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modern teak classic The Karl chair by Danish architect John Mortensen. Solid teak with leather seat. $499

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1513 Cullen

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Leah Petri

Tammy Koen

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4 MAY 2019 |

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R E D H A N DE D BOURBON

CAUGHT RED HANDED Transparency is our truth and we are proud to say Red Handed Bourbon is a blend of thoughtfully curated spirits from our favorite distilleries in Kentucky and Virginia. We’re proud because the way we blend and finish it embodies everything Treaty Oak encompasses: the juxtaposition of tradition and innovation. Proud because it is a Double Gold medal recipient from The Fifty Best, among a wealth of additional accolades. Proud that our Red Handed is a bourbon worth stealing.

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Your home. Our mission. Hand-selected for their tenure, values, and entrepreneurial spirit, these Austin agents are transforming the city’s search and sell experience. Discover a modern real estate experience at Compass.com.

Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Gary & Michelle Dolch

Nicole Kessler

10 MAY 2019 |

tribeza.com

Chris Long

Stephanie Panozzo


Dara Allen

Robin Banister

Joe Longton

Charlotte Lipscomb

Grossman & Jones Group

Beth Carter

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Photo by Casey Dunn

@burnishandplumb

12 MAY 2019 |

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burnishandplumb.com


105 LAUREL LANE historic aldridge place FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS LISTING PLEASE VISIT

M A R Y W O O D WA R D. K U P E R R E A L T Y. C O M

mary catherine woodward GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISO R 5 12 .56 0.4524 mcw@soth e bysrea lty.com tribeza.com

| MAY 2019

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Turn lights to makeup mode. Okay.

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Say hello to a smarter routine. Voice control, personalized preferences and the intuitive technology of KOHLER Konnect™ products give you next-level control of your kitchen and bathroom experiences. Visit our showroom or learn more at KOHLER.com/KohlerKonnect. 9503 Research Blvd Austin, TX 78759 512.382.7939 KohlerSignatureStoreAustin.com

14 MAY 2019 |

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WestlakeViews.com

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16 MAY 2019 |

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THIS BREATHTAKING WATERFRONT PROPERTY ON APPLEHEAD ISLAND ON LAKE LBJ EMBODIES UPSCALE INDOOR-OUTDOOR LIVING. WITH A PATIO EXTENDING DIRECTLY ONTO THE LAKE, A BOAT DOCK BENEATH THE UPPER DECK, AND MULTIPLE OUTDOOR LIVING AREAS, YOU’RE PERFECTLY POSITIONED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ALL NATURE HAS TO OFFER.

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MAY / FOOD

CONTENTS

DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 24 Kristin’s Column p. 32

A Look Behind p. 108

Community Profile p. 48

FEATURES

Tribeza Talk p. 36

Community Pick p. 52

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 38

Style Profile p. 86

Music Pick p. 39

Style Pick p. 90 Travel Pick p. 94

Art Pick p. 40 Event Pick p. 42 18 MAY 2019 |

Local Love p. 46

tribeza.com

Karen’s Pick p. 98 Dining Guide p. 104

Home Plate p. 56 Chef on the Run p. 62 Hot Damn p. 70 Kitchen Aid p. 80 ON THE COVER Aaron Franklin and James Moody photographed by Ashleigh Amoroso.


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EDITOR'S LETTER

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with a bounty of sustainably sourced and organically grown whole foods, and chefs across the city are daily bringing their diverse backgrounds and experiences to our plates and palates. To that end we wanted to know how some of those chefs grew up eating. In “Home Plate,” we ask five of our favorites to share what food was like for them growing up and what it means now. The results are beautiful, heartwarming and funny, and remind us that while things are different, they’re also the same. A shared meal is still a perfect opportunity to come together. I think we can all agree that Aaron Franklin has changed the game when it comes to barbeque in Austin and Central Texas, and we're all much better because of it. Thanks first to his eponymous Franklin Barbecue and now to Hot Luck, the festival he co-founded with James Moody and Mike Thelin, we are all able to get a taste of his perfectly executed smoked meats and happy-golucky vibe. In Dorothy Guerrero’s “Hot Damn,” we get a peek into Franklin's and Moody’s inspiration behind Hot Luck and how the two Austinites like to gather with friends. Hint – it has more to do with Frito pie than foie gras. Per usual, this is merely the tip of the iceberg. In making this issue we spent time with El Naranjo’s Iliana de la Vega (“Chef on the Run”), invited ourselves into Patricia Tamminga’s home kitchen (“Kitchen Aid”) and followed Jacob Pechenik of Lettuce Grow (“You Say You Want a (Food) Revolution”) out to Agua Dulce to watch some seedlings take root. Grab a beer and taco and enjoy what’s to come!

Don’t forget to check out Tribeza’s new event – Nourish (tribeza.com/nourish). The day-long body and mind retreat is not to be missed.

P O R T R A I T B Y J E S S I C A PAG E S A N D P H OTO G R A P H B Y C L A I R E S C H A P E R .

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s I’m sure is the case for many of you, my childhood eating experience primarily consisted of family dinners and the occasiona l me a l out. Post homework, baseball practice or kickball game all five of us would gather around the kitchen table for my mom’s meatloaf and steamed carrots (heavy on the ketchup), grilled chicken and boiled brussels sprouts (these were the pre-roasting, pre-Ina Garten days), or Dad’s grilled cheese and tomato soup (always canned and always with milk). Food was important, but things were definitely different. I had yet to try gazpacho or curry (the gazpacho came first) and Matt’s El Rancho, Hut’s Hamburgers and The Salt Lick ruled the roost when it came to dining out. Thanks to Whole Foods and East Side Café, we were all slowly learning the benefits of sprouts and smoothies but tofuas-a-staple was still years away. Thankfully Hut’s and The Salt Lick have stood the test of time and happily post-church-Sunday-lunch at Matt’s still looks and tastes much like it did 30 years ago. If anything, family dinners have become even more important in our over-scheduled and over- (under?) connected era; my husband and I try our darndest to recreate the same family dinner experiences our parents did for us, albeit with a bit more international flair. Yes, food in general, and certainly food in Austin has changed quite a bit. We are now faced

Margaret Williams margaret@tribeza.com


40 2019

CELEBRATING

FORTY YEARS AUSTIN ° TEXAS

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TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

M AY 2 01 9

18 YEARS

N O. 2 1 3

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVENTS MANAGER

Claire Schaper

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Shaleena Keefer

OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres INTERNS

Mary Margaret Hayes Arianna Jopling Andrea Mendez

WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Holly Cowart Dorothy Guerrero Lauren Jones Abigail Moore Hannah J. Phillips

The attorneys at Wynne & Wynne believe there is a way to handle family law cases by taking the high road. Our approach reduces collateral damage to all parties creating a greater opportunity for success after a difficult life transition.

COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Ashleigh Amoroso Warren Chang Holly Cowart Molly Culver Isaac Feria Jonathan Garza Cathlin McCullough Jessica Pages Kathleen Pieratt Erin Reas Claire Schaper Mackenzie Smith Kelley ILLUSTR ATOR

Jessica Fontenot

WWLAWAUSTIN.COM

512-275-2148

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


SOCIAL HOUR

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TEXAS INDEPENDENCE DAY DINNER

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On February 28, the Texas State History Museum Foundation honored Texas legends Charles Butt and Leonardo “Flaco” Jiménez at the foundation's Texas Independence Day Dinner. Held at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, the event recognized the state’s rich heritage and generated support for the museum’s educational programs.

THE CRYSTAL BALL 2019

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CAMILLE STYLES PARTY #LIKEYOUMEANIT Camille Styles kicked off SXSW with a party at the CS Bungalow on March 8, complete with jungle vibes, Thai food, mezcal cocktails and a 30-pound albino python (guests were able to pose with the constrictor!). Guests gathered under the twinkling lights for good conversation and great cocktails and partied #LikeYouMeanIt.

TEXAS INDEPENDENCE DAY DINNER: 1. Senator Dawn Buckingham & Bruce Bugg 2. Joe Straus, Kate Rogers & Bruce Esterline 3. Carla Moran, Flaco Jimenez & Jan Bullock THE CRYSTAL BALL 2019: 4. Abigail Downing & Suzanne Huff 5. Nicole, Hayes & William Kessler CAMILLE STYLES PARTY #LIKEYOUMEANIT: 6. Kim West & Kristin Gish 7. Chanel Dror Tarlo, Hannah Zahner, Camille Styles, Caroline Pinkston & Megan Leihgeber 8. Lauren Petrowski, Karen Trombetta & Jen Pinkston 9. Mairin Heard & Maddi Bourgerie

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H R I S C A S S E L L I , T H AO N G Y U E N , J A M E S F R E N C H P H OTO G R A P H Y A N D H A N N A H H A S TO N

The Palmer Events Center was transformed on March 2 for the Crystal Ball, a debutante presentation celebrating Helping Hand Home’s 126-year history as a safe haven for children suffering from abuse and neglect. Starting with brunch, the event featured a fashion show by Julian Gold and a silent auction, which raised $1.3 million to support children across Travis County.


Tracy is passionate about homes, and finding your place in Austin.

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Tracy Picone compass.com

Broker Associate tracy.picone@compass.com 512.573.8851 member

Tracy Picone is a real estate agent affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SOCIAL HOUR

PARTY AMONGST FRIENDS On March 9, Andra Liemandt and Erin Thornton invited guests to Thornton’s home for a Party Amongst Friends. The shindig launched The Mrs band’s (Liemandt is the group's drummer) newest music video, and the lifestyle arts studio Eight also made its debut. DJ Westen Borghesi spun tunes while guests sipped cocktails and enjoyed bites from Clark’s, Lamberts and Pool Burger. All the while there was dancing on the converted tennis court, lounging on the lawn and a Tribeza-curated poolside photo shoot.

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THEORY AND BUMBLE BIZZ DINNER AND PANEL For Women’s History Month, Theory and Bumble Bizz celebrated the power of female leadership with two events, on March 27 and 28. Before the Be Heard women’s leadership panel, which showcased speakers from Kendra Scott, Bumble and Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls, the brands hosted an intimate dinner at Eberly honoring inspirational women everywhere.

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The Blanton Museum of Art put on a free day-to-night community festival on March 30 to kick off spring and gear up for big changes coming to the museum’s grounds. Visitors enjoyed the perfect fusion of live music and world-class art, alongside outdoor family art activities, local food and tours of the current exhibition, “Words/Matter: Latin American Art and Language at the Blanton.”

PARTY AMONGST FRIENDS: 1. John & Erin Thornton with guest 2. Louisiana Longwell & Kumara Wilcoxon 3. Jenna Scherz & Cara Caulkins 4. Jessica & John Price THEORY AND BUMBLE BIZZ DINNER AND PANEL: 5. Danielle Sobel & Naseem Scaglione 6. Andrea Messina & Kelly Krause BLANTON BLOCK PARTY: 7. Ali Alkhafaji & Mira Garcia 8. SaulPaul 9. Robert Quevedo, Simone Wicha, Diana Reyes & Victor Martinez

26 MAY 2019 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B YJ O N AT H A N G A R Z A , E R I N R E A S A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

BLANTON BLOCK PARTY


Situated on the edge of the Hill Country ten minutes from downtown Austin, Amarra Drive is a gated community of unique homesites, exquisitely cra�ted custom homes and thoughtfully designed lock and leave residences. Vistas showcase hill country, golf course, nature preserve and downtown skyline views. Amenities including golf, tennis, pools, spa, fitness and fine dining are available to property owners.

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SOCIAL HOUR

QUEST FOR THE SUMMIT Explore Austin’s 10th annual Quest for the Summit took place at Fair Market on April 5. Partygoers snacked on bites from Crave Catering, while Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Zilker Beer kept spirits high. The event also featured a band, a live auction, a wine pull and more, all to benefit the organization’s goal of empowering youth through leadership, mentoring and outdoor adventure.

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WOMEN & THEIR WORK DREAMLIFE BASH On April 6, Women & Their Work held DreamLife Bash, an immersive art party that included performance art, a dreamlike photo booth, tarot readings, music and more. The night commemorated the many ways that artists have found dreams as a space for exploring the imagination. Proceeds went toward the organization’s mission to invest in female artists and provide educational programming to underserved kids in the Austin area.

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DSACT COCKTAIL BASH

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10 QUEST FOR THE SUMMIT: 1. Nayeli Garcia, Jenny Jensen & Leah Rios 2. Rusty Stein, Todd Hanna & Jamie Matthews 3. Francisco Tovar, Jose Campuzano & Erik Govea WOMEN & THEIR WORK DREAMLIFE BASH: 4. Carter Cowden & Katie Hirsch 5. Alyssa Taylor Wendt 6. Connie Arismendi, Meeta Morrison & Chris Cowden 7. Laura Garanzuay & Jackson Bradford DSACT COCKTAIL BASH: 8. Lauren & Sean Greenberg 9. Noah Springfield, Brenna Prior, Sofia Jimenez & Ronnie Brown 10. Allie McCann, Travis Wilson, Suzanne Wilson & Heather Singleton 11. Liz Jones-Dilworth, Jeff Bissinger & Jennifer Edwards

28 MAY 2019 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A N DY S A M S P H OTO G R A P H Y

The Down Syndrome Association of Central Texas hosted its annual Cocktail Bash on April 3. This year’s edition, adopting the motto “Kick in for Rec!” included both a live and a silent auction and raised money for DSACT’s wide array of recreational programs, including a new soccer camp and the return of its popular bike camp.


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Call me; I speak real estate. Charlotte Lipscomb REALTORÂŽ

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CRS, CLHMS, Million Dollar Guild CharlotteLipscomb.com

512.789.6225 charlotte.lipscomb@compass.com


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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

32 MAY 2019 |

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I

t was about 6:30 a.m., and I brewed a cup of coffee and melted a stick of butter at the same time. Glasses perched on my nose, pajama-clad, sleep-tangled hair in a messy bun on the top of my head, scuffing around the kitchen in my fuzzy slippers. It was earlier than my normal baking time. But this was no ordinary day. I had big plans to road-trip to see my son in college, and there was no way in hell I was showing up without some homemade chocolate chip cookies. I hurried them into Tupperware, where they oozed and tilted into one another. My car smelled delicious all the way to Houston. I miss cooking for my boy — and his posse. I miss big breakfasts, the smell of bacon and French toast wafting up the stairs like sirens, luring bedhead scruffy football players to the safe harbor of the kitchen island. I miss chili cooking all day in the crockpot and the comforting drone of football games on television and oversize boys lounging by the warm glow of a fire in the fireplace. I miss steak dinner, the summer smell of the grill and chlorine and the sound of rowdy kids jumping in the pool. It looks different now, but certain things remain the same. Now I bring food with me, baked treats or homemade favorites in portions

Comfort Food By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Jessica Fontenot that can reheat in a dormitory microwave. Or I use food as bribery, exchanged for time and connection. Whether that means sponsoring trips to H-E-B for provisions, or hosting a motley crew of new friends for dinner after a college game, or an at-home reunion of high school friends for dinner at his beloved (okay, sacred) Matt’s El Rancho (and a tab comparable to an airline ticket, whaaat?), I am game to show up and pay up if it means I get the pleasure of my people showing up, too. Food and love are inextricable. Which brings us to a bigger question: How do we nourish ourselves, and those we love? We know there are certain ways of eating that optimally fuel our bodies. I subscribe to higher wisdom most of the time, with noted exceptions like coffee, wine, margaritas and queso. We know we need both sleep and rest, which are not the same thing. A Sabbath is essential, Sunday or any day where we unplug and give ourselves permission to say “no” in order to fully recharge our “yes.” We

need a balance of connection and downtime, honoring the equilibrium of our introvert and extrovert. A screen fast once a week, or even once a month, can restore our appetite for what truly satisfies. It’s important to nourish our sense of adventure, as well as our desire to root and nest. We need to dabble in discomfort just enough that we retain our awareness and appreciation for being comfortable. We must thoughtfully prioritize all aspects of Self — physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. In a world that emphasizes what we Do, we cannot neglect who we want to Be. Overall health is manifested in the intersection. I believe the most important source of nourishment is cultivated by our relationships — with God, self and others, in that order. Time invested in these connections is not dessert or a snack shoveled on the run; it’s the sustenance of the main course. Fast food might make us temporarily full, but the calories are empty. We cannot possibly or properly feed our people when we are starving. We teach health by living healthy. Wellness is about maintaining a deep well. Intentionally surrounding ourselves with people who comfort and inspire, beloved people who simultaneously call us home and call us higher, is ultimately what infuses our life with health, energy, love and meaning.

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Three-Course Feels. WHERE WELLNESS MEETS THE WATER Visit Lake Austin Spa Resort and experience

conscientious cuisine, rejuvenating world-class spa treatments, our beautiful lakeside resort WHERE WELLNESS MEETS THE WATER and a feeling you’ll enjoy long after your stay.

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By the SPOONFUL

TRIBEZ A

TALK

What if you could create a delicious yogurt without dairy? The brainchild of Erin Asaad, Culina yogurts rely on a plant base, making them lactose-free and veganfriendly. Flavors like bourbonvanilla and blueberry-lavender use coconut cream and maple syrup for an ultra-thick texture and natural sweetness. Find Culina at Whole Foods and Central Market.

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

CULINAYOGURT.COM

New ’Cue Juicy news for barbecue lovers: Micklethwait opened its second location, Micklethwait Market & Grocery, in Smithville in February. Like its original East Austin outpost, the new spot will serve up smoked brisket and ribs. Plus, visitors are in for even more treats in the form of baked goods, deli meats, beer and wine, and a selection of home goods. CRAFTMEATSAUSTIN.COM

36 MAY 2019 |

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Straight Up Before launching Frankly Organic Vodka last year, Kristen Risk and her husband, Philip, were focused on living a healthy lifestyle. “We were running marathons and eating healthy and never really gave a thought to what we were drinking,” Kristen says. The couple, along with Kent Croutcher, who’d worked with Kendall Jackson and Deep Eddy, wanted to do something different, starting with putting an ingredient label on Frankly’s bottles. “The sprits industry doesn’t have the same transparency requirements that all other food and beverage products must abide by, so many consumers don’t even question what’s in their vodka or their spirit,” Kristen says. The vodkas focus on organic fruits and ingredients like turmeric, ginger and maca roots. “Those functional ingredients are in our bottles, and that goes to that healthy lifestyle we like to lead,” Kristen says. “And we feel as though it contributes to the depth of flavor in each one of the profiles.” FRANKLYVODKA.COM


Organic MATTERS

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R O C H E L L E A B A N T E A N D C L AY TO N AY N E S W O R T H . B O O K P H OTO G R A P H B Y J O H N N Y A U T R Y, CO U R T E S Y O F PA U L A D I S B R O W E A N D T E N S P E E D P R E S S .

“After a career in tech and having semiretired, I went to cooking school really as a treat,” David Perkins says. “I wasn’t really planning on being in the food business.” Fast-forward a few years and Perkins is the founder and CEO of Beetnik, an organic meals company. After studying at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, Perkins was curious about finding a way to bring organic animal proteins, like beef and chicken, directly to customers without preservatives and chemicals. “We went to some grocery stores, and there

were no organic meals available to consumers, other than vegetarian meals, and we saw that as an opportunity.” Launched in 2014, today Beetnik is a family affair, as Perkins, his wife and three of their four children are involved. And the idea of family extends to the meals they make, too, as Beetnik offers more-family-size options. “Our goal is to make organic, convenient things not just for individuals, but increasingly we’re focused on everybody in the family,” Perkins says. BEETNIKFOODS.COM

SAY CHEESE Set sail with Antonelli’s this month as it takes its cheese expertise to Lady Bird Lake. Grab a spot on one of Antonelli’s Cheese-y Sunset Boat Cruises for an evening of tastings in a scenic setting. After a bubbles-and-bites kickoff, the award-winning cheese purveyors lead a guided tasting with recommended wine pairings. And if you’re hungry for more, the Hyde Park shop, started by John and Kendall Antonelli in 2010, regularly hosts Cheese 101 classes, honing in on seven styles and food pairings. ANTONELLISCHEESE.COM

Smokers Welcome For her seventh cookbook, Paula Disbrowe expanded her grilling repertoire by adding wood chips and logs to a typical charcoal grill. The smoky flavors created became the basis for “Thank You for Smoking,” a collection of 100 recipes meant to add some flamekissed dishes to weeknight meals. For a May night, Disbrowe recommends a Lefty’s Mezcal Sting cocktail, adding, “It would be delicious with Hot Luck Tri-Tip, named after Aaron Franklin’s food festival later [in the] month, or the Lemongrass Pork Chops with Charred Green Beans — two of my favorite recipes!” PAULADISBROWE.COM/BOOKS

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment CHICK COREA & BÉLA FLECK

May 4 Paramount Theatre IHEARTCOUNTRY FESTIVAL

May 4 Frank Erwin Center JMBLYA

May 4 Circuit of the Americas ELLE KING

May 18 ACL Live at The Moody Theater JA RULE & ASHANTI

May 18 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park MURS

May 18 Stubb’s BBQ ZZ TOP & BAD CO W/ CHEAP TRICK

May 19 Austin360 Amphitheater INDIA.ARIE

May 6 Stubb’s BBQ

May 20 Paramount Theatre

ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES

May 10 Stubb’s BBQ

THE AVETT BROTHERS

May 10 & 11 Whitewater Amphitheater

THE DRUMS

May 23 Emo’s Austin THE MRS

May 23 Stubb’s BBQ NEW ORLEANS CLUB REVISITED: TAMECA JONES

JIM JAMES

May 11 Stubb’s BBQ

May 23 Symphony Square

JOSHUA RADIN

May 12 One World Theatre FLUX PAVILION

May 16 Vulcan Gas Company DWIGHT YOAKAM

May 17 Whitewater Amphitheater POP 2000 TOUR

May 17 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park TOADIES

May 17 Emo’s Austin

38 MAY 2019 |

BEN PLATT

DAVID GRAY

May 25 ACL Live at The Moody Theater CODY JOHNSON & FRIENDS

May 25 & 26 Whitewater Amphitheater SUNSET SESSIONS: WHITE DENIM

May 26 Eberly

JUDAS PRIEST

May 28 & 29 ACL Live at The Moody Theater JESSIE JAMES DECKER

May 30 ACL Live at The Moody Theater tribeza.com

SLUSHII

May 30 Emo’s Austin

FRIDAY NIGHT FLIX: SIXTEEN CANDLES

May 24 Lone Star Court

SNOW THA PRODUCT

May 31 Emo’s Austin

FILM GAME OF THRONES WATCH PARTIES

Through May 19 Native Hostel

CINE LAS AMERICAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

May 1 – 5 Various Locations

MOVIES IN THE PARK: THE ROAD TO EL DORADO

May 3 Dick Nichols Park

MOBILE LOAVES & FISHES: COMMUNITY CINEMA

May 3 – 31 Community First! Village

CINEMA ON THE CREEK: CHRISTO’S VALLEY CURTAIN & SHORTS

May 19 Symphony Square

MODIFIED SCREENING & PANEL

May 21 AFS Cinema

MOVIES IN THE PARK: THE LITTLE MERMAID

May 23 Dove Springs Park

SUMMER CLASSIC FILM SERIES

May 23 – 26 Paramount Theatre

THEATER

COMEDY ¡ESTAR GUARS!: A MAY THE FOURTH/CINCO DE MAYO COMEDY

May 3 – 11 Ground Floor Theatre

THE BALLAD OF KLOOK AND VINETTE

LOVETT OR LEAVE IT

Through May 26 ZACH Theatre

May 5 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

CATS

FUNNIEST PERSON IN AUSTIN FINALS

May 7 – 12 Bass Concert Hall THE MERCHANT OF VENICE

May 8 – 26 Zilker Hillside Theater

(UN)DOCUMENTS

May 9 – 18 The VORTEX

BALLET AUSTIN: GISELLE

May 10 – 12 Long Center

DEX & ABBY

May 16 – June 1 Ground Floor Theatre PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE

May 17 – June 9 City Theatre Austin

RAIN RHYTHMS & DANCE TOOFAN

May 19 Long Center

CHICKENS IN THE YARD

May 24 – June 1 The VORTEX HAMILTON

May 28 – June 16 Bass Concert Hall THE BOOK OF WILL

May 31 – June 30 Austin Playhouse

May 13 Cap City Comedy Club

GRANDSLAM COMEDY HOUR

May 17 The Hideout Theatre

THE JIMMY DORE SHOW LIVE

May 18 Stateside at the Paramount ON CINEMA AT THE CINEMA LIVE!

May 18 Paramount Theatre

PEOPLE OF COLOR COMEDY FESTIVAL

May 24 & 25 AISD Performing Arts Center HANNAH GADSBY

May 30 Paramount Theatre

FAMILY MATILDA THE MUSICAL

Through May 12 ZACH Theatre

SUMMER AND BIRD

Through May 12 Austin Playhouse

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F T H E PA R A M O U N T T H E AT R E

MUSIC


WAKE UP, BROTHER BEAR!

Through May 26 ZACH Theatre

DARCI LYNNE & FRIENDS

May 5 Bass Concert Hall

DISNEY ON ICE: FROZEN

May 8 – 12 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

BOCCA LEE: MOTHER’S DAY

May 11 Capital One Cafe Domain NORTHSIDE

THE MUSIC OF DAVID BOWIE FOR KIDS

May 19 The Mohawk

FAMILY FILM FESTIVAL: THE WIZARD OF OZ

May 25 Paramount Theatre

SLIME POP AUSTIN

May 26 Palmer Events Center

OTHER UNPLUGGED AT THE GROVE

May 2 – 30 Shady Grove

VIOLET CROWN FESTIVAL

May 4 Brentwood Park

PECAN STREET SPRING ARTS FESTIVAL

May 4 & 5 East 6th Street

THE PEACHED TORTILLA COOKBOOK SIGNING

May 7 BookPeople

TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL BOOK TIPS & SIPS

May 7 Prohibition Creamery

WIZARDS AND WITCHES BEER FESTIVAL

May 10 & 11 Fair Market

AUTHOR SERIES: MIMI SWARTZ

May 14 Chez Zee American Bistro LULUFEST

May 17 & 18 Various Locations FESTIVAL OF GOOD

May 18 Goodnight Ranch

WHIMSY & WONDER FESTIVAL

May 18 Downtown Liberty Hill, TX THE AUSTIN RECORD CONVENTION

May 18 & 19 Palmer Events Center

RENEGADE AUSTIN CRAFT FAIR

May 18 & 19 Fair Market

TEXAS MONTHLY LIVE!

May 22 Paramount Theatre

HOT LUCK FESTIVAL

May 23 – 26 Various Locations

MUSIC PICK

India.Arie By Holly Cowart PAR AMOUNT THEATRE, MAY 20

Singer-songwriter India.Arie’s story is one of consistent growth. Her first studio album, “Acoustic Soul,” put a national spotlight on the R&B artist in 2001, propelling her Grammy-winning platinum second album, “Voyage to India.” Her music has always felt like a personal diary full of ideas on life, love and identity. Now, after a hiatus, she returns with a national tour and brand-new full-length album, “Worthy.” The genre-spanning sound features Arie’s rich, satin voice alongside uplifting harmonies and a somewhat folksy acoustic guitar. But her message remains clear. “If we can learn what it means to really love ourselves,” croons the soulful vocalist in “Prayer for Humanity,” “then we can learn to love our neighbors as we love ourselves.” Her positivity produces a ripple effect, solidifying Arie as a symbol of self-love, understanding and strength — especially as an African American woman working to create space in an often claustrophobic society. And despite selling millions of records and garnering worldwide admiration, Arie has remained true to her visionary spirit.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts A SHARED VISION

Through April 13 Davis Gallery

INTO THE DIRT

Through May 11 MASS Gallery

UNUSUAL KINSHIPS: MAGDALENA JARKOWIEC

Through May 18 Dimension Gallery

UNITY OF OPPOSITES

Through May 18 Big Medium Gallery

CALDER KAMIN: WHAT A MESS

Through May 24 Central Library Main Gallery

ART PICK

Texas From Above: The Photographs of Jay B Sauceda By Holly Cowart BULLOCK TEX A S STATE HISTORY MUSEUM, THROUGH JUNE 16

Texas is big. Really big. Even if you’ve lived here your entire life, it can be a hard place to define. And just when you think you’ve seen it all, one lone photographer-pilot-cowboy comes along and flips your perspective upside down. Jay B Sauceda, author and founder of the e-commerce company Sauceda Industries, is a nonstop powerhouse of creative energy. Since graduating from the University of Texas in 2007, he has donned many hats — most recently that of aerial photographer with a freshly published body of work and a five-month-long gallery exhibition. It all started in 2014. After taking to the skies in his single-engine Cessna, he flew above endless miles of winding highways, patchwork fields and Gulf waves, capturing a breathtaking glimpse into the varied landscape of Texas’ full perimeter. While his bird’s-eye view depicts large-scale scenes, their intimate, often poetic nature creates a moment of stillness and reflection. Sauceda holds a deep-rooted love for the Lone Star State, and in each photograph it’s readily apparent. “Texas From Above” will remain on view at the Bullock Texas State History Museum through June 16. Considering how this series proudly chronicles Texas’ geographical history, the pairing is a perfect fit.

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NOISY LULLABY

Through May 25 Davis Gallery GABRIELLA VILLARREAL

Through May 26 Ao5 Gallery THE LIVING NEED LIGHT, THE DEAD NEED MUSIC

Through May 26 Blanton Museum of Art WORDS/MATTER: LATIN AMERICAN ART & LANGUAGE AT THE BLANTON

Through May 26 Blanton Museum of Art

NEW MONUMENTS FOR NEW CITIES

Through May 31 Waller Creek

CROSSING THE LINE

Through June 3 Mexic-Arte Museum

ROSA NUSSBAUM: HORIZONLAND

Through June 6 Women & Their Work

CAULDRONS & CRUCIBLES: IN SEARCH OF THE SUBLIME

Through June 7 Lora Reynolds Gallery

DIANA GREENBERG: SOLO SHOW

May 4 – 26 Wally Workman Gallery

WEST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR

May 11 & 12, 18 & 19 Various Locations

NEW MONUMENTS FOR NEW CITIES: ARTISTS IN CONVERSATION

May 16 Symphony Square

COMPOSITE LANDSCAPES: EARLY FILM SPECIAL EFFECTS

May 16 Harry Ransom Center

SOLO EXHIBITION: SUSAN SCAFATI ARTIST’S RECEPTION

May 17 Austin Central Library THE BALLAD OF WESTERN EXPRESSIONISM

May 3 – June 2 Yard Dog Art Gallery HERITAGE

Through June 8 Asian American Resource Center


Eli Halpin Gallery Studio Gift Shop 1023 Springdale Rd Austin Tx

elihalpin.com

Eat here. It’s good for you. atxfood.co | 512 621 2680 1601 Barton Springs Road, Austin, TX 78704


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

Free Shakespeare in Zilker Park: The Merchant of Venice By Holly Cowart ZILKER HILL SIDE THEATER, MAY 8–26

Our city’s dedicated Shakespeare aficionados are teaming up with the Austin Parks and Recreation Department for the 35th annual Free Shakespeare in Zilker Park, a series of performances open to all at Zilker Hillside Theater. This month, “The Merchant of Venice” will be taking center stage. Written between 1596 to 1598, the story focuses on Bassanio, who, in an effort to gain the wealthy Portia’s hand in marriage, calls on his dear friend and Venetian merchant Antonio for a loan. Antonio then becomes indebted to the begrudged moneylender Shylock, who requests his payment be returned with “a pound of flesh.” Intertwining tones of romance, comedy and danger culminate in a lively trial, metaphorically underscoring the pitfalls of greed and what a life is truly worth. Set in the Belle Époque period of 1890s Italy and brought to life by theater company Austin Shakespeare, the play highlights the immersive design of artistic director Ann Ciccolella and costume designer Aaron Kubacak. Spread your blankets across the grassy lawn and kick-start summer with this imaginative community production. Performances will take place Thursdays through Sundays until May 26, with a preview show on May 8 at 8 p.m.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y K I M B E R L E Y M E A D

MUSEUMS


Mexican Cuisine. Exquisite Atmosphere. Unparalleled Art. 2330 W. North Loop | Austin, Texas | 512.459.4121 | www.FondaSanMiguel.com

C E L E B R AT E !


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8–5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M–Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa–Su 11–4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 1600 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com THE TWYLA GALLERY 209 W. 9th St., #200 (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 sites.utexas.edu/utvac WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org

INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


DIANA GREENBERG Wally Workman Galler y 1202 West 6th Street Austin, TX 78703 wallyworkman.com 512.472.7428 Tues- Sat 10-5pm Sun 12-4pm image: Red Bud Tree, mixed media on canvas, 36 x 48 inches

James Allen has joined our Home Lending team. Whether you’re buying a new home or refinancing, James can find the right mortgage option for you.

James Allen, Home Lending Advisor On a recent morning run, James playfully announced his new position with Chase. You can now find him at downtown their d location.

512-657-4343 • j.allen@chase.com homeloan.chase.com/j.allen • NMLS ID: 572997

All home lending products are subject to credit and property approval. Rates, program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. Home lending products offered by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. ©2018 JPMorgan Chase & Co.


LOC AL LOVE

Shiner

Austin

Houston

In the Can Shiner, Day Quencher

Circle Brewing Co., Lady Bird American IPA

Karbach Brewing Co., Crawford Bock

“We wanted a flavorful and

Designed by Trina Bentley of Make

Austin-based creative agency

easy-drinking light beer with a

& Matter, the Lady Bird (named for

Guerilla Suit joined forces with Karbach and the Houston Astros

refreshing can to match,” says

Lady Bird Johnson) is meant to evoke

Shiner’s Nick Weiland. Austin’s

sunny Hill Country drives and fields

just in time for baseball season.

McGarrah Jessee led the can

of bluebonnets. “The simple and

“The can design is a blend of old

design, whose crisp tiles and

elegant can design reinforces the

and new, inspired by the Astros’

vibrant colors are meant to

IPA’s inspiration while also reflecting

throwback rainbow uniforms

evoke a sunny summer day in

Circle’s commitment to use as few

and Minute Maid Park’s iconic

small-town Texas.

ingredients as possible,” says the

‘Crawford Boxes,’” explains

brand's co-founder Ben Sabel.

Guerilla Suit’s Julie Warenoff.


Austin

Salado

Del Valle

Remember when beer cans were a thing of shame and relegated to the most causal Styrofoam-cooleronly gatherings? No longer. Look along any grocery, café or bodega shelf and you’ll be met with myriad options of saturated color and inspiring design. Retro fonts, check. Illustrated wraparounds, check. Abstract and cheeky prints, check. We’ve rounded up a few of our favorite designs, all of which were created in the Lone Star State. Cheers! By Margaret Williams Photographs by Kathleen Pieratt

Barrow Brewing Company, Creek Don’t Rise Lager

Austin Beerworks, Bloodwork Orange

since 2016. Head brewer Dusan

Created by designers Keith

the Bloodwork Orange can,

Kwiatkowski, along with David

Davis Young and Bryan Butler,

which was first released

Kampa, led the HefeWeizen can

the Creek Don’t Rise can

in 2015. Austin Beerworks’

Live Oak, HefeWeizen Live Oak has been available on draft since 1997 but only in cans

Helms Workshop designed

design, “with the intention of

debuted in 2017. “As the beer

Michael Graham says, “The

creating something eye-catching,

was first brewed during a 2016

wrapped pattern highlights

classic and consistent,” according

Salado flood, Young chose to

components within the beer,

to Live Oak’s Myk O’Connor. “We

incorporate a lifesaver into

while also giving a nod to

let the beer speak for itself.”

the design,” explains Barrow

the beer’s namesake film, ‘A

Brewing’s KD Hill.

Clockwork Orange.’”


COMMUNITY PROFILE

Listening In The Carpenter’s Andrew Knowlton and Bon Appétit’s Julia Kramer talk bagels, leaving New York and why eating for a living is sometimes a contact sport 48 MAY 2019 |

tribeza.com

By Margaret Williams Photographs by Jessica Pages


W

We had the fun of eavesdropping as two friends and former colleagues reunited during SXSW. One, Andrew Knowlton, who after 18 years at  Bon Appétit (formerly as its deputy editor and currently as an editor-at-large), has now made his home in Austin, thanks to his undying need to own a grill (or three) and a project he couldn’t turn down: The Carpenter Hotel. Knowlton, along with his wife, Christina Skogly Knowlton, serves as a partner at the Mighty Union, the hospitality group that owns and runs the space. The other, Julia K ramer, Bon Appétit’s current deputy editor, was in town to appear on a SXSW panel (alongside Sam Hellman-Mass, owner of buzzy Suerte) and possibly do some scouting for the magazine’s Hot 10, which Knowlton and Kramer used to work on together but this year Kramer is leading solo. Like any good journalist, she played her cards close to the vest as the friends commiserated over and laughed about eating their way across the country.

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Knowlton and Kramer catching up inside Carpenters Hall.

ANDREW KNOWLTON: How many times have you been to Austin? Before this visit? JULIA KRAMER: Once. Fifteen years ago. I came to SXSW when I was in college to see all the documentary films. I was a real film nerd. AK: People who’ve been here forever worry about what it’s going to become. Is it still going to be weird, or whatever? Have you seen a change since your last visit? JK: I swear to you, the entirety of the last time I was here I was in a movie theater. So this is my first real exposure to Austin. You were the one who always came here. AK: Yeah, I always came to Austin when we were doing the Hot 10. It was also always warm down here in spring.

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JK: Clearly you knew what you were doing. So when did you first come to Austin? AK: In probably ’99. I worked for Lingua Franca magazine, so I came to an academic book conference. I remember having Tex-Mex, but I’m not sure where. It hadn’t become a food city yet. JK: And what were the first places that made it a food city? AK: One of the first restaurants I wrote about was Fonda San Miguel. It’s like an old-school grande dame Mexican restaurant, not Tex-Mex. It’s an amazing spot. But I think the thing that put Austin on the map was probably Uchi. And that’s weird, because sushi in landlocked Austin was kind of crazy. And then when MMH [McGuire Moorman Hospitality] relaunched Jeffrey’s, it

kind of caught fire. Chefs didn’t have to be in New York or L.A. or San Francisco anymore. JK: You lived in New York for 20 years? AK: Twenty-three years, yeah. JK: And you wanted a backyard for your kids, no competition to get them into fifth grade, that type of thing. But how did you choose Austin? AK: Basically I didn’t want to share a bathroom with three women, and they didn’t want to share one with me. But the real reason was the Carpenter project. Putting all that stuff that I’ve learned at restaurants into this. I remember coming down and running along the lake. I was like, this is the kind of place that I want to live. And then also, the big thing for Christina and I, we knew people would come visit. But it is trippy


having you here, my old colleague. You’re about to hit the road solo for Hot 10. I did it for several years, then we split it up, and then I did it last year on my own again. The funny thing is, the year we did it together, you were pregnant, and now you’re pregnant again and you’re hitting the road. Are you scared? JK: I’m pretty terrified. [Inter viewer inter r upts, a sking for an explanation of Bon Appétit’s Hot 10.] JK: We’re tasked with coming up with this list of America’s best new restaurants — places that have opened between May 1 of the previous year and May 1 of that year when the list is due. Because of Andrew’s and my nature, all the research happens basically in March, April and the first week of May. AK: Or, as I like to call it, the “fat season.” So where are you in planning everything? JK: Basically, I have a bunch of little legs planned. If you remember, three years ago, I was like, “All right, Andrew, I’ve got a 17-day trip planned. See you in two and a half weeks.” AK: And what did I say to you? JK: You said that was a bad idea, and in fact it was. I ended up in the ER. You’re on a flight basically every other day, and all this — AK: Eating. JK: Yeah, all this eating. I showed up at my folks’ house, and they took me to the ER. I had pneumonia. So that was a bad situation, but my point in telling that story was that I can’t go on a 17-day trip again, because I have a 19-month-old at home. AK: Yeah, going on the road for three months and eating out five times a day sounds like an amazing proposition. And it is. But it’s also a contact sport. I remember last year waking up one morning in Seattle, and I was severely depressed. I hadn’t found any good restaurants, I felt like shit, and I couldn’t complain because Christina’s home with two kids. And I just sat in the room the entire day and watched Oprah reruns. That was the low point in my career.

JK: Okay, people ask me all the time, what is Andrew’s role at that restaurant? Because it’s very unusual to go from being someone who reviewed restaurants to being part of opening one. AK: When Christina got involved, I was kind of helping out and consulting. Then I found out that you can’t be involved and do it half-ass. So I’m here more often than not. Working with Grae [Nonas, head chef], changing the menus, the playlist, the lighting. All those things that you and I critique, that all comes back to me. Christina and I eat here once a week, so we’re not just on the floor. JK: Were you pretty involved in the menu development? AK: Yeah, Grae would come over to my house

"That's the most Austin thing I've ever heard." and he would cook two things. Almost like Bon Appétit in the test kitchen. We started piecing the menu together. But it’s scary when you open something like this. You’re opening yourself up to the public, to Yelp reviews, the things I never really thought about. Although I think we were always sympathetic to restaurateurs and chefs. We know how hard it is. Especially the kitchen, nobody works harder. JK: So what’s the thing about living in Austin that you like so much, that you can never live in New York again without? AK: Well, I knew what it was even when I was in New York, and when I moved down here, it just affirmed that I could never live without a grill for the rest of my life. And I don’t have one grill. I don’t have two grills. I have three grills.

JK: Wait, what? You have three? AK: So I have a classic Weber grill. And then I have a PK griller, which is like a stainless steel, kind of cast iron, but made into a grill. And then I bought one on the side of the road when I was driving. It’s basically an oil barrel cut in half, and it has a chimney. So it’s my smoker. JK: That’s the most Austin thing I’ve ever heard. AK: It is. I mean, with smoking, you just sit back and have a Lone Star, because nobody works in Austin either. So it’s great. You have all the time in the world. JK: When I think of you in New York, I think of you riding your bike home after dinner across the Brooklyn bridge in the freezing rain and snow. You were basically living an Austin lifestyle there. AK: I was. Can you ever see yourself moving? JK: I might be able to, but then I wouldn’t have a husband or children. Zach is a real city person. He’s that person on the sidewalk, walking so fast, they’re basically pushing you. AK: He needs that juice. JK: He thrives on that. AK: But you guys are a little bit younger, so give it five or 10 years. The one thing that I worry about here for you is the bagel selection. JK: I just ate a bagel. Biederman’s Deli? It was pretty good! AK: There’s a reason why the tortilla is the tortilla down here. It’s because it’s so hard to cook good bread with the temperature and humidity. So Christina and I, instead of buying bread like we did in New York, we always have a side of tortillas when we cook just to wrap around whatever. I stopped trying to force bagels and just embraced tortillas. Because the tortillas down here are awesome. JK: Yeah. So when I’m ready to live without bagels, I’ll let you know. This story is part of our new series “Listening In,” where we pair SXSW speakers and artists with their Austin analogue and then happily eavesdrop on the exchange. Find the complete series at tribeza.com/listening-in/.

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COMMUNITY PICK

You Say You Want a (Food) Revolution ZOOEY DESCHANEL AND JACOB PECHENIK ARE EMPOWERING PEOPLE TO RECONSIDER THE FOOD SYSTEM AND RECONNECT WITH WHAT THEY E AT By Abby Moore

Zooey Deschanel in front of Lettuce Grow's hydroponic farmstands. Photograph by Max Wanger.

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Jacob Pechenik leaving the greenhouse where Lettuce Grow's seedlings are grown. Photograph by Claire Schaper.

W

HEN JACOB PECHENIK,

entrepreneur, film producer and husband to actress Zooey Deschanel, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in 2008, he met an Austinite on the expedition. The two hit it off, prompting Pechenik to visit the following month. He returned several times, soon making more friends in Austin than he had in the eight years he'd spent in New York. “Austin has such a sense of community,” he says. “Right now, I spend most of my time in L.A., and it’s not that way at all.” So when it came time to launch their new company, Lettuce Grow, a hydroponic farmstand and seedling subscription service, he and Deschanel chose Austin to be

home to the company’s largest farm. “It’s perfect for Lettuce Grow,” Deschanel chimes in. “It’s a place where people have real pride in local food.” The network of farms, which extends into California and will soon include operations in Michigan and Florida, provides support for owners of Lettuce Grow’s farmstands. The product, a minimalistic white tower made of ocean plastic, is sold in three heights. Each tier of the farmstand has potting holes where seedlings are planted and grown. The concept empowers people to grow 20 percent of their food at home. “We wanted to figure out a way we could make growing at home easy, affordable and accessible, and hydroponics was the perfect way to do that,” explains Deschanel. Rather than expecting

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COMMUNITY PICK

Scenes from Agua Dulce farm, which is Lettuce Grow's homebase. Photographs by Claire Schaper. LEFT: Photograph of Pechenik and Deschanel by Laura Hajar.

members to acquire a green thumb, farmers nurture baby seedlings for the first two to three weeks, before distributing them through the company’s monthly subscription service. The farmers and data scientists at Lettuce Grow work with members’ information to curate personalized packages. Zip codes indicate sunlight index and daily temperature so they can determine which varieties will grow and how quickly. Along with the seedlings, they include recipes, to keep members consuming creatively. “We’re not just about growing food,” Pechenik says. “We’re about delivering nutrition and helping people eat better.” The mission coincides with Deschanel and Pechenik’s other endeavor,

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The Farm Project, which empowers people to reconnect with food by raising awareness of agricultural practices and their ethical implications. The initiative was started after Deschanel became pregnant with their first child, in 2015. “We wanted a healthy baby,” Pechenik says, “and that led to a lot of curiosity. ‘Why is good food so expensive and hard to come by when processed alternatives are free-flowing?’” They decided through their health-conscious curiosities that the best way to solve the problem was to reengage consumers. The Farm Project qualifies people to have opinions on how their food is sourced, while Lettuce Grow provides them the resources to produce it themselves.


“There’s really nothing stronger than letting people grow their own food.”

“There’s really nothing stronger than letting people grow their own food,” Pechenik says. “When you raise something, watching it die or be thrown out is the most depressing feeling.” According to Pechenik, 52 percent of produce is wasted in the current supply chain. A traditional food system sends lettuce over a journey of 10 or 11 days, he says. By the time it’s shelved, it may already be wilting. “Our lives were changed when we started growing food at home and saw how much more delicious and nutritious our food was when it didn’t have to travel thousands of miles,” recalls Deschanel. The hydroponic device also reduces water waste by 95 percent, compared with a traditional garden. The electrical pump is triggered every 30

minutes, recirculating water within the farmstand. Not only does Lettuce Grow eliminate environmental costs, it also eliminates the modern challenges of growing. “We’ve been growing food for millions of years. It’s really in our DNA to do that,” Pechenik says. “But with 50 percent of the population living in cities, there’s not enough space, people don’t have time, and planting yields unpredictable results.” Farmstands, however, can be placed on balconies and sidewalks and will soon be made for indoors. Explains Deschanel, “They allow you to grow tons of produce with very little time and effort.” The three-by-three-foot stand yields the same amount of produce as a 40-square-foot garden, making fresh food accessible regardless of space. In an effort to eliminate other barriers to access, Deschanel and Pechenik implemented a give-back program, called Lettuce Give. For every 10 farmstands sold, one is donated to an underserved school or community. “We believe everyone deserves fresh food grown with love,” says Deschanel. “It's an important part of our mission to make this available to everyone.” As parents to a three-and-a-half-year-old daughter and a 22-monthold son, the founders share a passion for educating and fostering a healthy future for children. Their toddler is evidence of the food revolution that could be sparked by like-minded initiatives. She eats broccoli, radishes and chives straight from the family’s farmstand, according to Pechenik. “I guess we’re our own client,” he says with a laugh, “but when our kids pick the food themselves, they’re proud of it. It opens the door for them to see the world in a different way.” Deschanel and Pechenik desire that experience for all of their members, so people will begin investing in food raised with love, care and nutritional value in mind.

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WHO: Sarah McIntosh WHAT: Owner and chef, ƒpicerie

and ƒpicerie at the Contemporary HOMETOWN: Shreveport, Louisiana FOOD: Seafood gumbo with shrimp, oysters, crawfish, blue crabs, redfish and blackfish “Seafood gumbo is normally made during Lent, but it also coincides with crawfish season, so you use the shells leftover from a big crawfish boil to make the broth. Food was a huge focus in my house growing up. That’s just the culture in Louisiana. But also my maternal grandmother, Drendy, was a huge cook, and every time we walked in her house [in Charleston, Missouri] she was cooking something."

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WHO: Erind Halilaj WHAT: Executive chef,

Il Brutto and La Matta HOMETOWN: Umbria, Italy FOOD: Umbricelli with fava beans, black truffle, pecorino cheese, black pepper and olive oil “I mean, everybody cooks in Italy. Regardless of what job you do, you cook. Because it’s not just about eating food, but about being together. You share an experience. Think about fava beans like you would crawfish. You put them in the middle of a table and everyone gets messy and drinks. On a Sunday morning before lunch, farmers come with cases of the beans, and people drink red wine, eat pecorino cheese and clean fava beans.”

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WHO: Tavel Bristol-Joseph WHAT: Pastry chef and partner, Emmer & Rye, Henbit, TLV and Hestia HOMETOWN: Georgetown, Guyana FOOD: Curry chicken with red potatoes, ginger coconut milk and a blue emmer roti

“Growing up, my grandparents had seven kids and two grandkids in a two-bedroom house. Food was scarce at times, so when you had it, you cherished it. I became a chef so that I could give, because I understand what it’s like to be without. In Guyana there’s a strong Indian influence. It’s all about eating with your hands. First you rip the roti and then dip it into the sauce. You want that bread to soak up some of the moisture so you get a really juicy bite. Make sure you get some meat, make sure you get some potatoes, then kind of shovel it into your mouth.” tribeza.com

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WHO: Ling Qi Wu WHAT: Owner and chef,

Lin Asian Bar + Dim Sum HOMETOWN: Langqi, China FOOD: Fujian red wine chicken with rice “This is my favorite dish my grandma made growing up. She would raise chickens in her backyard, so whenever we had a special day, we’d catch one and clean it up. We'd chop up the chicken, marinate it — a little bit of salt, wine and ginger with rice wine paste — and stir-fry it with some spicy chile paste. My grandma taught me a lot. She never complained and always worked happy.”

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WHO: Ferm’n Nœ–ez WHAT: Executive chef, Suerte HOMETOWN: Torre—n, Mexico FOOD: Black bean tamal with picadillo

“When I was a kid, I was the pickiest eater. Sometimes my parents would have to take me to McDonald’s. I was that kid. Growing up in Mexico, there’s all these options for having delicious food every day. I always took that for granted until high school, when my dad was diagnosed with prostate cancer. A lot of things changed in our household. I went from Wednesday night tamales to Thursday morning steamed broccoli. That got me thinking about what I really liked about cooking and why all of a sudden I didn't like this new food.”

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By Anne Bruno Photographs by Claire Schaper 62 MAY 2019 |

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ChefRun ON THE

Iliana de la Vega has been making traditional Mexican cuisine for more than 25 years and while she's appreciative of the sudden recognition, it really is all about the work

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C

Chef Iliana de la Vega is a woman in constant motion. On the morning we meet in her East Austin home, she’s working on a menu for a Cinco de Mayo celebration to take place on the campus of Stanford University. As one of only three consulting chefs there, her work in the dining halls and concept cafés of the prestigious institution brings a food-centric perspective on cultural learning. As soon as our conversation ends, the Mexico City native will be on her laptop emailing contacts in Oaxaca about a private tour she’s leading in April, and then it’s out the door to El Naranjo, the restaurant she and her husband, Ernesto Torrealba opened in 2012, where she is executive chef. While de la Vega travels to Mexico and Stanford’s campus several times a year, as well as other locations to consult with clients, most of the work she does outside of the restaurant takes place via laptop and cellphone in the unassuming chef’s home office, otherwise known as her kitchen table.

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The semifinalist for this year’s James Beard Award for Best Chef Southwest is low-key by nature. It’s apparent that although she’s deeply appreciative of the attention such recognition brings, for de la Vega, it’s all about the work. She conveys that accolades are nice, but she’s not doing anything now that she hasn’t been doing for more than 25 years; she has always been steadfast in meeting her own standards, which are typically higher than anyone else’s. Widely recognized as an expert on traditional Mexican cuisine, for years de la Vega has been lauded by the likes of The New York Times and Bon Appetít for her handson skills and historical knowledge. To hear her speak on the seemingly endless varieties of Mexican chiles is a short-form master class encompassing millennia of her home country’s heritage. A quick YouTube search reveals cooking demonstrations, conference presentations and media interviews in both English and Spanish. De la Vega's first restaurant and subsequent cooking school were located in Oaxaca, her mother’s hometown. She and Torrealba, an architect by training, moved there shortly after getting married and opened Restaurante El Naranjo in centuries-old colonial building. For almost 10 years, de la Vega created dishes that highlighted a balance of flavors using only fresh, handpicked ingredients, conspicuously omitting lard. “It was a bit radical to the people there, and many of the locals didn’t like it,” de la Vega explains. “But what I was doing was

going back to the real roots, and that’s not lard. Lard came with the Spaniards. It wasn’t there before. Chiles, tomatoes, corn, beans — fresh and where you can experience all the flavors. And I like lard, just not when I'm cooking a mole.” In 2006 the region was engulfed in political unrest, and in a matter of days, de la Vega and Torrealba made the wrenching decision to leave Oaxaca with their two teenage daughters for the United States. The family started in New Mexico but soon moved to Texas when the Culinary Institute of America’s newly established San Antonio campus came calling, asking de la Vega to initiate a Latin Cuisine program, which she led for five years. “When we first came to the U.S., it was very difficult,” she says. “And after I started at the CIA and was commuting from Austin to San Antonio, a lot of time alone in the car, I realized I was mourning what we left. I really missed it.” After a successful trial run with a food trailer, de la Vega and Torrealba opened El Naranjo at 85 Rainey Street. The restaurant’s reputation has gained even greater attention for its chef and piqued an interest in the places from which she draws inspiration. Three and a half years ago, de la Vega and her daughter Isabel Torrealba, a journalist and anthropologist, started Mexican Culinary Traditions. The guided tours and cooking classes they lead in Oaxaca and Mexico City are another thing on the busy chef’s plate, but they feed her passion for sharing everything she loves about Mexico.


Chef de la Vega • James Beard Semifinalist for Best Chef Southwest (2019) • Recipient of Ohtli Award, the Mexican government’s highest honor given to Mexicans living abroad (2014) • Named Hispanic Female Entrepreneur of the Year by the Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (2014) • Appointed Culinary Institute of America’s first Specialist for Mexican/Latin Cuisines, Member of the CIA’s Consultative Council on Latin American Cuisine and launched the CIA’s Latin Cuisines Certificate Program (2007-2012)

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A Typical Workday Chef de la Vega’s workweek starts on Tuesday morning and winds down after the final brunch service late Sunday afternoon. Sunday evening is downtime, and Monday is her official day off. That doesn’t mean that Monday is without work, but the goal is a somewhat slower pace, doing what didn’t get done the week before and preparing for the one ahead.

Tuesday – Saturday 8:30 a.m. De la Vega and Torrealba have breakfast together. She checks emails and works on recipes for the restaurant and her consulting clients, including Stanford University and other public and private organizations. The chef and her husband head to the restaurant in separate cars. 10:30 a.m. At the restaurant, prep for the day’s meals are underway as the kitchen buzzes with activity. “I have a good team. I expedite things, but my team is reliable, very professional. That let’s me breathe.”

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1:30 p.m. De la Vega and Torrealba eat lunch together before he leaves to attend to the business side of the restaurant and she and her team prepare for dinner. “Some things I need to do myself, like one of our three moles – there’s something about the way I put it together that’s just different. I enjoy making the bread myself when I can. And I can prep anything and jump in the kitchen at anytime, I like that too.” 5:30 p.m. De la Vega stays through the dinner service, reviewing plates as they leave the kitchen and working the dining room. “I like to know feedback right away, good or bad. I want the experience to make people happy, so if there’s something that needs attending to, I want to know now so I can do something about it, not 10 days later online. Also, I love answering questions about the food. I may help a customer choose something for their child. We don’t have a children’s menu. I don’t understand those — what do children eat? Food! I’m always happy to make sure something works for them. Mainly, I want people to try and learn for themselves what they like or don’t like.” 11:00 p.m. "Our last seating at the restaurant is 10 p.m. I may leave once the food is out, so I’m usually home by 11. We cook something together every evening when I get home.” 12:30 a.m. Bedtime.

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Sunday

4:30 p.m. After brunch service at the restaurant ends, de la Vega heads home and it's time to relax. "We may have a glass of cava and watch a movie or walk the dog and do some gardening." De la Vega says she likes the idea of being disconnected, but it’s hard to do. She’s not obsessive about checking her phone throughout the day but says that’s how business is done. “I will respond right away when I need to, but I try not to interrupt things I’m doing. For my daughters, I will always answer right away — that’s important — I will always be available.” 8:00 p.m. Typically de la Vega and Torrealba have dinner between 7 and 9 PM, either at home or out. They might read or catch up on things around the house. “I guess you could say I like to stay busy.”

Monday

De la Vega’s one full day away from the restaurant 10:00 a.m. Mondays typically find de la Vega doing her personal shopping at Central Market. “I like to see what looks good. If the girls are home, we might do something special. Otherwise, it’s whatever we feel like for the week. At the fish and meat counter — I don’t actually like to eat a lot of meat — I’ll get several things that we’ll have early in the week. I never freeze things like that. Why would you want to buy fresh and then put it away in a freezer?”

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2:30 p.m. De la Vega and Torrealba share a light lunch in the afternoon. She may talk with Isabel and contacts in Mexico about their upcoming trips. “It’s about the culture and the food; that’s how you know a place, I think.” De la Vega also does all of the restaurant’s social media. “At one time, we had someone else doing it, but it’s too personal — it’s about how you want to say something, to show what you’re doing.” 3:30 p.m. “Ernesto does some food ordering, I do some and our Chef de Cuisine does some as well. But Ernesto does payroll, accounting and generally handles the business end of things. He’s very good at that and he likes it; I don’t have an interest in that end of things. So that works out well." 7:00 p.m. On Monday evenings, the couple might have friends over or go out to dinner. "We are together a lot — we’ve been married for 33 years, so we each know how the other likes to do things, which is good!” tribeza.com

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HOT

damn Two of Austin’s most famous entrepreneurs have hit on the perfect recipe for Hot Luck. With the quirky food-and-music festival now in its third year, they just keep turning up the heat. By Dorothy Guerrero Photographs by Ashleigh Amoroso

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Hot Luck began as an excuse for Aaron Franklin and James Moody to hang out more. The pair, who had known each other for years, concocted a plan over lunch one day to create an event they’d actually want to attend. For America’s preeminent James Beard Award-winning pitmaster, of Franklin Barbecue fame, and the owner one of Austin’s most iconic clubs, the Mohawk, it would have been easy for their joint venture to quickly get overexposed and overproduced. But they wanted this thing to have a soul. Fortunately for us, Franklin and Moody, along with Mike Thelin, co-founder of Feast Portland, have found the sweet spot of hype, effort and fun in their festival-that’snot-a-festival, which bills itself as something closer to a religious sensory experience: “Hot Luck is what happens at the fire — in the flames. It’s where the inspiration turns tribeza.com

into food. And that food feeds the people, and the music, and the next round of crazy ideas that flicker to life.” From random music collaborations to unfussy food from high-end chefs, the Memorial Day weekend event, spread across different venues like Antone’s and the Barracuda, has something for most people, but not everyone. And that’s kind of the point. This year the potluck lineup includes several bands with food names (Leftover Salmon and Archers of Loaf, haha) and culinary geniuses from around the country cooking the stuff they make for friends and family. If you’re tired of standing in lines and dusty fields for hours on end, Hot Luck is here for you. The small-scale format, easy pace and lack of pretension all make it clear: These guys are serving up something hot and fresh.


HOW DID THIS WHOLE THING COME ABOUT? JAMES MOODY: Aaron and I were together at Franklin Barbecue one day, just sitting at the picnic table. We were having beers, just talking about how Fun Fun Fun Fest went away and how Franklin was doing and how we were all looking to do something new. So it just accidentally started amongst friends, honestly.

WHAT MAKES HOT LUCK DIFFERENT FROM THE OTHER FESTIVALS OUT THERE? AARON FRANKLIN: We try to set it up like you’re in our backyard. Like you’re kind of going to your best friend’s house, and your best friend just happens to be the raddest chef in the world cooking hot dogs and just hanging out. I also encourage the chefs to not go out of their way to be fancy. JM: It’s what South by Southwest felt like in the early 2000s — super-venue-based and intimate. We were all exhausted from the idea of trying to get a large number of people in a big field. Because I’ve done that for 10 years. So we just started talking about blending music and the quirkiness of what we did in music with the quirkiness of what Aaron does in food. It wasn’t an economic endeavor, but strictly a creative one. tribeza.com

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HAS IT GROWN INTO WHAT YOU ENVISIONED? JM: It seems to be on track for that idea. If you’re going to do something that’s an annual event, you have to commit mentally to doing it for a few years to understand what it’ll be. The customers will tell you what it is, or should or shouldn’t be. They’ll tell you which ideas are good and bad. And you’ve gotta give yourself time to react to that and create something that fits.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART ABOUT THE WEEKEND? JM: Personally, it’s that it’s just us. There are no investors. There’s no board of directors. So when we have a goofy idea, we don’t need approval. We just do it. That’s what the early days of Fun Fun Fun Fest were like, before it got really big. I also like the high-low nature of what we do, which a lot of Austinites identify with. Especially people who have been here a while. Austin is not just about all the new stuff — it’s about these heart-and-soul places. AF: Every time I get excited about something, I get excited about something else. So I think I’m just kind of excited about the whole thing. It’s a way more cohesive package than in the previous years.

HOW DO THE TICKETS WORK? AF: Our goal was to appeal to everybody. There’s a pretty big sliding scale on affordability. We have the All-in Whole Enchilada Pass [$550], and that gets you into some things that you can’t buy separately, but it also gets you into everything. That’s the best bargain out there — you get into all the shows and all the main events. Of course, for people who don’t want to spend that much money, you can buy tickets to music and food events à la carte.

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Franklin and Moody cooked up Hot Luck sitting around a picnic table at Franklin Barbecue.

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Franklin and Moody (center) taking it easy with friends around a campfire in Bastrop.

WHY DID YOU THINK THE FORMAT WORKS SO WELL? AF: People just want to have a good time, and that’s working. Just being who we are, being true to ourselves and being true to our city. It doesn’t have to be a pristine event. It can be a little funky and rough around the edges. We all kind of enjoy being in that gray area. [Pauses.] I mean, Franklin Barbecue is pretty clean and perfect, but, you know, otherwise ...

IN A BOOMING TOWN LIKE AUSTIN, HOW DO YOU PRESERVE THAT? JM: That’s the best part. You don’t have to grow. If you can keep it small, and small is the magic, then you never sacrifice the magic. AF: We don’t look to make it much bigger than it is as far as attendance, but we look to do more things throughout the year and would gradually like to make it a year-round thing where we could do stuff outside of Austin. Really, at the end of the day our goal is just to have fun. We just want people to have a good time.

WHAT IS Y’ALL’S APPROACH TO THE FOOD? JM: Aaron is a brilliant chef. Not only does he just know everything that needs to happen from a food perspective, but our whole arrangement with chefs is that we tell them to leave their chef coats at home and to wear the T-shirt that they wear underneath the chef coat. And they come, and they cook whatever the hell they want, in whatever way they want. We could have a Michelin-starred chef come out and cook hot dogs if they want.

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AF: Most people get invited in person or via text or email. It’s not a PR company that’s blanketing all the hot chefs. And I really kind of think about it all year-round. It’s more based on — instead of who’s hot in the industry — who is really, really awesome. We have a lot of chefs who don’t really do festivals, so it’s kind of special. Austin is a community that takes care of itself, and the chef thing is like that, too.

DO YOU HAVE THAT SAME APPROACH TO BOOKING THE MUSIC? JM: So, different people can customize and schedule a good time based off what they’re into. So you’ll be able to look at the bill and go, “All right. I’m going to eat all this stuff till I’m uncomfortably full. Then I’m going to go hear some music that’s for me.” So we’ll have options for you: blues, soul, country, rock and roll, punk, garage. We’ll have all that available. Then you can choose your own adventure. So, hopefully, by the end of the weekend, people will have different paths to the same result.

BUT REALLY, WHY SHOULD WE GO? JM: There was something that happened in food about, I don’t know, four or five years ago, where this ridiculous term “foodie” came up. And it created some barrier between people around food. And it made some people feel like food wasn’t for them. Which is ridiculous. So this is the appreciation of food for everyone. The chefs leave their chef’s coats at home. There’s this beautiful high-low nature to it. What if you could go to your favorite tailgate, but it was run by chefs who are running some of the best restaurants in the world?

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Kitchen Aid When chef and educator Patricia Tamminga was ready for a kitchen overhaul she turned to designer Shannon Eddings for the refresh she had dreamed of By Margaret Williams Photographs by Molly Culver

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“I grew up cooking with my mom and grandmother in East Texas, in a lively kitchen full of family, garden vegetables and homemade bread. Cooking for me has always been about the experience, whipping up recipes and spending time with others around the kitchen table or, in my case, island. You’ll always find seasonal fruit, local eggs and good tea in my fridge.”

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“Tamminga wanted the kitchen to be light, airy and highly functional," explains Eddings. The quartz Silestone countertops paired with articulating pendant lights from Visual Comfort and bright white Clay Imports tile create dimension, without any one item dominating the space.

P

atricia Tamminga has a way of putting everyone around her at ease — children, adults, animals. She asks the right kinds of questions and makes the kind of eye contact that, in the middle of a chaotic day, creates focus and connection. Even a brief conversation with the former chef, teacher and cooking-class instructor is centering. This is ironic, given that Tamminga has what some might call a “full plate” (pun intended). The Lufkin native, who studied finance at Ole Miss and culinary arts at Johnson & Wales, in Charlotte, North Carolina, began her food career at Brennan’s in Houston. After quickly realizing that the line cook life wasn’t for her, she moved to Austin in 2008 to pursue another passion: teaching elementary-age children. Teaching led to in-home cooking classes, where she guided children to “cook from scratch and become confident in the kitchen,” she says. These classes emboldened the instructor to renovate and convert a bungalow on 35th Street into Patricia’s Table, where from 2014 to 2018 Tamminga and her staff offered hands-on cooking classes to thousands of children. My own children were lucky enough to have been on the receiving end of these camps and classes, and I was always amazed at Tamminga’s ability to juggle the food work, the people work and the business work of running a cooking school. After years of teaching in her home and at

Patricia’s Table, Tamminga was ready for a pivot, and Beeline Market was born. Housed in the same sunny 35th Street bungalow, Tamminga and her new business partners, Jennah Granger and CiCi Steward, now serve Austin children through their grab-and-go meals and school lunch-delivery program. “Closing Patricia’s Table was bittersweet,” Tamminga says. “Not only did I make incredible relationships with families, I also learned so much along the way. The relationships I developed with Texas farmers and local purveyors have served as a great foundation for Beeline Market. We are seeking to change the landscape for convenient, nutritious kid meals. Our bento-style ‘buzz box’ meals ensure that kids have the fuel they need to keep their bodies and brains energized and focused.” In the midst of all this — teaching, cooking, managing, closing and opening (I’m tired just typing) — Tamminga realized it was time for her own home kitchen to get a much-needed overhaul. Enter Shannon Eddings. The local designer, who tends toward clean lines with traveled and textural inf luences, specializes in creating spaces that manage to straddle the accessible and aspirational. Eddings helped bring Tamminga’s classic and airy vision to life, and now the light-filled and highly functional space provides the perfect counterpoint to Beeline Market’s commercial kitchen, where Tamminga spends most of her days. Come on in. tribeza.com

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Banana-Sweet Potato "Puffins" INGREDIENTS: 1/4 cup sweet potato purée 1/3 cup applesauce  3 tablespoons maple syrup  2 eggs  1/2 teaspoon vanilla  1 cup mashed banana  1/4 cup water  1 1/2 cups + 2 tablespoons Barton Spring Mill 105 WW flour (store-bought whole wheat flour works great, too)  2 tablespoons ground flax seed 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon  1/2 teaspoon salt  1/2 teaspoon baking soda  ¼ cup whole milk (if making the pancake version) INSTRUCTIONS: Mix the wet ingredients. In a separate bowl, mix the dry ingredients. Combine. Don’t overmix. 

For pancakes: Add 1/4 cup of the milk to the batter. Heat the griddle or skillet. Add a small pat of butter, coconut oil or vegetable oil to coat the pan. Cook pancakes. Pour about 1/4 cup of the batter onto the griddle and cook until a few holes form on top of each pancake and the underside is golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip the pancakes and cook until the bottom is golden brown and the top is puffed, about 2 to 3 minutes more. Using a spatula, transfer the pancakes to a serving plate. Beeline Market mixes things up on Wacky Wednesdays by serving these breakfast "puffins" for lunch.

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P U F F I N P H OTO G R A P H B Y C L A I R E S C H A P E R

For muffins: Preheat oven to 325°. Place muffin liners in a muffin tin. Fill the muffin liners 3/4 of the way full. Bake muffins for 22 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into a muffin comes out clean.


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STYLE PROFILE

SMOKE SIGNALS E XPORTING TE X AS BARBECUE TO THE E AST COAST IS THE LORD’S WORK, AND MARC GLOSSERMAN IS THE MAN FOR THE JOB By Hannah J. Phillips

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A

S A TEXAN WALKING AROUND NEW YORK CITY,

G LO S S E R M A N P H OTO G R A P H B Y I S A AC A N T H O N Y, H I L L CO U N T R Y I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H B Y J U S T I N A H A R O N I A N D F O O D P H OTO S B Y DA N R U B E N S T E I N

certain scenes feel familiar from films and song lyrics: buskers on a crowded A train, the flurry of feet in Grand Central Station, the dazzling Empire State building. But walking through the doors of Brooklyn’s Hill Country Food Park is a different kind of familiar; for a Texan, it feels like home. An amphitheater-style arrangement of food trucks welcomes you into the converted warehouse space, decorated with emblems from the Lone Star State and filled with the unmistakable aroma of smoked meat. For Hill Country’s founder, Marc Glosserman, it all started with childhood trips to visit relatives in Lockhart, officially designated “the Barbecue Capital of Texas” in 1999. Although he was born on the East Coast, Glosserman’s Texas roots run deep: His great-grandfather emigrated to Lockhart from Poland around 1900, selling fruit from a food cart before opening a small grocery. His grandfather Sam later served as mayor of Lockhart from 1954 to 1964. Glosserman’s earliest memories are of summers spent in the small town with extended family. “All of my cultural enrichment, my pride in place came from my cousins,” he says. “They were always beaming with Texas pride.” The first stop from the airport was always a rendezvous at the legendary Kreuz Market for a barbecue feast with his grandparents. Fast-forward to about 2004, and Glosserman recalls revisiting Lockhart for a wedding, somewhat naively asking Rick Schmidt — owner of Kreuz Market and a close family friend — if he had ever considered expanding the business. “That deep-rooted barbecue tradition doesn’t exist outside of smalltown Texas,” says Glosserman, “but it’s about as identifiable with Texas as anything I can think of. And I wondered if you could export not just the barbecue, but that whole Texas experience.” The thought sent Glosserman on a journey, developing a plan and gathering support to open a Central Texas barbecue joint in Manhattan. With a background in finance but no restaurant experience, he spent several years networking with restauranteurs and pitmasters before finally taking the leap in 2006. Hill Country Barbecue Market opened in 2007, aiming not just to bring the Texan style of smoked meat to New York, but to reproduce the whole pitmaster culture as well.

Glosserman's extended family in 1975 celebrating Passover in Lockhart. LEFT: Glosserman and his wife Kristen make regular visits to the Hill Country to check in with their barbeque roots.

“As much as I love the meat, I also wanted to re-create that feeling of standing in line and having the guy behind the counter carve it to order. That, to me, is the pure DNA of Texas barbecue,” Glosserman says. Glosserman has worked to perfect that particularly Texan recipe ever since, replicating details down to the lighting and architecture of old Lockhart buildings, designed at the turn of the 20th century. And he’s had some help along the way: In 2009, when then-governor Rick Perry visited Hill Country Barbecue Market for lunch, Perry learned that New York’s Environmental Protection Agency was working to ban all cross-border shipments of firewood. The next day, Perry’s chief of staff emailed Glosser-

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STYLE PROFILE

Glosserman photographed by Isaac Anthony at Hill Country Food Park.

man, connecting him to the Texas Department of Agriculture and ultimately navigating a solution with the EPA that allowed Hill Country to continue importing the precious post oak that creates a unique Texas flavor. As for other imports, Hill Country was also the highest-selling outlet for Shiner Beer in the country in 2013, and Glosserman was instrumental in helping the brand start to distribute on the East Coast. Like a pitmaster with a prized brisket technique, Glosserman tweaks and curates the formula for a Texas experience in each of his restaurants. After the success of Hill Country Barbecue Market, he opened Hill Country Chicken in 2010 as an homage to the home cooking of his mother and grandmother, followed by a second Hill Country Barbecue, in Washington, D.C., in 2011. Most recently, he brought Hill Country Food Park to Brooklyn in 2018 as what he calls a sort of “test lab” for new projects. The concept is a nod to the Austin food truck scene, with trailers dedicated to different Texas staples, including breakfast tacos from King David Tacos at the South Congress-themed stall. Helmed by fellow Texans, King David boasts the only breakfast tacos in New York City made by a native Austinite, importing tortillas straight from Texas. Hill Country also recently joined forces with a local bar, Hank’s Saloon, which needed a new home and now hosts live music in the second-floor space at the Food Park. Glosserman attributes the success of the brand to his team and these types of partnerships.

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I WO N D E R E D I F YO U CO U L D E X P O RT N OT J UST T H E BA R B ECU E , B U T T H AT W H O L E T E X A S E X P E R I E N C E.

F R I E D C H I C K E N P H OTO G R A P H B Y L A U R E N VO LO .

“We are in the ultimate people business,” he says, “not just with our guests, but with the people we work with. When you have the right people, success is sure to follow. Those are the lessons that have become more and more instilled in me as we keep growing.” That mentality attracts everyone from East Coast locals, Texas transplants and visiting Texans like myself. In May, the Food Park hosts “The Tacos of Texas” authors Jarod Neece and Mando Rayo for a special screening of their new docuseries on seven regional tacos, followed by a conversation moderated by Bon Appétit contributor Rick Martinez. Plans to expand the brand revolve around building community around Texas food at these types of events. “The main driver for me, and the reason we created Hill Country, is how much fun and joy we get out of sharing what we do with people,” says Glosserman, quick to note that he has no plans to come to Texas anytime soon. “Texas may have enough barbecue already,” he laughs, “but we certainly make our pilgrimage to Texas at least once a year so we can continue being good ambassadors of all things Texas.”

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STYLE PICK

PICTURE

W

H E N I T CO M E S T O E AT I N G O U T, M A N Y

Austin restaurants have changed the playing field with unique menus, five-star wine lists and James Beard-nominated chefs. But a select few, such as Launderette, Jeffrey’s, Justine’s, Ciclo and Fonda San Miguel, have gone above and beyond by curating art-driven spaces that not only appeal to patrons, but make the entire dining experience that much more memorable. From a wall full of Warhols to paintings inspired by ancient Pompeii, these restaurants perfectly blend what Austinites seem to love most: food and art.

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By Lauren Jones

PERFECT


Launderette

L A U N D E R E T T E P H OTO G R A P H B Y J U L I A K E I M A N D J E F F E R E Y ' S P H OTO G R A P H B Y M AT T H A R R I N G TO N

Since opening four years ago, Launderette has been lauded by the likes of both Texas Monthly and Food & Wine, gaining national recognition for its fast-casual Texas menu and stellar pastry program led by James Beard semifinalist Laura Sawicki, yet nothing about this East Austin hot spot is stuffy. When it came to choosing artwork for the space, the team looked to painter Bradley Kerl, an artist they had been following since 2013 and whose work appeals to all ages. Kerl’s series, which adorns the eastern wall, is playful and comical, and for co-owner Margaret Vera, who is a collector of Kerl’s work herself, it’s the nonobvious details, the clear intention behind the pieces and the almost amateur style of painting that perfectly match Launderette’s comfortable and casual atmosphere.

Jeffrey’s

An Austin establishment since 1975, Jeffrey’s does fine dining like no other restaurant in the city. It exudes sophistication, and its dishes have always been praised, yet by 2018, the artwork in the main dining room was in need of a refresh. That is where multimedia artist Alexandra Valenti, whose work can also be seen at the LINE hotel, came in. Now eight of Valenti’s paintings, which were inspired by the ancient city of Pompeii and classical Italian architecture, make a stunning contrast to the restaurant’s dark-green walls and leather booths. Valenti’s paintings are also meant to evoke a sense of connectivity with viewers, as well as pay homage to nature and her Italian roots.

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F O N DA A N D J U S T I N E ' S P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T

STYLE PICK

Fonda San Miguel

Fonda San Miguel, an old Austin favorite, has been praised in years past by Eater Austin and Zagat for its authentic Mexican menu, but it’s the artwork that really sets the space apart. Owner Tom Gilliland has spent years curating his collection of museum-quality pieces, which he rotates out regularly. Gilliland has also relied on his friend, interior designer Bill Luft, to source pieces from the interior of Mexico, which, along with the vibrant works of art that hang throughout the restaurant’s multiple dining rooms, give Fonda San Miguel a notable hacienda feel.

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C I C LO P H OTO G R A P H B Y G A L D O N E S P H OTO G R A P H Y

Justine’s

The seductive brasserie on East 5th Street gets its cool-girl vibe from owner Justine Gilcrease’s impressive art collection. Gilcrease, who says finding art for the space is a constant obsession, collected pieces from art auctions, like Christie’s and Sotheby’s, as well as from galleries. With Justine’s, she wanted to “call to mind the comfort and conviviality of a French café.” From Brassaï’s “La Môme Bijou, Bar de la Lune, Paris,” to the Chagall lithograph “Le Petit L’Âne Equilibrist,” to a photograph of Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin by fashion photographer Patrick Bertrand shot in the Bois de Boulogne in 1969, she feels each adds to the restaurant’s ambiance. In the Secret House, a New Orleans-style home off East 7th Street, Gilcrease looked to the famed Andy Warhol, choosing two of his polaroids, “Champagne Glasses, Committee 2000” and “Bananas.”

Ciclo

The Four Seasons sits on one of the most enviable locations in downtown Austin, and thus the team at Whitespace Interiors, a design firm out of Chicago, felt it was important to bring the outside in when it came to the hotel’s newly redesigned restaurant, Ciclo. The four large panels in Ciclo’s main dining room were painted by Christiaan Pretorius and inspired by abstract expressionist Franz Kline, with each depicting the live oak and pecan trees that can be seen outside. A portrait of Western actor Lee Van Cleef, which Whitespace principal Michael Dalton refers to as tongue-incheek and showcasing Texan strength, also hangs in the restaurant.

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T R AV E L P I C K

By Margaret Williams Photographs by Cathlin McCullough

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McCullough took four cameras on her trip to Oaxaca. A highlight was time spent capturing the female artisans of Teotitlán del Valle.

P

H O T O G R A P H E R C AT H L I N M CC U L L O U G H L OV E S M E X I C O,

but her previous trips, usually centered around surfing, had never taken her to the interior of the country. McCullough recalls, “I was craving a photography trip, something that would be relatively cheap and inspiring to me, and I found myself only thinking about Oaxaca. I also wanted a place that comes alive during the holidays, since I’m a single mom and was spending only my second Christmas without my two kids [nine-year-old Henry and six-year-old Cleo].” The commercial and editorial photographer, who was up for a challenge and most excited to spend time with female artisans, brought only film cameras. “It’s pretty ridiculous, but I brought four cameras along — a medium format; a smaller 35 mm: a Holga, or ‘toy camera,’ for its portability and random light leaks; and a Polaroid to share photos with the women I spent time with,” she says.

The photographer stayed in the central historic district so she could easily walk everywhere. She started her excursion on the rooftop bar of Hotel Los Amantes at sunset observing life in the zocalo below. "Some of my favorite photos from the trip were taken with the new Kodak Ektachrome film, which is a reboot of slide film," she explains. "The color is incomparable.” Known for its indigenous arts, rugged landscape, Spanish Colonial architecture and rich cuisine (mole! tortillas! mezcal!), Oaxaca is a destination both timeless and of the moment, thanks to its opportunities for exploration and connection. Through McCullough’s lens we are shown the landscape, people and architecture of Oaxaca, along with the beauty of weaving, dyeing and gathering around a table.

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T R AV E L P I C K

One of my main goals of this trip was to get to know female artisans, so I hired a guide to take me to Teotitlán del Valle [a 40 minute drive from Oaxaca] to spend a morning with the women in the collective who make colorful rugs and pillows. Our host, Pastora, started the collective, and through her hard work, women can now sell textiles direct to consumers. They walked me through their process of cleaning the wool, using natural dyes, spinning and weaving. I loved getting to know them and learning about their artistic vision. Pastora’s mother made me a fabulous breakfast. The whole experience was the highlight of my trip.

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I joke that I ate my way around Oaxaca, and it’s true. You can’t go to Oaxaca without eating mole, hot cocoa, chapulines [crickets] and tlayudas [a type of open-faced tortilla or tostada]. There are seven traditional moles in Oaxaca, and I tried as many as possible. My favorites were the negro and the coloradito.

Some of my favorite experiences were meeting fellow solo travelers at Zandunga and the tasting menu at Criollo. Criollo is fun for fine dining, but you can eat well in Oaxaca every where. If you want to eat like the locals, I highly recommend having breakfast at Fonda Florecita at La Merced Market. It’s almost impossible to choose a favorite dish because every thing was so delicious. I had the best slow breakfast at Casa Oaxaca Café, and my favorite market was Mercado 20 de Noviembre, a food market.

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KAREN'S PICK

Malibu Poke THE HAWAIIAN STAPLE HITS DOWNTOWN

By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

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I N AU S TI N , TH E R E A R E TH R E E BA S IC FOO D G RO U P S :

barbecue, Tex-Mex and poke. Austin has gone gaga over this Hawaiian-style raw fish, and you can barely swing a dockless scooter without hitting a new poke joint. But out of this proliferation, some have broken from the pack. Take Malibu Poke, for instance. A recent arrival to town, the eatery opened in November in downtown’s Seaholm District. What makes Malibu Poke special is not just its light and beachy ambiance and nifty selfserve ordering system, but also its die-hard commitment to quality ingredients. With a pristine dish based around raw fish, you can’t cut corners. And Malibu Poke doesn’t.


For the uninitiated, poke is diced raw fish tossed with Asian condiments and served in a bowl. Pronounced “po-kay,” it has been a staple of the Hawaiian diet for decades. It’s a simple dish, where fresh fish is unequivocally the star. The classic recipe calls for tuna tossed with soy sauce, sesame oil and green onions. But there are as many permutations as the imagination allows: different types of fish, a kaleidoscope of flavorings, with or without rice and so forth. Ma libu Poke of fers the trad it ion a l t u n a , but also salmon, hamachi, shrimp, tofu and, coming so on , c h ic ken. Once you’ve dec ide d on you r protein, it’s time to pick your toppings and build your bowl — and the staff encourages letting your creativity f ly. For sauces, there are almost a dozen delicious homemade f lavors, like spicy chile, wa sabi-ponzu, red miso, coconut curry, spicy aioli, garlic-ginger, tropical chimichurri, bonito aioli and the ever-popular Malibu Sauce, a combo of all the above. With almost 40 choices, the topping selection is dizzying. Malibu promotes a less-is-more approach, although you can request as many as you like. On my first visit, I exercised restraint. But on subsequent drop-ins, I giddily piled my

MALIBU POKE bowl high with all sorts of goodies. classic tuna, wasabi-ponzu salmon, coThere are crisp fresh veggies like conut-curry hamachi, garlic-ginger tofu 211 WALTER SEAHOLM DRIVE carrots, jicama, red and daikon or the Whole 30-approved tropical chi(512) 609-8510 radish, cucumber and slivered red michurri shrimp. onions. Plus, avocado, edamame, Ordering your marinated shiitake mushrooms and white pickpoke bowl is almost as led ginger. For added crunch, there are macadamuch fun as creating it. mia nuts, spiced peanuts, toasted sesame seeds, At Malibu Poke, diners crispy shallots and arare crackers. Fresh herbs order from self-ser ve like basil, mint and chives add aromatics to your monitors. These highbowl. Or enhance tech kiosks educate dinthe bowl with a ers on ingredients and dusting of savory allow them to quickly seasonings like choose their favorite umami powder, combinations, thus minf urikake, togaimizing waiting in line. If rashi or bonito you’re a repeat customer f lakes. Like your — and there are a lot of those at Malibu — the bowl with a kick? ordering system features facial and credit card Then add some recognition technology that recalls your order serrano pepper, history. wa sabi t obi ko, Don’t overlook the drink offerings at Malibu sansho pepper, Poke. There’s a full selection of local beers, wine sriracha or chile and sake, plus low-sugar cocktails and mockoil. Or for a hint of tails, including the Malibu Poke Old-Fashioned. sweetness, there’s My favorite was the signature “frose,” refreshfresh mango, oringly slushy frozen rosé that was just the right ange slices, Asian balance of sweet and tart. pear, toasted coCheerful and airy, Malibu Poke’s interior was conut or teriyaki designed by renowned Austin architect Michael sauce. Hsu. If it weren’t for Seaholm’s nearby smokeIs your head stacks, you’d think you were in Southern Calispinning? There’s fornia. And although the restaurant takes its inmore: It’s time to spiration from more-tropical climes, it’s actually select the base for an import from Dallas, where restaurateur Jon your poke masterAlexis opened the first outpost in 2017. Alexis piece. The restauworked with James Beard-nominated chef Matt rant offers traditional sushi or brown rice, as McCallister, of FT33 fame, to elevate “quick well as low-carb cauliflower rice, tender kale and serve” poke by demanding fine-dining-quality a delightfully fresh seaweed blend that’s a far cry ingredients and attention to detail in a fast-cafrom the slimy, neon-green supermarket variety. sual concept. Can you find cheaper poke in AusIf you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the optin? Sure. But I challenge you to find anything as tions, then order one of Malibu Poke’s signature fresh, tasty and versatile as Malibu Poke. bowls, featuring chef-selected combinations like tribeza.com

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24 DINER

THE BREWER’S TABLE

CAFÉ JOSIE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

With an emphasis on quality and community, this East

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order

Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone at the brewer’s

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

table. Local ranchers and farmers source the ingredients,

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

which are utilized in both the kitchen and the brewery to

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

eliminate food waste. The seasonally changing menu is

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

34TH STREET CAFE

unique but provides options for even the pickiest of eaters (ask for the kid’s menu).

CAFÉ NO SÉ

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering pizzas,

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

famous Neapolitan technique is executed by the Stefano

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs at more than 900

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage of

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

cheese on this menu!

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect complement to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art

BAR CHI SUSHI

wine-preservation system with temperature control

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

ensures optimal taste and appreciation.

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the week-

EASY TIGER

ends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer

BARLEY SWINE

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO 1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542 3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668 A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

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BADU 1891

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

601 Bessemer Ave. | (325) 247 1891 badu1891.com

EL ALMA

Discover an extraordinary culinary experience in

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with

Llano, Texas. BADU 1891’s seasonal menu offers

unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Aus-

bold flavors and locally sourced ingredients for

tin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect

lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. Enjoy heartfelt

for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the

hospitality, a full bar and happy hour specials, robust

everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

cigar menu, and live music every Friday and Saturday evening.

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

EPICERIE

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

French-Vietnamese eatery with a colorful menu

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

of pho, banh mi, and sweet treats. Both the indoor

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

seating and outdoor patio bring comfort and vi-

here for a bite on Sundays.

brancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 The Shoal Creek favorite, affectionately known as Fonda, has been bringing people together for more than 4 decades. Known for their Interior Mexican Cuisine and artful dining room, Fonda San Miguel is the perfect spot to share an evening with friends. FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010 Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving

IRON CACTUS

unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley

606 Trinity Street | (512) 472 9240 ironcactus.com

serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international

With amazing outdoor patio views, friendly service and

twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

a lively full bar, Iron Cactus offers one of the best din-

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

ing experiences around. Leave your worries at the door and lose yourself in the comforts of the cactus.

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted car-

CICLO

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300 cicloatx.com Ciclo at Four Seasons Hotel Austin has launched a new happy hour concept! Offered in Ciclo’s Latin-inspired bar, covered terrace and back lawn, happy hour will run daily from 5:00 to 7:00 pm and include $4 snacks and $3 sweets, plus complimentary valet parking. Rounding out the menu is a rotating list of $5 beverages, including draft beers, house cocktails and wines by the glass.

amel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

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JUNE’S ALL DAY

LENOIR

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

kid-friendly patio all work together to make Hank’s our new

cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. In-

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir

favorite neighborhood joint. With happy hour every day

spired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering. The

comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique,

from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma. Drinks aside, the braised meat-

restaurant’s namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—

balls, chopped black kale salad (add falafel!) and spicy fried

one of less than 10 in Texas—who also serves as the beverage

chicken are a few standouts from the craveable menu.

director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

HOPFIELDS

LA BARBECUE

HANK’S

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

LE POLITIQUE 110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651 This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patisserie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

LORO

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and Aar-

has maintained the execution, top-notch service,

on Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition to

and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that

South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space, designed

makes it an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

The greatest stories are told with family and friends over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies just that, bringing nostalgic and classic Italian-

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio

American cuisine to the heart of Austin. From

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

102 MAY 2019 |

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Treasures of Mexico for the Discerning Taste

V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M

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Celebrate the Bride, the Graduate and your Mother!

1009 West Lynn Austin, TX 78703 512-474-8680 www.elinterior.com

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A LOOK BEHIND

Hail to the Chefs The Tribeza team had so much fun running around Austin with photographer Mackenzie Smith Kelley catching some of our favorite chefs in their natural habitats. Thanks chefs for allowing us into your homes and kitchens.

CLOCKWISE: Ling Qi Wu, Sarah McIntosh, Fermín Núñez, Erind Halilaj and Tavel Bristol-Joseph.

104 MAY 2019 |

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Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA May 2019  

The Food Issue No. 213

TRIBEZA May 2019  

The Food Issue No. 213

Profile for tribeza