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1214 West 6th St Austin,TX 78703

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Dedicated Team. ReďŹ ned Expertise. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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10 APRIL 2019 |

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40 2019

CELEBRATING

FORTY YEARS AUSTIN ° TEXAS

1601 West 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas • 512- 458- 5407 Monday through Saturday 10:00am-5:30pm www.GardenRoomBoutique.com

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WE’RE INTRODUCING SOMETHING A LITTLE DIFFERENT THIS SEASON.

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CO M I N G SOO N

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Visit Compass.com to be the first to view these exclusive private listings.

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Dara Allen Broker Associate

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All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. tribeza.com Nothing herein shall be construed as | APRIL 2019 legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Your Leading Man in Real Estate

Spring is here and it is my favorite time of the year in Austin. As the seasons change, consider changing your space. New season, new home, new you!

#YourLeadingManInRealEstate

Broker Associate | CLHMS 512.865.1611 matthew.redden@compass.com reddenrealtor.com tribeza.com

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ON THE COVER Model Isabel Li, photographed by Jackie Lee Young, in front of Hedwige Jacob's "If I could, I would cover everything with my drawings," exhibition at Women & Their Work.

APRIL / SPRING STYLE

CONTENTS

DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 26 Kristin’s Column p. 36

Community Profile p. 52

A Look Behind p. 108

Community Pick p. 56

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 40

Style Profile p. 90

Music Pick p. 41

Style Pick p. 94 Travel Pick p. 98

Event Pick p. 44 tribeza.com

Dining Guide p. 104

Tribeza Talk p. 38

Art Pick p. 42

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Spring Style Guide p. 48

Karen’s Pick p. 102

FEATURES

Objects of Desire p. 58 Uncommon Ground p. 64 State of the Art p. 70 Girl on Brand p. 82


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EDITOR'S LETTER

It’s here y’all. We did it. Come October we’ll be bemoaning the heat but for now, Zilker Park walks and patio drinks abound. This time of year means many thing for many people and for us it means style. The people, places and things that are causing us to sit back and take note. Who is upping their game and who is changing the game? No story personifies this more than “State of the Art.” The fashion feature that also turned into an art story was photographed by Jackie Lee Young, styled by Margaret Williamson Bechtold and shot on location at Preacher Gallery, Women & Their Work and MASS Gallery. All three spaces are pushing the edge thanks to their inventive exhibits, and in our case we were lucky enough to work with artists Magda Sayeg, Hedwige Jacobs, Haleh Pedram and Amada Miller. To say this shoot was a collaboration would be a severe understatement. Working with all of the artists, both in front of and behind the camera, was a joy. Erin and John Thornton’s studio space certainly stopped us in our tracks (“Uncommon Ground”). The midcentury home that now serves as a studio and workspace for the couple is the brainchild of Erin’s ever-evolving creative mind.

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Originally sold as a teardown, the couple quickly sensed the home’s integrity on their initial walk through. Their instincts were confirmed when they discovered it was once the home of revered architect George Page. The space is filled with antiques, family treasures and Erin’s magazine archive, and instantly transports everyone who walks through its doors. Thanks to Casey Dunn, we were able to beautifully capture the environment whose rooms are just begging for cocktails and conversation. I am just scratching the surface of this month's issue. Alex Williamson, Bumble’s chief brand officer, let us in on a playful shopping trip to Feathers Vintage (“Girl on Brand”), a favorite local sartorial destination. Plus, the varied group of stylish Austinites featured in “Objects of Desire” makes a strong case for the emotion we all carry via our belongings. One member of this group, Patty Hoffpauir, happens to be celebrating 40 years of owning her boutique. Happy 40th to The Garden Room! Thanks for reading – whether you are scrolling, page-turning or clicking, we're so glad to have your support.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y J E S S I C A PAG E S

Spring Margaret Williams margaret@tribeza.com


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

A P R I L 2 01 9

18 YEARS

N O. 2 1 2

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVENTS MANAGER

Claire Schaper

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Shaleena Keefer

OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Anne Bruno Holly Cowart Andrew Dunkin Dorothy Guerrero Lauren Jones Laurel Miller COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Nick Cabrera Warren Chang Holly Cowart Casey Dunn Jonathan Garza Rustin Gudim Taylor Prinsen Erin Reas Claire Schaper Jackie Lee Young

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

ILLUSTR ATOR

Jessica Fontenot

S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


1111 W. 12th Street, #115 | $1,075,000 | Pending

18 Ehrlich Road | $1,550,000 | Pending

Broker Associate

512.289.6300 chris.long@compass.com chrislongaustin.com

726 Bermuda Street | $1,995,000


compass.com

3208 Stratford Hills Lane | $7,500,000 All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SOCIAL HOUR ATXGALS GALENTINE’S SHOW AtxGALS transformed Fair Market for a Queen of Hearts-inspired Galentine’s Show on February 8. The party featured incredible artwork by more than 15 local female artists, two live DJ sets and food trucks. Through this event, atxGALS futhered their mission of helping women in the arts gain exposure, all while giving back to like-minded organizations like the Girls Empowerment Network and Austin Pets Alive!

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From February 8–10, the Paramount Theatre and The Nobelity Project honored Texas legend Delbert McClinton. The celebration kicked off with McClinton’s Marquee Star unveiling on Congress Avenue before a performance by his band, the Self-Made Men. Afterward, The Nobelity Project held its Feed the Peace Awards, which acknowledged McClinton for his support of charitable causes in Texas.

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BLANTON MUSEUM GALA On February 9, the Blanton Museum of Art hosted a lively gala at the museum recognizing its unique role as a local and international arts leader. The night raised almost $800,000, providing essential funding for the museum’s programming. Guests were also the first to experience the exhibition “Words/Matter: Latin American Art and Language.”

ATXGALS GALENTINE’S SHOW: 1. Madilyn Biscoe, Poonam Patel & Courtney Runn 2. Jessica Fontenot AUSTIN HONORS DELBERT WEEKEND + THE NOBELITY PROJECT FEED THE PEACE AWARDS: 3. Jim Ritts 4. Delbert McClinton & Quentin Ware BLANTON MUSEUM GALA: 5. Ross & Elle Moody 6. Conley Hataway & Catherine Nissley

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TAY LO R P R I N S E N A N D B E L L S A N D W H I S T L E S P R O D U C T I O N S

AUSTIN HONORS DELBERT WEEKEND + THE NOBELITY PROJECT FEED THE PEACE AWARDS


Courtney Oldham Broker Associate 512.809.5495 courtney.oldham@compass.com

150 Silver Charm Dr Sold | Offered at $1,599,995

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SOCIAL HOUR

INDYCAR SPRING TRAINING On February 12 and 13, Circuit of The Americas welcomed more than 20 professional IndyCar drivers and their teams to the COTA track for Spring Training. The public was given the opportunity to get up close to their favorite drivers, cars and teams as they practiced before the arrival of the IndyCar Classic Series on March 22.

Lamar Union Plaza put on a Valentine’s Day bash with beverages, bites and giveaways on February 14. Guests grooved to live music from local artist Taméca Jones while indulging in a Jose Luis Salon braid bar, a European Wax Center brow bar, photos with GOGA baby goats and more. The night culminated at The Highball lounge with two festive burlesque shows.

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RISE SCHOOL HEART & SOUL LUNCHEON On February 15, The Rise School of Austin held its Heart & Soul Luncheon at the Fairmont Hotel. More than 300 attendees enjoyed a silent auction, empowering programs and a special fashion show starring Rise students and their fathers. All proceeds went toward The Rise School of Austin, whose purpose is to provide the highest-quality early education to all gifted, traditional and developmentally delayed children.

INDYCAR SPRING TRAINING: 1. Helio Castroneves with a fan 2. Scott Dixon VALENTINES SHMALENTINES AT LAMAR UNION: 3. Elizabeth Franklin & Marrell More 4. Brian Roby & Brenner Burgess RISE SCHOOL HEART & SOUL LUNCHEON: 5. Lutie Butler, Donna Stockton & Patty Hoffpauir 6. Chris Bomely with his daughter

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y E R I N R E A S A N D T Y L E R S C H M I T T O F T H E M I L L P H OTO G R A P H Y S T U D I O

VALENTINES SHMALENTINES AT LAMAR UNION


SOCIAL HOUR

GOOD COMPANY SOUTH CONGRESS GRAND OPENING Austin fashion designer Mallary Carroll commemorated the opening of her second Good Company store, on South Congress Avenue, on February 19. Friends got an exclusive look at the stunning space and designs, with 10 percent of the evening’s profits donated to The Kindness Campaign. In addition to other brands, Good Company carries Carroll’s own clothing-and-jewelry label, SBJ Austin.

AUSTIN WOMEN IN CULINARY DINNER

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Sixteen of Austin’s best female chefs, bartenders and sommeliers came together on February 20 to support the Les Dames d’Escoffier Austin Chapter’s scholarship program. Held at Eberly, the Austin Women in Culinary Dinner began with a reception, where attendees bid on an impressive list of silent-auction items, and followed with a four-course dinner that spotlighted female trailblazers in the culinary industry.

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MAGDALENE HOUSE ATX HOMECOMING

GOOD COMPANY SOUTH CONGRESS GRAND OPENING: 1. Liz Aweller, Mallary Carroll & Roka Music 2. DJ Amy Edwards AUSTIN WOMEN IN CULINARY DINNER: 3. Lisa Carpenter & Selene Amberson 4. Bonnie Wright & Amanda Turner MAGDALENE HOUSE ATX HOMECOMING: 5. Vimal Fernandez & Kimberly Tesarek 6. Valerie Parker, Anna Herd & Alison Dalton

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5 P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T, WA R R E N C H A N G & R I C K PAT R I C K

On February 22, Magdalene House ATX hosted its Homecoming fundraiser at the Hotel Van Zandt. The event featured inspiring keynote speaker Becca Stevens, who spoke on love being a powerful force for change. The two-year residential program for female survivors of sex trafficking and addiction offers free housing, access to health care services and job training, giving them the opportunity for financial independence.


Thinking of making a move? Give us a call; we speak real estate!

Charlotte & Weston Lipscomb REALTORÂŽ |

512.789.6225 charlotte.lipscomb@compass.com CharlotteLipscomb.com


SOCIAL HOUR

DRESS FOR SUCCESS LITTLE BLACK DRESS BOOT SCOOTIN’ SOIRÉE Dress for Success’ Boot Scootin’ Soirée took place on February 23 at the Phillips Event Center. This year’s gathering featured live music, bites and libations, a silent auction and more. All proceeds went toward Dress for Success Austin, empowering women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, tools and professional attire.

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More than 250 people gathered on February 23 for Creative Action’s signature fundraiser, Big Hair Country Fair, at Fair Market. The night raised over $250,000 for the nonprofit, which provides social and emotional learning and social justice education through arts-based programs. Students from Becker Elementary did a rendition of “Seasons of Love,” and teens from the organization’s Changing Lives Youth Theatre Ensemble performed an original piece.

2019 TEXAS MEDAL OF ARTS AWARDS The Texas Medal of Arts Awards highlighted 11 luminaries for their contributions to the arts. The festivities started with a cocktail reception at the Blanton Museum on February 26, followed by a brunch at the Governor’s Mansion on February 27. The events concluded with an awards show gala, raising nearly $1.8 million for increased access to arts and education in Texas.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS LITTLE BLACK DRESS BOOT SCOOTIN’ SOIRÉE: 1. Wendolyn Washington & Sharon Gaston 2. Sam Schneider & Marcy Marbut BIG HAIR COUNTRY FAIR: 3. Kathleen Loughlin & Beverly Crenshaw 4. Jose & Bobbie Rodriguez 2019 TEXAS MEDAL OF ARTS AWARDS: 5. Lynn Wyatt & Brandon Maxwell 6. Camila Alves McConaughey & Matthew McConaughey

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BIG HAIR COUNTRY FAIR


SOCIAL HOUR

2019 ELITE 25 NEW MEMBER PARTY Austin’s top luxury real estate agents gathered at Sway on February 27 to recognize 2019 membership with the Elite 25 Austin, which represents the city’s top 1 percent producing realtors. The 34 members, chosen by Elite 25’s managing director, Tony Trungale, set a new record for qualifying membership, requiring a minimum of eight homes sold, each over $1 million.

FRONT & CENTER LONG CENTER GALA

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The Long Center hosted its 11th annual gala, Front & Center, on March 1. Friends mixed and mingled with a cocktail reception before dining in the Michael & Susan Dell Hall. Special guest, Mayor Steve Adler, honored 10 years of arts leadership in Austin with the Icon Award, showcasing the work and effort of those who have contributed to the Long Center’s success.

HOT LUCK + ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE “THREE AMIGOS” SCREENING

2019 ELITE 25 NEW MEMBER PARTY: 1. Tony Trungale, J Kuper & Kevin Burns 2. Stephanie Panozzo, Michelle Jones, Crystal Olenbush & Charlotte Lipscomb FRONT & CENTER LONG CENTER GALA: 3. Ryan Coaxum & Laura Coaxum 4. Brendan Bujold, James Wood, Jason Schuber &, Ryan Phipps HOT LUCK + ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE “THREE AMIGOS” SCREENING: 5. Adi Anand & Aaron Franklin 6. James Moody

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The Hot Luck festival partnered with the Alamo Drafthouse Rolling Roadshow for a one-night screening of “Three Amigos” at Community First! Village on March 3. Founded by James Beard Award winner Aaron Franklin; Guerilla Suit principal and Mohawk owner James Moody; and Mike Thelin, co-founder of Feast Portland, Hot Luck is a rowdy mashup of the culinary and music worlds.


LAKE AUSTIN WATERFRONT

compass.com

LAKE AUSTIN WATERFRONT

3811 Westlake Drive | $9,990,000 | 5 bed | 6.5 bath | 5,775 SF | Separate guest house

2503 Tydings Cove | $3,400,000 | 4 bed | 3 full, 3 half bath | 4,775 SF | 3 car garage

I’m proud to align myself with Compass, where top agents meet best-in-class tech and marketing.

Joe Longton Broker Associate 512.633.5186 joe.longton@compass.com Lake Austin Waterfront Specialist

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Making Space By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Jessica Fontenot

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I

have a certain number of wooden hangers in my closet. I don’t know exactly how many there are, but I do know that a set number exists. I will not buy any more. If one breaks, I throw it away. The fact that I won’t buy any more hangers is not only a result of my disdain for going to Bed Bath & Beyond (why is it that I always seem to get a 20 percent-off coupon from them but can never find one on the rare occasions I actually go?), it also is a statement I made to myself about consumption, order and simplicity. Ba sic a lly, it is a method for ma k ing absolutely sure I purge my closet. Typically this means that if I purchase something new and bring it home to my closet, I have to find a hanger for it. I can cheat and use an available hanger for something that is currently in the laundry pile, but this only forestalls the inevitable — the forced decision point. OK, girl, in order to keep this, something else has to go — what’s it gonna be? Then I scour the inventory, looking for something I haven’t worn in a year, a color I knew I wouldn’t wear, a bold pattern when I am typically white/black/boring. I might pick something fancy from a previous life, because I try to never go anywhere fancy. Or something that screams luncheon, because I despise luncheons, even more than Bed Bath & Beyond. Or something that reminds me of someone I don’t want to remember. Or something that might be coming back in style, especially when it comes to jeans. Skinny-leg, stretchy, boot-cut, f lare, crop, boyfriend, bell-bottom, dark, faded, holes or no holes: How the hell will we ever know what’s coming? Or I’ll purge something my daughters would call “teacher clothes.” I have nothing against teachers, love them, but my girls must have had a few who

IN FASHION OR IN LIFE, WE MAY NOT KNOW EXACTLY WHAT WE WANT NEXT, BUT THE FIRST STEP IS TO SIMPLY MAKE ROOM.

dressed frumpy, because that’s how they label any outfit that is more comfortable than cute (excluding workout stuff, and only then if it’s from Lulu or Outdoor Voices). So I find the item that has lost its appeal and sacrifice it to free up the hanger. Out with the old, in with the new. Once in a while, I do something more drastic. The desire comes on suddenly, and it cannot be thwarted by reason, such has having no time to complete the task or having no large black trash bags. I look around my closet and am suddenly disgusted by my stuff. I see things I don’t like, things I never wear, choices I pass over every day. It’s like a revelation and I want them gone. Out. Immediately. So I summon a brutal, discerning eye and I force myself to go fast. No second-guessing and no pausing on memory lane. I move deftly and critically through the hangers and start f linging clothes mercilessly into the center of the closet. The pile starts growing, and by the time I am done with the racks, the drawers and

the shoes (why are the shoes so hard to part with?), there is a Himalayan heap on my f loor. At this point, and I’m not sure if it’s motivated by fear or exhilaration, I call my twin daughters in as the oversight committee. They jointly cast a cold stare over the racks, sometimes holding up an item and laughing, speaking something unintelligible to the mother of the twins. However, I speak enough twin to know what was said was definitely insulting. After the oversight committee has finished, they might fight about something they want when I die, and if I’m lucky they might stay long enough to hold black trash bags open for me while I stuff them with my sacrifices. Then they leave me to drag the bags to the back of my car, leaving a trail of fallen items down the hallway to the garage. Going to Goodwill might be one of the more satisfying things in life. The sense of relief and accomplishment and personal pride is way out of proportion to the actual effort or impact. When I return to my closet, I notice more empty hangers but oddly not much extra space. This is mysterious and frustrating. I want to see substantial change. Regardless of the impact or the results, I know I have made room, and this is what matters. In fashion or in life, we may not know exactly what we want next, but the first step is to simply make room. I have freed up hangers, literally and metaphorically. I have let go of accumulated junk that is taking up space for what could be more beautiful, more comfortable or more ref lective of who I am today. An important part of personal style is being authentic, unencumbered and having things that fit well. Not things that used to fit well, or used to be in style. I want the space to see what looks and feels good to me in this season.

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TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Twice as NICE Austin boutique Good Company is celebrating its second anniversary by adding a second location. In addition to its original outpost on West 12th Street, the doors are opening to a South Congress shop. Both spots will carry fashion from SBJ Austin, the line created by designer Mallary Carroll, as well as jewelry and accessories. GOODCOMPANY.SHOP

You don’t have to be working out to visit downtown’s Castle Hill Fitness. Now you can pop in for a little shopping at its new gift shop, Joy. Find adorable greeting cards, super-cute kids’ clothes, on-trend jewelry and other items that might make for the perfect thoughtful gift. CASTLEHILLFITNESS.COM

Refined Lines Before Kimberly Baldwin launched her ADM brand, she was traveling through Mexico, looking for inspiration and huipils, traditional embroidered garments. “I would always get compliments,” Baldwin

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says of wearing the huipils. “I was surprised so many people were like, ‘Where did you get that?’” With a fashion-design background, including time at Toms Shoes and Polo Ralph Lauren, Baldwin founded ADM after relocating to Austin from Los Angeles and connecting with an artisan community in Mexico. Using traditional weaving techniques, artisans create the brand’s flowy tops and dresses. “I wanted to do something that was a little bit cleaner, a bit more refined, but at the same time still traditional and handmade,” Baldwin says. SHOPADM.COM

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R O C H E L L E A B A N T E A N D C L AY TO N AY N E S W O R T H

JOY IN STORE


PLANT Power

READY to WEAR “My first baby was a boy, and I was getting was lots of ‘Little Slugger’ and ‘Daddy’s Little Hero’ — just ugly. There was nothing basic,” says Amy Richardson-Golia. “I always thought kidswear was overdesigned — appliques and ruffles and glitter — and I really just wanted something simple.” Looking for basic, durable children’s clothes, Richardson-Golia took matters into her own hands with her brand, June & January. With striped T-shirts and one-color cotton pants, the brand focuses on keeping patterns, colors and silhouettes simple. “Really making everyday pieces they can wear to restaurants or wear to school or wear on play dates,” Richardson-Golia says. Newly relocated to Georgetown, by way of Utah and New York, Richardson-Golia is readying June & January’s new summer swimwear collection, as well as new accessories and kids’ shoes. JUNEANDJANUARY.COM

Looking to give your personal energy a boost? Local herbal formulator Dr. Vim’s specializes in tapping the power of plants for its herbal teas, capsules and powders. Three blends of the Magnificent Mushrooms powder focus on the immune system, physical recovery, and mood and memory, respectively, and can be added to smoothies, homemade muffins or energy bars for a delicious lift. DRVIMS.COM

Time FLIES Steven Lee has always loved watches. “I was actually a pilot, my first career, and then I got into sales … but during that whole time I always had this passion.” In

2016 he launched his own brand, DuFrane Watches, borrowing inspiration from his Austin surroundings. Watch styles include the Bergstrom and the Barton Springs 656. Lee sketches out watch designs by hand and then works with makers in Switzerland to build the mechanical movements. “It takes anywhere from seven months to a year and a half to get a new piece

designed, developed, prototyped and then actually produced,” Lee says. He’s got a list of Austin-inspired designs he plans to produce, with a new watch expected this summer. While he’s tight-lipped on the new style, Lee hints, “It will be based off a very iconic Austin institution.” All in good time. DUFRANEWATCHES.COM

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC BOB SCHNEIDER

April 6 Antone’s Nightclub JENNY LEWIS

April 6 ACL Live at The Moody Theater TYLER CHILDERS

April 6 & 7 Stubb’s BBQ

PINK MARTINI

AL GREEN

BROTHERS OSBORNE

ROBIN TROWER

April 24 Bass Concert Hall

April 9 Paramount Theatre

April 24 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

April 10 Stubb’s BBQ

SAN HOLO

IRATION

OLD SETTLER’S MUSIC FESTIVAL

WALKER LUKENS

April 26 Stubb’s BBQ

April 11 Emo’s Austin

April 11 – 14 Tilmon, TX

BIG FREEDIA

April 12 Mohawk Austin

JACKIE VENSON: CD RELEASE

April 12 Paramount Theatre

ASTER AFTER DARK SUNDAY SUPPER April 14, 7 pm Lake Austin Spa Resort, Aster Cafe Join Chef Wayne Brooks from 827 Ray’s Kitchen + Cellar and Lake Austin Spa Resort Executive Chef Stephane Beaucamp for a gourmet supper with wine pairings. $85 per person plus service and gratuity. Space is limited, please RSVP at (512) 372 7341.

MARCO ANTONIO SOLÍS HOTEL ELLA SALON SERIES "MIDCENTURY MODERN: TEXAS"

April 12 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park ASO: WORLDS APART

April 16, 6-8 pm Hotel Ella

April 12 & 13 Long Center

Join Hotel Ella + UMLAUF for an evening with writer and curator, Katie Robinson Edwards, Ph.D. Edwards will be discussing her book, "Midcentury Modern Art in Texas." Attendees will receive a complimentary day pass to the UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum. Please RSVP to hotelellasalonseries.splashthat.

STS9

CITIZEN COPE

April 7 ACL Live at The Moody Theater LUCINDA WILLIAMS

April 8 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

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April 12 & 13 ACL Live at The Moody Theater WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY

April 12 & 13 Whitewater Amphitheater INDIGO GIRLS

April 13 Paramount Theatre JESSE

April 18 Antone's Nightclub JOAN BAEZ

April 17 Paramount Theatre

AUSTIN REGGAE FESTIVAL

April 19 – 21 Auditorium Shores

MAREN MORRIS

April 20 Whitewater Amphitheater SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

April 21 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

April 26 Mohawk Austin

SUNSET SESSIONS: A GIANT DOG

April 28 Eberly

CHVRCHES

April 28 & 29 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

JON HOPKINS

April 23 Scoot Inn

THE TALLEST MAN ON EARTH

April 23 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

April 5 & 6 Paramount Theatre COPENHAGEN

April 5 – 28 Austin Playhouse

PILOBOLUS: COME TO YOUR SENSES

April 11 Paramount Theatre

FRIENDS! THE MUSICAL PARODY

April 16 Paramount Theatre

THE BALLAD OF KLOOK AND VINETTE

April 24 – May 26 ZACH Theatre

DEERHUNTER

April 29 Mohawk Austin

BONEY JAMES

April 30 One World Theatre SAMMY HAGAR

April 30 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

THEATER

EMILY KING

April 23 Antone's Nightclub

AUSTIN OPERA: SOLDIER SONGS

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT

Through April 6 Ground Floor Theatre

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

April 2 – 7 Bass Concert Hall 100 PLANES

April 4 – 13 The Mastrogeorge Theatre

LA BOHÈME April 27-May 5 Long Center Puccini’s sweeping story of young Bohemians struggling to fulfill their dreams and find true love featuring some of the most beloved music in all of opera. Tickets start at $44, available at austinopera.org or (512) 472 5992.


FAMILY ROALD DAHL’S MATILDA THE MUSICAL

April 3 – May 12 ZACH Theatre

TREASURE ISLAND IN THE BAY OF BENGAL

April 6 – 28 Austin Scottish Rite Theater

EAST AUSTIN URBAN FARM TOUR

April 14 Various Locations

UT FASHION SHOW

April 25 Frank Erwin Center

AUSTIN FOOD + WINE FESTIVAL

April 26 – 28 Various Locations

SPRING FLING EGG HUNT AND CARNIVAL

RED POPPY FESTIVAL

KIDS BLOCK PARTY

EEYORE’S ANNUAL BIRTHDAY PARTY

April 13 Various Locations

April 27 Austin Central Library

April 26 – 28 Georgetown, TX

April 27 Pease Park

TILMON, T X, APRIL 11–14

GOOP MRKT

Through April 28 1204 South Congress Avenue WALLER CREEK POP-UP PICNIC

April 6 Palm Park

April 7 Congress Avenue MOTOGP GRAND PRIX OF THE AMERICAS

April 12 – 14 Circuit of the Americas WENDY DAVIS BOOK SIGNING

April 13 ByGeorge

CRAFTHER MARKET

April 14 Fair Market

Old Settler’s Music Festival By Holly Cowart

OTHER

CAPITOL 10K

MUSIC PICK

WEST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR

May 11-12 & 18-19 Multiple Locations Big Medium’s West Austin Studio Tour (WEST) is a free, annual, self-guided art event providing opportunities for the public to meet local artists in their work spaces. Don't miss the WEST kick-off party happening on May 9, 7-10pm. For complete information and a list of participating artists, visit west.bigmedium.org.

Founded in 1987, the Old Settler’s Music Festival is a four-day music experience. The gathering began as a bluegrass celebration created by the city of Round Rock, and while locations have changed, the fest found a permanent home last year after purchasing 145 acres of land in the small town of Tilmon (roughly a 45-minute drive from Austin). If the Grammy-packed artist lineup is any indication, the annual shindig is stronger than ever. Acclaimed alt-country musicians Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit will be headlining, followed by Brandi Carlile and the Del McCoury Band. You’ll also catch a solid roundup of rising homegrown artists such as Hayes Carll, Wild Child, Black Pumas, Paul Cauthen, Robert Ellis — this showcase is stacked. Thankfully, the performances remain up close and personal. “It’s not a big mega-festival,” says longtime director Jean Spivey. “It’s communitybred, with attendees that really care.” In fact, the tradition functions solely with the help of volunteers, who run everything from artist housing to catering. Whether you’re from here, new to town or just passing through, get an inside look at Americana culture with the artists and loyal fans who are keeping it alive and well.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts Through March 17 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center A SHARED VISION

Through April 13 Davis Gallery

LARRY GRAEBER & MARILYN JOLLY: WHEN THEY APPEAR

Through April 14 grayDUCK Gallery BUMIN KIM

Through April 18 Women & Their Work

ART PICK

SARA & SHANE SCRIBNER

Art City Austin By Holly Cowart REPUBLIC SQUARE, APRIL 13 & 14

Formed in 1956 as the Women’s Guild of the Texas Fine Arts Association, Arts Alliance Austin (which rebranded in 2005 and supports arts initiatives throughout the city) is responsible for one of the longest-running outdoor gatherings in the city — Art City Austin. Initially a hub for visual artists to present their work to the people, the group is extending its programming this year to include crafts, hoping to expand the public’s perception of how art is defined and experienced. During the festival, Republic Square will be filled with installations, performance pieces, noteworthy musical acts and the inaugural Convergence Fair, where attendees can shop makers of all mediums. Culinary arts are also getting a nod, with live demonstrations from talented mixologists, chefs and sommeliers. This year be on the lookout for the organization’s new fundraising event, Gallery 35. Held at Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery, the dinner will celebrate the intersection of multiple creative disciplines. Each food, drink and musical component will be influenced by the privately displayed artwork of abstract impressionist Roi James, making for a thought-provoking evening. Glimpse Austin’s ever-diversifying culture of creation on April 13 and 14. Tickets to the festival are $15 and include access the Art City Austin Festival and Convergence Fair at Republic Square, plus guided gallery tours across town. VIP packages are available for $50.

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Through April 20 Wally Workman Gallery ADAM SCOTT ROTE & MATTHEW MUNGLE

Through April 24 Ao5 Gallery

ART OF CELEBRATION

Through April 27 Art for the People PAPER FIELDS

Through April 28 Atelier 1205

WOMEN OF FLATBED: A RETROSPECTIVE

Through April 28 Elisabet Ney Museum

GRAY HAWN: ROMANCING LIGHT

Through April 30 Manuel’s Downtown FRESH

April 5 – 30 Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery

AUSTIN INTERNATIONAL POETRY FESTIVAL

April 4 – 7 Various Locations

MAGIC OF LIFE

April 4 – May 1 Old Bakery & Emporium ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF NANCY HOLT’S TIME SPAN

April 5 The Contemporary Austin Laguna Gloria SEAN RIPPLE: LOSSY PROCESS

April 6 – 27 Springdale General

AUSTIN POETRY SLAM SLAM OFF

April 7 Stateside at the Paramount ART CITY AUSTIN

April 12 – 14 Republic Square

FUSEBOX FESTIVAL

April 17 – 21 Various Locations

ARTIST TALK: LEANDRO KATZ

April 18 Blanton Museum of Art UNITY OF OPPOSITES

April 19 – May 18 Big Medium Gallery

ROSA NUSSBAUM

April 27 – June 6 Women & Their Work

P H OTO G R A P H B Y A N N A LVA W I E D I N G

JANINE ANTONI AND ANNA HALPRIN: PAPER DANCE


Puccini’s La bohème The Long Center for the Performing Arts

One of the most enduring works in all of opera, Puccini’s sweeping story of young bohemians struggling to fulfill their dreams and find true love contains some of the most beloved music in all of opera.

Tickets start at $44 AUSTINOPERA.ORG 512-472-5992


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

Austin Food + Wine Festival By Holly Cowart AUDITORIUM SHORES & FAIR MARKET, APRIL 26–28

Austin is a food and drink lover’s paradise. Not only are we patrons of a rapidly growing and diverse food industry, but our restaurants are host to some of the nation’s greatest chefs and mixologists. Trying it all can feel overwhelming! Luckily for us, we have the Austin Food + Wine Festival — a culinary playground highlighting our city’s renowned savory scene, with local (Tyson Cole, Fermín Núñez, Kristen Kish) and national (Nancy Silverton, Andrew Zimmern, Jonathan Waxman) talent to boot. Come April, Auditorium Shores and Fair Market will be filled with food-and-drink-focused activities, including fire pits manned by barbecue experts, a hands-on grilling masterclass and a cutthroat taco showdown among local and global icons where one “tortilla-wrapped treat” will take all. For those who want more, "Feast Under the Stars" will prelude the fest, on Thursday evening, and feature a decadent five-course meal, with each dish created by a different award-winning chef. In addition to providing a memorable edible experience, the gathering celebrates the hardworking and passionate restaurateurs, chefs and sommeliers who continue to make Austin a high-profile destination for all things delicious. A portion of the revenue raised from the event will go toward the Austin Food + Wine Alliance, a nonprofit that has invested more than $250,000 directly into Central Texas’ culinary community.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y R O G E R H O

MUSEUMS


elihalpin.com Original. Authentic. Local. Fine Art by Eli Halpin

1023 Springdale Rd 10A Austin Tx

Are we protecting our kids enough? When it comes to child abuse, you can never be too overprotective. Talking about it is the first step.

#ProtectAustinKids

Learn how to prevent child abuse at ProtectAustinKids.org


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8–5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M–Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa–Su 11–4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondotees.com

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 1600 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com/austingallery WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


MALLORY PAGE Wally Workman Galler y 1202 West 6th Street Austin, TX 78703 wallyworkman.com 512.472.7428 Tues- Sat 10-5pm Sun 12-4pm image: Temple Painting I, acr ylic on canvas, 60 x 60 inches


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Esby was founded in 2014 by designer Stephanie Beard and features quality clothing for women and men. The line is proudly made in America using high-quality, all-natural fabrics sourced world-wide. Beard and her team design well-made pieces that are meant to last, and esby’s clothing is fit to flatter, with an emphasis on comfort and wearability. esbyapparel.com

SPRI NG

STYLE Guide

A fabulous kaftan can transform your vacation wardrobe this summer. LA LO LA kaftans are effortless, chic and feature an incredibly flattering fit. Designer Leah Malasko travels the globe to source vintage silk fabrics, which she creatively pairs with beaded and embroidered trims to create oneof-a-kind resortwear collections. lalolaclothing.com


Hunt Design jewelry is simple, elegant and timeless. Ellen Hunt, designer and fabricator, is inspired by the landscape, the people she meets and her history as an architect and metalsmith. Each piece is handformed using recycled precious metals and even repurposed gemstones. Hunt is also available for custom designs. huntdesignjewelry.com Loewe Puzzle Bag + Loewe Gate Pochettes. Color is back in a big way. Spanish label Loewe’s stunning leather goods come in a multitude of sizes and bright pastel colorways. They are the perfect way to brighten your look this spring. Shop now at all locations. bygeorgeaustin.com

When wearing a classic hand-embroidered dress, you feel the authentic beauty, joy and warmth of Mexico. El Interior takes pride in it excellent customer service. Call, visit the website or stop by the Clarksville store. Celebrating its 40th year, El Interior can find the perfect style, fit and color for you. elinterior.com

Combining creativity with craftsmanship, CassandraCollections designer Cassandra King Polidori creates unique jewelry intended for both day and night. The collection’s aesthetic is defined by thoughtfully chosen stones and intricate silver or gold wire work. Each piece is handcrafted and one-of-kind, meant to reflect the individual taste of its owner. cassandracollections.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Hearth and Soul is a gathering place and shopping experience where you can discover beautiful things for yourself, your home or someone special in your life. The concept was born out of a desire to create a store within this fast-paced world where friends can relax and refresh. Our curated collection of simple, modern and classic items, including top brands and artisan goods, will both warm your heart and feed your soul. The floor plan is carefully designed to highlight each room of the home and features men’s and women’s clothing and accessories, skin care products, kitchen provisions, furniture, home décor, barware, entertaining pieces, pet supplies, books and more. The custom space is also created to delight and simplify your life by hosting community events, providing design services and offering a modern wedding registry. Our unique concept of hospitality retail is located in the heart of Tarrytown in Casis Village. hearthandsoul.com


Charles Quinn Photography

R E D , H O T & S O U L - M AY 4 , 2 0 1 9

nice

but

NAUGHTY

H A P P I E S T E V E R A F T E R PA R T Y 9 P. M . – L AT E T H E T O P F E R AT Z A C H T H E AT R E

OPEN BAR | BITES | DJ | DANCING

T I C K E T S A N D I N F O R M AT I O N : Z A C H T H E AT R E . O R G / R H S

“Sometimes you have to be a little bit naughty!” –Roald Dahl’s Matilda the Musical Experience ZACH Theatre’s notorious Red, Hot & Soul event, after hours! Gather your friends, dress up, and join us for an evening of glittering guilty pleasures as you dance the night away on the Karen Kuykendall Stage. A F T E R PA R T Y S P O N S O R Maria and Eric Groten


COMMUNITY PROFILE

Dressed to the Nines AUSTIN ARTIST DROR ON HIS UNIQUE ST YLE By Lauren Jones Portraits by Holly Cowart

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F

ROM HIS RETRO SUITS AND CRISP

button-ups to coifed hair and smooth voice, Houston-born artist Dror brings an air of nostalgia to Austin’s music scene. While singing and songwriting have always been his passion, the recent University of Texas graduate has spent the past few years developing his own style, pulling inspiration from a variety of genres. “I love a lot of soulful singers like Amy Winehouse and Sam Cooke, plus growing up, Ne-Yo and Usher were really popular. I think the music I’m making now is a fusion of it all: modern R&B, hip-hop and pop,” he says. As a child, Dror (born Jonathan Dror) tested his musical prowess in theater and choir and also tried his hand at writing. “I would write songs and test them out on my family,” he recalls. “I would ask who wrote this one and see if they would guess a real singer.” Despite not taking proper voice lessons until the end of high school, being around talented artists and attending a bevy of concerts is something that helped develop his unique sound. “As a kid, I would save up allowance money and put it toward concerts,” he remembers. “Houston is such a big city, everyone would come through. That was the first time I fell in love with seeing performers.” Come college, the singer joined an a cappella group and produced his first song, one that became an overnight sensation. It was the fall of 2014 and Snapchat had just piloted its campus story feature, selecting UT as one of the first two schools in the nation for its trial run. Dror’s attempt, a UT-focused anthem called “Put ’Em Up,” went viral, receiving over 20,000 views in 24 hours. “People started tweeting about it,” he says. “Yik Yak was also a forum at the time, and people would talk about it on there. I realized it had the potential to get more attention, and thus I turned the hook into a full song and ended up filming a video with some athletes I was friends with on the football team.” With lyrics such as “Put ’em up for the Texas / Put ’em up for the fight / Put ’em up for the burnt orange / And put ’em up for the white!” and “You know we counting down to game day / Hook ’em, Horns / Tailgating all

Scenes from Dror's self-directed music video, "Cookie Cutter." Photographs by Yvan Nguyen. OPPOSITE: Dror at Crestview Barber Shop.

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

through the night till early morn,” the song perfectly encapsulated the UT experience and overwhelming campus pride. After his original success with “Put ’Em Up,” Dror took a step back to discover who he wanted to be in the music industry. He interned at Sony Music during his junior year and made it to a fourth callback for NBC's “The Voice.” When it comes to describing Dror’s style, he has a timeless quality that plays to an era of days past, but with modern influences, much like his personal taste in music. “I credit my style development to my mom

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and my sisters,” he says. “I grew up in a house with three women who loved fashion, and they helped me be very open and take risks. I want to be able to look back at a picture in decades and not question what I was thinking.” Dror also frequents vintage shops like Houston’s Top Vintage, invests in high-end finds and even pulls pieces from his dad’s closet to complete his look. His good-luck charm, a pair of cowboy boots, comes from his grandfather, a man who was “always dressed to the nines.” “After my grandpa came to visit my parents in Texas, he absolutely fell in love,” he says. “So

in this random apartment in the Middle East [Dror’s family is from Israel], there are dozens of cowboy boots and steers on the wall.” His classic style is showcased in his most recent videos, for singles “Tryna Be” and “Cookie Cutter,” both of which are self-directed. “Tryna Be” was written one evening in college when he stayed home from a party everyone seemed to be attending. “I started thinking about who I wanted to be as a person, as an artist, and how I wanted my life to look,” he says. “I think there are plenty of people who are struggling to find themselves and do what is popular, but if more people were true to themselves, we’d all have a better time.” The video is very cinematic, with influences from artist Lana Del Rey and director Wes Anderson and clothing from the 1950s. “This was my first video, so I wanted it to be a really strong introduction of who I am,” he says. “From writing the plot to casting to wardrobe to directing the shots, I enjoyed it all.” “Cookie Cutter,” his second single, is similar in message. “I wanted to write about my own experience growing up,” he says. “I never wanted to have a job I wasn’t passionate about, come home and call that my life.” The video has a vintage vibe, with a nod to the dystopian movies like “The Truman Show” and “Pleasantville,” and depicts Dror’s childhood and life in a picture-perfect world. “We filmed in Austin and Houston,” he says. “There are a lot of picturesque houses over by 43rd Street, and in Houston we got to film in the childhood home of James Baker, George H. W. Bush’s best friend and his Secretary of State.” So what’s next for Dror? The singer-songwriter is hoping to make it big and get a record contract. “I have a stockpile of music I’ve been holding onto,” he says. “I’ve also started talking with management companies and have had labels reach out.” Sounds like exciting things are just around the corner.


Eyelash Extensions Lash Lifts Lash Tinting Brow Shaping Brow Tints Full Service Hair Salon

512.628.0175 4410 Medical Pkwy Austin, 78756

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COMMUNITY PICK

In Tribute: Andrew Shapter

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By Margaret Williams Portraits by Todd V. Wolfson HEN THE FOUNDER OF TRIBEZ A , Z ARGHUN DEAN,

first met photographer Andrew Shapter in 1999, he handed him a prototype of the magazine he was hoping to launch. Dean remembers Shapter’s immediate response: “What can I do to help you succeed?” Born in Fort Worth, Shapter first picked up a camera at age 12, his eye from then on forever in tune with the world around him. After studying political science at Texas State University and spending time in Washington, D.C., Shapter settled in Austin and began a long career in fashion and music photography and filmmaking. In 2006 he co-wrote and produced his first documentary, “Before the Music Dies,” and would go on to release multiple documentary, television and feature-length projects. “The Teller & the Truth,” from 2015, is the tale of Francis Wetherbee, a Smithville bank teller who’d been missing since 1974, and in 2016 Shapter worked on behalf of the U.S. State Department to produce “Refugees Are…,” a video documenting the worldwide refugee crisis. Here at Tribeza we were lucky to have been the beneficiary of so much of

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Shapter’s work and talent. He collaborated with the magazine for close to 10 years and photographed many covers, including our first. Stephen Aravalos, who was the magazine’s art director from 2003 to 2005, remembers: “The first issue of Tribeza I picked up was at D Berman Gallery in 2002, and I was so impressed with the photography [shot by Shapter]. It’s hard to imagine the origins of Tribeza without thinking of Andrew. His photography helped shape its vision, and I was very fortunate to work with him.” Shapter was a man of immense creative energy, compassion and generosity. Dean recalls a sentiment shared by many of Shapter’s friends and colleagues: “As hard as Andrew always worked, he always enthusiastically said yes to anyone who needed his help. When you worked with Andrew, his sheer will brought the tide that raised all boats.” After a yearslong battle with cancer, Shapter died on February 23, at the age of 52. He is survived by his wife, Christina, and their two children, Faron and William, to whom we send our deepest condolences. Dean put it best when he said, “From all of us who are grateful for your generosity, Andrew, thank you.”


LEFT: A Shapter cover from April 2004. BELOW: The photographer and director, captured by Wolfson, in April 2018.

ABOVE: Shapter worked with Tribeza for almost 10 years, shooting the magazine's first cover, released in March 2001.

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+ Objects of Desire Everyone plays favorites. And when it comes to telling our own style stories, we all have that one special piece that makes us feel complete as we step into the world. The reasons these objects cast their spells over us are as varied as the pieces themselves. On the following pages, we hear from a few style makers about their favorite things. By Anne Bruno Photographs by Nick Cabrera styling by Katie Leacroi

+ Marcus Hersh About me

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I'm a stylist and buyer at Valentine’s. I try to see beauty in everything. My style icon is Yves Saint Laurent, and if I could go shopping with anyone, it would be Marie Antoinette. Right now, I'm into making beaded jewelry. tribeza.com

My style in three words

Eclectic. Authentic. Flamboyant. My favorite thing

On my 31st birthday two of my best friends, Julie and Sari Warenoff gave me a customized, vintage Levi's

jacket. It was made just for me by people who love me. It also goes with everything. No matter where I am, people stop me to talk about it, and I love meeting new people.


+ Cristina Facundo About me

Full-time wardrobe stylist, mom, blogger and founder of Mini Market, a semiannual pop-up catering to moms and their minis. MY STYLE IN THREE WORDS

Effortless. Minimalist. Closet-color-enthusiast. MY FAVORITE THING

Ahhh, so hard to say! My engagement ring, wedding band… my mom’s handkerchiefs, which I grabbed from a yard sale pile a few years ago. Photos of her wearing them in the ’70s are my favorite pictures of her. A gold sapphire ring that was a gift from my sister, who picked it up in a flea market in Paris. It’s big and bold and I love thinking of who wore it before me. All things that are sentimental and tell a story.

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+ Emory Blake About me

Former NFL player and forever Auburn Tiger raised in Austin. I co-own a store called South of Everywhere, on South Lamar. We feature high-end menswear and also do event consulting. Faith and family are the most important things in my life.

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My style in three words

Clean. Minimal. Elevated. My favorite thing

These Rafs [Raf Simons] were the first designer shoes I bought myself. I got made fun of for them, but I didn’t care. I knew they were fresh. My national championship rings

are also important to me. To be part of the 2010 national championship team is a blessing. Auburn is a special place. I built relationships there that will last a lifetime. The rings remind me of that, and spark curiosity and conversation, which opens up opportunities to get to know people.


+ Emily Chandler About me

Native Texan with a passion for vintage. I turned my hobby into a business called OLIO Collection because I know I’ll never stop digging for treasures. My style in three words

Over. The. Top.

My favorite thing

I don’t feel dressed without a bold vintage jacket, oversize cocktail rings — as many as I can get on each hand — and massive clip-on earrings. (I don’t have my ears pierced.) Even better if I can layer it all with an outrageous caftan. I love vintage because each piece tells a story — the fabric, the lines. Each item takes on a personality of its own. I love Iris Apfel and people who are confident in their own taste. She adheres to my motto: There is no such thing as overdressed. tribeza.com

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+ Patty Hoffpauir About me

I’m beginning to measure things in years – 50 years of marriage, 45 years of having children, 40 years of owning The Garden Room. I have two grandchildren, who I create silly Easter creations for. And as my friends and family will attest, I love to rearrange furniture in an afternoon. 

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My style in three words

Twisted classic.

My favorite thing

When I was a young girl, I'd study my grandmother's box of buttons; one with a dog was my favorite. Going through her belongings after she was gone, I came upon the dog button

and gave it to a wonderful artist named Cheryl Gran, who was creating bracelets. She crocheted the band with pearls and black and white beads. I treasure this bracelet. My Rebecca Munro jacket is special, too — reminds me of the ’80s, when women were becoming more independent.


+ Langston Dillard About me

I’m a boy from Texas. I spend my time reading articles about design on sightunseen.com and browsing for vintage furniture I likely won’t buy. I work in public relations and go to UT, and some days I go to class. I’d love to go shopping with Solange Knowles. I would trust her with probably everything, my wardrobe included. MY STYLE IN THREE WORDS

Silhouetted. Consistent. I want to say “classic,” but that sounds boring and my style isn’t. MY FAVORITE THING

I bought a bright-red wool coat from a vintage shop last fall and have worn it nonstop ever since. Historically, I’ve worn nothing but black, white and neutrals. They’re basic colors, easy to coordinate and they make me feel safe. This coat is the opposite in every way, but I’ve found confidence in its boldness.

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UNCOMMON

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A RESTORED STUDIO REVEALS A LAYERED HISTORY WITH A STYLE ALL ITS OWN By Margaret Williams Photographs by Casey Dunn

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hen Erin Thornton and her husband, John, heard that the lot next to their Tarrytown home was coming up for sale, the plan was fairly cut-and-dried: Purchase the property as an investment and scrape the existing home, which they had been informed was a teardown. That all seemed fine and well until they actually stepped into the space. As Erin remembers, “We both split off, started walking around the house and kept kind of meeting in the middle, nervous about who would say it first. I forget who did. ‘Is it just me or does this house have integrity?’ ” At the time, thanks to a distracting out-ofdate Mexican-inspired interior and a longago ’80s addition (which managed not to have affected the bones of the original structure), the couple LEFT: Erin describes didn’t know why the home the space as "an felt the way it did but decided amalgamation of the various eras within to integrate the two lots and mine and John's keep the house as a revolving individual lives." studio and workspace. Thank As evidenced by goodness they acted on the contemporary those initial instincts, as the mirrored art (The couple later learned that the Renner Project) paired with 1970s midcentury gem had been Lucite slipper chairs. built as the home of renowned architect George Page. Page had been a partner in Page Southerland Page (founded in 1932 by George’s older brother, Louis, and his good friend Louis Southerland; George joined the firm in 1939), known for its

early midcentury residences and later McCallum High School, Dart Bowl and Palmer Auditorium, to name a few. Erin, a writer and designer, with infectious creative enthusiasm, explains that the layered studio has had multiple iterations, three to be exact, and will most likely have more. “This house has allowed me to re-create a new way, in exactly my way. It’s been about creating an environment where work is play and play is work. They exist seamlessly. It’s also about inviting other people in.” And in fact, the couple held their New Year’s Eve nuptials in the space, which I imagine was iteration two, but who’s really counting? While the noteworthy backstory and current inspiration for the studio are certainly interesting, the space stands on its own. Sunlight pours in from all directions, and despite its openness, Erin has managed to create pockets that flow effortlessly from one to the next. Framed flea market textiles live next to contemporary art, passed-down familial silver is integrated with a pair of ’60s Lucite chairs and a French antique sofa sits below a ceiling covered in a faux-ivy trellis (described by Erin as “extreme fakeness”). And don’t miss the Gummi Bear-filled crystal bowl surrounded by Fortuny-upholstered Danish chairs. Somehow it all manages to feel both worldly and cozy. I could go on and on, but I’ll let the space (and Erin) do the talking. Pass the Gummi Bears, please.

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"I am constantly moving stuff around. I used to have a store [Fabby Darling], and it spoiled me. So this is what I do – I tend to buy things that I love, find spots for them and then move them." The Thornton's lounge space is anchored by an antique rug from Black Sheep Unique and custom sofas from Mod Shop.

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Floor sculpture by Abraham Cruzvillegas and mixed-media piece by Gary Carsley.

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The salon wall, which is a mix of fine art and pieces sourced from Uncommon Objects, is backed in a textural Hermès horse hair herringbone.

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“This room is definitely my favorite...when you come back next time, there will be paintings and notes covering every surface. That makes me feel good. Plus, this is the best work table ever. John’s designer [Robert Smith] purchased it for what was going to be his bachelor pad in the W. And it’s gorgeous and a bear, but we have never been able to get rid of it, because we both love it.”

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The current art scene is immersive, tactile and female. Installations at Preacher Gallery, Women & Their Work and MASS Gallery provided the perfect foil to our most coveted spring looks. Life imitates art, and now it seems that fashion does, too. Bravo. PHOTOGRAPHS BY Jackie Lee Young STYLING BY Margaret Williamson Bechtold HAIR AND MAKEUP BY Lauren Garcia MODELING BY Isabel Li (Page Parkes Agency)

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PREVIOUS SPREAD FASHION: BYRON LARS BEAUTY MARK dress, The Garden Room. VADA JEWELRY earrings and rings, ByGeorge. ART: Magda Sayeg's "Spirographs," Preacher Gallery. THIS SPREAD FASHION: INNIKA CHOO dress and N°21 shoes, Sunroom. PEARL BAG, Beehive. VADA JEWELRY earrings and rings, ByGeorge. ART: Sayeg's "Yoga Balls," Preacher Gallery. tribeza.com

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OPPOSITE FASHION: LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ dress, Sunroom. ART: Sayeg's "Wall of Balls," Preacher Gallery. ABOVE FASHION: CHANEL jacket, Archive.

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ABOVE FASHION: SIGNATURES jacket and skirt, Dylan Wylde. VADA JEWELRY rings, ByGeorge. ART: Haleh Pedram's "Chip Study I," MASS Gallery. OPPOSITE FASHION: TOPSHOP top and dress, Nordstrom. KENDRA SCOTT necklace, Kendra Scott. ART: Amada Miller's "Framing an Observable Universe I, II and III, " MASS Gallery.

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ABOVE FASHION: COTTON CANDY LA sweater, Dylan Wylde. VADA JEWELRY bangles, ByGeorge. OPPOSITE FASHION: TOPSHOP dress, Nordstrom. VADA JEWELRY necklace and rings, ByGeorge. ART: A detail from Hedwige Jacobs' "Corner Room," a site specific installation from her exhibition at Women & Their Work Gallery: "If I could, I would cover everything with my drawings."

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LEFT FASHION: BALENCIAGA shoes, Neiman Marcus. OPPOSITE FASHION: DEREK LAM 10 CROSBY dress, Neiman Marcus. VADA JEWELRY, ByGeorge. BAG, Beehive. ART: Jacobs' "Corner Room," Women & Their Work Gallery.

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By Dorothy Guerrero Photographs by Claire Schaper

on

Girl brand Bumble’s chief brand officer has a style that’s as bright and refreshing as the company she helped build tribeza.com

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I

t’s the Thursday before SXSW, and South Congress has that calm-beforethe-storm vibe. At June’s All Day, there are not one but two photo shoots happening as customers stroll in for a very late breakfast. The occasional outof-towner walks past the window with a swinging badge, but the throngs of influencers have yet to descend. When our server hears us discussing the rise of Bumble, she is moved to interject. “I have to tell you,” she says, “my fiancé and I met on Bumble!” And then things get really real when she whips out her phone to show us the adorable, chubby-cheeked baby on her wallpaper. Her Bumble baby. “This happens all the time,” Alex Williamson whispers to me with a cheeky smile. Williamson, who is Bumble’s chief brand officer, has been with the company since its start in 2014. She and founder Whitney Wolfe Herd met as undergrads at SMU. As the dating app with a female-empowerment mission expanded into friendships and professional networking, Williamson’s role has taken her all around the world. These days, she needs a wardrobe that will work as hard as she does. But a recent freak mold infestation ruined most of her clothing. Luckily she has the clothes on her back, a blue-and-white dress with the sweetest lace detail, red cowboy boots and a Bumble-branded jean jacket that says “Making Moves” across the back. After settling up at June’s, we head around the corner to Feathers Vintage to catch up on her coveted career and get her something to wear for spring.

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ABOVE: After a bite at June's All Day, Guerrero and Williamson popped into Feathers, where the two were met with drinks by store manager Brett Williams. PREVIOUS SPREAD: Williamson shown at June's.

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On the “stuff” of life

I don’t have an attachment to my stuff anymore. I was traveling for weeks, and I had one suitcase of my mom’s clothes with me. [Worth noting: Her mother is Cathy Williamson of @themiddlepageblog, a Dallas-based fashionista with a big following.] I stopped caring which was the best gift that I’d ever received, and I stopped feeling devastated. It doesn’t really matter; it’s all just things.

On the coat that got away

Last time I was at Feathers, there was this orange embroidered shearling coat that I loved. It was very loud and looked like something that you’d wear to a music festival or Burning Man. I didn’t know how I could wear it a lot without being the girl in that coat — but it was amazing. If I ever see the girl who got it around town, I’m gonna be like, “Can I buy that off of you?”

On dressing up

It’s so fun to express yourself. I love statement dresses and always gravitate toward a high neck. Clearly, everything that I’ve grabbed in here is highneck. And then I love crazy heels. I wear a lot of prints.

On her work uniform

Other than statement dresses, it’s typically jeans and T-shirts. And “Bumble” T-shirts and “Bumble” sweaters. And then I’ll throw on a blazer. Working in tech is very casual — people aren’t expecting me to be super-dressed-up. Just a bit of extra effort makes you look very polished and put-together.

On the office dress code

What’s unique about our office is that it feels very supportive. I think women dress for other women, but mainly at Bumble they dress for themselves. People come in their sweats and workout clothes — as long as you’re getting the work done, it doesn’t really matter.

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THIS PAGE: Scences from Feathers, Williamson's favorite vintage shop. OPPOSITE: Williamson, photographed by Kristen Kilpatrick, at the Bumble headquarters.


"I want the focus to be on what I'm saying."

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On her fashion icons

I think people who usually get it right are Olivia Palermo — she does a great job with her style. Cleo Wade, the author, always looks amazing. And then Amal Clooney is always incredible.

On those red cowboy boots

The boots are Allens. I broke them in dancing at — where was it? — White Horse. And then ... Barbarella.

On the perks of having a fashion blogger for a mother

I hardly have time to shop, period. Which is what’s so great about my mom. I’ll say, “Can I borrow this?” And she’s like, “I’m never gonna see it again.” She does patterns, but she does them in a different way. I tend to like grunge and messy hair and no makeup. And my mom is very Dallas.

On her crazy schedule

Today I’ll be in the office, and it’s my first day back in three weeks! I’ve been to London, Vancouver, Los Angeles and Aspen. And Dallas. And now I don’t have anything planned, which is really nice and very rare. But every time I say that, something happens and I’m gone again the next day.

On her style evolution

When the company first started, I spent the first year wearing a crop top that said “Bumble” on it. And I would go into bars to get downloads. I’d walk up to people — I’m not joking — and be like, “I'm so sorry to interrupt …,” and pick one guy out of the table of however many and say, “Did we match on Bumble, because you look really familiar?” I was a lot more of a risk-taker in the beginning, and I think my style has become more refined. I always want to look appropriate, because I’m representing everybody else on the team. Whatever makes you feel empowered is how you should dress. I want the focus to be on what I’m saying. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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STYLE PROFILE

Kirby and Monahan shown inside House of St. Clair.

The Best Is Yet to Come L AUREN KIRBY AND CARSON MONAHAN SHARE THEIR INSPIR ATION FOR HOUSE OF ST. CL AIR By Andrew Dunkin Photographs by Claire Schaper

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Art + Objects from House of St. Clair

S

IT TING DOWN WITH C AR SON

Monahan and Lauren Kirby at the sophisticated br ick-and-mor tar headquarters of House of St. Clair surrounded by sketches and fabric swatches, it’s hard to imagine that the pair launched the Austin-based brand only one year ago. Monahan and Kirby, who are partners in both business and life, moved to Austin from Michigan in 2014 and recently became engaged. In a single year the couple’s modern menswear brand has not only become a creative force in Austin’s exploding fashion scene, but has also spread beyond the city, expanding to stores around the U.S. as well as Japan and Europe. Monahan made his start in product design at Fortune Goods, a small jewelry and accessories company. From there, he went on to develop

what is now House of St. Clair. His designs, drawing on the rich history of textiles, reimagine classic male silhouettes of the ’40s and ’50s in the style of the ’90s grunge, skater and hip-hop movements that shaped Monahan’s childhood. In her youth, Kirby developed a style all her own, finding inspiration in photos of old runway shows like Celine, Versace, Dior and YSL; she combined classic pieces with current ones to create contemporary looks. She later honed her skills as the director of production and an associate designer at Esby Apparel. Kirby’s current work for House of St. Clair reveals an affinity for iconic designs, but also ventures into modern avenues of style and utility. We spoke in the couple’s East 12th Street office, where their simple white desks face each other.

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STYLE PROFILE

A scene from House of St. Clair's brick and mortor. OPPOSITE: The Marrakech shirt.

ANDREW DUNKIN: Carson, many of your designs

call back to the roots of the garment industry. Where did that inspiration come from? CARSON MONAHAN: This may sound cliché, but from my granddad. He was one of the first men that I noticed had style. And for me, growing up in the skate and music culture of the ’90s, style was important. He looked elegant no matter what the occasion. Those early inf luences are with me from season to season, but in our own twist. I’ll take a fabric like check tweed, generally used to make a suit or hunting jacket, and make a hoodie or an oversized shirt. It’s fun to take original inf luences in menswear and make them into something that speaks to our generation. AD: How would you describe House of St. Clair? CM: We combine classic with contemporary. I would consider most of our clothing as unisex. For example, many of our pants have a high rise that works well on women. With our tops, we don’t make anything that is super-slim, so on a guy, it’s more shapeless and draping, which also works well on women. Our brand advocates for quality of product. It’s always been important for us to have everything made in the U.S.A., not only because we can easily communicate to somebody in California, Texas or New York who’s making our product, but also to ensure top quality control and well-paid partners. When we source materials, we want to know where the best wool comes from, the best corduroy, where the best denim mills are. LAUREN KIRBY: Yes, because you can’t stand behind something, say it’s made the right way, and not be part of the process. AD: Lauren, how did your experience at Esby lead you to join Carson at House of St. Clair? LK: At Esby, I learned ever y thing from marketing to branding to wholesale, production,

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design and even down to the finances. That base allowed me to hone in on my love of product development — concept to creation — and the making of the garment. AD: Tell me a bit about your personal styles and how that reflects House of St. Clair? LK: My design style is vintage and modern, masculine and feminine. It has to do with my love for old runway shows, vintage pieces, old music and movies. We both enjoy going to vintage and antiques stores to look for clothing, objects, books and art that inspires us. Sometimes it’s just one little detail on an item that we develop further and work around. AD: I can see you two sitting at home, watching “Casablanca” and taking notes. LK: [Laughing.] We really do that. CM: For me, all the inf luences in my life, from grunge to hip-hop, jazz to electronic, have given me a lineage to draw from. Our style is a mix of

the old and new, and I think House of St. Clair reflects that. AD: What gave you the confidence to develop your personal style to what it is today? LK:  Dressing for myself. We too often dress for the people around us, but you feel most confident when you feel comfortable in your own skin. When I started doing that, I became more confident. And trying more-adventurous looks, because it’s fun to take risks in fashion. I love picking out outfits in the morning, wondering if things will work together, and then seeing them come to life. CM: Neither of us has a problem with taking risks and wearing something a little different. I like to be comfortable and look good. Clothing is self-expression, so why not have fun with it? If other people think it’s weird, who cares? It’s just clothes. For us as designers, we want everybody to feel


CLOTHING IS SELF EXPRESSION, SO WHY NOT HAVE FUN WITH IT? IF OTHER PEOPLE THINK IT'S WEIRD, WHO CARES? good. I think it’s really cool when people can mix what we create through their own personal lens. We love to see our pieces help people explore their own style. AD: What are you excited about, and what can you tell us about this spring line? CM: This spring line was very inspired by our trip to Marrakech in Morocco, specifically the spice merchants in the ancient medina. It is a colorful and cultural explosion that truly invokes a lifetime of inspiration. You’ll find a lot of that color throughout the line. LK: Many of the shapes we used were inspired by the clothing we saw there as well — a little boxier and longer, making it easy to wear for a variety of body types and during the hottest months. CM: But I think we are really excited to introduce a women’s capsule in the near future. AD: Anything you can tell us about it? LK: Just … more to come!

SEE THE EXHIBITION FREE ADMISSION 21st and Guadalupe Streets hrc.utexas.edu tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK

Passage to India

AN EFFORTLESS CLOTHING LINE IS BUILT AROUND T WO SISTERS' LOVE FOR HERITAGE INDIAN TE X TILES By Margaret Williams Photographs by Jenny Antill

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S

I S T E R S E R I N B R E E N A N D K AT I E

McClure never thought they would have a clothing line together, much less one with a connection to India. But after falling in love with the country's heritage textiles on a trip there, the sisters' caftan and resort wear brand, Mirth, was born. “I went to UT and majored in textiles and apparel," says McClure, "but post-college I veered from that industry and worked in recruiting, events and sales. I always regretted not pursuing a career in the fashion industry and felt the desire to do something creative that also had meaning.” Breen's background is in special education and after closing her first business, which provided therapy for children with Autism, she decided to take a trip with her sister. “Traveling in India after closing the clinic, plus my love for caftans is what ignited my desire to delve into the industry.” We sat down with the designers to talk about Mirth (whose name was born during a laughter-filled elephant ride taken by the sisters), working together and doing business in Texas and India. MARGARET WILLIAMS: I have a sister myself and love that you two work together. Is that something you'd thought about doing for a while? KATIE MCCLURE: We certainly never thought we’d have a brand together, design clothing or trek to India for work. It’s all been a crazy adventure. I had been living in Switzerland and Singapore and was traveling in Bali, Nepal and India to find inspiration for what to do next. I

fell in love with beautiful artisan textiles and the effortless silhouettes I was seeing. But I couldn’t find a caftan I loved, which is what first sparked the idea. When Erin closed her clinic, it was the perfect timing for her to join me so she could do some soul-seeking of her own. ERIN BREEN: When I arrived in India Katie already had the idea brewing. After days spent speaking with locals in the textiles business, we kept saying to each other, “We could really do this!” On this one magical day we went on an elephant ride and couldn't stop laughing because it felt as if years of puzzle pieces had come together. Hence, Mirth, the name of our company. MW: After the initial idea, what happened next? KM: We were starting from the ground up. We had some savings and did almost everything ourselves – which could be frustrating because of the time spent on failing and learning. But in

the end, it gave us a deep understanding of every corner of the business. EB: We spent a couple of years organizing all of the logistics before officially launching in 2016. We had to establish a supply chain, hire a production team and source fabrics that were ethically made – and could be made consistently, with quality control. Social impact is at the heart of what we do. MW: What does it mean to work with “heritage textiles?” KM: Many of the textiles are made using techniques that have been around for centuries. The two methods we use are handloom weaving, which comes in many forms based on the region, and hand block printing. EB: Jamdani is a weaving technique practiced in West Bengal. Weavers in rural villages weave in motifs [“buti”] by hand as the fabric itself is

OPPOSITE: Looks from Mirth's Spring '19 line. The sisters on a recent scouting trip. RIGHT: McClure in Bagru, a city in northwest India. tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK

Breen and McClure are committed to working with artisans whose skills have been passed down for generations and often require no electricity.

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woven—all done by sight. We work with weaving revival projects created specifically to keep these traditions alive and bring work to rural areas. Sadly, mass production techniques have taken over much of the demand for handmade fabrics. MW: Tell me about your production process. KM: The design process for one season takes over a year and a half and we have about six seasons that we're working on at once. There are two main parts to the design process: the fabric and the garment. We design the fabric both in Houston and in India. Sometimes we take an existing design and tweak it, or we come up with a new one. A blockprint, for example, starts with a drawing. A carver carves a wooden teak block by hand. Once we have several blocks and ideas, we travel to India to sample in person. It’s a collaboration with the master printers and they tell us when they don't like something or think another way will work better. It's a ton of fun and the end result is rarely

what we initially planned—it’s usually better! EB: It's a bit of a hodge podge of experimentation and often an accident ends up being the showpiece. In Houston we work with a patternmaker and sample maker. And we also sample directly with our suppliers in Delhi. It allows us to use their technical capabilities, things like embroidery and smocking. We start from many different directions, but somehow it ends up as a cohesive collection. MW: Highs and lows over the last three years? EB: A lot of late nights and a lot of self-doubt. There are tough days when we question ourselves. But it’s surreal seeing someone in public wearing our pieces. We don’t think that feeling will ever get old! KM: Getting our first order from GOOP was a huge moment. Whenever we are in India collaborating with our partners, it reminds us of why we decided to do this. Not only are we getting to dream up and create beautiful garments, but

we’re making a visible difference in entire communities because of the job opportunities being created. EB: Finding inspiration also – when we travel, we always ask drivers for recs. Often they take us to tourist places, but sometimes they deliver us to a gold mine of a shop. We love visiting a group of all-women weavers in Maheshwar. They have a co-op that trains women and allows them to earn a substantial living in a supportive environment. Each region is different and the food is so incredible, too. MW: How do you find the sweet spot of designs that suit urban dwellers and vacationers alike? KM: That’s our goal. We create what we want to wear—easy, comfortable, but still chic. We want to create pieces that women can wear all the time, no matter what they're doing. (OR ... no matter where they are.)

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T R AV E L P I C K

Marfa

MUCH ADO IS MADE OF THIS WEST TE X AS TOWN’S ART SCENE, BUT THE DINING IS ALSO MIGHT Y FINE

I

W E NT TO M A R FA , B U T I S KI PPE D TH E

selfie at the Prada installation. I also didn’t make it to the Chinati Foundation, but in my defense, it was that or a final meal at the celebrated Marfa Burrito. I cannot be forced to choose between asado and art. With all due respect to Donald Judd and his ilk, I experience places through my stomach, and for my first foray to this remote West Texas town, it was all about gustatory gratification. I was fresh off of judging the International Frank X. Tolbert-Wick Fowler Memorial Championship Chili Cook-Off in Terlingua, and it seemed fitting to end my West Texas trip with a culinary pilgrimage to Marfa. Even if you know about Marfa only by association (as I did), you’re likely aware that

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it’s “quirky,” if not downright weird. Marfa does what it wants, when it wants. That’s part of the charm. Despite its isolation (located in the TransPecos, even the nearest railway is more than 25 miles away, in Alpine), Marfa’s food-anddrink scene is more than capable of holding its own, especially given the fact that the best of its establishments emphasize regionality, using high-quality Lone Star State-grown or -raised ingredients. A quick scan of recent menus includes mentions of Marfa Maid Goat Cheese, Bandera quail, South Texas antelope, Beeman Ranch Akaushi beef (a Japanese breed frequently mislabeled as wagyu or Kobe), mesquite toast, backyard fruit and Gulf seafood. Provenance aside, what Marfa’s chefs, cooks,

P H OTO G R A P H B Y R YA N H E F N E R . I L L U S T R AT I O N CO U R T E S Y O F S T E L L I N A .

By Laurel Miller


bakers and mixologists are doing with said ingredients is remarkable for any small town (Marfa’s current population sits right around 2,000). This standard applies both to fine dining (like Austin, it’s all about come-as-youare, be it clad in Wranglers and dusty ropers or head-to-toe couture) and hole-in-the-wall spots like Marfa Burrito and Stars Marfa (exquisite doughnuts bedazzled with toppings like roasted banana glaze, peanut butter and malt powders and lardons). At Marfa Burrito, where owner-cook Ramona Tejada has been serving up made-f rom-scratch, no-frills Mexican fare out of her home kitchen for years, the house-made f lour tortillas are the star attraction; bring cash. I also fell hard for Do Your Thing coffee; owners Simone Rubi and Robert Gu ngor a re Bay A re a refugees/artists/musicians/ former baristas who saw a need for a top-notch coffee house in Marfa. The minimalist space is part of The Lumberyard, a artist collective and community hub that makes an ideal place to while away a blistering-hot West Texas afternoon. There are delicious drinks, like a latte spiked with mesquite and vanilla bean syrups, but don’t miss the house-baked sourdough made from wild yeast starter. Each loaf is thickly sliced and turned into addictive toasts topped with the likes of avocado, tahini, za’atar oil, gochugaru, toasted sesame seeds and Maldon sea salt, or

butter and house-made jam. In fact, I may have eaten a second breakfast my last morning, just to get another taste of that dense, chewy, flavorful bread. Marfa’s high-desert environment vibrates from the best menus, manifesting in soulful dishes and drinks that reflect balanced elements of heat, smoke, sweetness and earth. At Stellina, a standout dish was molotes, plantain-masacheese fritters with black bean and habanero sauce; even the bread and butter came with a rotating duo of salts, such as chicatana ant and cardamom, and char red cor n and lime. Another evening, I enjoyed a Spicy Chihuahua cocktail (mezcal, serrano agave syrup, lime) in The Capri’s lush garden before d i n ner. T he s t u n n i ng restaurant (concrete f loor and walls, exposed brick, seductive lighting, regional artifacts), a part of the Thunderbird Hotel, is chef Rocky Barnette’s love letter to explicitly sourced ingredients (customers will feel less warmth from the lackadaisical staff, but you’re in Marfa, relax). Muscovy duck is paired with cortido, huitlacoche and cacao; yucca blossoms are fried tempurastyle; and foie gras terrine may appear with “plums from our orchard.” My final dining pick and the perfect spot for a sweet finale? Cochineal: Think orange cardamomMarfa Maid goat milk ice cream or tres leches cake with brandied cherries. Says Krista Steinhauer, co-founder/executive

"MARFA DOES WHAT IT WANTS, WHEN IT WANTS."

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Selections from Marfa's eclectic food scene (clockwise from right): The Water Stop, Do Your Thing, Marfa Maid Goat Cheese, Marfa Burrito (owner Ramona Tejada pictured at right).

M A R FA B U R R I TO A N D WAT E R S TO P P H OTO B Y S E P T E M B E R B R OA D H E A D

chef at Stellina, “Marfa definitely attracts creative types who dine out a lot and are exposed to myriad cuisines. But it’s also a really supportive community where people can launch their projects more easily than most places.” Steinhauer has been a pivotal influence on the local food scene since her arrival in 2004. “I was moving back to Texas from Italy and wanted a change from Austin. Back then, Maiya’s was the only fine-dining spot in Marfa, but now there are so many different ways to enjoy a night out,” she says. After co-founding the p o p u l a r Fo o d S h a r k truck and the late Comida Futura, Steinhauer opened S t el l i na w it h Br a ndon Messer in 2016 (she took over full ownership in January, after Messer moved on to pursue other opportunities). Since its inception, Stellina — which has justifiably been likened to a dinner party, for its convivial atmosphere — has morphed from a Mediterranean bent to skewing more south of the border. Like Barnette, Steinhauer derives pleasure from local sourcing, including “produce from growers in town and game from Central Texas. There are even vineyards in the Davis Mountains whose wine appears on our list. We’re always looking,” she says. One blustery afternoon, I drove two miles east on Antelope Hills Road to visit cheesemaker and artist Malinda Beeman of Marfa Maid Goat Cheese. She moved to town 20 years ago to establish a community arts organization following stints as a professor of art in Printmaking at the University of Houston and program director of painting and drawing at Colorado’s prestigious Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass.


OPPOSITE: "Prada Marfa," an iconic installation by artists Elmgreen and Dragset.

The self-taught cheesemaker notes that her current profession, which she’s been doing fulltime since 2010 with the help of her partner, Allan McClane, “is kind of the integration of my life experience. As a painter and sculptor, it’s about making what you want and refining that thing. Cheesemaking appeals to me for the same reason.” Beeman and McClane offer year-round farm tours by appointment where visitors can interact with their herd of 30-odd goats, and their cheese is featured on West Texas menus and available at Farmstand Marfa, the weekly market she and McClane established in 2006. Says Beeman, “When I moved here, the food was terrible. I met Allan and we started an organic garden, which led to the farmstand, but when the recession hit, we decided we needed to be completely self-sufficient as well as have a product we could sell at the market.” As I nibbled the remaining crumbles of Beeman’s herbed chev re, I asked her the same question I’d posed to Steinhauer earlier in the week. Why does Marfa have such a progressive dining scene? “I’ve often thought about that,” she said. “Artists are generally ver y interested in creating and enjoying a great meal. Not finding that in Marfa years ago, many of the people who have started the most-innovative food businesses here have also come from an arts background.” She paused to watch a few does ambling across the pasture, in stark relief against that endless West Texas horizon, and smiled. “I believe the art of a town often reflects the quality of the food.”

Bunking Down Options run the gamut from glamping to high-end luxury. El Cosmico, Liz Lambert's iconic glamping spot also boasts the best options for travel keepsakes at on-site Provision Co. Thunderbird Hotel, a midcentury motor lodge renovated in 2004. Hotel St. George, a luxe option and community hub featuring Bar Saint George, poolside venue Bar Nadar and LaVenture for fine dining. Ranch 2810, the ultimate Airbnb experience, a lavish contemporary property designed by architect Carlos Jiménez. Located in the Chihuahuan Desert, 10 minutes from town.

Down(town) Time Venture out to sees the stars of your dreams or hang around town for shopping. McDonald Observatory in nearby Fort Davis is a must-see for some of the country's darkest skies and brightest stars. Check their schedule for events. Boutiques like Communitie, Cobra Rock, Garza Marfa, Freda, RABA Marfa, Moonlight Gemstones (aka “the rock shop”), Marfa Book Company, Wrong and Marfa Brand Soap, which sell locally-sourced and crafted goods to fit any budget. Lost Horse Saloon, the hottest spot in town for late-night drinks and live music.

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KAREN'S PICK

LORO

THE SOUTH L AMAR SMOKEHOUSE STRIKES JUST THE RIGHT E AST-MEETS-WEST BAL ANCE

By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

B

ORN OUT OF A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN TWO JAMES BEARD AWARD

winners — barbecue king Aaron Franklin and Uchi sushi master Tyson Cole — Loro is a unique creation that allows these unrivaled chefs to collaborate and color outside the lines. Billed as an “Asian smokehouse,” it allows them to do something different, rather than what’s expected. Here’s a tip about Loro: Manage your expectations. I don’t mean it’s not good, because it is. It’s very good. But don’t come expecting to replicate your experiences at iconic Austin eateries Uchi or Franklin Barbecue. Because Loro is an entirely different beast. What you can expect is some wildly creative and delicious food. Most dishes are whimsical mashups of Franklin’s barbecue genius and Cole’s Asian mastery. For example, thin slices of Franklin’s legendary beef brisket are marinated in Vietnamese nuoc mam, then smoked and drizzled with

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With ample indoor and outdoor seating, Loro is known for its smoked meats and boozy frozen cocktails.


chile oil and garnished with fresh Thai herbs. The result is East-meets-West f lavor heaven. There’s sausage, of course, but it’s infused with Thai green curry and served on a roll, banh mistyle, dressed with spicy mayo, Asian slaw and fresh herbs. The smoked baby back ribs are stunning. Sourced from heritage Duroc pork, they’re meaty, moist, tender — and available only on Sunday and Monday nights. Shall I go on? There’s a knockout smoked-brisket sandwich piled high on a bun and topped with tangy Vietnamese green-papaya salad and zesty chile aioli. It’s so drip-down-your-arm, lip-smackingly good that you’ll be thinking about it for days to come. And don’t miss the rice dishes. Chef Cole elevated rice to an art form at his Uchi and Uchiko sushi dens, and his outstanding coconut rice bowls at Loro are topped with tempting options like Malaysian curry chicken, Chinese barbecued pork belly, smoked salmon and crispy Szechuan tofu. Even veggies get the East-West treatment.

Snap peas are lightly grilled over oak, then lacquered with a spicy kimchi emulsion, giving the fresh pods an umami bomb that’s utterly addictive. Sweet corn is tucked into pillowy fritters and served with a sriracha aioli dipping sauce. Even starters are thoughtfully prepared. There’s a playful take on Texas’ favorite fair food, kettle corn, served in a brown paper bag and topped with savory burnt ends. It’s a snackable yin-yang of sweet and salty. And in a cheeky nod to Austin’s ubiquitous Tex-Mex chips and salsa, Loro offers fried wonton chips dusted with Asian spices and served with two delicious dipping sauces: a piquant Thai green salsa and a velvety peanut sambal. These aren’t just toss-off nibbles to keep you satiated until your entrées arrive; they’re worthy of their own menu spotlight. I got so carried away talking about the food that I forgot to men-

tion the drinks. Loro has a serious bar program with a great sense of humor. Its signature boozy slushees are the perfect antidote to Loro’s smoky, fiery food. Rotating options include mango-sake and a frozen gin and tonic so dangerously tasty that I ordered another round and resigned myself to Uber. There are delicious batch cocktails that riff on classics like old-fashioneds, Moscow Mules and Tiki drinks, plus a nice selection of wine and beer. Open just a year, Loro’s welcoming, sprawling space was inspired by historic Texas dance halls. Its exterior is an unassuming brick façade with a low-slung roof, and inside there are broad timber trusses, airy windows and skylights, and a long oak bar. A grove of ancient live oaks surrounds the restaurant and shades the outdoor deck and patio. Loro’s approachable price point and fast-casual service attracts throngs of diners throughout the week. And though it’s always buzzing, it doesn’t require the requisite hourslong wait of Franklin or the elusive reservation of Uchi. Instead, it invites you to step right up and start enjoying two culinary geniuses at play. What more could you wish for?

LORO 2115 S. LAMAR BLVD. (512) 916-4858 LOROAUSTIN.COM tribeza.com

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24 DINER

THE BREWER’S TABLE

CAFÉ JOSIE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

With an emphasis on quality and community, this East

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order

Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone at the brewer’s

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

table. Local ranchers and farmers source the ingredients,

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

which are utilized in both the kitchen and the brewery to

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

eliminate food waste. The seasonally changing menu is

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

34TH STREET CAFE

unique but provides options for even the pickiest of eaters (ask for the kid’s menu).

CAFÉ NO SÉ

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering pizzas,

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

famous Neapolitan technique is executed by the Stefano

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs at more than 900

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage of

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

cheese on this menu!

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect complement to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art

BAR CHI SUSHI

wine-preservation system with temperature control

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

ensures optimal taste and appreciation.

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the week-

EASY TIGER

ends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer

BARLEY SWINE

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO 1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542 3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668 A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

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BADU 1891

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

601 Bessemer Ave. | (325) 247 1891 badu1891.com

EL ALMA

Discover an extraordinary culinary experience in

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with

Llano, Texas. BADU 1891’s seasonal menu offers

unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Aus-

bold flavors and locally sourced ingredients for

tin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect

lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. Enjoy heartfelt

for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the

hospitality, a full bar and happy hour specials, robust

everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

cigar menu, and live music every Friday and Saturday evening.

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

EPICERIE

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

French-Vietnamese eatery with a colorful menu

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

of pho, banh mi, and sweet treats. Both the indoor

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

seating and outdoor patio bring comfort and vi-

here for a bite on Sundays.

brancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 The Shoal Creek favorite, affectionately known as Fonda, has been bringing people together for more than 4 decades. Known for their Interior Mexican Cuisine and artful dining room, Fonda San Miguel is the perfect spot to share an evening with friends. FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010 Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving

IRON CACTUS

unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley

606 Trinity Street | (512) 472 9240 ironcactus.com

serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international

With amazing outdoor patio views, friendly service and

twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

a lively full bar, Iron Cactus offers one of the best din-

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

ing experiences around. Leave your worries at the door and lose yourself in the comforts of the cactus.

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted car-

CICLO

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300 cicloatx.com Ciclo at Four Seasons Hotel Austin has launched a new happy hour concept! Offered in Ciclo’s Latin-inspired bar, covered terrace and back lawn, happy hour will run daily from 5:00 to 7:00 pm and include $4 snacks and $3 sweets, plus complimentary valet parking. Rounding out the menu is a rotating list of $5 beverages, including draft beers, house cocktails and wines by the glass.

amel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

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JUNE’S ALL DAY

LENOIR

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

kid-friendly patio all work together to make Hank’s our new

cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. In-

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir

favorite neighborhood joint. With happy hour every day

spired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering. The

comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique,

from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma. Drinks aside, the braised meat-

restaurant’s namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—

balls, chopped black kale salad (add falafel!) and spicy fried

one of less than 10 in Texas—who also serves as the beverage

chicken are a few standouts from the craveable menu.

director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

HOPFIELDS

LA BARBECUE

HANK’S

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

LE POLITIQUE 110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651 This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patisserie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

LORO

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and Aar-

has maintained the execution, top-notch service,

on Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition to

and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that

South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space, designed

makes it an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

The greatest stories are told with family and friends over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies just that, bringing nostalgic and classic Italian-

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio

American cuisine to the heart of Austin. From

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

106 APRIL 2019 |

tribeza.com


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

MAY 1ST 6- 9 PM BRAZOS HALL 204 E. 4 TH ST., AUSTIN, T X

FEATURING SOME OF THE HOTTEST MEXICAN RESTAURANTS IN AUSTIN: ATX Cocina, Comedor, Cool Beans, Cruzteca, Curra’s Grill, El Chile, Eldorado Cafe, Gabriela’s, La Pera, Licha’s Cantina, Maudie’s Tex-Mex, Mellizoz, Pueblo Viejo, Sazón, Serrano’s and more...

JANE & MANUEL ZUNIGA

/mexicarte

@mexic_arte

@mexic_arte #TasteofMexico

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| APRIL 2019

107


A LOOK BEHIND

Photo Play By Margaret Williams Photographs by Rustin Gudim

Want more? tribeza.com/party-amongst-friends-photo-play/

D E TA I L P H OTO G R A P H B Y K E E G A N AT L E E

On March 9 designer Erin Thornton and musician and philanthropist Andra Liemandt hosted a “Party Amongst Friends” to celebrate the release of “My Tribe,” a new music video from local band The Mrs (Liemandt is the group’s drummer). The event included a living photo shoot, conceived by Thornton (whose studio space you saw earlier in the issue on page 64) and curated by yours truly. Guests were invited to join the stage of “Tribe,” a play by Zero Eight that brought the seven forces of nature to life. Perception, vitality, integrity, intensity, meaning, volition and stamina … what will it be?

108 APRIL 2019 |

tribeza.com


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA April 2019  

The Style Issue No. 212

TRIBEZA April 2019  

The Style Issue No. 212

Profile for tribeza