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All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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we’ll toast to that over 40 wineries & tasting rooms | museums & historic sites | peaches & wildflowers | German heritage | golf sophisticated shopping | festivals & events | eclectic art galleries | cycling | Hill Country cuisine | live Texas music

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Visit our showroom today to make your dreams come to life. 9503 Research Blvd Austin, TX 78759 512.382.7939 KohlerSignatureStoreAustin.com

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| JULY 2019

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Jordan Hicks & Napoleon Professional Football Player and His Nulo Dog

the heart of 8 JULY 2019 |

Discover Austin’s Own Nulo Pet Food tribeza.com

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CONTENTS

JULY

Chris Sanders' family cabin, photographed by Ryann Ford.

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/ OUTDOORS

Hat Creek's "Big Hat," by Kathleen Pieratt.

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DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 16 Kristin’s Column p. 26

Dining Guide p. 118

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 30

FEATURES

Music Pick p. 31

Get Out p. 48

Event Pick p. 34 Community Profile p. 38

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Karen’s Pick p. 116

Tribeza Talk p. 28

Art Pick p. 32

Model Margo Whitley captured by Jackie Lee Young at Sno-Beach.

Travel Pick p. 110

Local Love p. 42 Community Pick p. 44 Style Profile p. 106

A Look Behind p. 122

Hot Child in the City p. 58 Where the Wild Things Are p. 68 Cabin in the Woods p. 76 ON THE COVER Sonny Guadarrama photographed by Matt Conant.


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EDITOR'S LETTER

Margaret Williams

A

ustin residents like to complain about the Texas heat, but I have a confession — I love it. I love the heat and everything that comes with it: daily swimming, Hill Country peach picking and lazy nights spent outdoors listening to live music. As a kid I loved walking into the baking summer heat after a freezing-cold postchurch lunch at Three Amigos (now Santa Rita). Between the huge ice waters and blasting air-conditioning, I always left freezing and ready for the sweet relief of a hot car. A sort of strange reversal of jumping into Barton Springs after a long run — another thing I love. This issue celebrates being outdoors, and no time of year is better for fullon appreciation than summer. We find ways to wring every last drop out of

12 JULY 2019 |

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these long days. In fact, as I type this I am plotting how to best take advantage of the upcoming longest day of the year. Canoe on Lady Bird Lake (on my kids’ summer bucket list)? Drive out to the Blue Hole in Wimberley? Get a sitter so my husband and I can make our way over to Stubb’s or Mohawk? Scratch the sitter, pour ourselves some strong margaritas (after a healthy spraying of insect repellent) and kick it on the back porch? Let’s do it all. We took the same approach here. The following pages are chock-full of all our favorite people, places and food that celebrate or personify the outdoors. Whether it’s the Austinites who have made it their business to spend time outside, in Pam LeBlanc’s “Get Out”; or the founders of Explore Ranches (“Where the Wild Things Are”), who “want to get more people to experience the wilds of Texas”; or Chris Sanders’ stunning redo of his family cabin (“Cabin in the Woods”), this month has it all. Oh, and while we were at it, we decided to create the summer fashion editorial of our dreams. Celine and Sno-Beach. Yes, please. Get out there, y’all.

P O R T R A I T B Y K AT H L E E N P I E R AT T

margaret@tribeza.com


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OUR CLOSINGS GET YOU MOVING

EXCELLENCE IS HERITAGE | THREE OFFICES TO SERVE YOU

TARRYTOWN | ROLLINGWOOD | DOWNTOWN


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

J U LY 2 01 9

18 YEARS

N O. 2 1 5

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVENTS MANAGER

Claire Schaper

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

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PHOTOGR APHERS

Warren Chang Matt Conant Ryann Ford Jonathan Garza Kevin Greenblatt Jessica Pages Kathleen Pieratt Taylor Prinsen Erin Reas Breezy Ritter Jonathan Vail Jackie Lee Young ILLUSTR ATOR

Jessica Fontenot

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


H UN T I NG I N TH E HILL CO UNT RY

P H OTO G R A P H B Y H A R P E R S M I T H


SOCIAL HOUR

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TASTE OF MEXICO On May 1, Austin’s leading Mexican culinaryarts festival returned to Brazos Hall. MexicArte Museum’s annual Taste of Mexico brought together more than 50 top Austin restaurants and beverage purveyors with a focus on the Puebla influence in Mexican cuisine. Proceeds benefited the museum’s art-education efforts, like the nationally recognized Screen It! program, which introduces youth to screen-printing techniques and careers in the art field.

SOMOS AUSTIN

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More than 200 people attended Somos Austin on May 2 at AFS Cinema. The event raised more than $170,000 for the Hispanic Impact Fund at Austin Community Foundation, which supports the economic security and advancement of Hispanics in Central Texas. The highlight of the event was The Latino Monologues, a collection of personal stories shared by Latino leaders in Central Texas.

KAPPA SETTINGS PREVIEW PARTY

TASTE OF MEXICO: 1. Ann McEldowney & Charles Cresswell 2. Kayhan Ahmadi, George Elliman & Brad Lawler 3. Samantha McWilliams & Emily Donohoo SOMOS AUSTIN: 4. Xochi Solis 5. Mike Nellis, Yvette Ruiz, Susan Espinoza & Sergio Rodriguez 6. Cristina Tzintzún KAPPA SETTINGS PREVIEW PARTY: 7. Lela Rose, Sam Masters, Susie Hunter & Allie Horne 8. Trisha Bridges 9. Beth Voorhees, Patty Loose & Amy Sutton

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TA S T E O F M E X I CO P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TAY LO R P R I N S E N

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Austin Alumnae Association celebrated Austin’s elite designers at Kappa Settings on May 8. Guests enjoyed spectacular tablescapes as well as a talk by fashion designer and keynote speaker Lela Rose. All proceeds went toward CASA of Travis County, The Refuge, LifeWorks and The Beyond Batten Disease Foundation.


Rachel Kay, Applebox Imaging


SOCIAL HOUR

FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN Friends of the Children Austin hosted its inaugural Dinner With Friends at Mattie’s on May 9. Nearly 200 guests enjoyed a spring garden party-themed evening with drinks, dinner, music, programming and a live auction. The event raised more than $474,000, furthering the organization’s mission of breaking the cycle of generational poverty through professional mentorship for the most vulnerable children in Austin.

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MOODY FOUNDATION DAY On May 9, The Moody Foundation commemorated its more than $2 million grant to rehabilitate and restore the Barton Springs bathhouse. Committed to investing in Austin’s natural spaces, the organization aims to build a bigger, better and greener future for Texas. During the celebration, Mayor Steve Adler proclaimed May 9 Moody Foundation Day.

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AIA DESIGN AWARDS

FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN: 1. Nancy Pollard 2. Manuel Cantu, Christian Alvarado, Daisy Woods & Leenayvia Rodriguez 3. Ali Carr & Mia Washington MOODY FOUNDATION DAY: 4. Kathie Tovo, Luci Baines Johnson, Alison Alter & Leslie Pool 5. Ann Phipps & Michael Cannatti 6. Mayor Steve Adler & Ross Moody AIA DESIGN AWARDS: 7. John Vesel, Ed Richardson, April Clark & Antonio Medina 8. Wendy Dunnam Tita & Ingrid Spencer 9. Denisse Valle Hudock, Murray Legge & Sofia Razzaque

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TAY LO R P R I N S E N A N D AT E L I E R W O N G

On May 9, the Austin Chapter of the American Institute of Architects gathered community leaders and architecture enthusiasts at Fair Market to recognize outstanding design alongside those leading the charge to improve Austin’s built environment. Esteemed jurors selected recipients excelling in architectural design, technical ability and social impact. The award-winning projects were exhibited at the Austin Central Library, where the public voted for their favorite project of the year.


compass.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

3208 Stratford Hills Lane | $7,500,000

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726 Bermuda Street | $1,895,000 4 Cicero Lane | $1,995,000 Pending

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512.289.6300 chris.long@compass.com chrislongaustin.com

Pending tribeza.com

| JULY 2019

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SOCIAL HOUR

PARAMOUNT THEATRE ANNIVERSARY GALA The Paramount Theatre and friends toasted to the historic theater’s 104th anniversary at the 2019 anniversary gala on May 11. The 1960s-themed bash brought together riotous music, incredible auction items, delicious food and amazing community support. Congress Avenue was converted into a dinner-dance party featuring musical icons The B-52s, making for an unforgettable night.

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STILL AUSTIN WHISKEY BOURBON RELEASE Still Austin Whiskey Co. hosted a bourbon release party on May 11 at the South Austin distillery highlighting its first high-rye bourbon whiskey, available only in the Still Austin tasting room and select Austin-area locations. Party-goers were treated to a buildyour-own-cocktail station, a fantastic lineup of local vendors, live music, a photo bus and an airbrush tattoo station.

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AHA HEART BALL

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PARAMOUNT THEATRE ANNIVERSARY GALA: 1. Bryn Williams, Elena Garcia Slaton & Melissa Swerdfeger 2. Mafalda Tan & Jeff Straathoff 3. Karen & Brian Burgess STILL AUSTIN WHISKEY BOURBON RELEASE: 4. Carolyn Baron, Andrew Baron & Kevin Lawson 5. Brittni Sherwood & Ross Puryear 6. Sharon & Malik Crowdern 7. Stephanie Melchor & David Giles AHA HEART BALL: 8. Bobby Jenkins, Sylvia & Jeff Thomas 9. Bobby Dillard 10. David Huffstutler, Sarah Huffstutler, Easton Corbin & Lady Huffstutler

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B E L L S & W H I S T L E S P H OTO G R A P H Y A N D J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

On May 11, the American Heart Association held its annual Heart Ball at the JW Marriott to celebrate the organization’s efforts to build a foundation of health in the community and ensure that everyone lives a longer, healthier life. Supporters enjoyed a cocktail reception and dinner, an Open Your Heart moment, an exciting live auction and a musical performance by Easton Corbin.


© Jonathon Jackson

Austin City Limits Live at The Moody Theater ACL Live is home to the acclaimed KLRU-TV produced PBS series, “Austin City Limits” the longest running music series in American television history and Austin’s premier destination for live performances. Nestled next to the W Austin Hotel, ACL Live is part of Block 21, the first mixed-occupancy building of its type in the world to be LEED certified. LEED is a mark of excellence developed by the U.S. Green Building Council acknowledging measurable performance attributes that benefit human and environmental health.

Visit www.acl-live.com for information on upcoming performances and private event opportunities. © Alison Narro

A PR O PE RTY BY:


SOCIAL HOUR

SUSAN SCAFATI SOLO EXHIBITION RECEPTION On May 17, the Austin Central Library presented “If a Tree Falls…,” a solo exhibition by American conceptual artist Susan Scafati. Spanning three floors, the exhibition featured artworks that expand on Scafati’s exploration of the ways individual versus collective identities are constructed. On display through next year, the mixed-media installation in the thirdand fourth-floor windows reimagines our constructed landscape as a suspended spectrum of everyday urban forms in flux.

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TRIBEZA’S NOURISH RETREAT Tribeza held its first-ever Nourish Retreat on May 19 at Springdale Station. Presented by Equinox, the daylong event included a host of treats and activities like a morning yoga class, special pop-ups, a scrumptious lunch from ATX Food Co. and a fun selection of arts and wellness workshops by Atelier Dojo, Roux Saint James and Equinox. After a mixology lesson with Desert Door Texas Sotol, guests left feeling refreshed and rejuvenated.

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HABITAT FOR HUMANITY BLUEPRINTS AND BLUE JEANS

SUSAN SCAFATI SOLO EXHIBITION RECEPTION: 1. Adam Best & Jenny Hoger 2. Ann Blackshaw & Lily Blackshaw 3. Tess Paoletta & Callum O’Donnell TRIBEZA’S NOURISH RETREAT: 4. Brittney Williams & Jasmin Jones 5. Samantha Ehlinger & Shelly Crossland 6. Viviene Ngo & Moshmee Kalamkar 7. Elizabeth Simmons, Lizzy Simmons & Monica Ruiz-Olloqui & Katie Owen HABITAT FOR HUMANITY BLUEPRINTS AND BLUE JEANS: 8. Chris Engen & Cameron Sykes 9. Patricia Mitchell & Lisa Hugman

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y E R I N R E A S A N D H O L LY CO WA R T

On May 22, Austin Habitat for Humanity put on its annual Blueprints and Blue Jeans event. Attendees received a first look at Austin Habitat’s next level of innovation, an exciting six-story development, known as 4th & Onion. Designed by architecture firm Page, this building will be one of the largest multifamily developments built by any Habitat affiliate in the world.


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SOCIAL HOUR

THE COMMUNE GRAND-OPENING The Commune celebrated its grand opening on June 1 at the newly opened creative coworking and event space on North Loop. Guests enjoyed local fare from Contigo Catering and Gati ice cream as well as Goodnight Loving Vodka, Susto Mezcal and Brewtorium beer. Mood by Moss kept it colorful with aura portraits, while DJ Ella Ella spun fresh beats.

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ADDERLEY SCHOOL RED CARPET On June 1, the Adderley School held a VIP red carpet event with Jack Dylan Grazer, the breakout teen star of “IT” and DC Comics’ superhero film “Shazam!” Grazer, an Adderley school alum, presented two outstanding students with the "Jack Dylan Grazer Scholarship Award of Excellence” after the school's production of “West Side Story.”

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THE COMMUNE GRAND-OPENING: 1. Zanny Cox, Lauren Cunningham & Ransom Ashley 2. Claire Zinnecker, Emily Leach & Kate Weaver 3. Briana Lang & Liana Veksler 4. Emily Kobroff & Matt Maa 5. Joey & Mari Davi ADDERLEY SCHOOL RED CARPET: 6. Jack Dylan Grazer, Janet Adderley & Stone Mountain 7. Pete & Karen Peterson 8. Robert & Sarah Carrasco 9. Khris & Vanessa Ramdeen

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Elegant Estate in Judges Hill | 903 W 18th Street, 78701 Shown by appointment only www.903W18th.com

REALTORÂŽ 512.351.5083 chelsea.kumler@compass.com

compass.com

4 BD, 5 BA Estate | 5,017 SF 2 BD, 2 BA Guest Home | 1,080 SF Studio Apartment | 766 SF

Chelsea Kumler

Bassett Ranch | 3450 Pursley Road, 78620 4 BD, 5.5 BA Estate | 5,948 SF 3 BD, 2 BA Guest House | 2,300 SF 1 BD, 1 BA Treehouse Bungalow & Man Cave

Bassett Ranch 226.9 Acres Shown by appointment only www.3450pursleyroad.com www3450pursleyroad.com

Heather Witbeck REALTORÂŽ GRI, CCS 512.920.2521 heather.witbeck@compass.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

tribeza.com

| JULY 2019

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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

OUTSIDE MYSELF

By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Jessica Fontenot

26 JULY 2019 |

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I

H AV E N E V E R B E E N A GY M G I R L . Don’t get me wrong; I’ll go. I know it’s good for me. We all need strong bones, especially as we get older, and it’s not a bad thing to postpone bingo arms (aka that aging tricep wing). I can enjoy a spin class, especially if my friend Maria is teaching. It’s not that I mind the weights or the music or the people, per se. It’s just that I associate exercise with fresh air and natural light. To me, exercise is fun — or should be. It’s the closest thing to “play” we get as grown-ass people. It’s like the difference between the playground versus indoor recess for my inner child — no contest. I love the way the breeze hits my face, the way the humidity makes me sweat and the way the sunlight filters through the trees on the greenbelt or along the lake. I love the packs of UT athletes and runners training with Gilbert, the way they pass by in a fit stampede, a rush of energy that creates its own current. You can feel it, electric on your skin. I love the way the sunlight looks different depending on the time of year, varying degrees of gold. I love to inhale the unmistakable scent of rain, and the way each season carries a smell — cut grass, pollen, decaying leaves, sunscreen by the rowing dock. I like the way it feels different on a weekday or a weekend, at the dark crack of dawn or postschool-drop-off hour, the way it’s a different community depending on the time of day. It can be Type A runners hastily glancing down at beeping Garmins, young parents pushing baby joggers, families riding bikes or walking their dog, or older women wearing capris and carrying Starbucks, walking and cackling with their friends — reminding me that life outside at any age is always good. I love how you can experience a 20-degree temperature change on a run in Texas. Or feel the wind picking up and the crackling atmospheric anxiety of a storm brewing. There is nothing like watching the panorama of clouds turning ominous and lightning streaks like a line graph across the darkened sky while hurrying back to your car. I love the little-known fact that Lady Bird Lake can get white caps, if you are crazy enough to be out there to witness them. Or the way a f lood can leave tiny fish and frogs strewn across the gushy wet trail. My friend Paige threw handfuls

of them back into the river very early one morning. I didn’t even try to tell her it wasn’t worth it, that she wasn’t making an impact. Because I knew she would tell me it mattered to that one, and she was right. My favorite gift from Paige is time, and sometimes we make an AllDay Run. It means run all day, from school drop-off to pickup (I have no one to drive anymore, but she does), and stop for food along the way. We have run to Tacodeli for tacos, even run through the drive-through at P. Terry’s for a cheeseburger and a Coke, which we inhaled greedily and kept on going. Please don’t get the idea we are in a rush. We are noodling through town, through neighborhoods and the UT campus and on the East Side. We are enjoying each other, savoring having time to finish conversation threads and knit them together. We can run in silence, we can talk for hours. It’s all good, simply because it’s all good. In our culture, we get so stuck. Stuck to our jobs, our responsibilities, our roles and relationships, our schedules, our computers, our social media, our freaking phones. We get so stuck on our have-tos that we forget our get-tos. We forget to go play. We forget what we love to do. We do so much and so often that we forget to be. We forget that being outside is not a luxury; it’s a necessity of being human. As a new therapist, I watch my supervisor take her adolescent clients outside. They take off their shoes together and walk barefoot in the grass, under the trees, and scrunch their toes in the dirt. This used to be a daily part of childhood. Now it’s called grounding, and it’s considered therapeutic. Kids aren’t the only ones who don’t go outside enough anymore. They aren’t the only ones anxiety-ridden, depressed, stressed and obsessed with the life that lives inside their phone. We wonder why we feel so good on vacation. Maybe it’s not so much being away, as it is being outside? Breakfast outside, beach walks, mountain hikes, fresh air, taking in a sunset or simply taking our time. We wonder why we sleep so much better or feel so deeply connected with our partner, or our family. Being outside helps us to feel connected on the inside. Outside is not a time, space or activity reserved for kids, playgrounds, outdoorsmen, athletes, weekends or vacations. Time in nature is necessary. Cultivate it. Claim it. In doing so, we cultivate and reclaim ourselves.

“We get so stuck on our have-tos that we forget our get-tos. We forget to go play. We forget what we love to do. We do so much and so often that we forget to be.”

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| JULY 2019

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Summer SWEETS

Not that you need any additional reason to enjoy a delicious summer treat (isn’t the heat enough?), but July 21 is National Ice Cream Day.

Local sweet-treats purveyor Lick is celebrating by introducing vegan ice cream sandwiches. Embrace the holiday with a thick layer of

vanilla coconut milk ice cream on two gluten-free chocolate cookies. ILIKELICK.COM

BOTTOMS up

TRIBEZ A AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN

Feel like you’re having a Caribbean getaway without leaving downtown. Opened in May, the Lost Lei is serving up tiki drinks with aplomb — and a fair amount of rum. Opt for one of a dozen classic cocktails or try a Polynesian Retreat, Fog Cutter or El Diablo (yes, it contains tequila) in festive glassware. LOSTLEIAUSTIN.COM

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“I’m pretty privileged, because I get a front-row seat to see two bands a week of my choice,” David Arnsberger explains. As the host of “Texas Radio Live,” on Sun Radio, Arnsberger runs a live show every Wednesday night in the courtyard of Güero’s Taco Bar on South Congress. “We’re in our eighth year now, and we wanted to have a show where we could feature not only some of the best talent in Texas, but also focus on the depth of talent we have in the Austin area,” Arnsberger says. Robert Earl Keen and Ray Benson have graced the oak garden stage, with fans enjoying a drink in the shade or listening online. “We’ve got listeners in at least 20 different countries that we know of, all across the world,” Arnsberger says, “and that’s pretty cool.” SUNRADIO.COM JULY 2019 | tribeza.com

r

omes the C S e UN

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By Nicole Beckley

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TO N Y S M I T H , A N N I E R AY

TALK


GET on BOARD After Tony Smith built a wooden canoe as a personal project, he wanted to build something else. He decided on a standup paddleboard, setting the course for what would ultimately become Jarvis Boards. Today the company’s surfboards and paddleboards are custom-built by hand, with inlaid designs created using different woods, including cherry, maple and bubinga, and finished with a recycled resin. The beautiful paddleboards weigh between 23 and 28 pounds, with two styles available, perfect for floating on Lady Bird Lake. JARVISBOARDS.COM

up CYCLING Since 1997, Austin’s Yellow Bike Project has been a resource for bicycle enthusiasts, and those who want to be. Through the project’s regular hands-on community workshops, kids and adults can learn the ins and outs of bike maintenance and repair. Bicycles donated to the nonprofit get refurbished and given away to partner organizations like Caritas, Refugee Services of Texas and many others. During the day, the storefront sells frames, parts and used bicycles to keep its programs running. Cyclists can also pick up a City of Austin bike map, which highlights comfortable bike-friendly routes around town. From YBP’s East Austin outpost, riders can take the Southern Walnut Creek Trail, a protected path that extends all the way to Manor Road. AUSTINYELLOWBIKE.ORG

Well-Suited “I feel like every woman can feel beautiful no matter what age they are; they don’t have to wear a shirt on top of a bikini, they don’t have to wear a one-piece that’s just a basic stitch and style,” says JodiLeigh Fetterolf. After moving from London to Austin in 2015, Fetterolf wanted to follow her fashion-forward impulses. She started Millie Mayfield, bringing a love of floral patterns and ’40s-style cuts to swimwear. The online shop launched in March. “A lot of the cuts we have are high-waisted,” Fetterolf says. “It covers the right places and makes you feel more confident.” MILLIEMAYFIELD.COM tribeza.com

| JULY 2019

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment THE PETERSON BROTHERS’ PRE-FOURTH OF JULY BASH July 3 Antone’s Nightclub YEASAYER July 4 The Mohawk

TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS & ROBERT EARL KEEN July 12 & 13 Whitewater Amphitheater MUSIC IN THE SQUARE July 12 – 26 Downtown Georgetown BLACK JOE LEWIS W/ EMILY WOLFE July 13 The Mohawk

DEVIN THE DUDE July 5 Antone’s Nightclub

RECKLESS KELLY July 13 Antone’s Nightclub

YOUNG THE GIANT & FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS July 5 Whitewater Amphitheater

AUSTIN SYMPHONY CONCERTS IN THE PARK July 14 – August 25 Long Center

CHICAGO July 6 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

PANTEÓN ROCOCÓ July 16 Emo’s Austin

MISS LAVELLE WHITE’S 90TH BIRTHDAY BASH July 7 Antone’s Nightclub

BLUES ON THE GREEN July 17 Zilker Park

NEW FOUND GLORY July 9 Emo’s Austin

BLACK FRET SUMMER SESSIONS July 19 Long Center

SANTANA W/ THE DOOBIE BROTHERS July 9 Austin360 Amphitheater

RANDY ROGERS & WADE BOWEN July 19 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre

THE HEAD & THE HEART July 9 & 10 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

OLD 97’S July 20 Stubb’s BBQ

REEL BIG FISH July 10 Emo’s Austin

FLOAT FEST July 20 & 21 Gonzales, TX

KIRK FRANKLIN July 11 Paramount Theatre

MAN MAN W/ REBECCA BLACK July 23 The Mohawk

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RÜFÜS DU SOL July 25 & 26 ACL Live at The Moody Theater TAMECA JONES July 26 Antone’s Nightclub AUGUST BURNS RED July 27 Emo’s Austin SLIGHTLY STOOPID July 27 Whitewater Amphitheater TRACY LAWRENCE July 27 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre ALICE COOPER & HALESTORM July 29 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

SUMMER CLASSIC FILM SERIES

Through July 30 Paramount Theatre

MOVIES IN THE EAST: JURASSIC WORLD

July 5 Bryant Park

MOVIES IN THE PARK: SPACE JAM

July 11 Martin Middle School Fields SUMMER CINEMA: DONNIE DARKO

July 11 Republic Square Park

NAPOLEON DYNAMITE SCREENING & CONVERSATION

July 13 Paramount Theatre

POOLSIDE CINEMA: THE GETAWAY

July 16 The LINE Hotel

FRIDAY NIGHT FLIX: GREASE

BRUNCH ON THE LAWN July 21 and August 25 Hotel Ella Enjoy a full Texan buffet, lawn games and live music at Hotel Ella's Brunch on the Lawn. Brunch is available from 10am-3pm with music by David McD starting at 11am. Tickets include brunch, activities and complimentary valet. $40 for adults (ages 12+), $15 for children. Reservations recommended (hotelella. com/goodalls) with walk-ins welcome to capacity.

THEATER

FILM

July 19 Lone Star Court

GREEN SCREEN FILM SERIES

July 19 & 26 The Contemporary - Laguna Gloria MOVIES IN THE EAST: A DOG’S WAY HOME

July 19 Bryant Park

MOVIES IN THE PARK: THE ROAD TO EL DORADO

July 25 Dick Nichols Park

THE LEGEND OF GEORGIA MCBRIDE

Through July 7 City Theatre Austin

IMMORTAL LONGINGS

Through July 14 ZACH Theatre DEATH TAX

Through July 27 Hyde Park Theatre HOTTER THAN HELL BURLESQUE

July 6 Stateside at the Paramount THE TEMPEST

July 11 – 21 City Theatre Company DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID

July 12 – August 17 Zilker HIllside Theater

SUMMER STOCK AUSTIN

July 19 – August 10 Long Center

2019 CLASSIC GAME FEST

July 27 & 28 Palmer Events Center ANN

July 31 – September 8 ZACH Theatre

COMEDY LADY MACBETH AND HER PAL MEGAN

Through July 6 Santa Cruz Theater

DRY BAR COMEDY

July 17 Cap City Comedy Club

P H OTO G R A P H B Y N E I L K R U G

MUSIC


STEVE TREVINO

July 18 – 20 Cap City Comedy Club CELESTE BARBER

July 20 Paramount Theatre DESUS & MERO

July 20 ACL Live at The Moody Theater THE TRY GUYS

July 20 Bass Concert Hall JB SMOOVE

July 25 Paramount Theatre

OTHER H-E-B AUSTIN SYMPHONY JULY 4TH CONCERT & FIREWORKS

July 4 Vic Mathias Shores

JULY FOURTH FRONTIER DAYS CELEBRATION

July 4 Old Settlers Park

WILLIE NELSON’S 4TH OF JULY PICNIC

July 4 Austin360 Amphitheater

2019 OITA JAPAN FESTIVAL

FAMILY ONCE UPON A WHA A A?!

June 1 – 30 Austin Scottish Rite Theater AUSTIN SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S DAY ART PARK July 10 – 24 Austin Central Library

PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT July 12 Thinkery FAMILY DAY July 14 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden SUMMER FAMILY FILM SERIES July 20 Bullock Texas State History Museum SUMMER STOCK JUNIOR MUSICAL THEATRE DAY CAMP July 30 & 31 Long Center

July 13 Asian American Resource Center

BE THE CHANGE CONFERENCE

July 15 – 17 Huston-Tillotson University RHYTHM ON STAGE

July 18 Long Center

12TH & CHICON: ALLEY BEAUTIFICATION & SOCIAL

July 20 The Station Recovery Community Center COLSON WHITEHEAD

July 23 First Baptist Church of Austin B SCENE: A LOVE SUPREME

July 26 Blanton Museum of Art LADY BIRD DAY

July 27 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center QUESOFF

July 27 Mohawk Austin

MUSIC PICK

Beck and Cage the Elephant By Holly Cowart AUSTIN360 AMPHITHEATER, JULY 26

Mark your calendars, Austin. Trailblazing alternative groups and Austin City Limits alumni Beck and Cage the Elephant have united for a two-headliner-inone kind of tour. Cage the Elephant, whose self-titled debut arrived in 2008, have an instantly recognizable sound. They represent modern-day rock at its best, thanks in part to the authenticity they strive for within their music and lead singer Matt Shultz’s emotionally raw renditions. Although they have faced growing pains and tumultuous times, they have continually found ways to reinvent themselves, expanding the boundaries of what defines them. They recently returned to the scene with “Social Cues” in April, with one track featuring none other than tourmate Beck. Beck is the multigenre, multiplatinum artist whose critically acclaimed sound has for decades put him at the forefront of a category all his own. Like a kaleidoscope, his songs are a fusion of styles, whimsically shifting into an imaginative musical collage. He holds an extensive list of both instrumental abilities and guest features that have amounted to an impressive body of work spanning 13 studio albums. The cherry on top? He also puts on one hell of a show. On July 26, catch them together on the Austin360 Amphitheater stage at Circuit of the Americas for a night well spent under the stars. As if the lineup couldn’t get any better, they’ll be joined by rising sibling duo Wild Belle and Austin’s own, Spoon. tribeza.com

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts Through July 6 MASS Gallery

METROMORPHOSIS

Through July 13 Davis Gallery

ABRAHAM CRUZVILLEGAS: HI, HOW ARE YOU, GONZO?

Through July 14 The Contemporary - Jones Center THE RISE OF EVERYDAY DESIGN

Through July 14 Harry Ransom Center

CREATIVE CURRENTS

Through July 22 Link & Pin Gallery

ART PICK

JENNIFER DATCHUK

“Truth Before Flowers,” Jennifer Ling Datchuk By Holly Cowart WOMEN & THEIR WORK, THROUGH JULY 25

Identity is a tangled web. Countless factors play a role in determining how we label ourselves, and even then it can be vastly different from how others perceive us. One artist attempting to unravel these external influences is ceramicist Jennifer Ling Datchuk. Datchuk was born in Ohio to a father whose parents immigrated from Russia and a Chinese immigrant mother, and her work often dissects her own complex relationship with labels. Growing up, she found it extremely difficult to fit in, simultaneously a part of and apart from her intersecting identities. She became accustomed to people asking her, “What are you?” finding they were rarely content with her answer. The sculptor, now based in San Antonio, explores this personal dichotomy in her latest exhibition, “Truth Before Flowers,” on display at Women & Their Work through July 25. Combining porcelain, hair and typical Chinese patterning, she breaks down how physical appearance, generalized stereotypes and cultural routines are created in an attempt to categorize both the self and others. On top of genealogy, the materials further tackle the expectations placed throughout history on women to fit into an exclusionary, unattainable idea of perfection. As Datchuk’s compositions pull at the thread of what is socially accepted, she shines a light on the beautiful multitudes we all contain within us, celebrating the undefined.

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Through July 25 Women & Their Work

CONSTANT ESCAPE

MEENA MATOCHA

Through August 4 Atelier 1205

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

July 6 & 13 Cloud Tree Studios & Gallery COFFEE CHAT: REBECCA GOMEZ

July 11 Big Medium Gallery

MEET HER HANDS: BIG CHICKEN & BABY BIRD

July 11 Elisabet Ney Museum

COWBOYS IN SPACE & FANTASTIC WORLDS

July 13 – December 1 Bullock Texas State History Museum ELIZABETH CHILES: ON WATER

July 16 – August 19 Central Library Central Gallery

Through July 27 George Washington Carver Museum

CERAMICS 101

MISCELLANEA

CONTRAST FILM FESTIVAL

Through July 27 Wally Workman Gallery RE-MEMBERING IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE LIVING

Through July 27 George Washington Carver Museum VISUAL ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Through July 27 Dougherty Arts Center SUMMER OF DISNEY

Through July 28 Ao5 Gallery

July 17 Broad Studios

July 18 – 21 AFS Cinema

COOL SUMMER NIGHTS 2019: TIME

July 19 Bullock Texas State History Museum CIRCADIAN BUZZ

July 20 – August 31 Davis Gallery

LILY COX-RICHARD

July 27 – December 29 Blanton Museum of Art

J E N N I F E R L I N G DATC H U K , O N E TO U G H B I TC H , 2 019, P H OTO G R A P H O F S L I P C A S T P O R C E L A I N S H A R D S , C H I N A PA I N T S , G O L D L E A F.

A LITTLE ACCIDENT, LIKE ANY OTHER


ELI HALPIN GALLERY Gift Shop & Art Studio


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

Jaws on the Water By Holly Cowart VOLENTE BEACH RESORT & WATERPARK, JULY 13 – AUGUST 17

Picture this: The sun has slowly finished setting and you’re snug in your inner tube, drink in hand. Your feet are swaying in the deep, dark waters when you hear it — those two simple yet menacing notes rapidly building speed signaling the approach of something sinister. Just as you feel something brush past your leg, the world’s most notorious great white shark bursts onto the screen. It’s OK if you scream, we won’t judge. The 1975 blockbuster film that terrified a generation of beach-goers with Steven Spielberg’s tremendous mechanical monster can now be relived in a brand-new way. Hosted at Volente Beach Resort & Waterpark on Lake Travis and presented by Alamo Drafthouse’s Rolling Roadshow, the immersive screening of “Jaws” will take place every Saturday through August 17. Before settling in for the movie, visitors can partake in a full-on shark celebration (costumes? Check.) while spending time cooling off thanks to the park’s private beach, pools and waterslides. The evening will also contain multiple pop-up bars along the shore, scuba divers lurking below and a fiery finale, making this one-of-a-kind, spine-tingling viewing experience the ultimate summer event. Who needs Shark Week? We’ll see you on the water.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y R E N E L L M E D R A N O

MUSEUMS


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8–5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu-Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com

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BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium

CAMIBAart 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery

CO-LAB PROJECTS 1023 Springdale Rd., Ste. 1B (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: F-Su 12–4 linkpinart.com

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com

PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com THE TWYLA GALLERY 209 W. 9th St., #200 (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 sites.utexas.edu/utvac

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com

KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


WE’RE ON THE ROADS AGAIN! Austin Public Works will be improving more than 500 streets this summer. Helpful tips: • Loose rock is common and takes time to fully settle • Avoid sharp turning and hard breaking to prevent spreading rock • Park vehicles away from streets for two days Visit austintexas.gov/streetmaintenance to see if your street is scheduled to be resurfaced.

WWG

Wa l ly W or k m a n Ga l lery

Jam es A n d rew Sm i t h , Mar yBeth K araus, Scott Ki ch e 1 202 West 6th Street Aust in, Tex as 78703 wal ly workmangal ler y.co m 512.472.7428


COMMUNITY PROFILE

Listening In: Filmmakers Ben Masters and David Modigliani on sandlot baseball, turning Texas stereotypes on their head and humanizing politics By Margaret Williams Photographs by Jessica Pages with assistance from Katie Leacroy

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B

en Ma st er s a nd Dav id Modigliani arrive at The Long Time, home of the Texas Playboys, a sandlot baseball team, on one of those perfect spring days. It’s been just a few weeks since both directors’ documentary films premiered at South by Southwest. Masters’ “The River and the Wall” won the Louis Black Lone Star Award, and Modigliani’s “Running With Beto” was a recipient of an Audience Award, recognition that caps a wild couple of years for the two filmmakers. In December 2017, Masters, along with Austin Alvarado, Filipe DeAndrade, Jay Kleberg and Heather Mackey, set out to document how the president’s proposed border wall would affect Texas’ western borderlands. Their three-month journey, which started in El Paso and ended in the Gulf of Mexico, saw the friends traversing the Rio Grande via mountain bike, horse and canoe, and the result is a documentary equal parts wild and hilarious. Interviews with former congressman (and current presidential candidate) Beto O’Rourke, Congressman Will Hurd and Dr. Louis Harveson of Sul Ross State University are interspersed throughout to provide details on the larger political and historical context of the Texas-Mexico border. Modigliani f irst met O’Rourke playing baseball for the Playboys in April 2017 — O’Rourke was on the opposing team and had just announced his run to unseat incumbent senator Ted Cruz — and the filmmaker, whose past feature documentaries “Crawford” and “61 Bullets” delve into the complex human side of politics, was impressed with O’Rourke’s energy and campaign style. The two stayed in touch, and that fall, Modigliani was granted

full access to trail O’Rourke, his staff and his family for the final year of his campaign. The intimate and up-close results — thanks in large part to the trust O’Rourke and his wife, Amy, placed in Modigliani and his team — capture the excitement, exhaustion and emotion of a campaign that Texas hasn’t seen since the likes of Lyndon Baines Johnson. Despite the many ways in which their work overlaps, Masters and Modigliani are meeting for the first time. The two embrace, with Masters ready to get down to brass tacks. Take it away, gentlemen.

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Masters and Modigliani talk documentary filmmaking on the bleachers of The Long Time.

BEN MASTERS: So what’s your connection to this place [gestures to the surrounding field]? DAVID MODIGLIANI: I’m a founding member of the Texas Playboys. We started in 2006. Jack Sanders owns the property and is the founder. It is a special place. BM: And you first met Beto here? DM: Yes, a while back, the Playboys had barnstormed El Paso to play Los Diablitos. I missed that trip, but they came to play us in April of 2017. They had this lanky center fielder with a name I hadn’t heard before who happened to be a U.S. congressman. He had just announced that he was running for Senate. I was playing first

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base. He got a single, so we chatted a bit there. Then, in the seventh-inning stretch, he got up on a hay bale and started speaking to the 100 or so people that were here. It was very clear to me then — he’s magnetic and charismatic — but it was also the type of campaign he talked about running. He was going to every county in Texas and test this humanto-human politics. That sounded like an epic odyssey. There’s a built-in narrative structure. BM: Making a documentary is a real pain in the ass that requires multiple years of your life, and I know every time I get approached with a topic, my first instinct is like, no, absolutely not.

DM: Right, and you’ll be telling that story long after the film is finished. BM: You’ve got to go ask people for their hardearned bread, and then create an expectation that essentially you alone are responsible for delivering on. DM: Filmmaking is putting the cart in front of the horse. It’s usually a very challenging decision. In this case, I was pretty damn sure I wanted to do it right away. I believe in the importance of storytelling in our society, but sometimes it’s hard. Am I doing my part? To see the possibility of telling a story that could help humanize politics, that was exciting to me. BM: I like that Beto is a character in the film, but it’s not a glory piece. It’s amazing the amount of trust and access that they gave you. How did that conversation and relationship begin? DM: Building the trust to create such an intimate film, I credit Amy. She invited me and my crew to come over and have a drink on the Friday night before we began shooting. It created an opportunity for everyone to kind of get to know each other before beginning work. BM: Everybody says things they wish they didn’t say. Everybody has actions that they wish that they could redo. Did he ever ask for any type of creative control or insight? DM: You know, he didn’t. I knew from the beginning that it would be vital for us to be creatively and financially independent from the campaign and set those terms. He had either seen or spent some time learning about this film I had made called “Crawford,” which involved spending time in a very conservative town and reflecting the humanity of folks across the political spectrum. I think he saw that there was a through-line to my work, and it wasn’t someone acting opportunistically. BM: In your film it really felt like we were along for the ride. It’s mostly cinema verité with some talking heads. Why did you decide to shoot and


edit that way? What were you going for? DM: We had the opportunity to be up close with this extremely kinetic campaign, and that is the experience that I wanted the audience to share. BM: I know that’s really hard. DM: We had great editors. Just extraordinary — cutting a two-hour scene into 90 seconds while still making you feel these human moments. “The River and the Wall” does that, too. Delivering a vast amount of information, but making it digestible through these very alive, and funny, moments. Following this group traveling the border, I felt like I was on that journey with you. I loved the fact that you were able to get those two guys [O’Rourke and Hurd], whose districts abut one another and [who] probably don’t agree on a ton, to share some of the same perspective and some different perspective about the border situation and how to address it. BM: Yeah, you can’t help but respect [Hurd]. He has a desire to do good in the world, which I find incredibly admirable. What connects those guys is public service. We’ve lost that in our politics. Both are there to serve. BM: “Running With Beto” is really about this movement in Texas, and there were all these other colorful characters from across the state. DM: Yeah, there’s so many narratives of Texas that people project onto it that aren’t from here or live here. I knew we wanted to confuse people’s stereotypes. We had a woman from Bulverde — from a military background, gun enthusiast, swears like a sailor — who really found purpose in community after the [2016] election. We had a 17-year-old kid from Houston, Marcel McClinton, who had experienced gun violence at his church and became really involved in politics as a result. And we had a woman from the Valley in McAllen, Amanda Salas, who was just hellbent on registering as many voters as possible. BM: Someone that saw the film told me, they’re like the Greek chorus of the film. I think they help

show the moment in Texas and help process the loss at the end. We have their sense of this being not the end of something but the beginning. The scene where Amanda confronts her father? That was probably the best scene of the movie for me. You have somebody with strong conservative values and somebody with strong Democrat

“Honestly, I felt more energized on election night, because we now had the responsibility to show what this campaign meant to people across the state.” values. They were actually talking about it. DM: Thank you. Yeah, that scene means a lot to me, too. I think part of making politics feel accessible also has to show people struggling within their own families. How do we talk about things that impact our lives with the people that are all closest to us, despite often disagreeing? BM: Is it fair to say you’re a fan of Beto?

DM: Fan is hard, but I would say I deeply respect Beto after seeing how hard he works. BM: But I’m assuming you wanted him to beat Cruz? DM: Yeah. As a citizen of Texas, I would have preferred Beto to win that election, yeah. BM: How does that boundary — personal belief, maybe a hint of fandom — play into the creation of a documentary and the different hats that you have to wear? DM: I think in any character-driven documentary, I need to feel a deep connection to the subject, because I’m asking the audience to connect with them, too. I felt an empathy for what Beto and his team were experiencing, particularly when the campaign really took off and the national news media descended. But I think at the same time, including election night, when they were experiencing the emotional loss of a hard-fought campaign, I felt empathetic toward them but ultimately came back to our job of telling the story. BM: So on election night, did it sink in, or were you captivated with filming everything? DM: The loss was palpable. The disappointment after this extraordinary effort by the campaign and the movement that was behind it, to not quite get over the hump, that was palpable. Honestly, I felt more energized on election night, because we now had the responsibility to show what this campaign meant to people across the state. Because he lost, it felt all the more important and exciting to be offering an in-depth story for the historical record.

This story is part of our series “Listening In,” where we pair SXSW speakers and artists and then happily eavesdrop on the exchange. Find the complete series at tribeza.com/listening-in/.

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LOC AL LOVE

BURGER KINGS By Margaret Williams Photographs by Kathleen Pieratt

I love a good burger. Always with mustard, pickles and cheese and sometimes wrapped in lettuce (#adulting). There are many ways, high and low, to serve up a great burger, and thankfully many in Austin are knocking their patty offerings out of the park. Since no time of year screams grilled sirloin more than summertime, we are taking the opportunity to anoint our favorites. I present you with Tribeza’s highly unscientific roundup of Austin’s best burgers.

Casino El Camino CHICAGO BURGER

We had to bend our knees for this one thanks to its three-quarters of a pound of chargrilled Angus beef and bacon. The East Sixth Street bar has devoted regulars, due to its great food, old-school vibes and owner, Paul “Casino” Eighmey. One even pulled us aside to proclaim, “I think it’s the best damn burger in the United States.”

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Hat Creek

The Peached Tortilla

BIG HAT

JAPAJAM BURGER

Where my parents at? Hat Creek’s double-patty cheeseburger layered with tomato, thick-cut pickles, crunchy red onion, iceberg lettuce and mustard is just the right size to hold in one hand while wrangling your child with the other. Not an insignificant factor, as the burger joint, founded by Drew Gressett in 2008, is a family favorite.

A friend of the magazine told us about this one and, man, are we glad she did. With tomato jam, a fried egg and Chinese barbecue sauce, this burger is what saltysweet dreams are made of. Pro tip: As you take your first bite, let the egg yolk drizzle over your Parmesan fries.

Hut’s Hamburgers RITCHIE VALENS BURGER

How to choose? When in doubt follow the jalapeños and guacamole — and Texasraised beef, grated cheddar, chopped tomato, onion and mustard. Since 1939, the classic restaurant, with its iconic neon sign, has been holding its own, and nostalgia aside, the burgers are still spot-on. You have until October to enjoy this one as co-owner Mike Hutchinson recently announced Hut's upcoming closure.

Pool Burger

THE LOYAL FOREVER

There McGuire Moorman goes again, solving a problem we never knew we had. Now all our Deep Eddy trips beg to end with a burger and fries. The double-patty Loyal Forever (named for nearby Austin High School) gets our order at the tikithemed joint thanks to its grilled onions, pickled jalapeños and ranch dressing.

Wholly Cow Burgers PURE SINGLE WITH CHEESE

As classic as it gets and about as good as it gets. Wholly Cow uses “local, hormone-free, organically raised and grass-fed beef” and surrounds its patties with King’s Hawaiian buns. Ours came fully dressed with American cheese, lettuce, tomato, chopped onion, dill pickle, mustard, mayo and ketchup. Perfection. tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PICK

Peace Garden CHILDHOOD REFLECTIONS ON THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF FAMED ISAMU TANIGUCHI JAPANESE GARDEN

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ROW I N G U P I N W H AT N OW F E E L S L I K E T H E S M A L L

town of Austin in the 1960s, I met a lot of colorful locals as a little girl. There was “the princess,” a woman who rode an old bicycle all over town, dressed completely in black. Try as I might, she wouldn't talk to me, but I was fascinated by her comings and goings all the same. At Barton Springs Pool, there were always regulars having fun and carrying on intellectual debates while I perfected my front flips off the diving board. My dad, Harley Clark, was a young attorney, and every Saturday I'd go downtown with him to the Piccadilly Cafeteria, where he’d meet a group of fellow lawyers and judges for breakfast. After we ate, he would go to his law office and I had the run of Congress Avenue. My first stop was usually an office building where I’d watch Cliff, the man in charge of the parking garage, move between floors on what looked like a giant motorized trapeze with footholds. He was always kind to me but (wisely) never gave in to my pleading to try it myself. And then there was Isamu Taniguchi. My dad, who was in the Men’s Garden Club of Austin for years, respectfully referred to him as “Old Man Taniguchi,” I guess to distinguish him from his son Alan, who was the dean of the School of Architecture at UT. Although I knew that the younger Mr. Taniguchi was famous, he didn’t occupy a large space in my heart or imagination, but the older Mr. Taniguchi certainly did.

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Old Man Taniguchi was the most interesting person in my 10-year-old world. I remember the first time I met him and how curious I was at his seeming otherworldliness. I had never met someone from Asia before, and he looked completely different from anyone I’d ever known: small and sinewy, with soft leather-like skin and the most exceptional twinkle in his eyes and an easy smile. The fact that he was from Japan, had a thick accent and, as my father explained, had been rounded up by the Americans in 1941 and put into a detention center in South Texas made him infinitely fascinating. And most important to me, he built what we now know as the Isamu Taniguchi Japanese Garden in Zilker Park, but back then, I knew it simply as “my” beloved garden, a spellbinding place where I felt at home. While my father attended his garden club meetings, I had hours of unstructured time to daydream and explore. I often had Mr. Taniguchi’s garden to myself, and no one seemed

A S -7 0 -74 0 3 8 , A U S T I N H I S TO R Y C E N T E R , A U S T I N P U B L I C L I B R A R Y.

By Cari Clark Color photographs by Kevin Greenblat


Days gone by. A snapshot taken in the garden, March 1970. Image courtesy of Austin American-Statesman. tribeza.com | JULY 2019

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‘‘

IT HAS BEEN MY WISH THAT THROUGH THE CONSTRUCTION OF THIS VISIBLE GARDEN I MIGHT PROVIDE A SYMBOL OF UNIVERSAL

to notice when I’d lie down in the streambed, letting the water flow over me as I’d gaze up at the trees. I explored every path, amazed by all the plants; it truly was my secret garden. Only later did I realize that most everyone who strolls through it, especially children, feels that way. I always knew it was magical, but as a child, I had no idea it was intentionally Zen. Isamu Taniguchi was born in Japan in 1897 and immigrated with his parents and brother to California at the age of 17. He became a very successful tenant farmer, started a co-op and developed a breed of tomato that could be shipped to the East Coast. Not long after the attack on Pearl Harbor, widespread antiJapanese hysteria took hold, and more than 120,000 citizens were incarcerated, including the Taniguchi family. While Isamu, his wife and sons were eating lunch at their home one day, there was a knock on the door, and two officials entered and arrested him as an “enemy alien.” He was interned in one detention camp after another, finally being sent to a camp in Crystal City, Texas, where he was reunited with his wife. He not only lost years of his life behind a fenced camp in dry South Texas, but also lost his livelihood; when he left California, his farm and equipment were pillaged. While the Taniguchis were interned as

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I M AG E CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N A M E R I C A N -S TAT E S M A N . A S -7 0 -7 5 2 0 8 - 02 , A U S T I N H I S TO RY C E N T E R , A U S T I N P U B L I C L I B R A R Y.

PEACE. – ISAMU TANIGUCHI


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a threat to the United States, their college-age sons were recruited to serve in the U.S. Army. (More than 4,000 served the very country holding their fathers captive.) When World War II ended, Isamu and his wife were released from the internment camp, and eventually, he retired to Austin, where his sons were living. Exceptionally industrious, he had a lot of energy for a man nearing 70. He had been schooled in the “art and Zen” of horticulture and wanted to create a Japanese garden for his new hometown and as a gift to Austin for educating his two sons at the University of Texas. In the mid-’60s his son Alan was busy as an architect working with Austin's Parks and Recreation Department to design the trails around Town Lake (now Lady Bird Lake). Through Alan’s connections, the city turned over a hilly, rocky section of parkland to his father. Deeply affected by the war and his internment, Isamu Taniguchi wished to restore balance and give Ausintites a place of reflection and peace after so many years of racial discord and conflict. Mr. Taniguchi created his garden — mostly by himself, in an astonishing 18 months — using one little sketch. The ponds would spell out “Austin,” and he would incorporate themes of the Orient that symbolize peace. At the age of 67, he worked daily and created — by hand — the paths, the ponds, the waterfall, the streambeds and the arched bridge, which is a “Togetsukyo,” or “bridge to walk over the moon.” In 1969, his garden was opened to the public. It is true that Mr. Taniguchi created the garden by himself, but he wasn’t completely alone in his work. As my father recounted to me, Mr. Taniguchi felt a kinship with the tallest tree on the hillside, which he called Mother Tree. Working daylight to dusk, he came to depend on the tree not

only for shade but also for companionship and encouragement; he used to say she spoke to him, urging him on as he broke and placed rocks for the paths and ponds. When the garden was finished, the ponds filled with water, the bridge and teahouse built, he waited for her to talk to him again but she never did. Her work was done. His beloved Mother Tree had died and given her spirit to the garden. You have to hunt for it, but Mother Tree’s remains are there, her beauty and strength striking. Mr. Taniguchi tended the garden for many years before he passed away, in 1992, at the age of 95. His spirit is still there, too, one reason why, after 50 years, the garden remains one of Austin’s most magical places. In 2015, good folks, including former Mayor Frank Cooksey and Evan Taniguchi, an Austin architect and Isamu Taniguchi’s grandson, created the Zilker Botanical Garden Conservancy to ensure that the gardens continue as one of the city’s crown jewels. I am incredibly grateful to have known Mr. Taniguchi and Mother Tree. Every time I’m in the garden, I can feel both of them there.

ABOVE: Clark pictured in the space that holds rich childhood memories. LEFT: Taniguchi in August 1970. Image courtesy of Austin American-Statesman.

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ou can keep your air-conditioned office cubicle, thank you very much. Here in Austin, we love the outdoor lifestyle and everything that comes with it, even if it means mosquito-bitten ankles, perpetually wet hair and sunburned ears. It’s why we live in a city with easy access to rugged hiking trails, lakes and rivers where we can take a cooling splash, and parks that invite us to hang a hammock or pitch a tent. We can pedal bicycles into the hills, practice yoga outdoors and dine alfresco beneath big Texas skies when it’s time to refuel. We caught up with four Austin residents who have plunged into the outdoors full time, making it not just a way to spend leisurely weekends, but a lifestyle and career choice.

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Get Out Four Austin residents who make it their business to spend time outside

BY Pam LeBlanc

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Guadarrama during an early-morning (and friendly) match at Zilker Park.

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onny Guadarrama started kicking a soccer ball around when he was just 2 years old. His father gifted him with a love of the game and later coached him and his two brothers on a youth league in Leander. The skills stuck. Guadarrama played for Cedar Park High School, landed a full scholarship at Campbell University in North Carolina, then left school after his freshman year to play professional soccer in Mexico. He’ll never forget suiting up on November 6, 2006, in Torreón, Mexico, with Santos Laguna, a team that he and his father had grown up watching. “The journey took me to the same team and the same stadium, and my parents were there watching me play that very first game,” he says. Now the accomplished midfielder is fulfilling another dream: playing on Austin’s first pro soccer team, Austin Bold FC, whose inaugural season launched in March with home games at Circuit of the Americas. “I think it’s the world’s game,” he says of soccer. “There’s not another game like it, and you don’t need much to play. I fell in love with it at an early age and am still in love with it now.” He says hours of training, not natural athletic ability, made him a good player. He wants to pass along what he’s learned. When he’s not sprinting down a field after a soccer ball himself, he coaches youth at the Lonestar Soccer Club’s Junior Academy. “I don’t know what I’d be doing if I wasn’t playing soccer. I wouldn’t be as happy as I am now if I was sitting inside all day,” he says. “I wouldn’t change this job for any other job in the world.”

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Galvรกn on the still waters of Lady Bird Lake atop a Rowing Dock ATX board.

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etween the sixth and 12th grades, Rodolfo Galván spent a lot of time outdoors, learning to rock climb, canoe, hike and bike through Explore Austin, a nonprofit organization that uses outdoor recreation as a way to empower and teach leadership skills to low-income youth. These days, he serves on the board of directors. “It’s difficult to say how my life would have been without it,” says Galván, 21, who was born in Mexico but grew up in East Austin, under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy. “Every year we’d take a trip to Colorado and do a solo night, where we slept one night far away from everybody else. It’s on those solo nights, just being in nature and being by yourself, that you step out of this whole hectic city life. It ended up changing the way I thought. A lot of our problems seem very big in this big, chaotic, always moving life. For a moment you feel like you can take a breath and step out of that.” Now he’s working on a business degree and has created his own nonprofit organization, Código Austin, which encourages minorities to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics. And thanks to Explore Austin, he says, he still likes the occasional paddle session on Lady Bird Lake. A lot of Latinos in Austin don’t climb, run trails or standup paddleboard because it’s something they just assumed they couldn’t do, he says. “It’s not part of the culture. Sometimes they’re too scared, it looks too expensive or it’s seen as a luxury,” he says. “Explore Austin takes that away and says, ‘You can do this.’”

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Canales and Smith

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ob Canales swam competitively at Stanford University, then moved to Austin to attend law school. That’s when he decided to enter a half-Ironman and quickly discovered that racing wetsuits weren’t built with swimmers in mind. He and Kurt Spenser, a Stanford teammate, dreamed up a better one, designed to fit a body positioned with arms extended instead of hanging at the side. The suit revolutionized triathlon wetsuit design and spurred the swimmers to develop other products, from goggles with tilted lenses that make it easier to spot buoys or objects on the horizon during open-water swimming to neoprene jammer-style swimsuits that encourage better body position in the water. Now, through their company, ROKA, they’re focusing on performance sunglasses that are lightweight, grippy and don’t, as Canales puts it, “look like a spaceship landed on your face.” The work includes a good helping of in-the-field testing, and Canales enjoys a dip in Barton Springs Pool to test his creations. “We have to prototype our ideas in the real world, sometimes a ridiculous number of times, until we get it right. That can’t happen behind a desk,” he says. Canales enjoys solving design problems in novel and elegant ways. “When you build something from scratch out of your garage with one of your best friends, then nurture and grow it over several years with a dedicated team and a supportive and patient group of investors, that experience, for me, transcends the common understanding of a ‘job,’” Canales says. It requires research, working with design teams and testing solutions. “To help make all of that happen, I can’t just sit behind a computer or grind numbers,” he says.

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Canales likes to decompress, and test out new gear, at Barton Springs. tribeza.com

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Parker is happiest behind a ski boat on Lake Austin.

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athleen Parker spent nearly every summer weekend as a kid at the family vacation house on Lake LBJ, learning to water ski when she was 5 and driving the boat while her dad skied behind it at 9. She studied business at the University of Texas and worked as a recruiter but ditched the more traditional career 12 years ago for a life encouraging women to do stuff they didn’t believe they could do. As a coach and fitness instructor at iGnite Your Life, she teaches cardio strength classes outdoors and at area parks, and on Wednesdays she grabs the boat keys and picks up students for a “lake escape” — three hours of water skiing and wake surfing on Lake Austin. “Some of the women haven’t skied in 20 years, and they’re out there slalom skiing now,” Parker says. “We’re bringing joy to these women who thought they couldn’t do it anymore.” She prefers a shady tree to a rumbling air-conditioning unit and says she’d rather be in the water than just about anywhere. “The water to me is just warm-fuzzy — it’s where I grew up,” she says. “My mission is to empower women to get out there and not be afraid of the water. So many people are afraid to get behind the boat, and it’s not a scary place.” Don’t even try to take her away from those green-blue waters. “I just love it, and I plan on doing it until I’m 100,” she says.

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Hot Child in the City photographs by JACKIE LEE YOUNG styling by MARGARET WILLIAMSON BECHTOLD

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Come summer, what’s a girl to do?! As the temperatures rise, we vote for lakeside days paired with graphic separates and pool-hall nights, where the neon glows, the skirts swing and the drinks flow. Our girl Margo shows us how it’s done.

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BUCKET HAT, Urban Outfitters. HOOP EARRINGS, model’s own. VADA JEWELRY necklace, ByGeorge. CAROLINA K swimsuit, Good Company. ARIANA BOUSSARD-REIFEL silver rings and bracelets, Good Company. SHELL BRACELETS, Beehive. CELINE skirt, ByGeorge. Shot on location at Texas Rowing Center.

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Fresh off the Boat

Take the plunge into the waters of Lady Bird Lake and don’t forget your bucket hat. What’s old is new.

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In Deep

Dive bars and steamy nights go together like peas and carrots. Soak in the air-conditioning and sidle up to the pool table. Who knows where the night will lead.

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Opposite: UNRAVEL CO. bag. This Page: BARENA VENEZIA shirt, ByGeorge. ORLEBAR BROWN “Deep Eddy Pool” swim trunks, ByGeorge.

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SHELL EARRINGS, bracelet and anklet, Beehive. HOOP EARRINGS, model’s own. RACHEL COMEY top, Sunroom. LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ skirt, Sunroom. BANDANA (worn as a bracelet), Beehive. Shot on location at Deep Eddy Cabaret.

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EARRINGS, Beehive. LAPINA eyewear, Sunroom. VADA JEWELRY necklaces, ByGeorge. BIKINI TOP, Beehive. MARNI skirt, ByGeorge. DEZSO bracelets, Sunroom. Shot on location at Sno-Beach (Barton Springs location). Hair and Makeup by Lauren Garcia. Modeling by Margo Whitley and Ethan Marshall (Page Parkes Agency).

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Let it Sno

What’s better than a frosty treat on a hot summer day? One paired with tropical accessories, saturated lids and a side of Marni.

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where the WILD things are

Explore Ranches offers outdoor enthusiasts an in-depth new way to experience the wild lands of Texas By

Laurel Miller Jonathan Vail

Photographs by

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Several of us are gingerly plucking ripe berries from a spiny agarita shrub, while chef Jesse Griffiths — owner of the acclaimed Austin butcher shop and restaurant Dai Due — forages nearby. He’ll use the fruit in a glaze for grilled, bacon-wrapped dove this evening, but right now, lunch is his priority. He hands us tongs to harvest tender young nopales paddles, which he’ll char and slice before tossing them with chile pequin, lime, white onion and goat queso fresco. Two hours later, we’re enjoying the nopales salad, which is accompanied by coffee-rubbed axis deer backstrap cooked in the coals; for dessert there’s a decadent mesquite flour pound cake (“More like a two-pound cake,” jokes Griffiths, referring to the ungodly amounts of butter it contains). It’s an earthy, rustic meal, perfectly suited to the alfresco setting: a 4,649-acre ranch outside Junction, on the western perimeter of the Hill Country. There are nine of us attending Explore Ranches’ inaugural culinary retreat at Llano Springs Ranch; with us are landowners Tom and Sonja Vandivier, their daughter Jessica, and Tom’s sister, Ann Brodnax. The weekend is a laid-back affair that includes lodging and a cooking class, with all meals prepared by Griffiths and featuring ranch-sourced wild game; there’s also fishing, wildlife viewing, swimming, canoeing and a property tour. The retreat is part of a progressive new tourism concept, the brainchild of native Texans Jay Kleberg, Jesse Womack and Allison Ryan (see sidebar, “A Home on the Range”).

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Tostadas with wild boar chorizo and refried beans are characteristic of Griffiths' rustic, earthy food.

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he three founders grew up on ranches; among them, they have more than 40 years of experience as conservationists and outdoor enthusiasts. Explore Ranches was established in 2018 and is based on a simple premise: Guests can book private stays at historic, scenic ranches that offer exclusive access to “the nation’s least explored lands.” The overarching goal, says Womack, “is to enable landowners to keep properties in the family and provide income in the form of non-consumptive activities such as hiking, birding, stargazing, paddling, horseback riding, biking, fishing or wildlife photography.” Adds Kleberg, who is also the director of conservation initiatives for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation (TPWF), “Many of our partner ranches harvest wild game as part of their land and wildlife management practices. While Explore Ranches is primarily focused on non-consumptive

recreation on private lands, we offer these culinary retreats to demonstrate the benefits of managing native habitat for wild and sustainable sources of protein.” Depending on the property, guests might cook for themselves or have the option of an onsite chef, but, says Womack, “Adding a culinary component like this was part of our big picture, since people are becoming more concerned about where their food comes from.” For Griffiths, an avid hunter and fisherman and the 2019 ambassador for TPWF’s “We Will Not Be Tamed” campaign, which advocates exploration of the state’s wild places, the opportunity to work with Explore Ranches aligned perfectly with his ethos of sourcing local ingredients. All of Dai Due’s fresh product comes from Texas. If it’s not in season or grown here, you won’t see it on the menu: Roasted mesquite beans replace chocolate, and all of the wines are made with Texas-grown grapes. Griffiths’ side venture, the New School of

Traditional Cookery “promotes responsible use of our wild resources. The aim is to educate, train and empower people within our community to utilize local foods to their fullest,” via immersive hunting and fishing weekends and workshops devoted to whole animal butchery. Although conservation is the school’s core value, Griffiths says that for him, hunting is also meditative. “It’s about being quiet, spending time in nature. I hunt close to home, identify some trees, pick some mushrooms on the way. But it’s also about frugality and feeding families.” The Explore Ranches founders felt Griffiths would be the right fit for their culinary component, which can also include pasta or cheese-making and food preservation. “Jesse is the ideal ambassador,” Kleberg says. “His generosity and awareness of all the great things Texas has to offer — and his doing them in combination with wild game, fishing and other outdoor pursuits — encourages people to enjoy recreation in a responsible way.”

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Paella with Carolina Gold rice, wild duck and turkey meatballs, crawfish and spring peas gets cooked over an open fire.

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f the collaboration — the culinary component can be added to any host property — Griffiths says, “My hope is that students come away with more confidence, especially when it comes to foraging. Most wild foods fall on the ground and rot, but in Austin alone, we have loquats, dewberries, mulberries, nopales.” For their part, the Vandiviers were the first family to sign on as an Explore Ranches host. Tom, a retired attorney from Dripping Springs (where he and Sonja still reside part time), purchased the property with Ann and their late father in 1994. At the time, it was a former cattle ranch overrun with cedar and other invasive plant species. “We wanted to come in and start from scratch and turn it into something,” he says. “It was about molding it, making wildlife and water conservation and ecotourism our primary focus, but we also wanted to share it with folks. We’ve hosted hunters, university biology classes, birding groups, school kids. Explore Ranches’ concept is unique and very much in line with our business model.” Tom; Sonja, a former music teacher who grew up on a South Texas rice farm; their two daughters,

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Laura and Jessica; and Ann spent 16 years clearing the property of cedar; today, the high plateau landscape is dotted with live and shin oaks and carpeted with wildflowers. Plantings of Texas snowbell — a tree that’s nearly extinct — are emblematic of how even long-neglected soil can be restored to fertile habitat. Says Ann, “We’re so thankful for this slice of the Hill Country. There’s a deep joy that comes from being the stewards of the land, water and wildlife here.” While the exact date the ranch was established is unknown, the main house was built in the 1940s. The Vandiviers have found numerous 19th-century military artifacts and wagon ruts on the property, as well as hundreds of surface arrowheads (the oldest dating back 8,000 years), which are now on display in one of the simple homes constructed for guests. In recent years, Llano Springs Ranch has received accolades for its land and wildlife stewardship, including the prestigious Leopold Conservation Award. Since 1994, the Vandiviers have offered lodging and guided hunts, operating under a Managed Lands Deer Permit for the species found on the ranch: white-tail, axis and fallow deer, and blackbuck. There are also feral hogs, wild turkeys, doves and various duck species, as well as rare birds like the golden-cheeked warbler and the blackcapped vireo and the occasional bald eagle. One of the most distinctive features of the property is its namesake springs, which flow into


“This offers all of the things we’re into: great food, ecology, land restoration.”

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the nearby South Llano River. (“This ranch and its free-flowing waters are kind of a hidden jewel,” says Kleberg. “You need to know someone to access it.”) Those same springs feed a sizable emerald body of water called the Blue Hole, which provides a quiet place to cast a line (the Vandiviers practice catch and release; an exception was made for the retreat for culinary purposes), paddle a canoe or swim. Our final afternoon, Griffiths leads a casual demonstration cooking class while he preps dinner (fish soup with aioli, wild turkey-stuffed ravioli made with Rouge de Bordeaux heritage grain flour from Barton Springs Mill in Dripping Springs, and pecan custard). As an instructor, he’s gregarious and easy to follow and his in-depth knowledge of ingredients fascinating, but the vibe is akin to watching a friend prepare dinner. After the class, Tom takes us on a property tour in his Kawasaki Mule; at one point we startle a herd of axis deer, including two bucks with magnificent racks. We watch, awestruck, as the animals race up the hillside and over a ridge. Upon our return at dusk, the other family members greet us with Palomas made with Desert Door Texas Sotol, and the 13 of us sit on the porch, watching the

resident wildlife drink from the springs. Binoculars are passed, and the conversation is lively, despite most of us being relative strangers. Says guest Owen Temple, an Austin-based musician and songwriter interested in conservation, “It’s great to see all of these creative people co-create an experience like this, especially in this setting. It just brings out the best in everyone, but this has still exceeded expectations in every regard.” Adds Austinite Erin Buckingham (who’s visiting with her husband, Andy), “This offers all of the things we’re into: great food, ecology, land restoration. It shows you what 20 years’ worth of hard work looks like.” After dinner, Owen borrows a guitar and sings, while Sonja entertains us with anecdotes about ranch life. We look for shooting stars and sip William Chris Wines, from Hye. Before they retire for the night, the Vandiviers thank us for being part of this new venture, which has made a profound impact on them. I glance around and see I’m not the only person whose eyes are welling up. Later, as I crawl into bed, I think about something Erin said to me at dinner. “I love how much this family loves this piece of land. It’s infectious.” It is, indeed.

Clockwise from top right: Nopales ripe for the picking; the extended Vandivier clan; Sunfish are used to make the base for a soup; meals take place on the porch overlooking the springs.

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Chef Jesse Griffiths

A Home on the Range Explore Ranches was born of a desire to “get more people to experience the wilds of Texas, to open gates to private land,” says Kleberg. He grew up on a ranch in South Texas where “nature tourism has been a part of our business model for decades.” Womack manages his family’s cattle ranch in Victoria County, while Ryan, a personal trainer based in Austin, grew up visiting her family’s ranch, the Withers, in the Davis Mountains (the property is now one of Explore Ranches’ listings). Currently, Explore Ranches has nine ranches listed, from a remote and sprawling Big Bend property that sleeps 20 to a “canyon oasis” on the confluence of Independence Creek and the Pecos River. There’s also Middle Creek Ranch, just outside Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and Tejon Ranch, the largest contiguous expanse of private land in California. Ultimately, the brand aims to offer exclusive experiences on the world’s most majestic — and exclusive — lands. Accommodations range from luxury retreats to rustic cabins with meals; hosts and custom itineraries are available on all properties.

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CABIN IN THE WOODS AIA award-winning architect Chris Sanders updated his family’s hunting cabin to a modern hideout in the Piney Woods by Hannah J. Phillips photographs by R yann Ford 76 JULY 2019 |

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Sanders worked with longtime collaborator, Killy Scheer, "We preserved the paneled walls and ceiling in the original living room and made it more of a quiet space for conversation," explains the interior designer.

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idden in the heart of the Piney Woods of East Texas, scattered cypress trees and loblolly pines surround a family hunting camp affectionately named Little Boggy. The site has served as a gathering spot since the 1940s and was recently updated and expanded by Chris Sanders, of Sanders Architecture, which won an AIA Design Award in 2016 for Juniper restaurant. For the cabin redesign, Sanders worked with his mother and father-in-law, Ellen and Buddy Temple, to honor the bones of the original home and preserve family history while creating a modern compound to accommodate the growing clan. “Buddy passed away during the design process,” Sanders says, “so it was nice that we were able to have that time together before he passed, working to satisfy his vision for the cabin as a family gathering space for years to come.” The building started as a three-room hunting camp, expanding over the decades to include a kitchen, a dining room and additional structures outside. The main intent of the redesign was to add an entertainment room and more sleeping quarters for the Temples’ many children and grandchildren. “We really wanted to respect the old building,” says Sanders. “There’s a lot of family attachment to it, so the proportions and the form and the materiality of the additions were very sensitive to that 80-year-old structure.” One particular highlight of the new additions is the two-story, three-bedroom guest house with an upstairs screened-in sleeping porch. Oriented on the southeast corner of the building, the porch is intentionally positioned toward southeastern summer breezes and sweeping views across Black Cat Lake. “All the windows really embrace that lake view,” says Sanders, describing how the arrangement of the new buildings creates a sort of central outdoor court for things like the family Thanksgiving football game. “The family comes here to hunt and fish, so it’s all about enjoying the outdoors.” tribeza.com

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here are outbuildings throughout the property to accomodate the growing family. The new two-story guesthouse (shown above) provides additional sleeping quarters and includes a screened-in sleeping porch. RIGHT: For the kitchen in the main lodge Sanders took down a wall in order to create space and add height. The original kitchen included a small pegboard for cast iron pans, and that idea was expanded upon and carried through in the update.

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A nod to the family's heritage in the forest products industry, Sanders used southern yellow pine as a primary material throughout the project.

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D

uring the renovation, Sanders and his team preserved brick and boards from the exterior of the original building. Shown alongside "African American Man" by Joan Farrar. LEFT: "The rooms in the guest house are meant to be bright, spacious and contemporary but with elements from the main house to make the whole compound consistent," explains Scheer. Custom built-ins, textural art and pops of color create a playful kid's space.

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T R AV E L P I C K

Fairbanks, Alaska DOG DAYS OF SUMMER HAVE YOU DOWN? START DAYDRE AMING ABOUT (AND PL ANNING FOR) COOLER ADVENTURES LIKE THIS WINTRY NORTHERN LIGHTS QUEST By Jennifer Simonson

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The Aurora Ice Museum, part of Chena Hot Springs.

N O R T H E R N L I G H T S P H OTO G R A P H B Y V I N C E N T G U T H , A U R O R A I C E M U S E U M CO U R T E S Y O F C H E N A H OT S P R I N G S R E S O R T.

I

TRIED TO READJUST THE SCARF

wrapped around my face as it slipped off my nose, but with two pairs of gloves and the occasional jerk of the dog sled, it was hard to get a proper grip. I was just 48 hours into my Alaskan vacation, and I had lost count of the number of times I’d told myself I didn’t know it could actually get this cold outside. Six months earlier I’d read an article about how Fairbanks is the best spot in the United States — and one of the top spots in the world — from which to see the northern lights. As I glanced through photos of darkened trees silhouetted against skies streaked with green, purple and pink light, I decided Alaska would be my next travel destination. The only reservation I had about visiting the Last Frontier State was the weather. February and March, when high temperatures hover around zero degrees, are two of the best months to view the aurora borealis. As a born-and-bred Texan, anytime temperatures dip below 50 degrees is cause for concern. When temperatures hit the freezing point, I find it perfectly acceptable not to leave the house.   Instead of hiding from the cold, however, Alaskans embrace it. They build bars out of ice and drink martinis inside them. They hook dogs to a sled and go mushing. They put on swimsuits and take dips in hot springs. And, of course, they layer up, grab some hot cocoa and go outside in the dead of night to watch for lights in the sky. My first night in Alaska I stayed in a log cabin at the Chena Hot Springs Resort (approximate-

ly 60 miles outside of Fairbanks). Weary travelers have soaked in the hot springs ever since two gold miners discovered it in the early 1900s. The water temperature remains at a consistent 104 degrees, while the outside air temperature can plummet well below freezing. The thermometer read -5 degrees as I entered the building to check into the hot springs. After entering, the woman behind the counter told me to lock my clothing in a locker, exit the building through a back door, then follow the sign to the hot springs entrance. “What do I wear outside while walking to the springs?” I asked, thinking that surely I’d be given a parka or dead animal or something to wrap up in. I couldn’t just be left to stumble around subfreezing temperatures in a swimsuit, right? “This,” she said, handing me a f limsy, standard-size towel. I changed into my swimsuit, wrapped the towel around my waist and stepped outside. I quickly hopped down the walkway, trying not to slip on the frozen footprints of recent visitors. Footlong icicles hung at the entrance of the springs. I placed my towel on a wooden rod covered in frost and gingerly stepped into the steaming water. I settled into the springs, soaking up the mineral-rich water while admiring the frozen trees and heaps of snow surrounding me. Afterward, I wandered over to the Aurora Ice Museum for an appletini. Created from more than 1,000 tons of ice and snow, the museum is the world’s largest year-round ice environment, consistently staying at 25 degrees inside. I sat down at the Ice Bar as the bartender poured my appletini — the bar’s only beverage offering

— into an icy martini glass. After finishing my drink, I did as instructed, making a wish into the glass and then throwing it on the ground outside until it broke. That evening I looked for the northern lights from my patio, but I went to bed before spotting anything. Seeing the northern lights is never guaranteed. Clouds or lack of solar activity leads to heartbreaking tales of visitors traveling thousands of miles only to return home without seeing the lights. Because Fairbanks is such a popular aurora borealis destination, several local businesses offer heated viewing cabins and yurts complete with hot cocoa, tea or coffee to keep visitors warm while waiting on the night’s big show. On my second evening in Alaska, I arrived at one called Aurora Pointe with Kory Eberhardt. Eberhardt is a third-generation Alaskan who opened Aurora Pointe in 2018 to accommodate visitors wanting to see the lights. We arrived at 10:30 just as a faint green light began to develop on the horizon. “It is just beginning,” Eberhardt said. After an initial display of colors, the sky went

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T R AV E L P I C K

dark. We headed inside to warm up. Eberhardt told stories about his grandfather moving to Alaska to homestead, the “engineering marvel” that is the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline and life in the great north. Just after midnight, someone opened the door to the building and shouted, “Aurora!” We jumped up, put on our jackets and gloves, and rushed outside in time to see an intense display of purple and green shoot across the night sky. The lights were active for 15 minutes before the sky went dark again. I had time to snap a few shots before the cold temperatures zapped my camera’s battery. For the crème de la crème of aurora borealis viewing, stay a night or two at the Borealis Basecamp. Ten luxury igloos sit high above the Fairbanks city limits. The same plexiglass used to make helicopters has been used to make the igloos’ windows. Visitors lie in their warm, cozy beds and watch the magical lights dance around them. For those who want to go to sleep but don’t want to miss the action, the hotel has installed a buzzer in each igloo that alerts guests when the lights become active.

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LEFT: On Simonson's second evening in Alaska she was lucky enough to see the Northern Lights.

A Taste of Alaska Lodge.


P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R E D P H OTO G R A P H Y. A U R O R A B O R E L I A S CO U R T E S Y O F C H E N A H OT S P R I N G S R E S O R T.

ABOVE: Paws for Adventure offers traditional dog sled tours.

As for daytime activities, visitors can go snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and dog mushing. While I have not thought about dog mushing since reading “The Call of the Wild” in fourth grade, the sport is alive and well in Alaska. “It is not unusual for people in warmer climates to own horses and go riding on the weekends,” explained one of the workers at Paws for Adventure. “That is how we look at it here in Alaska with dogs.” Paws for Adventure offers traditional dog sled tours. Peter, a self-proclaimed dog musher for life, was my guide. After settling comfortably into the wooden sled, covering my body with a subzero sleeping bag and wrapping my face in a scarf, we set off for an hourlong ride through the backcountry. During our ride, Peter told stories about his run during the famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in 2017, how racers suf fer ing from sleep exhaustion can fall off their sled and how he moves farther north during the summer to run dogs on glaciers. As we mushed, Peter occasionally yelled out, “Haw," prompting the dogs to veer left, or, “Gee,” to veer right. At one point, I stood up on the back of the sled, holding on for dear life as eight dogs pulled us as fast as they could through the winding snowbanks. Who knew you could have so much fun while being so incredibly cold?

Year-Round Fun A Taste of Alaska Lodge sits on 280 acres of wildflower-rich land with fantastic views of Denali. The Alaska Heritage House B&B is an early-20th-century Victorianstyle bungalow perfect for history lovers. The pet-friendly cabins at Pike’s Waterfront Lodge sit on the banks of the Chena River. Ah, Rose Marie Bed & Breakfast is two cozy 1930s homes within walking distance of downtown shops, restaurants and galleries. Alaska is known as the land of the midnight sun because the sun shines for almost 24 hours during summer months. Play a round of golf at midnight, take a walk in the woods with reindeers or smell the roses at the Georgeson Botanical Garden. Adventurous types gravitate toward the Chena River State Recreation Area for all outdoor adventure, including rafting, hiking, fishing and camping.

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KAREN'S PICK

Chef Ling of China's Fujian Province is known for her soup dumplings which Spezia describes as, "eyes-roll-back good."

Lin Asian Bar + Dim Sum Restaurant By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

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A LONG TIME AGO, THERE WAS A LITTLE TOWN

called Austin. It was quaint and funky and served tasty barbecue and Tex-Mex. But that’s about all. It didn’t have much culinary diversity, and it certainly didn’t have much Asian food. But then the little town grew up, and people started moving here from all over the world, like chef Ling Qi Wu, from China’s Fujian Province. And like so many Austin transplants, she helped transform our sleepy brisket-and-breakfast-taco hamlet into a bona fide culinary destination with her global culinary talents. Chef Ling’s restaurant, Lin Asian Bar + Dim Sum Restaurant, is undoubtedly one of the most popular restaurants in town right now. Open just a year, it has been packing them in since day one, perhaps because the chef/owner’s stellar with pork, chicken and duck broth and scallops, reputation preceded her: She helped develop the lobster and shrimp. It’s a tasty and creative openormously popular dim sum program at Austion, but I prefer the original. tin hot spot Wu Chow. Prior to that, she spent My other dim sum favorites include the flavormore than 15 years at Ronald Cheng’s Chinatown ful basil chicken dumplings, the simple and subrestaurants. But after years of cooking in other lime shrimp har kaw, and the exceptional sticky people’s kitchens, Ling decided to strike out on rice, each glistening kernel like a shiny pearl. her own. And although it’s her weekend dim sum Don’t overlook Lin’s vegetable offerings, like the that put her on the map, her other sophisticated refreshing Szechuan spicy cucumbers and any Chinese dishes draw equally enthuof the seasonal sautéed greens, like siastic crowds at lunch and dinner Chinese broccoli, snow pea leaves LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM RESTAURANT throughout the week. or bok choy. Although the full dim 1203 W 6TH STREET Dim sum, the Cantonese morning sum menu is served only at weekend LINASIANBAR.COM meal of bite-size foods, is frequently brunch, several items are offered (512) 474-5107 a cacophony of banging carts piled throughout the week at lunch and with greasy, tepid offerings. But at dinner, including the legendary Lin, it’s a civilized affair where you order à la soup dumplings. carte from a menu, thus ensuring your dim sum Lin’s lunch and dinner offerings are just as arrives hot and fresh. buzz-worthy. The dinner-only Seafood Delight If there’s a signature dish at Lin, it’s the soup with Bird Nest is an Instagram star and tastes dumplings. These tender steamed morsels burst as good as it looks: a mélange of sautéed shellwith an unctuous broth and savory pork filling. fish and vegetables cradled in an edible basket Drizzled with a touch of ginger-infused vinegar, made of latticed taro root. This stunning dish they are eyes-roll-back good. Lin also offers a turns heads when it’s delivered to your table. single, Texas-size seafood soup dumpling filled The crispy jalapeño shrimp is another popular

choice, and the sautéed seasonal vegetables with tofu is one of my go-to orders: a garden-fresh medley of vegetables sautéed in a delicate sauce and garnished with silky cubes of fried tofu. It’s a dish that could be mundane but instead is ethereal. There’s also smoked duck offered nightly and roasted Peking duck on the weekends. Lobster tail and Angus beef with foie gras are other elegant selections. Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Ling and her team, including her husband, Jimmy Ng, transformed a former pizza joint into a charming Asian boîte, with whimsical lighting, hand-drawn murals, an open kitchen and a shaded outdoor dining patio. There’s a welcoming little bar that mixes some impressive cocktails, and Lin’s trademark logo is stamped on all the custom serving pieces, from the traditional Chinese tin cups to the wooden dim sum baskets. It’s a new era in Austin. When I moved here 20 years ago from California (yes, I’m one of those), I bemoaned Austin’s lack of culinary diversity. But now, with the influx of restaurants like Chef Ling's, I’ve got nothing to complain about.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

CAFÉ NO SÉ

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises deli-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor

cious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch,

and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

diner favorites. Order up the classics, including

and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the

roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

classic avocado toast is a must-try.

decadent milkshakes.

charcuterie board.

34TH STREET CAFE

THE BREWER’S TABLE

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts

This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great

at the brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

for weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

source the ingredients, which are utilized in both

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

the kitchen and the brewery to eliminate food waste.

EASY TIGER

ASTI TRATTORIA

The seasonally changing menu is unique but provides

EL ALMA

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

options for even the pickiest of eaters (ask for the

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential

kid’s menu).

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Aus-

Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

tin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect

goat-cheese panna cotta.

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

BAR CHI SUSHI

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

soft centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

A great place to stop before or after a night on the

executed by the Stefano Ferrara wood-burning

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2

ovens, which runs at more than 900 degrees.

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Viet-

a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu

Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage of

namese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi,

features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls

cheese on this menu!

and sweet treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor

under $10.

CAFÉ JOSIE

patio bring comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal

BARLEY SWINE

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

EPICERIE

encourages sharing with small plates made from

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

locally sourced ingredients, served at communal

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

with the housemade macarons.

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

The Shoal Creek favorite, affectionately known

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the

as Fonda, has been bringing people together for

Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-

more than 4 decades. Known for their Interior

tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the

Mexican Cuisine and artful dining room, Fonda

salted caramel budino) alongside locally sourced and

San Miguel is the perfect spot to share an

seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also

evening with friends.

offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010 Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR 1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800 Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme cocktail.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168 Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies

IRON CACTUS

606 Trinity Street | (512) 472 9240 ironcactus.com With amazing outdoor patio views, friendly service and a lively full bar, Iron Cactus offers one of the best dining experiences around. Leave your worries at the door and lose yourself in the comforts of the cactus.

like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and

GRIZZELDA’S

Pecorino Romano.

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

HOPFIELDS

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere

HANK’S

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

between traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beau-

recipes, each fused with a range of f lavors and styles.

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff

tiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and

The attention to detail in each dish shines, from

and a kid-friendly patio all work together to make

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

Hank’s our new favorite neighborhood joint. With

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

dark mole served over chicken brined for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

happy hour every day from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma. Drinks aside, the braised meatballs, chopped black kale salad (add falafel!) and spicy fried chicken are a few standouts from the craveable menu.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

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JEFFREY’S

LAS PALOMAS

LE POLITIQUE

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 |

110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

laspalomasrestaurant.com

This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously

Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming

favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican

marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern

service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere

cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy

that makes it an Austin staple.

family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

miss the margaritas.

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

LENOIR

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Le-

one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

noir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making

America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge

the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable.

in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles

JUNE’S ALL DAY

from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patisserie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town. LORO

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole

serious cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro

and Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a

favorites. Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas

welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive in-

bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages

door-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office

sipping, noshing and lingering. The restaurant’s

of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsur-

namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—one of

prisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out

less than 10 in Texas—who also serves as the bever-

on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai

age director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

LA BARBECUE

The greatest stories are told with family and friends

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream.

over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies

Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

just that, bringing nostalgic and classic ItalianAmerican cuisine to the heart of Austin. From family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

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Art with a heart.

Fine art at your fingertips. V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE

Discover exquisite contemporary works in this new online art source. Bookmark ArtfulGalleries.com for your fine art and artful gifting whims. 14% goes to a nonprofit partner you select at checkout.

ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ArtfulGalleries.com “A Rockport Day #2” by Carrie Megan

Subscribe TODAY TRIBEZA is available for delivery!

RECEIVE A YEAR SUBSCRIPTION FOR $36. SIGN UP AT TRIBE Z A .CO M tribeza.com

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A LOOK BEHIND

Nourish first-ever wellness and arts retreat has come and gone. Let’s take a moment to reflect on a day that was filled with community, delicious food, bodies (and brains) in motion and, most important, fun. Thanks to all of you who came out to Springdale Station for the day, and special thanks to Equinox, Desert Door Texas Sotol and Atelier Dojo, whose sponsorships and activations made Nourish possible. See you next time!

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T A N D S E P T E M B E R B R OA D H E A D

J U S T L I K E T H AT, T R I B E Z A’ S


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA July 2019 Issue  

The Outdoors Issue No. 215

TRIBEZA July 2019 Issue  

The Outdoors Issue No. 215

Profile for tribeza