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architecture & graphic design portfolio

treymcmillon.com

selected works 2012-2019


C O N T E N TS 03

Resumé

04

SYNC - NYC

10

Interpreting the Landscape

Spring 17

18

Armature House

Spring 16

24

Deconstruct the Box

Fall 15

30

United States Federal Courthouse

Spring 15

36

Gerhard Richter Art Gallery

Fall 12

40

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Spring 12

Big Ideas for Small Lots Competition

ARCH 5994 | Research + Thesis

ARCH 5716 with K. Edge

ARCH 5715 with K. Edge

ARCH 4012 with A. Economou

ARCH 3011 with J. LeBlanc

ARCH 2012 with D. Baerlecken, K. Johnson, & C. Hunter

Spring 19

New York City, NY

Niobrara, NE

Blacksburg, VA

Fairlawn, VA

Greenville, SC

Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, GA

01


treymcmillon.com

EDUCATION

T R E Y M c M I L LO N

trey.mcmillon@gmail.com 706.974.0606

Master of Architecture

August 2015 - May 2017

Bachelor of Science in Architecture

August 2010 - May 2015

Architectural Designer

May 2017 - April 2019

Graduate Assistant

October 2015 - May 2017

Architectural Intern

May 2016 - August 2016

Interior Design Intern

May 2015 - August 2015

Graphic Designer

October 2012 - May 2015

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University

Blacksburg, VA

Georgia Institute of Technology

EXPERIENCE

Atlanta, GA

C3 Studio, LLC Acted as project manager from schematics to construction on all commercial and civic work Developed concepts and presentations for $1M+ redevelopment along South Knox Waterfront Improved project scheduling and budgeting efficiency via new tracking methods

The Global Forum on Urban & Regional Resilience Generated visualizations for urban and financial research initiatives Participated in community-oriented design strategies for campus resiliency Initiated campus infrastructure research project that was presented internationally

McMillan Pazdan Smith Assisted in three-dimensional BIM and two-dimensional construction drawings Participated in early design process of new projects and fostered client relations Reviewed drawings and construction process through site visits with architects

Cortland Developed and implemented company standards for CAD and project delivery Provided design insight for multi-family community renovations Produced comprehensive interior drawings for construction

Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center Designed primary advertising for recreation programs and events Facilitated communication between CRC and student body Directed design direction of semesterly editorials such as program guides

SKILLS

LEADERSHIP

Graphics

Adobe Creative Suite ArcGIS AutoCAD Sketching

BIM + 3D

Revit Rhino 3D SketchUp V-Ray

Project Management Budgeting Collaboration Scheduling Specifications

Blacksburg, VA

Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, GA

Other

Google Suite Microsoft Office Model Making Slack

PARK(ing) Day Knoxville

June 2018 - Present

Theta Chi Fraternity

August 2012 - May 2015

Georgia Tech Greek Week Executive Board

October 2013 - April 2014

Featured Artist

April 2019

Design Jury Finalist

December 2017

Hugh Barrett Coyle Scholarship

August 2014

Executive Committee Coordinated 30+ organizations in city-wide community/design event Advertised event through range of platforms and media outlets Managed day-of procedures including set-up, operations, and clean-up

Executive Committee Served on executive committee as secretary of Alpha Nu chapter Optimized administrative records such as contact info and meeting attendance Operated as Historian, Special Events Chair, and T-Shirts Chair

Technology Chair Programmed and managed Greek Week website Oversaw technology committee of 20 volunteers in documenting events Increased engagement on Facebook and Twitter by 200%

AWARDS

Knoxville, TN

Dogwood Arts Festival Chalk Walk Passageways 2.0 Alleyway Activation Challenge

Undergraduate Architecture Scholarship

Knoxville, TN

Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, GA

Knoxville, TN

Chattanooga, TN

Atlanta, GA


SYNC - NYC

SY N C - N YC Big Ideas for Small Lots

YEAR

2019

LOCATION

New York City, NY

PROJECT

Competition Entry

The intent of SYNC — NYC is to provide an affordable housing option to nearly 25 small and undeveloped lots throughout New York City. The common themes of transparency, light, and connectivity link the sites to each other, to the city, and to the conceptual design that SYNC — NYC offers. The dense urban fabric of New York City is the ideal condition to explore the benefit of offering residents an affordable housing option that seeks to more strongly connect them to the environs of the city, while also providing privacy and security in an engaging way. The proposed solution creates a synchrony between the individual sites and their development in a way that enhances the streetscape and the lives of those who will take up residency. The design goal of SYNC — NYC is to provide as much light as possible to the individual units as well as introduce a layer of transparency uncommonly found in residential projects. The primary circulation operates both vertically and horizontally through the building and functions as a large lightwell that directs sunlight in to each unit via translucent openings from the stairwell to the units. The stairs also provide a subtle barrier between indoor and outdoor spaces, while encouraging interactions between the tenants. Internally, the units are optimized to work at a standardized 11’-6” width. Each of the units are also designed so that spaces stack vertically with rooms in the same location on each floor - eliminating the need to reconfigure by lot and prefabricate as much as possible to reduce cost. The main corridor through each unit is placed so that, although the front door to the apartments are in different locations, the main entry feels natural and welcoming to whichever portion of the unit you are entering.

04


Urban Infill Design Competition | Competition Entry


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1 De 3 ta

06


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07


SYNC - NYC

08

Urban Infill Design Competition | Competition Entry


113

09


Interpreting the Landscape

ARCH 5994 | Research + Thesis

I N T E R P R E T I N G T H E L A N D S CA P E Cartographic Re-Presentation

YEAR LOCATION PROJECT

2017 Niobrara, NE ARCH 5994 | Research + Thesis

There is a disconnect between how one experiences the landscape and how one represents the landscape. There are physical objects and quantitative data that define a landscape, or site to put it in architectural terms. However, there are also ethereal impressions and representative abstractions that define the site with equal influence. Although a proxy for substantive information, maps have become abstract and purely systematic methods for ordering the site in to an understandable format. Defining political boundaries, property lines, trade routes, and natural and built environs only gives a partial interpretation of the landscape. Similarly, the way in which these constructs are symbolized lends a hand in how the landscape is understood and managed. Mapping more theoretical topographies, such as the culture or economy, of a site becomes the new challenge – and one that we should dare to undertake in today’s political climate. Not only in how it is defined and quantified for visualization, but also in how those visualizations take shape. Unlike rivers or railroads, there are no graphic standards for how to map the emotional response that one feels when standing in a space. To create a methodology by which a site can be understood, we can challenge these common cartographic standards on a variety of levels that influence how a designer might choose to intervene. Due to the uniqueness of individual sites and the qualitative nature of spatial and material decisions, designs are typically tailored to its own particular site in order to avoid becoming unfit or improper. What is too steep versus what is too shallow on one site becomes a null argument on another. This is true of both the physical and metaphysical site.

10


Silt

Clay_Silt

Sand

Sand_Gravel

Sand

Supratype_53

Supratype_36

Supratype_47

ARCH 5994 | Research + Thesis

Supratype_86

Supratype_77

Supratype_41

Interpreting the Landscape

Clay

11


Interpreting the Landscape

Function

Function

Movement

Sequence

House

Cu lture _In te

Anticipation

Repetition

Society

Structure

Organization

Service

Surface

Interaction

ARCH 5994 | Research + Thesis

rac

tion

Customs + Traditions

Op era ti

on _C ult

ure

Church

Religion

Museum Library

Language

Cemetery Arts + Literature

Retail Government

io ract Inte r n_P ogr

Theater

am

Economy

Food + Clothing

ration

Merge

Taper

Split

Embed

Compress

Overlap

Bend

Branch

Expand

Program

Operation

m_Ope Progra

Office

12

School

Music + Dance


03_Territorial

02_Regional

01_Local


Interpreting the Landscape

Supratype_41

Supratype_47

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_G OR_Lo #_55 %KX_9.16

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_H OR_Lo #_31 %KX_5.17

Supratype_77

Supratype_36

SH_S SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_H OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_R SZ_1.0 HT_1.5 RF_G OR_La #_30 %KX_5.00

Supratype_86

Supratype_53

SH_S SZ_2.0 HT_2.0 RF_HT OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.5 RF_G OR_Lo #_29 %KX_4.83

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ARCH 5994 | Research + Thesis

Geometry_01

Geometry_04

Geometry_07

Geometry_10

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_G OR_Lo #_55 %KX_9.16

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_G OR_Lo #_55 %KX_9.16

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_G OR_Lo #_55 %KX_9.16

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_H OR_Lo #_31 %KX_5.17

Geometry_02

Geometry_05

Geometry_08

Geometry_11

SH_S SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_H OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_S SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_H OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_S SZ_1.5 HT_1.0 RF_H OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_R SZ_1.0 HT_1.5 RF_G OR_La #_30 %KX_5.00

Geometry_03

Geometry_06

Geometry_09

Geometry_12

SH_S SZ_2.0 HT_2.0 RF_HT OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_S SZ_2.0 HT_2.0 RF_HT OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_S SZ_2.0 HT_2.0 RF_HT OR_N #_44 %KX_7.33

SH_R SZ_1.5 HT_1.5 RF_G OR_Lo #_29 %KX_4.83

15


As a built object, the structure works to allow views around and through the site to see the extending landscape. By creating voids shaped that are shaped by the programmatic elements, there are remaining spaces that expose the exterior space and frame the landscape and horizon. This allows the site to become an extension of the building and an object that works with the space in order to enhance the understanding of its surroundings.

17


Armature House

A R M AT U R E H O U S E Live | Work | Sell

YEAR LOCATION PROJECT

2016 Blacksburg, VA ARCH 5716 | with K. Edge

The process for this project was divided in to three major sections: Site + Form Analysis, Form Selection + General Concept, and Material + Structure. These three separate, but related process of analyzing, evaluating, and designing the site allowed for a greater range of influence in approaching the project. The project started with an in depth understanding and analysis of the site. Two lots just one block off of South Main Street in Blacksburg, Virginia provided the land for the project. Understanding the way in which Blacksburg breaks down in to zones and districts was the foundation of the site analysis and ultimately reoccurring theme in the overall project. The program for the project stemmed from a new arts district in Blacksburg known as the Live | Work | Sell Zone, an existing residential zone that allows home owners and leasees to combine a living area, studio, and gallery in to one space. Given the opportunity to pick an artist to inhabit the space, the studio was charged with the task of combining these three programs in to a single building suitable for the chosen artist. Ideas about connection, whether physical or not, became important in the project. Regardless of physical intersection in the space, there needed to be a clear connection or view to the space in order for the building to work. The house began to revolve around the idea of separate spaces being intruded on either by a common space or by views from another area of the house. The necessity to separate the spaces entirely was due to a level of respect for private versus public spaces.

18

ARCH 5716 | with K. Edge


Live | Work | Sell

Downtown District

Typologies + Program Arrangements

Parks + Green Space

Historic District

Overlapping Programs

Sixteen Squares

19


Armature House

20

ARCH 5716 | with K. Edge


Armature House

ARCH 5716 | with K. Edge

21


Deconstruct the Box

D E C O N ST R U C T T H E B OX Big Box Store Renovation

YEAR LOCATION PROJECT

2015 Fairlawn, VA ARCH 5715 | with K. Edge

Reuse the Box - a design studio that begins with an ordinary vacant building in a particular kind of setting. Ordinary buildings when thoughtfully addressed can create beautiful urban and suburban spaces. It is our charge (and specifically suited to our expertise) to show communities the potential of our surroundings and to fulfill a role as stewards of the environment, not only in the sense of sustainability but also in the sense of beauty. By separating the buildings a number of design problems are solved. The site becomes more open, the buildings more intimate, and the program divides evenly between the two new forms. Nearly everything from the existing structure is retained. CMU walls, fire-proofed columns, and open web steel joists speak to the history of the building and the site. Cuts were made along the column grid and large cantilevered roofs create a horizontality that keeps the connection between the two buildings. Large glass curtain walls take the place of the void that would have been left when bisecting the structure. This leads to a visual interest between the two buildings where three architectural spaces are created - the cafe and lobby of the auxiliary building, the outdoor procession between the buildings, and the stacks and reading space of the main library building. The 16-acre site has been carved up to more efficiently provide vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The central parking of the existing site was not conducive to providing a walkable area. While retaining several of the surrounding buildings, along with some new construction, the green space and roadways allows for seamless movement.

24

ARCH 5715 | with K. Edge


Deconstruct the Box

Configuration Study

ARCH 5715 | with K. Edge

Column Grid

Possible Configuration

Chosen Configuration


Deconstruct the Box

Ground Floor

Northeast Elevation

Northwest Elevation

26

ARCH 5715 | with K. Edge

Mezzanine


Deconstruct the Box

ARCH 5715 | with K. Edge

Southwest Elevation

Southeast Elevation

27


United States Federal Building

ARCH 4012 | with A. Economou

U N I T E D STAT E S F E D E R A L B U I L D I N G Justice Through Equality

YEAR LOCATION PROJECT

2015 Greenville, SC ARCH 4012 | with A. Economou

A key aspect in designing a federal courthouse is that the organization of, and presentation of space, must be inherently just. The integrity of the justice system is lost if the design of its federal buildings do not reflect the same sense of democracy that the system represents. My goal was to portray this democracy, almost in a literal way. There is a clear hierarchy among public corridors and lobbies, restricted offices, secure holding cells, and courtrooms in use by all of the above. But within those categories, equality is the defining factor in portraying to the average citizen that the U.S. government is being as fair and just as it can be. The driving force behind my design was to keep all courtrooms on one level. This allows for no court or judge to be given any preference over another. The courtrooms are also all on the ground floor. This is in order to keep the building simple for the public. They have a large urban yard before entering and a large lobby just within the front doors. Only occupants who work and spend a great deal of time there need to penetrate the building further. The U.S. Marshals are given a mezzanine-like space on the 2nd floor. This gives them the security they need and symbolically gives them views of the lobby of the courthouse. Other offices, as well as the judges’ chambers, are on the 3rd floor. The judges are separated, physically and symbolically, from the general office space. This is also the space above the plaza as keeping them in the front of the building was important to me. As the driving force of the court proceedings, they needed full dominion of the site.

30


United States Federal Building

Courthouse Modules

Courtroom

ARCH 4012 | with A. Economou

Restricted Circulation

Secure Circulation

Public Circulation

31


United States Federal Building

32

ARCH 4012 | with A. Economou


Gerhard Richter Art Gallery

ARCH 3011 | with J. LeBlanc

G E R H A R D R I C H T E R A RT G A L L E RY A New Lawn for Atlanta

YEAR LOCATION PROJECT

2012 Atlanta, GA ARCH 3011 | with J. LeBlanc

Gardens and museums have a long history. The Richter Gallery, located on a site between 10th Street and Peachtree Place introduces a public garden across from the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. The idea was to draw visitors in through the strong, slightly off-center axis and lead them up to the second and third floors by use of an elevator directly along the main line of procession. The glass elevator at the rear of the building presents a strong focal point for anyone passing the building from the front or the back. Another focal point is the large cantilever, an “object floating in space,” that allows for an impressive view of the city. The large north-facing window also creates naturally lighting without causing directly sunlight to any interior spaces. The line of trees in the lawn creates a dialectic that rhymes with the roof of the museum. A library also serves the museum on the first floor, as well as a small cafe. After entering the lobby, visitors are encouraged to move directly to the elevator, made evident by the strong linear axis through the window on the opposite side. The elevator and stairs are both treated as objects within the space. The stairs counter the axiality on the right side by creating a tall mass that runs straight through the top of the second floor. The third floor, the Richter Gallery, acts as a mezzanine that ends just short of the window on the north face. The museum was designed with two particular Richter pieces in mind: ‘11 Panes’ + ‘7 Standing Panes.’ These two pieces directly led to the design of the cantilever and large glass aperture to the interior of the museum. Reflecting the proportions and transparency of Richter’s art, the museum aims to bring his ideals to the exterior of the city of Atlanta.

36


Gerhard Richter Art Gallery

3rd Floor

2nd Floor

Ground Floor

Basement

38


ARCH 3011 | with J. LeBlanc

Section A-A

Section B-B

39


Federal Reserve Bank

ARCH 2012 | with D. Baerlecken, K. Johnson, & C. Hunter

F E D E R A L R E S E RV E BA N K Textile Studio

YEAR LOCATION PROJECT

2012 Atlanta, GA ARCH 2012 | with D. Baerlecken, K. Johnson, and C. Hunter

Textile-based patterns were the basis for this studio. The process began with understanding the mathematical principals behind plaiting and experimenting with a number of materials. From there, applications to the facade of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta could be tested. The interweaving structure of plaiting corresponds to the systematic duality of the Federal Reserve Banks a privately-owned, government regulated, federal establishment. Structurally, the diagonal strands provide for a rigid system which may correlate to the necessity of the bank to remain financially stable. Timber “strands� seemingly grow upward from the ground and gradually make their way to the top of the building. New plaited surfaces are constructed and then interlocked with one another to recreate the defining enclosure. Due to the fluctuating nature of twill pattern new spaces emerge along the surface and at the corners. Highlights of a new surface draw attention to the reconnected program These changes create a new visible interest in the structure of the Federal Reserve banking system. By moving the circulation to the interstitial space between the public and private areas a clearer line can be delineated between the two programmatic areas. The bi-modal nature of this space also for a circulation method structured around moving upward along one axis, while move downward along another axis. The resulting over/under pattern is continued by creasing or curling each element over or under itself so that it may continue to be incorporated into the pattern. When the end of a strand is reached, the pattern may be ended or continued by adhering a secondary strand to the bottom. It is at these points that additions can be made such as splitting into multiple levels.

40


Federal Reserve Bank

MS

Strand Configurations

1/1

ARCH 2012 | with D. Baerlecken, K. Johnson, & C. Hunter

ML

Needs More Strands

2/2

3/3 MS

1/2

Needs More Length

1/3

NP

2/3

Not Possible

2/4

3/4

MS

1-1

NP

MS

2-2

MS

MS

1-2

ML

ML

ALT

41


Federal Reserve Bank

10th Street Elevation

Peachtree Walk Elevation

42


ARCH 2012 | with D. Baerlecken, K. Johnson, & C. Hunter

11th Street Elevation

Peachtree Street Elevation

43


architecture & graphic design portfolio

treymcmillon.com

Profile for Trey McMillon

Trey McMillon | Architecture + Graphic Design Portfolio  

Trey McMillon | Architecture + Graphic Design Portfolio  

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