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DINING

Established in 1982

The Golf Issue

CONTENTS

Supporting Valley Philanthropy Since 1982 volume 27, No. 2

Special Features 15

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Charity Spotlight: Mahnah Club

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Story: Golf Without Freeways

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10 Questions for … Simon Doonan

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Wedding Bells

40

Auto Trends

41

Hostess Gift

42

Home Design: Tear-down or Treasure?

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Remembering

46 Trends Charitable Fund Addressing Luncheon 48

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Anne Thoits and Matt Kellar

Oscar Night America

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Kelli Daughdrill

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Dancing With the Stars SOCIETY

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FA S H I O N

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HOME

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SOCIETY 14

The Honor Ball

15

Oscar Night America

15

Amare Stoudemire Foundation

16

Ballet Arizona

18

Science Center Gala

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Crisis Nursery

24

Beach Ball 2009

25

Asia Now

30

Escada at Neiman Marcus

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Fresh Start Fashion Gala

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Dancing With the Stars Arizona

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John C. Lincoln

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The Promise Ball

40

Doorway of Hope Dinner

41

Mahnah Club

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Friends of the Arizona Cancer Center

45

Suns & Stars

49

Best of Everything

MONTHLY FEATURES 7

On the Cover:

The Golf Issue

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Khalid and Rena Hasan with Elliot and Tiffany Kaplan

DINING

Established in 1982

Natalie Dobson

Models Lauren Mary and Brian Evans, courtesy of The Agency Arizona Clothing courtesy of Moda Georgio Phoenix and Pink Paradise, a Lilly Pulitzer Signature Store at The Borgata Scottsdale Location: A private Paradise Valley residence Photographer: Scott Foust 480.633.3740 Hair & Makeup: Brittany Zorna 307.220.2623

TRENDS MAGAZINE

Books: Beth Ames Swartz

Reversing the Trend

11 La Dolce Vita 26

Trends in Phoenix

28

Wine Me, Dine Me

33 Phoenix Art Museum Spotlight 37 Trendy Reading: “Eccentric Glamour” 46

Black-tie Calendar

47 Pet of the Month: Buster 48

Valley Events Calendar

REVERSING THE TREND By Bill Macomber

Tired of grim tidings? Have a Chili Cheese Frito. I’m not kidding. Sometimes we have to count our blessings where we find them. America may not make the best cars in the world anymore. Our banks and leaders are real disappointments. But there’s one thing America still does better than anyone else. We lead the world in snack food. That may not sound like much, but it is. If you don’t believe me, eat half a bag of Doritos Blazin’ Buffalo & Ranch tortilla chips, preferably with the evening news turned off. How do you feel now? Where else but in America would they start with corn, whey protein concentrate, disodium phosphate, buttermilk solids and salt and come out the other end with a Chili Cheese Frito? Nowhere. Never mind what happens in the small intestine after eating a sack of Hot Wings and Blue Cheese Flavored Doritos. It’s worth every particle of tomato powder, partially hydrogenated soybean oil and artificial color. Doritos alone offers 18 varieties, including Tacos at Midnight Flavored Tortilla Chips. Not just tacos. Midnight, too. I’m not sure what midnight tastes like. Not always great, in my experience. The point is that in Mexico they know what a taco tastes like at night, but they never stuck it on a corn chip and sold it in a colorful bag. Little Debbie sells Ho Hos, Cupcakes, Twinkies, Ding Dongs, Suzy Q’s, Donettes, Mini Muffins and Sno Balls. If you can’t find something in that food group to ease the pain, you’re not looking. Sugar, palm oil shortening and “cocoa processed with alkali” never tasted like this. In America, you can buy a corn nut that tastes like chile picante with lemon. Canada? Maybe jerky shaped like a fly strip. Ruffles potato chips come in nine flavors. Natural Reduced Fat Sea Salted Potato Chips is one of them. The ruffles alone would be enough. So take comfort in what we do have. When it comes to the economy, many of us thought we were eating the equivalent of a Godiva chocolate. It was actually a round, brown piece of decorative soap. A lot of us have the taste of soap in our mouths. Shove a Cheeto in there instead. It’s the only way to get that taste out.

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Ask Angie

SO C I E T Y | FA SHI O N | HO ME | DINING

Your divorce and family law expert.

volume 27, No. 2

By Angela Hallier Hallier Law Firm PLC

Q. My spouse and I hope to minimize expenses associated with our divorce and expedite the divorce process. I believe with assistance, my spouse and I can settle our divorce without court litigation. What are our options? A. Three options you could explore to meet your goals are collaborative divorce, mediation, or arbitration. Collaborative divorce is a process through which the parties and their respective attorneys commit themselves to resolving all issues of the divorce by negotiated agreement. The process focuses on a “team” approach to issue resolution, and encourages the free exchange of information, conferences with the parties and their attorneys, and meetings with professionals who are hired to assist in the process. The professionals may include coaches for each party to guide them through the difficult issues that arise when a divorce occurs; a child specialist (if there are children) who assists the parties with a parenting plan; and a financial professional who can assess the parties’ assets and debts, provide options for their division, and help with financial planning for the future. Attorneys and other professionals who participate in the collaborative divorce process are required to have intensive training specific to collaborative divorce. Attorney Andi Mengedoth of my firm has such training and is available to speak to you if you wish to know more about this divorce resolution process. Another option is to participate in formal mediation. You and your spouse could engage a professional mediator to work with you both, without either of you retaining an attorney. Trained mediators can not only help you and your spouse exchange information and reach a settlement, but can file all court documents needed to commence and finalize the divorce. Both Attorney Jodie Cuccurullo and Attorney Andi Mengedoth of my firm are so trained and are available to assist you if you wish to explore this divorce option. A privately retained mediator can also be very helpful in resolving your case even if you and your spouse have attorneys. The mediator will often “caucus” to help the resolution process by going back and forth between rooms where each party and their counsel are located. Jodie, Andi, and I can all serve as mediators in this regard. Also be aware that the Maricopa County Superior Court offers free and/or low cost mediation services. Last, arbitration is a method to resolve the issues that just cannot be agreed upon in your case in a somewhat less formal setting than the courthouse, and many times in a more expeditious fashion than waiting for a trial date. The arbitrator will hear testimony, review exhibits, and render a binding decision as to the contested issues in your case. This process can take place with or without attorneys. Jodie and I are available for arbitration resolutions. Questions to “Ask Angie” may be e-mailed to AskAngie@hallierlaw.com or faxed to 602-285-1077. Only questions chosen for publication will be answered. No documents will be returned. Angela Hallier is a Certified Family Law Specialist and Managing Partner of Hallier Law Firm PLC.

Hallier Law Firm PLC 3216 North Third Street, Suite 300, Phoenix, Arizona 85012 Phone: (602) 285-5500 Fax: (602) 285-1077 E- mail: AskAngie@hallierlaw.com Web site: www.hallierlaw.com

It is always advisable to seek the counsel of a qualified attorney who can advise you specifically about your case. The information in this column is provided for general information only in the state of Arizona, is not specific to any one case and does not create an attorney-client relationship between the author and the reader. ©Hallier Law Firm PLC Advertorial

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TRENDS MAGAZINE

Publisher: BILL DOUGHERTY Editor: Bill Macomber Travel Editors: LAUREN and IAN WRIGHT Feature Writers: NICOLE TRAYNOR | JOE GOLFEN | JENNA LEE DILLON Advertising Manager: SUZANNE EDER Account Executive: KIM KNOTTER Executive Assistant: BRITTANY ZORNA Public Relations and Marketing: CARA MCGINNIS New York Correspondent: JJ Buchanon Los Angeles Correspondent: Jennifer Bentley Art Direction: SWEET DESIGNS Fashion Photographer: SCOTT FOUST | SCOTTIE DEVIOUS Senior Society Photographer: PETER KRZYKOS Society Photographers: KATHY Desanto | LOUANN ALEXANDER | ARNIE COGAN Trends Makeup and Hair Stylist: LAURA FLAGLER | BRITTANY ZORNA Distribution: MEDIA PRINT Certified Public Accountants: THOMAS S. HOLLY, CPA, PLLC AJ’s Fine Foods Distribution: pogo Printing: MEDIA PRINT Information Technology: IT CONSULTING Music Production: chris beckley/the production group Special Events Coordinator: ROBYN LEE Special Events Fashion Coordinator: MARGARET MERRITT SUBSCRIPTIONS: To guarantee receiving every issue of TRENDS, send a check for $25 (one year), $50 (two years) or $75 (three years) to Trends executive office (address below). Subscription will start the next month of publication. No refunds. Please send checks and address changes to: TRENDS Publishing 6045 N. Scottsdale Road, Suite 205, Scottsdale, AZ 85250 Phone: (480) 990-9007 Fax: (480) 990-0048 Website: www.trendspublishing.com DEADLINES: All editorial and advertisement copy due no later than the 18th of the month six weeks prior to publication (for example, Sept. 18 for the November issue). Published bimonthly by Trends Publishing. Editorial E-mail: bmacomber@trendspublishing.com Advertising E-mail: seder@trendspublishing.com © 2009 ISSN 0742-034X

La Dolce Vita

By Bill Dougherty

You’ve probably heard by now that the month of April brought us the new best-dressed men and women of Phoenix. They are Laura Grafman, Victoria Glimcher, Lois LeMarr, Joey Leslie, Angela Cesal-Shaulis, David Cantor, Jerry Colangelo, Robert Sussman and Jim Valenzuela. These nine people represent the most stylish people in Maricopa County. And I’m sure if you have had the pleasure of meeting any of these charming people, you would agree. They were all presented on April 22 at The Trends Charitable Fund Luncheon at The Arizona Biltmore.

George Abrams

Speaking of best-dressed. The other evening Michael Saavedra gathered 60 or so of his partner George Abrams’ closest friends for a surprise birthday party at Frank and Lupe’s in Scottsdale. Anyone who knows George knows that he is perhaps one of the most stylish and witty gentlemen on the social scene. Not to mention one of the most extraordinary party planners in the Valley.

Everywhere you looked you saw: Libby and Joel Cohen, Betsy and Mike Hendricks, Sharron and Del Lewis, Jill Krigsten-Ormsbee (another name hyphenator), Lisa Pagel, Nancy Silver (The Paper Princess), Chris Gustafson, Christi Warner and Paul Beyer, Kimberly Jacobsen, and Kristy and Tim Moore. I also spotted Ginette and John Karabees, Kim Knotter and Tyler Hemmen. Then there was Angela and Mark Karp, Brenda Howard and Nancy Nashban, who looks stunning in new blonde locks. And that’s just to namedrop a few! Mariachis played and margaritas flowed from bottomless blenders. It was the perfect setting for the perfect person. I’m always amazed that wherever I go, someone knows George. And it doesn’t seem to matter what social circle I’m in. It must be great to have so many adoring fans! The other evening my wife and I had the pleasure of being invited to a cocktail party at the splendid home of famed architect Richard Doria and his beautiful wife, Susan. It seems that everywhere I’ve been lately, I’ve run into Trends Best Dressed people. Richard had the distinguished honor last year, and as we were exiting the fabulous party, we ran into Tanner Flynn (Best Dressed 2007) and Remy Toh (Best Dressed 2002). I’ve never met a man with the style Remy Continued on page 13

TRENDS MAGAZINE

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has. He looks as though he walked off a movie set of a bygone era. The party benefited the YMCA Strong Kids Campaign. Showcased were fine works of art that looked magnificent against the pristine walls of the Doria’s masterfully designed home. Every time I pass through their home, I’m amazed by its simplicity and its grandeur. I’m delighted that they open their home for charities. Have you ever wondered why so many of the beautiful women in the social scene are so fit. Many outsiders would venture to say that none of these ladies in question eats. I would beg to differ after what I witnessed the other morning. Harriet Carroll, a professional choreographer and dance performer, is keeping these ladies in shape. Anyone who likes to dance knows that the dance diva has been teaching classes in Scottsdale for decades. But what they didn’t know is that once a year Harriet throws a huge dance-athon at The Village at D.C. Ranch. This year, she partnered with Fresh Start Women’s Foundation, courtesy of Pat Petznick, and Dunkin’ Donuts, courtesy of Karen and Richard and Susan Doria Burt Hayenga. From the first class

to the last, everyone who matters attended and danced for the sake of charity. So next time you see a svelte socialite, remember that it’s diet and Harriet that have made a difference. What a great and generous lady. In cocktail polo news you should know: That a residential realtor and a hotel owner have been spotted around town a lot and in very swank places. That a socialite that we all took for yesterday’s news seems to be making a huge comeback? That the Arizona Kidney Foundation has managed to snag Larry King as emcee for their big bash next fall. That an outspoken blonde socialite decided to remove her hairpiece while standing in a valet line. That the stork is bringing a delivery to a much-talked-about Paradise Valley couple. That girls who wear glasses seldom get passes. That a former publisher may want to book herself into the Reality Check Motel. That a socialite you all know and fear is just about to be arrested by the karma police, and it’s about time. Now you’re all caught up for a little while.

Gotcha:

A woman who finds herself on the wrong side of unattractive proved yet again the ugliness more than skin deep. During a recent cocktail reception at a charity gala, she pushed herself and her husband in front of a society photographer, demanding a photo. When the photographer asked the woman’s name, the attention-seeking lady went berserk that the photographer didn’t know who she was! She caused such a ruckus that other guests looked on in disbelief. In these tough economic times, do we really need to put up with this?

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CH A R I T Y BALLS

The Honor Ball

Pam and John Ward

Jerry Bisgrove and Kathy Harris

Drew and Laurie Brown

TWO PEOPLE YOU SHOULD KNOW Honoree Drew Brown and his lovely wife, Laurie. KEEPER OF THE FLAME Laura Grafman RAVISHING CHAIRS Kathy Harris and Pam Ward DANCE PARTY Guests moved and grooved to the sounds of the Jacqueline Foster Orchestra.

Laura Grafman and Lynn Lancaster

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Joel and Judy Zaft

Larry and Judy Cunningham

Sandy and Ruth Ritz

Teri and John Cunningham

PA R T I E S

Oscar Night America

Tim and Deborah Bateman

Kristin and Chuck Souers

Darrin Smith and Ade Podlesnik

Gregory and Johanne Rossi

AND THE OSCAR GOES TO ‌ The Arthritis Foundation LADY IN RED Beautiful Chair Deborah Bateman ACADAMY AWARD DESIGN The new Sheraton Hotel downtown.

PA R T I E S

Vicki and Jack McDonald

Melia Dunn and Matthew Carrick

April Norman and Lynda Trainor

Amare Stoudemire Foundation

Kate Good and Amare Stoudemire

Carina Corrales and Elizabeth Santana

Eileen and Tony Yeung

Tiffany Anderson

Marcie Saban and Shane Powell

Lacey Dreyer and Julian Alessi

BLOW IT UP Saks Fifth Avenue showcased everything from hot pants to python boots. A GENTLEMAN AND AN ATHLETE Amare Stoudemire and his gallant crusades. COUPLE NUMBER 1 Chris and Tonya Kelly looking runway ready.

Chris and Tonya Kelly

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CH A R I T Y BALLS

Ballet Arizona

Alice and Sheryl Cooper

Del and Sharron Lewis

Conrad and Julie Prusak

DYNAMIC DEUT Chairs Julie Prusak and Carol Schilling BELLE OF THE BALL Sheryl Cooper in shades of aqua and lime. BRAVO A smashing performance by Ballet Arizona to Dance of the Hours. CHANGE OF SCENERY The Phoenix Art Museum provided the perfect venue.

Carol Whiteman and Carol Schilling

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Denise and Tom McClain

Lynn and Steve Johnson

Jacque and Nick Firestone

Bill and Barb Fenster

CHARITY SPOTLIGHT

Mahnah Club Charity Gala

Biltmore Skin Care Center Love The Skin You’re In

ASK THE EXPERTS: Skin Care 101 Mahnah Club of the East Valley, a women’s service organization, was founded in 1954 and took its name from the Hopi word “Mahnah,” meaning “leading women of the tribe.” Since then, the club has been dedicated to providing assistance to the social challenges of our community. On March 21, the club held its 17th annual charity gala fundraiser at the Mesa Hilton. Gala Chair Kim Chittick, President Connie Little and Chair Marilyn Martin filled Trends in on what Mahnah is up to. Which charities does Mahnah Club support? The club supports two main charities, Child Crisis Center-East Valley and Save the Family Foundation. In addition, the club makes smaller donations to numerous charities. Charities have included Gabriel’s Angels, A & A Cottages, Sunshine Acres, Sirrine Health Adult Day Services, Neighbors Who Care and Room for Joy. Mahnah Club also has a scholarship fund that gives college scholarships to high school seniors. What are some of the achievements of Mahnah Club over the years? Mahnah Club provided the initial leadership and financial base for the Child Crisis Center in 1981. The club received the Hon Kachina Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service the following year. In 2006, Mahnah Club was recognized at the 25th anniversary celebration marking the founding of the Child Crisis Center. Mahnah members continue their commitment to be of service to the community. Do Mahnah Club members volunteer, too? In addition to their fundraising activities, Mahnah Club members donate many hours to volunteer service in the community. Club members volunteer at the Save the Family thrift store the second Saturday of each month. Mahnah Club has a Kids Works committee that puts together lunches and dinners for the children of Save the Family clients to feed them while their parents take classes in the program. Mahnah members also decorate the Child Crisis Center for the holidays each year. Last summer, club members organized a carnival for the children served by the Child Crisis Center and Save the Family. Does Mahnah Club have other fundraising events? In the fall, Mahnah Club holds the High Fashion Hannah’s Luncheon and Fashion Show. The most recent event featured fashions by Carrine’s Boutique in Scottsdale, a silent auction and a style makeover for a client of Save the Family. Mahnah Club has also held a classic car raffle in previous years with a vintage Ford Mustang. What plans does Mahnah Club have? Mahnah Club is committed to building relationships within the business community. Businesses throughout the valley have been essential to the club’s fundraising efforts over the years with their donations of money, goods and services. For the past three years, Mahnah Club has hosted a business networking event at the Mesa Arts Center sponsored by Mesa Bank. The purpose of this event is to increase awareness of the club in the business community. Mahnah Club plans to continue to seek partnerships with local businesses to better serve the community. How can people find out more about Mahnah Club and get information about the gala? The website is www.mahnahclub.org. Current club president is Connie Little, 602.770.6930.

Jan Dupuy, RN Nurse Specialist in Cosmetic Skin Care Owner of Biltmore Skin Care Center Q. What is a free radical? A. A free radical is a breakdown within the cellular structure caused by irritants like the sun, pollution and smoking. Free radicals lessen the cells defensive mechanisms. Overexposure to them, can lead to premature aging and illness. Since prevention is the key, it is advised that you consume and apply antioxidants. Antioxidants like vitamins A, C and E can be found in veggies and fruits and in some topical creams and lotions designed to protect your skin from the aging process of free radicals. A great topical cream that I highly recommend is Prevage MD. Don’t confuse this with the plain Prevage sold in department stores. Prevage MD is twice as strong! If you can’t use Prevage MD, (there is a small population that is allergic) I recommend a well compounded, medical grade formula of vitamin C/E to be applied daily along with your sunscreen. Combine these with a healthier diet and you’ll see younger skin from the inside, out. Q. Why is exfoliating so important to the skin? A. Shedding old skin cells makes room for new, healthier ones. Old cells can be carriers of pre-cancerous cells. It’s a good idea to shed them before they cause bigger health concerns. Also ridding yourself of dull dead skin, will boost your appearance and glow. Mini-peels on a monthly basis are a breeze. Quarterly treatments may also be done if scheduling is a challenge. Going this route I recommend a little more aggressive peel. All micro peels improve texture and tone through collagen stimulation. Expect brown spots to fade too!

Latisse is Here! The new eyelash growth product from Allergan is available. We have seen amazing results to those faithful to this new product. Users start seeing results in 10-12 weeks, so start now and be batting luscious thick lashes by June! All consultations are complimentary at:

Biltmore Skin Care Center 602-224-6100

2398 E. Camelback Rd., Suite #780 • Phoenix, AZ 85016 Send Questions & Comments to: biltmoreskincare.com Proudly Associated with Barry Fernando, MD (Board Certified Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon) ADVERTORIAL

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PA R T I E S

Science Center Gala

Doreen Picerne

Christi Warner-Beyer and Kathy Munson

Lisa Quintalino and Sue Robisch

Peter and Margie Ricker

THE MOTOWN SOUND Guests moved and grooved to the sounds of Hitsville USA. HAIR-HOPPERS Event chairs Christi Warner-Beyer, Bobby Barnes and Kathy Munson NOWHERE TO RUN Attendees arrived and departed dressed in wacky ‘60s garb. HEAVEN MUST HAVE SENT YOU The Arizona Science Center raised muchneeded funds in a troubled economy.

Paul Beyer and Bobby Barnes

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Katie Devney

Jeanne Patterson

Suzan and Carl Spiekerman

PA R T I E S

Crisis Nursery

Tom and Carol McGovern

Julie Rauch and Catherine Graves

Cindy Mero and Suzanne Dickey

OFF TO SEE THE WIZARDS Fabulous Chairs Suzanne Dickey and Cindy Mero PAVING THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD Honorees Gwen and Doug Parker WHEN IN THE EMERALD CITY ‌ Grace Edgar and Jennifer Stern looking great in shades of green. Dyan and George Getz

Bill Cleverly and Char Davis

Grace Edgar and Jennifer Stern

Gwen and Doug Parker

Brian Kelly and Katherine Cornish

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GOLF

Golf Without Freeways By Bill Macomber A round of golf can take somewhere north of four hours, so here’s an idea: Make a date for play that doesn’t involve a 45-minute freeway excursion to the first tee. This issue we’re profiling four golf courses fairly close to the middle of town. They’re among the courses the city grew up around. They’re easy to get to, fun to play and beautiful to look at. They also peek out at some of the best views in the city. So swing away without a long drive!

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THE BILTMORE COUNTRY CLUB This historic property backs up to the single most dramatic piece of nature the Valley – Piestewa Peak. The first golf course built in this beautiful setting, the Adobe, laid out its lines in 1928. Another course, the Links, came along in 1979. “Pretty much the city grew up around it,” says course manager Dick Bates. “It’s the best

location in the city with all those businesses up and down Camelback. We get a lot of summer business from that direction.” One advantage to the Biltmore’s in-town setting is old-growth landscaping. “All the courses up north are desert courses. Our Adobe is a Midwest-style course, pretty green. You can go out there and not beat your brains out,” Bates says. The manager’s favorite view: Bates’ preferred view from either course is the one the Biltmore is famous for: The 15th. “It’s our signature hole, up by Lincoln. From it you can see the peak to the north. You can see Scottsdale, Tempe, all the way downtown. You can see a long way.”

PAPAGO PARK GOLF COURSE The course profiled here that’s closest to the center of Phoenix is municipal – Papago Park Golf Course.

THE CAMELBACK INN Nestled to the north of Camelback Mountain are two top courses, Padre and Indian Bend, at the Camelback Inn. “We’re in a little micromarket here,” says Rob Bartley, golf director. “We have a great partnership with local hotels. We’re pretty centrally located, like within 20 minutes from the airport. The location is pretty central to our success.”

“If you look in the parking lot there is everything from a Mercedes AMG to a rebuilt Volkswagen,” course manager Albert Murdoch says. Past the dramatic buttes adjacent to the course, Camelback Mountain and Piestewa Peak are visible to the north and west. To the south golfers see South Mountain.

These great views have been improved by recent renovations. Besides work on the greens, tees, bunkers and irrigation, nearly 300 trees have been cleared out to make sightlines more dramatic. The best view from the course depends on a lot of things, Murdoch says. “The time of day, who you’re playing with and if you’re playing well.”

The manager’s favorite view: “How about from here in the pro shop watching the sun rise on the buttes?”

When Padre was built in 1978, cotton was still grown in the neighborhood. What sits there now are towering trees, great bunkers and an award-winning water hole – the 18th. Indian Bend has beautiful mountain backdrops lined up between eucalyptus- and palm-trimmed fairways. The homes to the north and south of the inn don’t give either course the feel of being locked in an urban setting, despite the central location. The manager’s favorite view: “My favorite spot on the course is standing on the 12th tee of Indian Bend looking back at the mountains,” Bartley says. “Some days it looks like you could hit the ball right over those mountains.”

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GOLF

THE PHOENICIAN Camelback Mountain was the primary design factor when the old Valley Club Golf Course was rebuilt around the Phoenician Resort 20 years ago.

Besides this amazing view, the advantage of being on the south side of Camelback Mountain on a fast track between Scottsdale and northeast Phoenix is time saved, says Kevin Betts, director of golf. By the time golfers motor from the center of town to an outlaying course, play 18 holes and drive back, the day is gone. “It’s great for people staying around here at places like the Royal Palms. Realistically, the ride’s about 10 minutes versus a 40-minute excursion to get up to somewhere like Troon North,” he says. Canyon, Desert and Oasis courses comprise the Phoenician’s three nine-hole courses. The views over the city are outstanding. The manager’s favorite view: “I’ll take Desert number six. You’re looking north toward Pinnacle Peak. You can see everything to Fountain Hills on a clear day.”

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CH A R I T Y BALLS

Beach Ball 2009

Tammy Remen

Susan Sly and Chris Arkeveld

Susie and Tim Wesley

MODEL CHAIR Susie Wesley DO YOU KNOW THE WAY TO ST. TROPEZ? Guests frolicked at the French Riviera-themed party. MERCI, BEAUCOUP To Phoenix Children’s Hospital and all their fantastic efforts. CHARITY BALL CENTRAL The Arizona Biltmore Hotel

Sue Orzechowski and Bonnie Lunt

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Claudia Reyes and Juan Pablo

Kimberly Jacobson

Stu Evans

Rick and Kris Baker

PA R T I E S

Asia Now

Lilly and Berne Yee

Tony and Eileen Yeung

ROYAL PURPLE Chairs Lilly Yee and Eileen Yeung BRUSHES WITH ART Beneficiary: Asian Arts Council of the Phoenix Art Museum. PLACE TO BE Great Wall Cuisine, authentic Chinese bites in Phoenix.

Amy Clague and Paula Hardison

Doris and Hong Ong

Barbara and Tom Payne

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TRENDS IN PHOENIX

By Bill Macomber

NATIVE OF ITALY Why is it Italians seem to wear clothes so well? Maybe it goes back to mastering the folds of togas 2,000 years ago. A sense of effortless style permeates the luxury brand, roberto botticelli. Handmade shoes and accessories for both genders are available at only two stores in the U.S., both in Arizona. The most recent one opened late fall at the Biltmore Fashion Park. The words “exotic,” “European” and “aesthetic” come to mind when you lay eyes on these belts, handbags and shoes. You feel like saying, “You’re not from around here, are you?”

HIGH CLASS Most people learn faster on their feet. For anyone trying to master Spanish, living with a Mexican family and studying at an American-accredited university in Mexico is a fast track to fluency. This livein language course held in Cuernavaca, just south of Mexico City, mixes school time (only five students per class) with a home setting. Classes are held at Centro Bilingue/Universidad Internacional. Everything except travel and books is $860. That includes a private room and bath. Cuernavaca is located near Taxco, Tepotzlán, archaeological sites and several beautiful natural refuges. The program is June 12-27. For more information, contact virginia. foster@pcmail.maricopa or call 602.254.9620.

ARTS & CULTURE If there’s a virtuoso in the world of ceramics, it’s Kurt Weiser. He’s known for his technical prowess and unusual ceramic forms. His work also displays amazing china painting skills with a contemporary edge. The subject matter is mysterious, blending lush, color-saturated nature with the human form. Eden Revisited: The Ceramic Art of Kurt Weiser is a 30-year retrospective exhibit of Weiser’s work. The show consists of 50 ceramic objects and drawings dating from the 1970s and runs through May 16 at ASU’s Nelson Fine Arts Center. The Biltmore’s roberto botticelli can be reached at 602.955.0403.

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The center is located at 10th Street and Mill Avenue in Tempe on the ASU campus. 480.965.2787.

TRENDS IN PHOENIX

BEAUTY BUSINESS

NEW IN TOWN The Kitchen Market Café and Wine Bar has opened at The Shops Gainey Village with a mix of eat-in and ready-to-go freshly prepared entrees featuring natural, organic and locally grown ingredients. Centered around an open kitchen bistro with a wood-burning pizza oven, The Kitchen offers signature entrees, sandwiches and salads, an artisan bakery, charcuterie, fromagerie, espresso bar and wine shop. That’s all paired with a food market. The Kitchen is also launching a full range of catering services, including breakfast buffets, boxed lunches and company dinners.

An art deco box found in London by Hannah MacGibbon, Chloe creative director, inspired Lisy, the new Chloe Parfum purse spray. The spray is being offered in a limited-edition genuine leather case in a blush shade. This refined accessory keeps the shape of the Chloe fragrance bottle while minimizing size for portability. The spray itself is a subtle variation of the original scent. The rose note is slightly richer than the original, leaning toward the flower’s powdery interior. Peppercorns take the top note, while the base notes include sandalwood and tonka bean. Smooth glass replaces the vertical pleats of the original bottle. The purse spray became available this spring at Saks Fifth Avenue.

The Kitchen is located at 8977 N. Scottsdale Road. www.thekitchenscottsdale.com.

VENUES Ever thought about getting hitched in a castle? We say hitched instead of married because that’s what they called it in the Old West. Castle Mina de Oro near Wickenburg is open for weddings, workshops and other events, and it’s close enough to rustic to qualify. In the high Arizona desert, tucked against mountain backdrops, the castle was built in the shadow of the Congress Gold Mine with granite boulders quarried nearby. Today it’s a private estate. Anyone who likes the idea of a secluded retreat amid xeriscaped gardens may find the castle just the right backdrop for Western romance.

Saks is located at 2446 E. Camelback Road in Phoenix. 602.955.8000

DISH

Castle Mina de Oro is located 15 minutes outside Wickenburg. Visit www.arizonacastle.com

Finding a parking spot to grab a bite at Postino at 40th Street and Campbell in Phoenix can be daunting. A new Postino could help, right? The casual wine and café food restaurant opened a second location in late March in the 1960s building that housed Katz’s Deli for just shy of 30 years on Central Avenue. Postino owners renovated the 2,000-square-foot building to include an open bar, modern design and living room-style seating. The new Postino will duplicate the original’s Italian-influenced light fare featuring local produce, imported Italian meats and fresh bread. And, of course, wine. The new Postino is located at 5144 N. Central Ave. in Phoenix. 602.274.5144.

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TRENDS IN DINING

By Nicole Traynor

WINE ME: The Phoenician’s tasty tequila Tequila. Does the mere mention conjure up that crazy college night where “I got sick on that one time” stories surface? Most love tequila or really, really hate it. Well, get ready to give this liquor with the image problem a second chance. The Phoenician and El Tesoro have teamed up to offer an exclusive, eight-year-aged, 100 percent agave, private label Paradiso Tequila to guests of the famed Valley resort. Yep. You have to visit The Phoenician to get a taste. The only barrel made produced 330 bottles, and all of them can only be found here in the Valley. According to master distiller Carlos Camarena, a typical tequila is aged from one to two years … even the great ones. Eight years has never been done before. This private label El Tesoro Paradiso spent five years in a French oak barrel, three years in American oak. Time adds flavor, color and sophistication. These two types of barrels give this version a vanilla-meets-chocolate taste, and this quality tequila is affording the oft-unfairly stereotyped liquor an opportunity to reinvent itself. Beyond adding a kick to a margarita, tequila of this caliber can be used like vodka – subbed into the same mixers, but providing more flavor. The Phoenician offers everything from a champagne (and private label) bellini to a 750ml, hand-numbered bottle sold to take home. It’s worth a taste. And for what it’s worth, unlike the “I got sick on that once” experience, I’m told there’s absolutely no hangover when you stick with 100 percent agave. The Phoenician Resort is at 6000 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix. www.thephoenician.com

DINE ME: J&G stands for ‘juicy’ and ‘good’ Few things are better than sitting on the balcony of J&G Steakhouse, sipping wine, enjoying the sunset and looking out at the Valley’s beauty. J&G (we’re told it doesn’t stand for chef and owner Jean-Georges but rather “juicy” and “good”) is the new fifth-floor steakhouse at The Phoenician. The unrivaled ambiance, recommended wine, delicious snacks (wasabi peanuts, rosemary popcorn and nine-spiced almonds) and fantastic service were almost enough to keep us on the patio. But when we began our meal in the dining room, we were happy we did. The restaurant itself is dimly lit with an entire glass wall facing its gorgeous view. The setting is intimate – the perfect date destination. And for a steakhouse, the menu was surprisingly varied. We’ll start at the beginning. Rolls: worth mentioning. Glazed and warm from the oven, they melted in our mouths. Perhaps unfairly, I judge my meal by the competence of its pre-appetizer bread. We were in for a treat. We started with a spread of tartare – steak, tuna and salmon. The tuna was light with a wonderful complement from an occasional saltier black olive. Salmon was equally enjoyable with basil on top and a hint of wasabi served with sourdough baguettes. I ventured out of my comfort zone with the steak tartare. I’m told it’s not the traditional recipe, and a nice taste. My filet was superb. And it’s not easy to meet my steak expectations. As a clincher, J&G offers an amazing array of seven sauces. From Béarnaise to black pepper, smoked chili to soy miso mustard, I dipped in them all. Delicious! My date ate the bass. The selection of seafood – including the raw bar – is equally impressive. For our sides, we decided upon the macaroni and cheese, grilled asparagus with lemon zest and olive oil and the most delicious potato gratin with comté. This was topped only by our incredibly gracious, respectful and knowledgeable service (our waiter was also a sommelier). We will definitely return for steaks and sunset at J&G Steakhouse. After all, we didn’t even make it to dessert. The Phoenician Resort is at 6000 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix. www.jgsteakhousescottsdale.com

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FA S H I O N SHOWS

Escada at Neiman Marcus

Ina Manaster and Sandy Magruder

Lois LeMarr Jill KrigstenOrmsbee and Ruth Ritz

Lisa Pagel and Tim Braun

A GREAT BIG THANK-YOU Tim Braun and Lisa Pagel SHOP TILL YOU DROP Proceeds from the show benefited the Trends Charitable Fund. ON THE CATWALK Escada spring 2009 collection DRESSED TO PERFECTION Gaye Richardson

Gaye Richardson

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Bonnie Radow and Nancy Chait

Stevie Eller and Nancy Berge

Lynne Love

GALAS

Fresh Start Fashion Gala

Victoria and Sue York

Gary and Kim Brown

Heidi Coupland

WOMEN HELPING WOMEN Chairs Anne Marriachi and Heidi Coupland LADY IN RED Janet Beaudin, stunning in ruby. HELP IS ON THE WAY Beneficiary: The lucky women of Fresh Start. EPICENTER OF ALL THINGS CHARITABLE Arizona Biltmore Hotel

Anne Marriachi

Keith and Shannon Mishkin

Janet Beaudin

Melinda and Olen Petznick

Doug and Gwen Parker

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PA R T I E S

Dancing With the Stars Arizona

Ryan Freeman and Linda Pope

Libby Cohen

Denise and Len Mark

HOOKED ON SWING Linda Pope and Jack Clifford entertained the troops. MUSICAL CHAIRS Libby Cohen, Patsy Livi and Jan Clayton SPECIAL RECOGNITION Fred Astaire Dance Studios TAKE A BOW Celebrity dancers George Abrams, Julie Adelson, Cheryl Anderson, Julia Baker, Dave Dodge, Chrissy Donnelly, Vincent Guerithault, Darlene Keller-Price, Vernon Vaughn, Heidi Lisherness, Anne Thoits and Alan Young

Patsy Livi

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Jan Clayton

Sarah Clifford and Jack Clifford

Geegee Entz and Debbie Briar

Karen Hayenga

ART

Phoenix Art Museum Spotlight

Ernest L. Blumenschein was introduced to Taos Valley, N.M., after a fortunate carriage accident left him and fellow artist Bert G. Phillips stranded with a broken wagon wheel. Drawn to the area’s spectacular countryside and interesting cultures, he later founded the Taos Society of Artists to promote the splendor of Taos and the art of the American West to larger audiences. Later on, he was responsible for the establishment of the New Mexico Painters (1923-1927), one of the region’s earliest groups of modernist painters. His European training, willingness to innovate, and a commitment to creative excellence led the artist to paint in a style that combined traditional and realistic means of expression with subtle undercurrents of modernism. In Contemporary Rhythm includes more than 60 paintings and is the largest and most comprehensive look at the artist ever held. Organized by Phoenix Art Museum in collaboration with Denver Art Museum and Albuquerque Museum of Art, the exhibition spans works from Blumenschein’s early works in France, through his professional illustrations, to his major landscape and figural paintings of the Southwest. Bold use of color and fascinating compositions illustrate a unique fusion of modernist sensibilities and traditional academic painting rarely seen in other painters of his time. In Contemporary Rhythm: the Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein runs at the Phoenix Art Museum through June 14. To learn more visit phxart.org.

480 I 633 I 3740 www.scottfoust.com scott@scottfoust.com

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CH A R I T Y BALLS

John C. Lincoln

Barbara and Brad Hansen

Linda and Frank Surdakowski

Jon and Sandi Perez

GOLDEN VENUE The new Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel BELLE OF THE BALL Sandi Perez in shades of black and purple. WELL-SUITED Bill Sheely in a great silver-and-black tuxedo. ONE AMAZING FOUNDATION Proceeds benefit the John C. Lincoln Hospital and Foundation.

Bill and Mary Ann Sheely

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Lynn and Kevin Veale

Cliff and Toni Klima

Sandi and Clark York

Rose and Harry Papp

interview

10 Questions for… Simon Doonan Simon Doonan’s life philosophy is simple: “Life is like a gogo box. You jump on it wearing top ‘n’ bottom, false eyelashes, and jiggle around until you eventually fall off.” He hasn’t fallen off yet. The writer, fashion commentator and window dresser has written four books. He lives in New York City with his partner, designer Jonathan Adler. We think he’d be great to have over for dinner – a blend of wit and insight in someone who doesn’t take himself too seriously. What do you consider your greatest accomplishment? My life has a big arc. I was born not long after the war in a two-room apartment with no kitchen and bathroom. I have clawed my way to the middle. What is your idea of perfect happiness? Lounging around the back yard of the weekend house in Shelter Island, which I share with my bloke, Jonathan, and our Norwich terrier, Liberace. What four people living or dead, would you invite to dinner? I like funny people: How about Oscar Wilde, Kathy Griffin, Dame Edna and Dorothy Parker? What historical figure do you admire most? Winston Churchill: He was stylish and cultivated but he was also tough. When he died we all got the day off school so we could listen to the funeral on the radio!

Make-up Artist - Eyelash Specialist

What trait do you most deplore in yourself? Telling long, self-congratulatory stories where the punch line always seems to illustrate how fabulous I am. This is very infantile. I should really stop.

Licensed Aesthetician

What trait do you most deplore in others? An inability to fully appreciate my self-congratulatory stories. On what occasion do you fib or exaggerate? The only way to communicate to people today is to exaggerate. I do it 24 hours a day, and I LOVE IT! What is your current state of mind? I’m very Scarlett O’Hara. Tomorrow is another day. What’s your most cherished inanimate possession? I have a small airplane that my mum filed out of a lump of brass during the Second World War. She was very Rosie the Riveter. What is your motto? “If everyone’s not a beauty, then nobody is.” It’s a quote from Andy Warhol.

stunning - beautiful - natural

Sydney Goldstein A message from Sydney G... During my many years experience as a makeup artist and eyelash specialist, I have listened to women discuss their preferences. Each woman has her own idea or image in her mind, but most all women share the same goal - to look beautiful without losing their own personal sense of style. If you desire a classic look or a more contemporary look, my artistry allows you to look and feel beautiful ... naturally.

S A LON & S PA

4340 East Indian School Road, Suite 9 Phoenix, Arizona 85018 For Appointments, Please call 602.751.4139

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W E D D I N G B E LL S

THE COUPLE Ms. Gloria Sargent of Phoenix Mr. Michael Herrera of Phoenix MEET THE PARENTS Mr. and Mrs. Guillermo J. Ybarra of Tucson Mr. and Mrs. Fred Herrera of Deming, N.M. NUPTIALS, RECEPTION Blackstone Country Club THE RING John Hileman Jewelers THE FLOWERS The Flower Studio (white calla lilies throughout) THE CATERER Benjamin Lesnick, Executive Chef, Blackstone Country Club THE CAKE Matt Buoschio, Pastry Chef, Backstone Country Club THE BRIDAL GOWN Demetrios of San Diego THE PHOTOGRAPHER Sandra Tenuto, Tenuto Photo THE HONEYMOON Half Moon Bay, Calif., and Oahu, Hawaii SOMETHING DIFFERENT % Gorgeous sunset wedding at the stunning property of Blackstone Country Club

% Groom’s 7-year-old son, Matthew, walked the bride down the aisle

% Pastor Rowdy VanHorn delivered an unforgettable personalized service that guests will always remember.

% The professional staff from Blackstone Country Club made this wedding a night to remember by all!

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TRENDY READING

‘Eccentric Glamour’ by Simon Doonan By Bill Dougherty

In Simon Doonon’s latest book, Eccentric Glamour, the often witty window dresser of Barneys New York, steps off a gigantic cliff. This time the author is not afraid to say what’s on his mind. As if that’s ever been a problem for the dapper English export. Doonan’s quick wit and blunt force trauma examination of society is hilarious! In his new bestseller he not only coins the phrase “porno chic,” but goes on to examine just how so many women in the world have reached this new all-time fashion low. Doonan cites countless style divas through the latter part of the 20th century and into the 21st century who were not afraid to take risks. Whether with their clothing, hairstyle and choice of makeup, these ladies stood out. Targeting celebrities for playing it safe and sloppy, Doonan comes to the conclusion that rather than take risks, large groups of woman prefer to look like assembly line tarts. Overprocessed hair, breast implants too large and skin-tight clothing have created a new and bad global look.

BE MORE THAN NOTICED. “Best Men’s Fashions” RANKING ARIZONA

FASHIONS: Axis, BRIONI, CANALI, ETON Shirts, NAT NAST, ZANELLA, Samuelsohn, John SMEDLEY Knits, Arnold Zimberg, Ermenegildo ZEGNA, from A to Z, the best of Europe and the USA

In his celebratory pages, Doonan chooses to praise women for just being women and credits them for having a greater advantage over men in the departments of taste, style and glamour. He concludes this hysterically funny romp with short and insightful biographies on the women he has profiled. He says women have a choice to look smashing, or in many cases downright dreadful. This book is an easy and funny read that at times will have you laughing out loud. Anyone with an interest in fashion, style or the countless iconic women profiled should read this book.

SHOES: Michael Toschi, Canali, Donald J. Pliner, Ecco

SERVICES: Expert in-house tailoring, special made-to-measure department THE BILTMORE FASHION PARK

East Camelback at 24th Street

OPEN DAILY - 602.956.8600

richard doria, architect

www.THECLOTHERIE.com

Doria Architecture, Inc.

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CH A R I T Y BALLS

The Promise Ball

Alicia and Mike Markham

Becky and Dan Jackson

ELVIS ENVY Tanner Flynn in ‘60s bachelor pad chic.

Debra Pabst and Dennis Rowland with Sydney Blaine

Drew and Terri Buccino

Tanner Flynn and Crystal Perlmutter

Ed and Bonnie Marshall

Elyse and Ken Waters

Danielle Werstler

SWEAR TO CARE Beneficiary: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation LEADING LADIES Chairs Danielle Werstler and Steffani Meyers THE BALL GOWN Alicia Markham, stunning in metallic and black.

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CH A R I T Y BALLS

The Promise Ball

Lindsey Forg and Galina Mihaleva with Rose Fisher

Gary and Lorna Pederson

Gay and Barry Willits

Dionne Fedderson and Francis Najafi

Julia and Mary Jorden

Kelley and Bob Melvin

Michael and Elyssa Hillman

Sarah Victor Achi Yafte

Susan Wilcox and Mike Minnaugh

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PA R T I E S

A u to T rends

Doorway of Hope Dinner Karen Naranjo and David McBride with Kate Naranjo

Aston Martin V8 Vantage Roadster By Joe Golfen In a tense scene from the 2006 James Bond film, Casino Royale, Daniel Craig climbs inside an elegant and frighteningly fast Aston Martin DBS in hot pursuit of his enemies. The chase lasts for about 20 seconds before the car flips end-over-end in a terrible accident, and the same vehicle is demolished throughout the opening scene of 2008’s Quantum of Solace. All that senseless destruction left viewers with none of the car worship available in the older 007 films, and for those of us that yearned for a few more chances to see an Aston Martin in action, salvation may come in the form of the Aston Martin V8 Vantage Roadster. The V8 Vantage (starting at $110,000) shares a lot of similarities with its larger counterpart, including the sleek styling, gorgeous interior and impressive power. And when compared to the DBS’s startling price tag ($269,000), the only thing you don’t get is the V12 or the license to kill.

Gary and Jeanne Herberger Don Henninger and Bob Little with Neil Sutton

MVP Chair Dawn Carson Senger ALL-STARS Honorary Chairmen Ruth and Hugh Downs and Jeanne and Gary Herberger CLEAN SWEEP Beneficiary: HomeBase

The V8 Vantage is the best-selling Aston Martin ever, reportedly selling over 10,000 units globally since its launch in 2005, approximately one-third of those in North America. For 2009, Aston Martin has tinkered with the car’s powerful 4.7 liter V8 engine, managing to bump the power up by 11 percent, from 380 to 420 horsepower. The Vantage is far and away the fastest car I’ve ever driven, capable of insane speeds at the slightest tap of the accelerator. The handling was heavy and responsive, making cornering at high speeds a breeze, while maintaining a good feel of the road. Even with the top down, which causes many convertibles to lose a bit of their structure and start to sway, the Vantage remained tight and responsive. The only downside to the Vantage’s amazing performance was its bizarre automatic transmission, which seemed to have a lot of trouble shifting into first from a resting position, which brought back that uneasy feeling of learning to drive on a stick shift. Visually, the Vantage is an absolute beauty. The sleek, understated lines of an Aston Martin are in a class by themselves, offering sophistication where many makers add only flash. The interior features beautiful, soft leather with bold stitching on seats and dash. The on-board computer and premium audio system are really just distractions from the most spectacular aspect of an Aston Martin; the sublime engine sound. From the moment you hit the start button, the symphony of whirling, pitch-perfect growls begins. With the top down and the radio off, the textured brilliance of soaring down the road in a Vantage and the class of such a prestigious vehicle are unparalleled. Climb behind the wheel of this beauty and you’ll find you’re one step closer to living that Bond life, though you might want to drive it a bit more carefully.

Dawn Carson Senger and Jimmy Wayne with Martha Ostrom

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Richard Carmona and Carolyn Guillot

PA R T I E S

Mahnah Club

Rex Griswold

C.B. and Paulette Hagar

Christina and Leon Ovondo

Kathleen Shelton

CAPTAIN’S RECEPTION Guests mixed and mingled at the Mesa Hilton. LIFEBOAT Benefitting Crisis Child Center, Save the Family and Mahnah Club Scholarship Fund. CRUISE DIRECTOR Rex Griswold welcomes guests aboard.

Patrick and Marla Flannagan

Marilyn Martin and Kim Chittick

Kim Dennis

GIFTS

Hostess Gifts Gifts for people who love the outdoors are perfect this time of year. But let’s face it, not everyone has a green thumb. The following gifts will satisfy the indoor set, too. Add a European flair to gift-giving with canned seeds from an Italian company specializing in green ideas. If the hostess isn’t the earthy type, the cans themselves fill a space with color, especially coupled with dish towels and linen cocktail napkins in seasonal patterns. When the spring sun goes down, take the glow inside with a candle tool set (wick trimmer, candle snuffer and wick dipper that eliminates smoke). The set comes with refillable butane lighters. It’s a thoughtful, time-saving idea. For these and other gift ideas, visit Do Me a Favor at 835 E. Camelback Road, Suite 102, in Phoenix, or visit online at finefavorgifts.com.

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HOME

A ‘tear-down’ may be a piece of history By Elizabeth Rosensteel

BEFORE

I recently was driving through the quiet neighborhood of Bartlett Estates and was saddened to see yet another part of Arizona architectural history razed and unceremoniously dumped in a landfill. This wonderful, simple architectural gem had been designed in 1952 by Blaine Drake, a former disciple of Frank Lloyd Wright and apprentice at Taliesin Architects. Blaine was an advocate of energy-efficient design in the desert. He received national and international recognition for his work and retired from

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architectural practice in 1985. As an interior designer and advocate of quality and innovative design, I was saddened to see this unfortunate demise of history.

delightful inside, punctuated with the gentle sweeping curve of the main feature wall. It turns out that the estate sale was being held by the son of the owners. He had grown up in the home. I asked if he knew who the architect was and after rummaging through some boxes found the original plans. What a prize! These plans were drawn up when Paradise Valley was known as Nauni Valley. Perhaps they should archive the plans for a future owner. The response was ambivalent: “We’ve been told this is a tear-down.”

Later that day I found myself wandering through an estate sale in Paradise Valley at a house my husband and I have lovingly dubbed the “post office.” It is an unassuming late ‘60s-era home with dark lava stone as its main architectural feature. I jumped at the chance to finally see this place that had always piqued my curiosity. To my surprise it was even more

Who would say that? I wondered. There was a lump in my throat and I just nodded. I have heard this so many times before. Unfortunately this is an all-too-common response. It seems that the future of our town is to neglect the beauty and individualism of our past because the only attribute, to some, is in the value of the land.

As I reached for my cell phone to call my friend Jesse (Drake) to commiserate on yet another loss, I sat for a moment absorbed in my own thoughts. How fortunate I have been to be on the receiving end from our current-day patrons of the arts. As artists, designers and architects, our lives have been enriched and shaped by those clients who have had their hearts lassoed by a crumbling piece of architectural history. Against all odds these visionaries have breathed life back into aging architectural gems. Few understand the time and energy required to restore these projects or the amount of time and patience one needs to deal with the unknowns and the layers of hidden surprises. And yet, driven by blind faith to see a piece of history remain intact, these idealistic romantics charge headlong toward their quixotic fantasies and in the end are the most fortunate of homeowners. They have realized a transformation of self and home that is truly holistic. As an artist, my opportunity to provide beautiful designs and creative solutions only rises from the drawing board when someone enlists that creativity, shares the vision and is willing to subsidize our insatiable addiction to art and beauty. Indeed, throughout history what has been left to show future civilizations about former culture, people and grandeur? It has always been our art, architecture, music, prose and poetry. So I say to all of you brave souls who dare to see the future a little differently and who recognize the artistry in our architectural past, to all of you who listen to your heart and have the vision to give these homes new life: Bravo! Brava! I, for one, am grateful to know you noble idealists. These photos showcase an example of clients who took note of an aging architectural masterpiece. They had the foresight to hire an experienced, sensitive team of professionals to restore and improve the home, which added to the quality of lifestyle for its current owners. (The home was an AIA award-winning home designed 14 years ago by Gordon Rogers, another celebrated Arizona architect.) A heartfelt thank-you to these patrons, and a warm invitation to the next group of individuals who want to make a difference in preserving our architectural past.

Architect: Formwerks Studios Interior Design: Elizabeth Rosensteel Design Studio 602-522-0989 Millwork: European Design Countertops: Stockett Tile And Granite Robert Reck Photography

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R emembering

Remembering ... Georgia Green By Bill Dougherty

Georgia Green always had a warm and welcoming smile on her face. Last month she passed away after leading one of the most magnificent lives a person could dream of having. She was dedicated to the Barrow Neurological Institute from its inception. Not to mention the Phoenix Heart Ball since the year she chaired their gala in a flowing red chiffon gown in 1961. Georgia never stopped caring. I first met this grand lady when I was working for I. Magnin & Co. in 1991. Georgia was a fashionable socialite with a sense of humor and a very optimistic outlook on life. An accomplished artist, wife and mother, Georgia somehow managed to do it all. She gave generously to the charitable world. You could often find her on a dance floor at various galas, spinning around the room like Ginger Rogers. Even as her velocity slowed in later years, Georgia managed a showing or two of her splendid paintings and never missed a charity luncheon. I’ll never forget the year she modeled beachwear for Saks Fifth Avenue at the past Heart Ball fashion show. Georgia was a real trooper! A beautiful memorial service was held for her at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Paradise Valley, where she worshiped for decades. Dr. Robert Spetzler delivered a touching eulogy for the great lady. It was a beautiful and upbeat tribute to a woman who will live in our hearts forever. Georgia Green was truly one of the fairest of them all. She will be missed more than I can ever express.

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PA R T I E S

Friends of the Arizona Cancer Center

Nancy and Craig Berge

Tammy and Jon Underwood

Sue Cain

John and Doris Norton

WHAT PHILANTHROPISTS SHOULD BE Nancy and Craig Berge LADIES IN RED (APRONS) Beauties Barbi Woolsey and Missy Cooley HELPING TO FIND A CURE The Phoenix Friends of the Arizona Cancer Center and their tireless efforts.

PA R T I E S

Barbi Woolsey and Missy Cooley

Vivian and Vernon Nicholas

Judy and Clarence Bowe

Suns & Stars

Cher and Jennifer Daly

Paige and Dan Wheeler

Ben Tarwater and Victoria Lopez

Dan Majerle

THREE-POINT SHOT Phoenix Suns Charities adding big numbers to the board. TEAM COLORS Cher Daly in winning purple. GREAT ASSIST Honoree and Suns player Grant Hill. Grant Hill

Krissie Brubaker and Holly Levine

Larry Kauffman and Marcia Jobe

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trends charitab l e f u nd

BLACK-TIE CALENDAR

Events are black-tie attire unless otherwise noted

Addressing Luncheon

Champion’s Dinner Boys and Girls Club of Metropolitan Phoenix APRIL 11 Westin Kierland Information: 602.954.8182

The Opera Ball Arizona Opera APRIL 18 Biltmore Information: 602.218.7334

The Trends Charitable Foundation Celebrity Luncheon set the table April 22 for its annual get-together. The event this year was held at the Biltmore Resort and was one of the best ever.

Wish Ball The Make-a-Wish Foundation of Arizona APRIL 17 Biltmore Information: 602.395.9474

The Hope Ball Leukemia & Lymphoma Society APRIL 25 Westin Kierland Information: 602.567.7605

The Jewel Ball American Cancer Society APRIL 18 Montelucia Resort Information: 602.224.0524

Crozier Dinner Gala Catholic Community Foundation MAY 2 Biltmore Information: 605.354.2402

Fax Calender Submissions to (480) 990–0048 or e-mail bmacomber@trendspublishing.com

Helpers got together for the Addressing Luncheon in February at the Phoenix home of Ina Manaster. Along with a good time in a good cause, plenty of work got done. Invitations don’t just send themselves! Anyone who wonders how behind-thescenes work gets done leading up to big events, here’s a peek.

It’s time to subscribe to TRENDS Name _________________________________________________ Address _ ______________________________________________________ City ______________________________State_________ Zip _____________ ❑ 1 year $25.00 ❑ 2 years $50.00 ENCLOSED IS MY CHECK $_ __________ All Major Credit Cards Accepted Card Type ___________________ Card #_______________________________ Exp. Date ___________________ Please mail to TRENDS: 6045 N. Scottsdale Road, Suite 205, Scottsdale, AZ 85250

Carrie Hall, Christine Gustafson and Ina Manaster

Karen Thorn and Sandy Magruder with Char Davis

Jinger Richardson, Debbie Gaby, Carole Machiz and Christine Gustafson

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PET OF THE MONTH

Buster Buster is a handsome miniature pinscher with jet black and tan markings. This tailless pooch shows no signs of slowing down as he approaches age 2, and this busybody has a brisk outlook on life. With small legs that move at jet propulsion speeds, Buster buzzes to and fro with gusto. He may take more steps than most dogs because of his small paws, but he can keep up just about anyone, even folks with a long stride. In fact, some people might have trouble keeping up with Buster! He will impress any powerwalker as he effortlessly keeps up. He eagerly embraces life’s adventures, and he is always up for a fun escapade. From car rides to visiting dog-friendly restaurants, there is no doubt that Buster is excited to tag along. He is content as long as he is near his loved ones, and he is showered with attention from dog lovers everywhere. Given the chance, Buster will cover your face with sloppy kisses, but he is so sneaky about it you will never expect it. Buster is already house-trained, and he has mastered the “sit” and “stay” commands. He loves belly rubs, and he will plop over when he feels an itch coming on so the nearest person can give him a tummy scratch. Buster insists on being the only pet in his new home, but this bundle of energy should keep his new family plenty busy by himself. He doesn’t like small children and toddlers, but he loves hanging out with kids who are at least 13 years old. Bring the whole family down to meet Buster before you decide to take him home.

Suk-Hui Ltd. Custom Design Fashions Creations in luxurious silks, fine wools and elegant cottons for all occasions. Hilton Village 6149 North Scottsdale Road (480) 951-1388

You can adopt Buster at the Arizona Humane Society’s Nina Mason Pulliam Campus for Compassion, 1521 W. Dobbins Road, Phoenix. His adoption fee is $100. This fee includes his neuter surgery, vaccinations, a follow-up veterinary exam, an ID tag, a colorful collar and leash and one exuberant canine friend. For more information about Buster, please call (602) 997-7586, ext.1045, and ask for animal ID number A249454, or log on at www.azhumane.org. Please note: This pet might have been adopted by the time you visit the shelter, however, the AHS has dozens more wonderful pets that also need loving homes. Please take a moment to meet some of the dogs, cats and other companion animals at the shelter. To see all adoptable animals right now, visit www.azhumane.org/findapet.

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BOOK REVIEW

V A LL E Y E V E N T S

‘The Word in Paint’ By Bill Macomber

“The Thirteenth Moon: Facing Snow,” acrylic and mixed media, 60" x 48"

Arizona painter Beth Ames Swartz loves the written word. The written word apparently loves her, too.

She’s done a cycle of paintings based on poet T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets. Other series have been inspired by wisdom systems. Her most recent cycle of paintings was inspired by 8th-century Chinese poets Du Fu and Le Bai. The paintings, traveling in an exhibit called “The Word in Paint,” are the subject of a book by the same name. “The paintings just grew out of my reading the poems. The words started around the paintings, then ended up in the paintings,” Swartz says. Literally. Phrases from the poems are incorporated into each image. Swartz recited favorite translations of the Chinese poems to herself as she worked. As she did the words began to seep through her brush. “The paintings look Asian, and it wasn’t done purposely. When you observe very closely, things open up to you,” she says. She believes she’s the first American painter to directly respond to these two revered Chinese poets. To complete the aesthetic circle, contemporary writers responded to the finished paintings with poems. Those poems are displayed alongside the centuries-old Chinese poems and the artworks. Swartz says she has been moved by the sentiments expressed in the poems, most of which were written during a violent and socially turbulent period of Chinese history. “Basically, all these wisdom systems say the same thing. We don’t seem to have learned it yet.” “The Word in Paint” will run through May 17 at the West Valley Art Museum in Surprise. It then travels to LA Artcore in Los Angeles for July. The book is available through Arizona State University Press.

Facing Snow Battles, sobbing, many new ghosts. Just an old man, I sadly chant poems. Into the thin evening, wild clouds dip. On swirling wind, fast dancing snow. A ladle idles by a drained cask of green wine. Last embers redden the empty stove. No news, the provinces are cut off. With one finger I write in the air, sorrow. – Du Fu, 712-770 A.D., Chinese

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