat reads “Sin maíz, no hay

país”—a Mexican idiom meaning “Without corn, there is no country.” Working with a local graphic designer, Erales used concentric circles to create the hat’s husked emblem, symbolizing the need to preserve Mexican corn and culture. Growing up in a border town, the El Paso native always appreciated food, learning to cook cochinita pibil from his mother. The vibrant braised meat later became his signature dish, but his first restaurant jobs were purely to support his studies at the University of Texas in Austin. After college, he moved to Detroit to pursue mechanical engineering at General Motors while earning a master’s degree. Thankfully for Austin, both the kitchen and the city called him back. 

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“Having a stressful day in that type of job, I found a lot of relief in cooking,” Erales says. “And even though it can be stressful, too, I realized that I missed being in the kitchen.” Moving back to Austin in 2012, Erales sought out Fonda San Miguel, a bastion of interior Mexican cuisine in a sea of Tex-Mex. At the time, he says, most Texans equated Mexican food with queso and fajitas, whereas Fonda San Miguel used traditional techniques to infuse its menu with pure Mexican soul. “Their restaurant is driven by architecture and art and beauty,” says Erales. “You walk up and the building is absolutely gorgeous, and they were the first to do nixtamalization here in town.” Comedor updates both legacies, using the Mesoamerican technique of nixtamalization to prepare masa in a beautiful modern setting. A

transported,” Erales says, referring as much to the urban oasis as to the menu. “I want to put something on the table that’s both authentic and local, yet not immediately recognizable as Mexican cuisine.” Experimental dishes like bone marrow tacos are what separate Erales from other missionaries of the masa gospel—no doubt a byproduct of his experience working with local chefs like Jesse Griffiths and Bryce Gilmore. “I have so much respect for Jesse as a chef and as a person,” Erales says. “I learned so much from him about sourcing and respecting ingredients, minimizing waste and embracing the local terroir. And Bryce has done so much for farmers and the community. You go eat at Odd Duck and Barley Swine, and you can feel an evolution of cuisine.” Apart from local chefs, Erales also attributes that evolution to Barton Springs Mill, where James Brown’s heritage grains have become staples in the Austin restaurant industry. For Erales, such partnerships mean that the future of authentic Mexican cuisine and the farm-to-table movement are one and the same—especially in Austin. Pointing to the rise of people traveling to Mexico as a culinary hot spot, he predicts the next chapter of local food will further deepen the interactions among chefs and farmers to grow things previously only found in Mexico. 

dark-glass-and-brick entryway leads to an industrial dining space that feels intimate yet cosmopolitan, with cozy candlelight to balance the sparkle of skyline views in tall glass ceilings overhead. Handcranked window walls reveal a courtyard for alfresco dining on the open-air patio. “We want you to come here and feel

For now, he plans to continue sourcing Comedor’s heirloom corn from Mexico as a way to support indigenous communities, spreading the mission of masa through his ever-evolving menu. So far, Austinites are proving eager proselytes, always happy to add new revelations to the local culinary canon. -HANNAH PHILLIPS


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“I’m Princess Little Red Riding Hood,” says 9-year-old Kai Shappley, animated by a new cherry-hued cape, quick to clarify the reference with a sweet, high-pitched flurry of conjunctions. “There’s this book called “Land of Stories” that has all the fairy tales, but the Little Red Riding Hood story is different, and there’s a lot of magic, and she’s so beautiful, and she becomes queen of her people, and …” While deeper affinities go unmentioned, it’s likely not lost on Kai that the book’s author, “Glee”  actor Chris Colfer, is a fellow LGBTQ activist or that in his interpretation of the classic fairy tale, Red becomes the chosen leader of an acronymous movement, The C.R.A.W.L. (Citizen Riots Against Wolf Liberty) Revolution. Kai, who is transgender, has become the face of local trans youth and a pint-size, blue-eyed beacon of hope for the ACLU. Kai and her mother, Kimberly, are still relatively new to Austin. “Even though I was born and my body was like a guy’s, my brain and my heart know I’m a girl,” says Kai, when asked how she explains to people what it means to be transgender. She and Kimberly moved here last year from Pearland for a kinder environment and to be in an LGBTQ-affirming school district  that explicitly prohibits harassment of any kind, including based on gender identity. Before that, Kai  was the subject of an 18-minute documentary,  “Trans in America: Texas Strong,” an Emmy-winning short produced by the ACLU that follows her and Kimberly’s fight for Kai’s right to live without discrimination at school and in her community. It’s a stunning depiction of the burden trans people face and a captivating portrait of resilience. Kai is 6 in the film, all pigtails and wide-eyed positivity, radiating compassion even for her tormentors.

Kai’s fight to be Kai started at home amongst the backdrop of an evangelical Christian upbringing. “When she was born, I was active in the Baptist ministry and a straight-ticket Republican Tea Partier,” says Kimberly, whose initial response to Kai’s early preference for dresses and dolls was punishment. When Kai insisted, “You know  I’m a girl,” a common refrain since the age of 3, Kimberly spanked her. “No matter what the consequences, Kai persisted,” Kimberly says. Then, when Kai was 4, Kimberly overheard her praying alone in her room, asking God to let her die.  “I realized that I had a 4-year-old who would rather go be with Jesus forever than stay here and have to live as a boy one more day.” When Kai was in kindergarten, Kimberly  allowed her to legally change her birth name (Joseph) and to live as a girl.  Kai exhibits a kind of mystical fearlessness and a capacity for opening hearts and minds. To date, the film, which is available on YouTube, has been viewed nearly 3.3

would update the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to grant LGBTQ people protections. Kai was running through the halls and caught the attention of Texas Representative Pete Olson, who was against the bill. “He saw her and was like, ‘Hey, pretty girl. Where are you from?’” says Kimberly. “Kai said Texas. And he goes, ‘Oh, my gosh, my constituents! Come on in my office.’ He didn’t know who we were, but his staffers did. They were trying to make him stop. But he didn’t pick up on it. He was playing and taking selfies with Kai. I was like, ‘You know what? The Lord set this up.’” It’s a rare spirit that inspires such a gesture.   This year, AISD launched Pride week with a screening of “Trans in America,” after which Kai took the microphone, introduced herself to the audience and thanked the principal for efforts on behalf of the LGBTQ community. “My name is Kai Shappley, and my pronouns are her, she, like the candy bar!” “She’s just fearless,” marvels Amy Bench, the film’s cinematographer. “She knows at her core who she is. Her being her is the strength of Kai’s activism. In general, most people don’t have that same sense of self.”  On the horizon, Kai and Kimberly will be

million times. One man in North Carolina was so moved by Kai’s story that he spent months getting people from every single continent to write her letters of support, which he compiled in a “40-pound box of love” and sent with his own note, encouraging Kai to hold onto the letters for future reminders to stay strong, that there are people all over the world supporting her. Kai and her mother have also appeared on the “Today” show, “Vice” on HBO, Fox News and a host of national magazines and news outlets. On a recent trip to Washington, D.C., she was like the golden child, engaging the far right, if only temporarily. Kai and Kimberly were there to testify in Congress on behalf of the Equality Act, a federal bill that

featured in Daresha Kyi’s upcoming featurelength documentary, “Mama Bears,” which follows conservative Christian moms in their acceptance of their LGBTQ children. Kai is also set to appear in a new Netflix series this summer. Most recently, Kai and Kimberly were honored with the Glen Maxey Activism Award from Equality Texas. “Kai is a brave, fierce, and wickedly smart little girl with a vibrant personality,” says Angela Hale, acting CEO at Equality Texas. “She puts a human face on what a transgender child looks like and has been a rock star, helping us communicate to Texans and the American public that there’s nothing to be worried about, that a transgender child is just like any other child, who should be loved and accepted.” -TOBIN LEVY

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There’s a genuine, Texas-born, Austin-raised warmth about Laura Mayes. This welcoming energy also infuses her many online platforms. And it’s what she wants all women to feel when they walk through the doors of a Mom 2.0 Summit, which has revolutionized the way women converse about motherhood online. In 2005, Mayes was working at MMI Agency in Houston as vice president of public relations. Then she went on maternity leave. During those long hours awake at night with her newborn baby, Mayes discovered a community of connection and honesty in mom blogs. She read one after another. It was women telling their stories of successes and struggles with motherhood. Mayes went back to work inspired. Shortly thereafter, Mayes met Carrie Pacini at a work convention. They were the only two female attendees and gravitated toward each other. It was an instant bond that led to a mutual desire to spearhead a project centered around women in marketing and media. They developed the idea of what would become the Mom 2.0 Summit—an event to gather together female online influencers and content creators. The first summit was held in Houston in 2008, and though the attendee numbers were small that first year, the reception and online feedback were overwhelmingly positive. Eleven years later, Mom 2.0 has evolved into a powerful, much-anticipated event attended by thousands of women—both in person and online. Though discussion topics vary from year to year as online trends emerge, Mom 2.0 has stayed true to Mayes and Pacini’s original vision “to facilitate smart, open conversation and foster the ongoing development of the influential

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online space.” For the three-day summit, bloggers, entrepreneurs, content creators and makers (who are also juggling parenthood) gather to hear panelists and speakers and network with one another. Says Mayes about the demand for the summit: “Mom 2.0 is meeting a need. There just aren’t that many

incorporate elements of “delight.” The word can be found in every feature of the event, from the speakers to each day’s schedule. Says Mayes, “Most of the women attending a summit are taking care of people all day long. We want the summits to care for the people who care for the people.” Mom 2.0 is built by

events out there that can gather that many interesting, diverse and creative moms in the same room.” Mayes and Pacini keep the summits fresh by changing up the location and curating the culture of the event to reflect the host city. The closing party for the 2012 summit in Miami was held at the Versace mansion; the dress code was all white. The 2016 affair near Los Angeles included a beach party. And this year, the summit was held right here in Austin, Mayes’ beloved hometown. There was live music and a special guest: Texas native and courage expert Brené Brown. In every aspect of planning the Mom 2.0 summits, Mayes and Pacini are mindful to

women for women. It’s a party and a place to network and feel welcomed. The next summit will be held in Los Angeles, in May, with its aim of facilitating open conversation between moms, marketing and media. “We want all our Austin friends to attend. The more the merrier,” says Mayes, and that means in person or on the webcast. And what about that lone mom who buys a ticket to the Mom 2.0 Summit in hopes of boosting her online platforms and finding community with other moms? Mayes says, “The greatest compliment would be for that mom to say that at the summit she felt right at home.” -HANNAH PHILLIPS


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Nathan Ryan gets right to it: “Ultimately, people just want to avoid loneliness, feel safe and build community,” he says, sitting in the courtyard of an East Austin cocktail bar. Meeting to discuss his goal to create deeper dialogues in all areas of Austin, we are interrupted at least twice by contacts from one of his many social circles.   “This is Sarah Little from The Supper Club,” he says, introducing us when she stops by our table. Ryan isn’t just being polite: In fact, his whole philosophy revolves around the belief that making genuine connections is the best solution for most problems—professional, political and otherwise. “If you pull one thread in my calendar,” he says, “you find that it’s all different frameworks for getting more people to work together.” As CEO of Blue Sky Partners, co-founder of GoodPolitics, city council commissioner, board member for the LBJ Future Forum—the list goes on—Ryan keeps a busy schedule. We conduct the interview between a community engagement meeting at St. Edward’s University and a planning session for the next GoodPolitics event. Like his calendar, nothing about his curriculum vitae looks linear at first glance. Leaving a decade long marketing career in 2017, he co-founded Blue Sky Partners, a consulting practice helping startups restructure for sustainable growth, with Tim Seaton and Matt Glazer. The trio’s approach centers around candid discussions in all areas of entrepreneurship, based on their firsthand experience with the enormous pressures of running a company. “You can create spreadsheets all day,” says Ryan, “but your client has to believe that you are willing to go through the ups and downs. I’m thankful that Austin is more open to those conversations than most cities, but it’s becoming increasingly important to go even deeper.”  Ryan’s mission to make space for more dialogue is also the motivation behind GoodPolitics, an event series focused on bringing people together in the political

process. The series took shape in 2017, when Ryan and co-founder, Liz Coufal, bonded over a shared frustration at the high admission cost of political fundraising events. Hosting informal happy hours, they started inviting friends to meet candidates for casual discussions over beer. When one post-event poll revealed that nearly 80% of

the 200 attendees had never voted, Coufal and Ryan decided to put a brand behind the series and GoodPolitics was born. “The name makes people laugh, since the two words seem so diametrically opposed,” he says with a smile, “but we want people to know that they have as much voice as someone who can pay $1,000 for a seat at the table.” In 2020, they plan to expand across Texas by connecting with local leaders in other cities, specifically those with experience building consensus across various groups. Ryan hopes these events will not only affect national dialogues in next year’s election, but those happening at the local level as well. As part of the City of Austin’s Economic Prosperity Commission and as a board member of the LBJ Future Forum, Ryan is already involved in those conversations. Focused on issues like workforce development and infrastructure, the

Economic Prosperity Commission makes recommendations to the City of Austin for how to improve transportation and affordable housing. To a large degree, Ryan argues that these issues are the structural drivers of people experiencing homelessness. As a commissioner, he is pushing for more collaboration among local businesses, nonprofit organizations and

the city government. “We need to work together to identify gaps and pool resources wisely to address them,” he says. “I have zero interest in pointing fingers and more in forming coalitions that will focus energy on filling gaps.” For Ryan, assisting Austin’s homeless community means mobilizing the private and public sectors to go deeper on issues like land use, transportation and health care. If the city’s job is to remove as many barriers as possible, the best way to start is by convening conversations across multiple industries.  On an individual level, however, he believes that real change happens when we simply address people experiencing homelessness as humans—rather than a problem to be solved. As he has seen at Blue Sky and GoodPolitics, the most productive conversations happen when we engage person to person, setting aside personal agendas and preconceived notions. Just making eye contact and listening to someone’s story goes a long way, he says, bringing it back to that innate desire for community: “People just want to trust and be trusted. At the end of the day, I hope everything I’m involved in is helping build a culture where people trust each other more.” -HANNAH PHILLIPS

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Nina Means doesn’t need to break the mold. She makes her own. In her mind, if the world’s prescribed pattern doesn’t fit— whether in fashion or business—it’s time for a new design. Leaving a career in public health, Means carved her own path into fashion at brands like Rebecca Taylor and H by Halston before launching her own line. Now, as director of Austin Community College’s Fashion Incubator, she is working to weave the future of fashion with the future of Austin. Both, she says, depend on sustainability and technology. “We are in this unique space,” she says, “where we have the opportunity to leverage a variety of perfectstorm moments: On the one hand, we have global fashion brands looking to relocate or build directly in Texas. And with the city’s commitment to sustainability and zero waste, Austin is forcing businesses to grow in a genuinely green way.” That intersection is exactly where the Fashion Incubator plans to shine, helping young brands break those barriers from the very beginning. Working with six to eight fashion startups in 2020, the program’s mission is to teach the next generation of designers how to grow their business sustainably, integrating technology that will drive down costs and boost scalability.   The idea first started around 2015, when the City of Austin approached Austin Community College about creating a fashion hub to rival resources in New York and Los Angeles. Around that time, Means moved to Austin from New York City with her husband. Passionate about sharing her experience as a designer for large New York brands, Means taught as an adjunct professor at the Art Institute of Austin while working

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to launch the capsule collection of her eponymous brand. When a local buyer told her about the director position at the new Fashion Incubator, she loved the idea of combining the academic and business aspects of her fashion career with the community development from her previous role in public health. And

with Gerber Technology for a $13.1 million digital solutions package that saves designers time, money and materials. By creating threedimensional avatars that can be customized for any size, the end-to-end technology allows designers to test and tweak garments without creating costly samples—even sharing previews with potential buyers instead of attending trade shows. On the workforce side, the incubator encourages connections with local industries in a referral space that benefits both sides of the industry. For those looking to monetize sewing or stitching skills, for example, the incubator can provide technology training and ESL courses to integrate and grow local industries. In Austin, those connections

witnessing firsthand the lack of resources and connections while designing her own brand from Central Texas, she also knew exactly what the program might be missing. “There are way too many talented people in Austin—patternmakers, seamstresses, stitchers—but until now, everyone has always been in their own bubble,” Means says. “I wanted the incubator to bring everyone together so that everyone can get the resources they need.” The city pledged half a million dollars over six years for the program, partnering

extend far outside the fashion world, creating opportunities for partnership with local bioscience companies and innovation centers. As such, Means believes the city is uniquely positioned to leverage technology and build unique business models in a crowded marketplace. “I see us pushing the needle with research and development as we roll out the rest of our programming and learn more about what can be done in our industry,” Means says. “I hope that more people will see us as a lab for testing, sharing the infinite excitement that comes with taking on a project like this.” -HANNAH PHILLIPS


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Just five years after introducing their almond flour tortillas to Austin, the family behind Siete Foods have changed the game for grain-free products across the country. This year, they raised $90 million to expand the brand, innovating new products and adding members to the growing team. Today, Siete products are available in more than 13,000 stores, including Target and Whole Foods, but it sounds as though the Garzas are just getting started. While siblings Veronica and Miguel have been the public face of the brand, the name Siete honors their tight-knit family of seven, whose mantra is “juntos mejor,” or, “better together.” When Veronica Garza was diagnosed with multiple autoimmune diseases in high school, all seven members of the third-generation Mexican American family adopted a grain-free diet. When her

community. When people requested her tortillas for their own grain-free diets, Miguel suggested that they start a business. Approaching small stores in Austin, where all seven members of the family had studied at the University of Texas, the Garzas landed their first account with Wheatsville Food CoOp in 2014. The products sold out in days. Veronica quickly located a commercial kitchen space in a local gluten-free bakery, and her family started making the trip to Austin from Laredo every weekend. Already accustomed to sweating together in the gym, they started sweating together in the kitchen to grow the brand. “We wanted Siete to feel like an extension of our family,” says Miguel. “The culture we created has allowed that to happen. We have seen how family impacts health and well-being, so we made that our core value

innovative,” Veronica says. “We want to solve problems for our customers, but the products still have to taste good. We want to be as inclusive as possible without compromising on taste.” As the product assortment grows, so does the team at Siete, now headquartered in a colorful campus (complete with a coffee shop and CrossFit gym) on Burnet Road. Initially, Miguel says they hired “Swiss Army knife” employees, problem-solvers with a passion for building a scrappy Mexican American food brand. But as business grew, they started seeking specific skill sets that could take them to the next level. “You quickly realize that the only way to scale is to find good people who have skill sets that complement or even outshine your own. Year after year, you lift your head up and look at who is on the bus and where you need to go. Then, you add more people relative to the direction you’re headed and the problems you need to solve that year.”

brother Miguel started a CrossFit gym, all seven started working out together. Now the clan brings that family-oriented ethos to every business decision at Siete. The idea sprouted when Veronica first started making grain-free tortillas for family gatherings. Growing up in Laredo, she recalls making tortillas with her Grandma Campos from an early age. “She would invite every grandchild and great-grandchild into the kitchen to make tortillas, and they were such an important part of our lives.” As Veronica learned to manage her illness during college, she shared her homemade almond flour tortillas with her CrossFit

early on: family first, family second, business third.” Each member of the family has played a key role on the team, allowing Veronica the freedom to innovate new recipes. Starting with her signature almond flour tortillas, she soon added cassava flour tortillas to accommodate customers with nut allergies. New products are the direct result of her creativity and the family’s commitment to customer feedback. Using grain-free, glutenfree and vegan-friendly ingredients, Siete now boasts five product lines, including sauces, dips, chips and taco shells. “We see ourselves as a Mexican American food brand, heritage-inspired and

Asked about their vision for the future, Miguel and Veronica share general plans to add to the team, grow distribution and create delicious new products. But ultimately, the Garzas are less concerned about where the bus is headed and more about who comes along for the ride. “If we can build a company where we do everything with love,” Veronica says with a smile, “scaling that business to a billion-dollar brand will become a recipe for success for other mission-driven companies.” -HANNAH PHILLIPS To learn more about the Magnificent 7, visit tribeza.com.

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i't s the season! uniquely Texan spirits and how to serve them in style 3

curated by laurel miller photographed by denise prince illustrated by hannah-michelle bayley

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Few Lone Star State wineries produce their own fruit, but at William Chris Vineyards in Hye, it’s all about Texas terroir. Says winegrower/ co-owner Chris Brundrett,“We built our business off the idea that quality wine isn’t made, it’s grown. It’s the original farm-to-table drink, and we grow grapes and make wine from diverse regions across the state. We’re proud to share our part of the world with wine enthusiasts.” FOOD PAIRING

Sparkling wine is an underrated companion for sweet pastries. Try it with macarons or madeleines from Austin pâtissier Julie Myrtille or assorted holidaythemed chocolates from Maggie Louise Confections. To round things out, consider a savory option as well, like Callie’s Biscuits served with sliced

country ham and a decadent double- or triple-crème cheese such as La Tur or Delice de Bourgogne. Passed appetizers should have salty, crunchy, creamy, briny characteristics. Deviled eggs and homemade or store-bought thick-cut potato chips dolloped with crème fraîche and caviar play off the subtly sweet bubbles. Pressed for time? Order dressed eggs from local deli Mum Foods. HOW TO SERVE Keep multiple bottles chilled in a large Champagne bowl or oversized vessel and serve

sparkling wine ice-cold in a festive coupe or white wine glass. Says Brundrett, “The aromatics are really incredible and can be muted with a flute.” DÉCOR From left: Curtis Cake Stand Trio, $20/day, Melody’s Joy Dessert Table Design; Florentine Tray, $11/day, Loot Rentals; Ripple Gold Hammered Bucket, $49.95, CB2; Florentine Trays, Loot Rentals, $9-$11/day. 2018 William Chris Pétillant Naturel Rosé, $25, williamchriswines.com

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Gin

“The same way an art gallery curates collections, so too do gin distillers when crafting the right combination of botanicals, scents and flavors,” says Dan Udell, brand director for Waterloo Gin/Treaty Oak Distilling. “Waterloo specifically looked to the Texas Hill Country to create gins with a sense of place. The brand’s terroir– centric Old Yaupon Gin blends foraged native yaupon with juniper, local wildflower honey, makrut lime, anise and orris root. Waterloo No. 9 is a clean, crisp gin with pronounced notes of Texas–grown lavender, lemon, grapefruit and pecan, which adds a bit of depth and body.”

FOOD PAIRING

HOW TO SERVE

Gin pairs beautifully with blue cheese and fresh, soft-ripened or aged goat’s and sheep’s milk cheeses, which play well with the earthiness of juniper. Making your own marinated olives is guaranteed to garner raves. Source a mix of drycured and Castelvetrano or Lucques varieties from Central Market’s antipasto bar. Then, in a large sauté pan, add just enough extra-virgin olive oil to coat the olives; add a sprinkle of chile pepper flakes, sprigs of fresh thyme or rosemary, garlic cloves and strips of orange or lemon peel. Heat slowly over low heat, stirring occasionally to allow the flavors to mingle; remove from heat and serve heaped in a shallow bowl. A complex spirit like gin calls for bold, straightforward accompaniments like pickled veggies, salumi, cheese straws, endive spears with blue cheese and pecans. For a sweet element, try shortbread with a flavor profile that will complement the gin such as lavender or fresh herbs.

While a supply of goodquality tonic water is always appropriate, seasonal ingredients elevate gin cocktails. Udell recommends combining 1 1/2 ounces Waterloo Old Yaupon Gin, 1 ounce fresh Texas pink grapefruit juice and 1/4 ounce Luxardo Maraschino Originale; shake and strain into an ice-filled Collins or rocks glass; finish with tonic water. DÉCOR Clockwise from upper left: Pickard Timeless Crystal Tumblers, $48 each, Hearth & Soul; Florentine Tray, $11/ day, Loot Rentals; Beaker Glass Pitcher, $5.95, and Trap Pitcher, $14.95, both CB2; Modern Gold Candlesticks, $3/ day, Loot Rentals; Gianna Dishes, $24.94-$29.95, CB2; Bloomingville Round Marble Cutting Boards, $33-$55, Hearth & Soul; Crinkle Pink and Gold Bowl, $6.95, CB2; Nostalgic Mini Ornaments $38/set of 20, Anthropologie. Treaty Oak Waterloo Old Yaupon Gin, $18.99, totalwine.com

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Whiskey

The water used in making whiskey is often considered the most important part. Clean and free of bad-tasting impurities is the goal, but Sean Foley of Nine Banded takes it a step further by personalizing his spirits with Texas spring water.“We fetch limestone-filtered water from a ranch in Mason every few weeks,” the distiller’s CEO says. “It gives our whiskey a smooth quality that people really enjoy.” FOOD PAIRING

Whiskey and cheese are a love match, but a pairing composed of all-Texas ingredients makes a party presentation even more memorable. Caldera España from Schertz’s River Whey Creamery is made with raw Jersey milk and smoked over pecan wood; serve with dried peaches, toasted pecans and mesquite honeycomb or orange-vanilla bean marmalade. Pass plates of simple, playful bites like Gruyère gougères, chicken-liver toasts and a riff on Angels on Horseback made with baconwrapped dates stuffed with mascarpone. Bourbon for dessert? Yes, please. Pair it with Blue Heron Farms cajeta dolloped atop local goat cheese gelato from Gelateria Gemelli, with a tuile or other crisp

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cookie on the side. For less fuss, pile maple-whiskey and Aztec chocolate chews from Wildflower Caramels or Srsly Chocolate’s Texas Mesquite bars on a delicate plate. Make your own brandied cherries for a luxe Manhattan garnish. Rinse the syrup from jarred Amarena or Luxardo maraschino cherries and soak them in cognac overnight. Store in an airtight container for up to one month. HOW TO SERVE

“The classic Old- Fashioned cocktail is always a great choice for over the holidays. We like ours Burnt Orange,” says Foley with a grin. He composes a signature Burnt Orange Old-Fashioned with 2 ounces Nine Banded Whiskey, 1/2 ounce simple syrup, 2 dashes orange bitters and 2 dashes aromatic bitters. For more of a tasting experience, Heather Greene, CEO of Provision Spirits and maker of Ben Milam and Milam & Greene whiskeys suggests a global whiskey bar for parties. “I buy three or four gorgeous bottles from Scotland, Ireland and Japan, as well as a domestic bourbon.” Greene suggests printing a card with tasting notes to accompany the curated whiskeys, and serving a couple contrasting cocktails.

Balance a boozy Manhattan or Old-Fashioned with a lighter, more refreshing highball (one part whiskey to two parts seltzer water such as Bubbs, a sustainable delivery service delivering Hill Country water in vintage glass bottles). Garnish with a lemon twist and serve in a Collins glass. DÉCOR From left: Drake Metallic Double Old-Fashioned Glasses, $11.95/each, Pacific Teak Wood Appetizer Bowl, $14.95, and Pacific Teak Wood Appetizer Plate, $14.95, all CB2. Nine Banded Whiskey, $24.99, totalwine.com For a complete list of provisions to make shopping easy, visit Tribeza.com.


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MY SHERO Goddess Dessert Plates, $60/each, ladoublej.com

The fun of receiving lasts a second, but the joy of giving is forever. A gallery of wondrous objects made with integrity and panache destined to make the heart sing this holiday season.

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DISCO QUEEN PERFECT HARMONY I-35 LC Custom Guitar, $6,150, collingsguitars.com

Magnetic Midnight ‘Starstruck’ Headpiece, $810, 1stdibs.com

HAUT E HIPPIE Tulum Gypset Book, $85, assouline.com tribeza.com

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AMERICAN DREAM Restored Grand Wagoneer, prices starting at $63,000, wagonmaster.com

FINE AND DANDY Midnight Mystic Hat, $1,250, nickfouquet.com

OUT OF T HIS WORLD Atmosphere Ring, Price Upon Request, solange.co.uk

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COLOR ME HAPPY Multi Crayons, $12, fredericksandmae.com


SINNER'S PRAYER Salvation Mountains Embroidered Cardigan, $3,695, alanui.it

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OVER T HE RAINBOW Nina Rainbow Bag, $595, leninestore.com

PEARL OF WISDOM Grace Blanc Hairpin, $490, sophiebillebrahe.com

NAT URAL WONDER Butterfly Block Puzzle, $93, thewoodenwagon.com

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HOT ST UF F Snake Embossed Boots, $587, paristexas.it

PRETTY IN PINK Faustine Coat, $331, standstudio.com

Visit Tribeza.com for a complete holiday gift guide including a range of items to flatter all budgets and personalities.

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FOOD + DRINK

GOAN PLACES Transport yourself to the coast of India with East Austin restaurant Vixen's Wedding, p. 90.

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KAREN'S PICK

Vixen’s Wedding A GOAN-INSPIRED MENU OF BRIGHT AND COMPLE X DISHES SHINES IN AN E XOTIC YET HOMEY E AST AUSTIN SPACE By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart WHEN IT COMES TO FOOD, I THINK I’M PRETTY SMART. BUT I FOUND

myself Googling almost everything about Vixen’s Wedding, starting with its quirky name. And it’s unfamiliar Goan cuisine. And its uncharted location in a new hotel. Yet I sensed that once I unraveled its mysteries, I’d like the place, mostly because it shares a lineage with Lenoir. And I love Lenoir. But first, I had to find the answers to the riddles. I discovered that the name, Vixen’s Wedding, is a Portuguese phrase describing a rainbowproducing sunshower, a unique and joyful phenomenon reflected in the restaurant’s food, which is inspired by Goa, a state on the southwestern coast of India and a former Portuguese colony. And the restaurant’s location, in the new boutique Arrive East Austin Hotel, wraps around a bustling corner of East 6th and Chicon, and thankfully has valet parking for those who don’t arrive via scooter. So if it all sounds pretty funky and fun, it is. Open since July, Vixen’s Wedding has truly created something unique in a town where carving a niche has become more and more challenging. And if anyone’s up to the

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task, it’s Vixen’s chef/partners and culinary super-couple, Todd Duplechan and Jessica Maher. Their beloved Lenoir continues to garner raves after eight solid years. For their second act, they’ve continued to champion local and sustainable foods, but this time taking inspiration from the Indian coast. Duplechan became enamored with Goan cuisine during one of his early cooking gigs up in New York and eventually travelled the region to explore its food stalls and spice farms first-hand. Goan food is a cultural mash-up of f lavors that are bright and flavorful and complex. The chili pepper is perhaps its most predominant ingredient, resulting in fiery, bold f lavors that Duplechan thought would translate well to Texan palates. Being on the coast, the Gaon diet is seafood centric, although meat and fowl make appearances, too. At Vixen’s Wedding, you can sample them all. For starters, the fresh fish ceviche is a dazzling combination of flavors and textures: sweet and sour; silky and crunchy. The pillowy rice cake Idli buns are stuffed with pork and served with a zingy chutney. And don’t miss the Smoky Beet Dosa, an outstanding beet trifecta that tastes and looks way better than it sounds: a beet-infused dosa pancake, accompanied by meaty smoked beets, beet marinated garnish, and dollops of lip-smacking curry aioli. Even the homemade breads are special, showcasing a rotating selection of seasonal dough like paratha f latbreads, poee wheat buns, and sourdough tinged with tumeric. Entrees include fresh fish crusted with crispy f lattened rice poha and served with charred squash and a zip of chilis. There’s also Pork Ribs Vindaloo, coated in subtle, complex spices and served with an ethereal coconut rice. If you’re dining with friends, go big with one of the large format entrees, like the whole roasted chicken, slathered in piquant peri-peri sauce and brought to the table on a platter with a knife for DIY

VIXEN’S WEDDING 1813 E. 6TH STREET 737-242-7555 VIXENSWEDDINGATX.COM

carving. If you’ve got room for dessert, enjoy a decadent slice of moist Coconut Milk Cake served a la mode with turmeric ice cream. Cocktails are tasty and clever, with names like Goan Places, a refreshing and aromatic concoction of white rum, lime, pineapple, and coconut water. The wine and beer list includes surprising selections like a sparkling rose from Portugal. And for non-alcoholic options, the tea offerings are terrific. Vi xen’s Wedd ing is a cha r ming a nd beautiful space, accented with oversized fabric chandeliers, macrame room dividers, and vibrant hand-painted murals. A welcoming L-shaped bar offers counter seating while the rest of the dining room is framed by soaring windows. It’s a colorful, fanciful restaurant that feels exotic, yet homey and not so mystifying after all.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises deli-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

cious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch,

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and soft

diner favorites. Order up the classics, including

and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is executed

roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

by the Stefano Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs

decadent milkshakes.

charcuterie board.

at more than 900 degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware,

34TH STREET CAFE

THE BREWER’S TABLE

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

CAFÉ JOSIE

This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great

at the brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

for weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

source the ingredients, which are utilized in both

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

the kitchen and the brewery to eliminate food

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

ASTI TRATTORIA

waste. The seasonally changing menu is unique

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

but provides options for even the pickiest of eaters.

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential

there is no shortage of cheese on this menu!

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor

them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-

and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

goat-cheese panna cotta.

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the

BAR CHI SUSHI

classic avocado toast is a must-try.

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

COMEDOR

A great place to stop before or after a night on the

501 Colorado St. | (512) 499 0977

town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2

Hiding in plain sight on one of downtown’s busiest

a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu

street corners, Comedor is a restaurant full of surprises.

features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls

Lauded chefs Philip Speer and Gabe Erales deliver a

under $10.

menu that is equally clever and unexpected, with contemporary cuisine riffs on Mexican culinary traditions.

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

EASY TIGER 709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972 Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts

locally sourced ingredients, served at communal

2330 W N Loop Blvd | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com

tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or

This Holiday season, give the gift of DELICIOUS

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

with a Fonda San Miguel Gift Card. Available in any

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

denomination at the Restaurant, or on our website

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

encourages sharing with small plates made from

at FondaSanMiguel.com.

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with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

EL ALMA

GRIZZELDA’S

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere

with unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as

between traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican

an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting

recipes, each fused with a range of f lavors and styles.

is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks

The attention to detail in each dish shines and the

outside for the everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

tortillas are made in-house daily.

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

We love this charming French-Vietnamese eatery

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the

with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi and sweet

Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio

tossed pizzas and incredible desserts alongside local-

bring comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin

ly sourced and seasonally inspired specials.

neighborhood favorite.

ÉPICERIE 2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

HANK’S 5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077 Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff

IRON CACTUS

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

Hank’s a favorite neighborhood joint. With happy

606 Trinity Street | (512) 472 9240 ironcactus.com

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

hour every day from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be

With amazing outdoor patio views, friendly service and

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop

choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma.

a lively full bar, Iron Cactus offers one of the best din-

in here for a bite on Sundays.

and a kid-friendly patio all work together to make

HILLSIDE FARMACY

ing experiences around. Leave your worries at the door and lose yourself in the comforts of the cactus.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner spe-

HOPFIELDS

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food

cials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beau-

HOME SLICE PIZZA

tiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

For pizza cravings head to Home Slice. Open until 3

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s pro-

a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping conve-

ITALIC

vides modern spins on American classics. Dig into

nience and stocked with classics like the Margherita

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with

as well as innovative pies like the White Clam.

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents

on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

cranberry-thyme cocktail.

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

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JEFFREY’S

LA BARBECUE

LE POLITIQUE

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin

This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously

Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville

barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as deli-

accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming

favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch

cious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary

marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern

service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere

Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free

f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patis-

that makes it an Austin staple.

beer and live music.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

LAS PALOMAS

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 |

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on

laspalomasrestaurant.com

fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican

one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy

America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge

family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t

in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

miss the margaritas.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

JUNE’S ALL DAY

LENOIR

LORO

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole

serious cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Le-

and Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a

favorites. Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas

noir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making

welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive in-

bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages

the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable.

sipping, noshing and lingering.

KEMURI TATSU-YA 2713 E. 2nd St. | (512) 893 5561 Kemuri Tatsu-Ya is a Japanese-Texan mash-up that injects seriously good food with a sense of humor. The East Austin joint features Asian-inspired smoked meats and seafood, along with yakitori, ramen, and izakaya classics meant for sharing. Drinks are also an integral part of the meal, so come thirsty.

Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM 1203 W. 6th S. | (512) 474 5107 Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Chef Ling and her team create sophisticated Chinese dishes that draw enthusiastic crowds day and night. Make sure to stop by during weekend brunch to taste the full mouthwatering dim sum menu.

serie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

door-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

UCHIKO

PICNIK 4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644 A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients.

VINAIGRETTE

4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

RED ASH ITALIA

The greatest stories are told with family and friends

303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906

over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between

just that, bringing nostalgic and classic Italian-

high-quality food and enticing ambiance. This Ital-

American cuisine to the heart of Austin. From

ian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

ROSEWOOD 1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205

inviting ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE 609 W. 6 St. (512) 542 3380 Owned by actress and Austin resident Sandra Bullock, Walton’s is a dreamy brick-walled bakery, deli and floral shop. Take some pastries home after indulging in gourmet sandwiches and fresh salads for lunch, or stay for the rotating dinner menu. Most importantly, make it before 2 p.m. to order the legendary biscuit sandwich served only during breakfast!

Housed in a historic East Side cottage, chef Jesse

TINY BOXWOODS

DeLeon pays outstanding homage to his South Texas

1503 W 35 St. (512) 220 0698

roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf Coast fish-

This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and

519 W. Oltorf S. | (512) 487 1569

ermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers. This

delicious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood.

Named one of the top-20 wine bars in America by

new spot is sure to quickly become a staple.

Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon

Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international

Provencal salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates.

SUERTE 1800 E. 6TH ST. | (512) 953 0092 Helmed by executive chef Fermín Núñez, Suerte was inspired by extensive travels through Central Mexico. Artisanal masa is the highlight, made from local heirloom corn and used in distinctive dishes rarely found on Austin menus. Order the delectable Suadero Tacos, perfect for sharing with friends.

WINEBELLY

The bistro maintains a local feel with its comfort-

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating. The restaurant, located in downtown’s Seaholm district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

able, laid-back interiors.

WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.

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A LOOK BEHIND Pictures of John and Charlotte Henderson through the ages.

LOVE AND HAPPINESS By Aaron Parsley

The holiday season is always an extra-special time for Austinites John and Charlotte Henderson, whose wedding anniversary falls between Thanksgiving and Christmas. But this year just might take the cake. The couple will celebrate 80 years since they tied the knot on December 15. And there’s the recent declaration by Guinness World Records that the Hendersons are the oldest living married couple in the world, with a combined age of 211 years (John is 106 and Charlotte is 105). The Hendersons, who met at the University of Texas in a zoology class in 1934 and wed five years later, say their favorite

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memory from the season comes from their 50th anniversary, which they celebrated with family at the Austin Country Club. “It was the coldest night,” John recalls. “I remember reading in the paper it was a record low temperature in Austin. They seated us by the fire, and we were the only customers there. The dinner and service were very good.” To couples snuggling by the fire this winter wondering how the world’s oldest couple makes their love last, the Hendersons share this simple advice: “Be good partners. Don’t try to overwhelm each other in any way. Give and take.”


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA December 2019 Issue  

The People Issue No. 220

TRIBEZA December 2019 Issue  

The People Issue No. 220

Profile for tribeza