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HOME & ARCHITECTURAL

FEATURING BATHROOMS


CHARLES R. STINSON ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

P H OTO : PAU L C R O S BY

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HOME & BATHROOM Every home has a personality – there are some that stand out proudly from their environments, while others nestle comfortably into their surroundings. So how do you choose the style that’s best for your new home? You go to mytrends! On mytrends you can search for design ideas and solutions in our online showcase of hundreds of completed homes and connect with our community of architects and designers. And when you’re ready to start choosing, mytrends can suggest products, services and expertise to help make your final selections easier. In this issue of mytrends Home we’ve collected some of the latest ideas to impress us. You’ll find these home and bathroom projects and many, many more on mytrends – where everyone who loves design can find each other, share ideas and collaborate on projects. Join us today and discover a whole new world of design inspiration!

HIGHLIGHTS mytrends editorial contact – Kathleen Kinney kathleen.kinney@trendsideas.com mytrends sales contact – Judy Johnson judy.johnson@trendsideas.com

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42 Richard Landry AIA is best known for his classically styled estate homes. You’ll find many of those, and other examples of Landry’s work, at mytrends

This issue is a print edition of myTrends digital content

Faucets, taps, fittings – whatever you call them, they add the finishing touch to your bathroom. Go to mytrends to find traditional and contemporary designs

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BACK TO THE LAND

WHERE THE LIVING IS EASY

CONTEMPORARY HEART

With a profile that echoes the nearby rural barns, this vacation home by Vinci Hamp Architects offers room for extended family

A noted interior designer’s own weekend retreat, this house has an architectural symmetry that radiates a sense of order and calm

From the outside, this home’s cedar exterior and gabled roof lend a classic rustic appearance. Inside, it’s a completely different aesthetic

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THROUGH THE AGES

ON A CLEAR DAY

FOR YEARS TO COME

An Italianate limestone exterior gives way to an Art Deco-style interior on this home. Architectural details throughout evoke the glamour of yesteryear

The main living areas of this Hollywood Hills home open to expansive terraces. Below, views of the city stretch into the distance

A large portico creates a sense of arrival at the front of this European-styled home. The interiors are large and traditional, but suited to family living

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OUTSIDE THE BOX

DESIGN DIRECTIONS

REMODELED BATHROOMS

With intersecting planes and layered living spaces, this contemporary urban home makes the most of its lakeside location

Modern bathrooms enhance a sense of retreat through crisp, clean lines; while natural materials and organic forms provide warm accents

In some cases, a bathroom update means taking a step back in time. See how this interior designer recreated a vintage look for her own master suite

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in the landscape

With a twist The exteriors of these homes respond to the surroundings, but inside, they offer some surprises


Back to the land With a profile evoking a humble rural barn, this vacation home complex offers spacious guest accommodation for several families

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We each have our own idea of what makes an ideal vacation home, but most would agree that it needs to fit with the surrounding architecture, and open up to the scenery. There can be some inventive ways to achieve both these goals. Architect John Vinci had already completed several projects on this historic farm property, including a barn, museum and bridge, when the owners asked him to design their vacation home there as well. This had to comfortably accommodate all their adult children and their families at any given time. “There was talk of a transparent structure,

along the lines of the Farnsworth House by German architect Mies van der Rohe, who was head of the Illinois Institute of Technology when I studied there,” says Vinci. “A glass-walled home would have been ideal for looking out to the waterways and fields on one side of the farm. However, a Modernist appearance would have been at odds with the rustic old barns on the other side of the site.” To balance the need for harmony and views, Vinci took a dual approach to the design. And to address the issue of scale, the new house was built as two forms, linked by a glass walkway.

Preceding pages: Traditional standing-seam zinc roofs on this vacation home echo the pitch of the concrete slab roofs on nearby barns. The white stucco walls and tower are also in keeping with surrounding buildings. In contrast, the private side of the house opens up to the scenery with a wall of glass. Above: The side of the house facing the barns has smaller windows and doors, more reminiscent of traditional farm dwellings.

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Preceding pages: The great room follows the shape of the house structure for a voluminous feel. A stainless steel staircase leads to one of two master suites. All furniture pieces in the room were created by contemporary artists. These pages: Carpenter Mike Jarvi gave the cabinetry in the master suites in both buildings a crafted, hand-worked feel. Scallops were carved out of selected wood surfaces for a textural finish.

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While these twin forms are slightly taller and longer than the nearby barns, they have a similar footprint. They also look like classic farm buildings, with steep hip roofs and white stucco siding. On the facades facing the barns, Vinci has designed windows and doors to be in proportion with those in the century-old dairy buildings on the property. However, this is the conservative side of the design. The exteriors that look the other way are essentially Modernist walls of glass, punctuated by two-story inserts. These facades are only visible from the fields.

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Entry to the large living space is by a door half-way down the long side of the volume. The old-world farming environment outside gives way to an airy, modern interior. “You walk directly into the double-height, central living room,” says the architect. “This has a dramatically high ceiling that follows the steep pitch of the roof and is supported by exposed, painted steel beams. Dormer and clerestory windows flood additional light into the enormous space. Beyond this great room are the large kitchen and dining area, while at the other end there is an office.”


Above and far right lower: The pool and pool house have a decidedly modern aesthetic, but as they are tucked behind hedges, they have little impact on the traditional architecture around them. The plantings will mature over time to bring further privacy to this area. Large glass sliding doors can open up the pool house to the outdoors as desired.

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Sets of stairs at both ends of the great room lead up to the two private master suites, which are separated by the great room void. From the outside, these bedrooms appear as box inserts on the open side of the house. “The stainless steel staircases are leading features of the great room and were custom designed for the project,” says Vinci. “The owners had strict ideas about the furniture, too, and were instrumental in most choices. Together with interior designer George Larson and artistic advisor Jo Hormuth, they set about sourcing only classic Modernist pieces or items made by

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living craftspeople. For example, the chairs shaped from wood branches are by the famous British designer John Makepeace. The sculptural arrangement of cushions on the wall is by Jo Hormuth, while furniture-maker Mike Jarvi crafted the hand-hewn chair, reminiscent of a milking stool, out of local wood. The imported rugs are Iranian.” On the same axis as the main house and connected to it by a glass walkway, the bunkhouse has a nearly identical profile. A clear sightline runs directly through both volumes, adding to the sense of connection.


Shorter and lower than the main house, the bunkhouse also has windows of a similar scale as those in the old farm buildings, while opening up to the fields and waterways on the other side. A four-story observation tower at one end of the structure offers a birds-eye view of the surrounding farm. This element connects visually with silos on the adjacent barns and provides a focal point for the run of buildings. The bunkhouse has two bunkrooms, a family room downstairs and two bedroom suites upstairs. Separating the bedrooms out over two houses naturally makes entertaining

large numbers a great deal easier, says Vinci. Beyond the bunkhouse, a swimming pool and pool house run perpendicular to the two main buildings, and are discreetly screened from view by maturing hedges. “The pool house is a deep, shady retreat that has a distinctly modern air – from its shallow hip roof to its large glass sliding doors,” the architect says. resource list | video | plan | images Search 44581 at my.trendsideas.com

Top: The bunkhouse tower is in keeping with similar, older versions on two nearby barn structures. However, the clean-lined wraparound windows, together with another in the kitchen of the main home, are playful modern concessions. Story by Charles Moxham Exterior photography by William Zbaren, interior images by Eric Hausman

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Where the living is easy Designed as a weekend retreat, this house has a formal architectural symmetry that radiates a sense of order and calm

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Above: Home in the meadow – this vacation house, designed by architect Joan Chan and interior designer-owner Paul Siskin, has a highly symmetrical facade that belies the casual lifestyle enjoyed by the owner. With its full-height glazed walls and steel doors and windows, the main living area resembles a glass pavilion. Left: Sitting high on a natural plateau, the house commands a spectacular view of the distant mountains. Red lounge chairs on the grass create an informal outdoor living area.

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Loft-style living might not automatically come to mind when planning a country house, but that was precisely the look required for this vacation home. Interior designer Paul Siskin says he loves the idea of living in one big great room, and it seemed a perfect solution for his new home in the country. “I have never really liked the idea of lots of small, separate spaces,” he says. “It makes much more sense to me to have one large, flowing space, with floor-to-ceiling glass walls and no window treatments. It

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was also a way to maximize the great view from all sides of the house, which sits on a ridge – there are often wild turkeys and deer wandering past.” Siskin says he was initially taken with the idea of the Philip Johnson Glass House, which was mentioned in early discussions with architect Joan Chan. “The concept is wonderful, but in reality, I could see it would help to be able to close off a few of the walls.” With this in mind, Chan created a highly symmetrical plan for the house,

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placing the living area at the center and bedroom wings off either side. The central living space features 12ft ceilings, which step down to 10ft ceilings in the two wings. The symmetry and stepped roofline give the house a formality that belies the relaxed lifestyle within. “Although this is a modern house, it has a classical scheme,” says Chan. “In a sense, we started with a solid rectangular form and carved out a series of L-shaped voids that let in the light, including a high entry hall with a skylight.”


Facing page, top and lower: Symmetry also defines the formal entry, which is a 14½ft atrium space with a large skylight. With bookshelves lining both sides, the entry doubles as a library. Above: The central living area is open to the master bedroom beyond, which has its own small sitting area. A large sliding door can close off the bedroom if required. The furniture is an eclectic mix of items gathered over many years. Left and following pages: Steel I-beams form the fireplace surround. These are teamed with roughsawn wood that has been left to weather.

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Siskin says he has always liked the idea of entering directly into the living area, but the architect convinced him to create the formal entry, which the designer has lined with bookshelves. “There is a definite processional feel to this space,” says Chan. “You come into this very tall 14½ft atrium – essentially a library – which in turn opens into the living area. The large fireplace is on the same axis – you just get a tantalising sense of what lies beyond in terms of the view.” In keeping with the desired loft-style

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aesthetic, the main living area is a large steel-framed pavilion, measuring 20ft by 40ft. The space is completely open to the master bedroom, which features another sitting area. The extra-wide opening can be closed off with a sliding door. Steel windows and doors enhance the industrial look, as do the large steel I-beams that form the fireplace mantel. These were ground and polished by the contractor, a former bridge builder. Rough-sawn reclaimed pine wood on the chimney, polished concrete floors and

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natural walnut cabinetry in the kitchen area reinforce the raw quality of the material palette. Natural materials are also a feature of the furnishings, with leather, steel, chrome and wood most prominent. “The furniture is mostly pieces I have gathered over the past 40 years, for various apartments and stores,” Siskin says. “It’s a very eclectic mix – the dining chairs are new, but I have had the Corbusier chairs for four decades. They were originally black but I had them recovered in an orange-red leather.”


Facing page: Vintage leather chairs look right at home in the loft-style living area. The light pendants incorporate solid bronze fixtures. Above: With the doors open, the kitchen resembles an alfresco dining area. Natural walnut cabinets along the perimeter of the room are teamed with Absolute Black granite countertops. Left: Many of the designer’s collections have found a new home, including this grouping of candlesticks.

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Top and right: This room in the guest wing features two vintage day beds and a collection of framed photographs and art works. Above: The master bathroom continues the eclectic look – an antique clock has become a medicine cabinet. The marble vanity sits on steel legs that give it a ’30s feel. A walled garden outside the bathroom guarantees privacy – Siskin has avoided window treatments throughout the house.

Another room, which can be used as a guest room, features two vintage 1930s day beds, a collection of framed photos and art work, and a replica wooden rifle. The designer’s collection of antique chemistry glass bottles and flasks is also displayed in many of the rooms, including the master bathroom, which again mixes the old with the new. save | share | resource list | images

Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Eric Lagnel

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Contemporary heart Cedar exteriors and a gabled roof give this mountain retreat a classic country look – but appearances can be deceptive

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Buying into a resort-style enclave, owners may be swayed by the setting and amenities, but less compelled by building guidelines that ensure each house is in keeping with the rest. That was the scenario for the owners of this mountain getaway by architect Stephen Dynia. The challenge was to accommodate the roof form and materials prescribed by the development while achieving the modern sensibility that the owners wanted, says Dynia. “The exterior is in cedar and board-formed concrete, with a steeply pitched zinc roof. We chose to use metal rather than shingles for the

sake of longevity and crisp lines; and concrete was chosen for its strength and textural appeal, which fits with the rugged terrain.� The house is laid out as a central pavilion that is elevated to gain views up and over neighboring houses, with one wing on either side. There are also two low shed-roof structures located at diagonally opposite corners. These one-story volumes help to break down the overall mass in visual terms. In line with the rules for this mountain home, cedar siding runs horizontally on the main volume and vertically on the wings.

Above: A picture of rustic simplicity on the outside, this mountain home features cedar shingles and a zinc roof with exposed wooden trusses. The central living volume has an elevated base, while the two-story wings contain bedrooms, a media room and a three-car garage. Both the position and architecture of the house optimize views to a creek, mountains and ski slopes.

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Above: One of the two shed-roof volumes contains the entry to the home. While this looks like a separate form from the exterior, helping to break down the massing of the house, on the inside it connects to the rest of the interior, three steps higher. Right: The inverted floating ceiling creates a modern aesthetic. A long, freestanding cabinet introduces a human scale to the interior and organizes pedestrian flow.

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Above: A more refined version of the board-formed material on the exterior, concrete slab walls contribute to the structural integrity of the home, which is in an earthquake zone. The sculptural angled ceiling folds up and over the side stair to provide sufficient headroom. Stained concrete slabs underfoot feature hydronic in-floor heating. An entertainment hub bisects this side of the residence.

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However, upon entering the front door, set in one of these volumes, and stepping up into the main living spaces, everything changes. The interior of the home is as contemporary as the exterior is rustic. The eye-catching central feature is the dramatic, angled ceiling. Instead of echoing the form of the gabled roof, the shape has been inverted. “The contiguous ceiling reaches down into the center of the open-plan space, much like a geometric form made from folded paper,” says Dynia. “The ceiling does not quite meet the wall planes, which gives it a floating appearance –

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an ethereal effect enhanced by lighting concealed within the small gap. “The angles have a practical purpose, too. At one corner, the ceiling plane rises to accentuate views up the mountain to the ski slopes – as if the house is inviting the landscape in. At the corner diagonally opposite, it rises to optimize natural light to the kitchen.” Hidden away in the large space above the ceiling are all the various high-tech systems and plant that keep the house running. For example, the boiler for the hydronic fluid that supplies the in-floor heating is located there.


“The floor is in stained concrete, a material favored by the owners, and the walls are mainly in unfinished concrete – we gave this a more refined surface than the board-formed concrete on the exterior,” says Dynia. “In a house with no internal supports and a floating ceiling, these concrete walls bear most of the structural load, allowing the generous expanses of windows.” A substantial cabinet form bisects the central open interior, with the living spaces on one side and a long, gallery-like passage on the other. The cabinet helps bring a human scale to the soaring, 14ft-high space.

“Together, the walnut cabinet and angled ceilings give the interior spatial complexity, offering multiple readings depending on where you are standing,” the architect says. Bedrooms, a movie room and a three-car garage are located in the two double-story wings of the house. “The stairs to the wings also punctuate the main volume – these have been given different treatments for interest,” says Dynia. “While the exterior of this vacation home is a picture of pragmatic alpine charm, the interior is more like an abstract sculptural composition.”

Top: The walnut cabinet, which contains a refrigerated wine display and a wet bar, is in line with the kitchen’s rear cabinet. A pocket door can screen off the kitchen when the owners are entertaining. Above: The ceiling rises up at two corners of the home, including over the kitchen. This maximizes natural light on the countertops and creates an airy, enjoyable place to prepare and cook food.

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Left: In the corner diagonally opposite the kitchen, the raised ceiling ensures the living room provides views of the ski slopes. A freestanding wall element incorporates a fireplace. Story by Charles Moxham Photography by Cameron Neilson

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At the water’s edge From the wind in the trees to the ripples on the lake – this new home by Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design is at one with the natural world A magical site is just the first step in the journey towards a new home that’s a perfect fit for your lifestyle. For the owners of this new lake home, the second step was finding the right design team. The couple commissioned Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design and Nicole Norris of CRS Interiors to design their new home, on an idyllic lakeside promontory.

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Architect Charles R Stinson AIA describes the house as a modern composition of layered horizontal planes and vertical fins. “The large, overhanging roofs shade the home from the hot sun in summer, yet allow the lower rays of the sun in winter to warm the interior, thanks to the expansive glazing. The vertical fins, made from custom concrete blocks,

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are an abstract response to the tall trees on the lot. “The openness of the glass and the compositional design defines the spaces between the living areas, much like the branches of a tree outline the space it occupies.” Stinson says the home was designed to have a close connection with the outdoors, both visually and physically. “The siting of the house,


its scale and the architectural language are respectful of the highly visible lakeside location and work together to create an understated appearance from the water,� he says. CRS Interiors reinforced the strong connection with the natural environment with the interior design – the floors are maple, the cabinetry features white oak veneer and the furnishings are in neutral tones.

Lake views are maximized by the large windows, which are framed with fir wood on the interior. There are also clerestory windows that flood the great room with natural light and allow views of the tree canopy. Triple-pane glass provides extra insulation and saves energy during the winter. In summer, cross ventilation takes advantage of cooling lake

breezes. The home is heated and cooled by its own geothermal wells. For more details, contact Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design, 18304 Minnetonka Blvd, Deephaven, MN 55391, phone (952) 473 9503. Website: www.charlesrstinson.com save | share Search 44625 at my.trendsideas.com

Facing page: Nestled amid the trees, this lakefront property by Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design maximizes the spectacular outlook. The home can also be seen on the inside front cover. Top: The entry has a formal symmetry – windows are positioned to draw the eye to the view beyond. Above: The dramatic two-story kitchen area is framed by interlocking horizontal and vertical planes.

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grand designs


Personal space These projects share a strong, overarching vision that draws all their individual elements together into a cohesive architectural design


Through the ages An Italianate exterior gives way to an Art Deco-style interior on this home

Preceding pages: Decorative wrought iron at the front entry is the only clue that this Italianate exterior conceals an Art Deco heart. Above: Touches of Italian style filter indoors, too, as with this graceful groin vault on a second-floor corridor. Right: Window and stair detailing, artworks, lighting and furnishings all further the Art Deco feel.

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Often, it’s sheer size or wealth of detail that give a house a commanding presence. However, a sense of individual charm can have a more lasting impact. This grand home, set on a relatively modest half-acre site, is by architect Richard Landry, with interiors by designer Joan Behnke. The owners had wanted an Art Deco-style house, but neighborhood design guidelines dictated an approved Italianate look. Landry’s response was to include influences of both – Italianate on the exterior, Art Deco on the interior – for a house that conforms with its surroundings, yet retains its individuality. “I designed the exterior in the formal Italian style – with some changes to reflect California’s climate that’s suited to indoor-outdoor living. “The facade is traditional French limestone with classic Doric columns and stone tracery on the balconies. The recycled clay roof tiles were imported from Italy, and exposed wood outriggers under the eaves are another classic detail. Adding to the look of an historic residence, the entry steps are flanked by stone balustrades with channels for water to trickle down into ornate circular pools at their base.” Departures from this style include recessed balconies, which help to break up the facade visually, downplaying the home’s scale. Centuries ago, an Italian house of this size, around 21,000sq ft, would have been surrounded by its own estate – as much as 100 acres of land. The large windows are another modern element, letting in plenty of light and optimizing views to the front garden. The driveway and entry to the basement garage are set to one side to make way for extensive formal landscaping. Stepping inside the house is like stepping forward in time to the glamour and luxury of the post-World War I era. While not strictly Art Deco in style, the interior does draw inspiration from that period, the architect says.

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Above: The ceiling in the library is adorned with beams and a handpainted canvas mural. Right: Ornate coffered ceilings with Art Deco stepped mouldings are a feature of the interior, while classic Doric columns reflect the occasional Italian influence. The emphasis on straight lines and circles in both architectural styles help them merge visually.

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Above: From rustic to regimented – the view from the pool house fire pit takes in the grandeur of the house. The view is framed by rough stone columns and an archway. Right: And from formal to farmhouse – the pool house cabana has been given the look of an old barn. A fountain on the rear wall adds the pleasing sound of trickling water.

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The double-height entry foyer is crowned by a large wrought iron skylight in Art Deco style, and the stair, window and mouldings all reflect the stepped lines of the era. The glinting stand of green glass blades by Chihuly and a sculpture-meets-light fixture by Hervé Van der Straeten are also Art Deco in feel. While the exterior window frames are bronze – for a lavish Italian look – on the inside, they are wood. Landry says touches of Italian design can be seen indoors, too. The groin vault corridor upstairs shows a clear Italian influence, and the fluted columns fit with both styles. Most rooms lead off the central foyer, with formal rooms to one side and informal spaces to the other. The master suite and guest bedrooms are upstairs. The residence is frequently used for entertaining on a lavish scale and the basement includes a large games room, a bar area, lounge, an indoor swimming pool, two spas, and a movie theater, as well as the garage. The great room opens to a covered loggia with double bifolding doors, another concession to modern indoor-outdoor living. A coffered ceiling with stepped mouldings, and an inlaid floor pattern continue the Art Deco theme. Low, linear modern furniture is sympathetic to the architecture. The living room and covered loggia look across the swimming pool to what appears to be a rustic old building. However, this large stone structure is also brand new and incorporates a guest suite with balcony, a covered loggia, a tower and fire pit. “The concept was to create a visual story, implying that when the main house was built there were several existing structures on the land and one was repurposed as a pool house or cabana,” says Landry. The main residence and cabana have quite different characters, but similarities of tone and scale draw them together visually.

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These pages: The layout of the home, pool and cababa creates a sense of a large property. The cabana provides guest accommodation and covered seating, and makes a distinctive focal point. Story by Charles Moxham Photography by Erhard Pfeiffer

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On a clear day Designed in a U shape with a central glass entertaining pavilion, this new house in the Hollywood Hills maximizes an expansive view back to the city

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It seems hard to believe today, but back in the ’50s houses were not always built to make the most of a spectacular view – several large windows in the main living area were often deemed to be enough. But in many cities, including Los Angeles, the land some of those houses were built on has become increasingly sought after. For many of the new owners looking for a wider outlook, the best solution is to tear down and start over. Such was the case with this project, says architect Zoltan Pali of Studio Pali Fekete architects (SPFa), who was commissioned to design

Above: This new house replaces a 1950s home that did not maximize the spectacular views from the site in the Hollywood Hills. Architect Zoltan Pali designed the new house in a U shape, with a central glass pavilion. This accommodates the formal living and dining areas. The kitchen and family living area is to the right, and the master suite to the left. Left: The site was leveled to create a large outdoor living space, complete with swimming pool.

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Top: The exterior of the house is clad in wood panels that have a Bakelite core. The thinness of the material is expressed at the entry, where the wood panels meet a travertine wall. Because the distance between the street and the house is small, landscape architect Andrea Cochrane suggested a pathway that turns at right angles to create a sense of procession. Above: The gardens appear to come right inside the house.

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a new contemporary house in a neighborhood that was developed in the ’50s. “The site, on a north-south ridge is quite spectacular, but the house was less so,” Pali says. “It was clear we could design a new house where virtually every room could enjoy the view south to the LA Basin. A new house could also provide a better indoor-outdoor flow.” Because of the existing height restrictions, the house needed to sit low on the landscape. The architect consequently designed the house in a U shape, wrapping it around a large entertaining terrace and a swimming pool. One leg

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of the U – the master bedroom wing – is shorter than the others, so that it doesn’t block the view from the family living area. “We positioned the house close to the west boundary, so it is not right on the edge of the ridge,” says Pali. “This ensures there is plenty of space for the outdoor living area and pool.” To maximize this position, the central wing of the house, with the main living and dining area, is clad in glass on three sides. “This appears as a very glassy, steel-framed pavilion inserted between the boxy forms of the two wings. The effect is heightened by the way


the glass wraps around the sides of the pavilion, where there is a gap between the volumes, almost like a giant reveal. The windows at the sides open up to ventilate the living area, like side gills, yet they avoid the prevailing wind. These windows also bring light right into the rear of the house.” Pali says the pavilion itself is almost an outdoor space – a courtyard that has been wrapped in glass. “The glass panels slide across to literally open up the space to the outdoors, enhancing the sense of connection.”

Above: Textural materials create much of the visual impact on the interior. The wall beside the stairs on the left is a water feature – water flows down the dark, textured tiles. Left: The long travertine wall forms the central spine of the house. Cantilevered cabinets provide storage, yet allow the wall to read as an unobstructed architectural element. Skylights ensure this main circulation area is flooded with natural light.

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Above: The glass pavilion is bordered at the rear by the long travertine wall. Freestanding cabinetry helps to separate the living space from the main circulation area behind. The flooring throughout the house is riftcut white oak that has been brushed with a metal brush to bring out the natural texture, then sealed with a clear finish.

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In contrast to the translucent quality of the pavilion, the rest of the house is clad in durable Parklex wood panels. “The panels feature a phenolic resin and a Bakelite core, which makes them highly stable structurally,” says the architect. “And because they sit proud of the waterproof barrier on the house, heat never transfers across the gap into the building, so they are very energy efficient.” Pali says he wanted the materials to express the architecture and vice versa. “The skin of a building is most usually quite thin, yet often made to seem thicker. At the entry

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to this house, we clad the vestibule in travertine, and you can see, where the two materials meet, just how thin the wood panels are.” A travertine wall extends right though the house, forming the central spine. Doorways within the wall appear as openings carved out from the stone. “The wall is also a symbolic division between the public and the private spaces,” says the architect. “On one side are the big, open living spaces, and on the other, the bedrooms.” To bring light into the center of the house, there are three long, narrow skylights above the


main circulation area. Sunlight is angled down the travertine, creating changing shadows. Another defining architectural element that helps to link the interior with the outdoors is the position of the steel structural columns around the perimeter of the house. These are set back several inches, so the glass doors slide past the columns uninterrupted. “When you disengage such elements from each other, you lighten the feel of the architecture,” says Pali. “It is as though the roof is just sitting on these two pillars. This gives the house a clean, uncluttered look.”

Left: Soft mauve-gray walls give the master bedroom a sense of tranquility. With gaps, like deep reveals, between the glass pavilion and the two other wings, the house can be ventilated naturally. The structural steel columns on the perimeter of the house are positioned several inches inside the glass, which helps to lighten the architecture visually.

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Above: The kitchen-family room is also an entertaining space. It features two parallel islands. Right: All the main living areas open out to expansive terraces. Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Bruce Damonte

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For years to come Traditional European architecture is referenced in the design of this stately home, which is built from solid stone


Preceding pages: Solid stone walls, a slate roof and multi-gabled roofline define this new house, which reflects a strong European influence. This is echoed by the formal landscaping. Above: A large portico creates a sense of arrival at the front of the house. The entry has a highly symmetrical design that reinforces the traditional formality.

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The true character of a traditional home is best revealed in the materials, and whether or not they will they stand the test of time. There can be no doubt this house was built to endure for generations – the walls are made from solid stone and the roof is slate and copper. But it’s also the architecture that sets this house apart from other new builds. The house, which was designed by architect Mike Sharratt of Sharratt Design & Company, references traditional European architecture – there are English and Italian influences that can be seen in the roofline, windows and soffits.

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Builder David Erotas of Erotas Building Corporation says the exterior features a Chilton blend of stone from Wisconsin. “This is a heavily textured stone that conveys substance and permanence – you can see at a glance how solid this house is. And like traditional homes from centuries past, it was built with the patience and care required to achieve this level of craftsmanship and longevity.” The park-like setting also enhances the character. The house is set on several acres, with formal landscaping leading the eye to the main entry. This features a symmetrical arched


portico supported by large stone columns. Inside, a lowered ceiling immediately beside the front door creates a sense of intimacy and welcome. Beyond this is a large rotunda vestibule with a marble floor and an ornate domed, hand-painted ceiling that features a shell-like fan pattern with a bright blue border. Interior designer Laura Ramsey Engler says the owners wanted the house to have a very enduring, classical look. “They are a young family, but they didn’t want everything in a hurry. They recognize that some things take time when they are crafted by

hand. At the same time, however, I believed it was important that the interior offer a youthful, fresh take on tradition. Because the owners are young, I felt the design and furnishings shouldn’t be too stuffy or formulaic. “For example, the domed ceiling, with its radiating pattern is a classical derivation. But the bright blue accents break away from the tone-on-tone neutral palette that defines most of the interior. Because this is a circulation area that you pass through, it’s easy to be a little more adventurous with the design.” A coffered ceiling in the formal living room

Above: The gabled roofs, large overhangs and eyebrow windows enhance the old-world character of the house. So, too does the heavily textured Chilton blend stone that forms the exterior walls. The slate roofing mixes three colors in a random pattern. In contrast, the distinctive tower elements and feature standing seam copper roofing that will gradually acquire a patina over time.

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Above: The visual impact of the entry is further enhanced by a large rotunda-style entry hall with a domed ceiling. The hand-painted dome features a radiating shell-like pattern, edged with a bright blue border. Three types of marble on the floor reinforce the circle theme. Above right: Designed by Laura Ramsey Engler, the interior is not imitative of a century-old manor house. It has a more evolved look in keeping with modern sensibilities.

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is another distinctive feature of the interior. This incorporates extra-large beams with a circular centerpiece and a large chandelier. Silvery taupe walls and antique accessories are complemented by a custom handmade area rug in silk and wool that ties together the various tones. Arched windows echo the form of the wide arched openings between the various living and dining areas. These openings provide sightlines through the house and ensure there is an easy, relaxed flow to the circulation areas, in keeping with modern lifestyles. “A lot of attention was also given to the

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white oak flooring,” says Erotas. “It includes parquet in the hallway, and a 3ft square Versailles pattern in the formal living room, which creates a variety of textures.” Other key rooms on the first floor include a gentleman’s study, which features stained wood beams, alder millwork and wainscoting. “This room has a deeper, richer palette of materials, and a look influenced by menswear suiting,” says Engler. “A suede fabric was used to upholster the walls.” The large kitchen is visually anchored by a long island that has raised upstands at either


Far left: Stained cherry wood millwork is a key feature of the gentleman’s study off the entry hall. This room also has its own fireplace. Left: Walls in the formal dining room are a soft buttery yellow shade. The wallcovering incorporates an antique silver motif that adds visual interest. The upholstered dining chairs pick up the gray, taupe and gold tones evident throughout the house. There is also a hint of blue in the fabric.

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Above: Let me entertain you – the lower level of the house is fully equipped for entertaining on a grand scale. In addition to a threesided bar, there is a separate home theater, a catering kitchen and a mini basketball court. The stone columns have been roughly mortared to create a rustic, textural look. Doors on either side of the vestibule at the back of the bar lead to two wine cellars – one stores red wine, while the other stores white wine.

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end. These bring a sense of scale to the cabinetry. “They also add character, and serve to hide the main work area from the family room on one side, and formal living room,” says Engler. The cabinetry has an off-white glazed finish, with moulded bead doors and traditional pulls that enhance the old-world look. Other features include a French Provincial-style hood and a tall black cabinet with antique gold detailing concealing the refrigerator and freezer. Much of the entertaining in the house takes place on the lower level, however, where there is a catering kitchen, large bar area, separate

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home theater and mini basketball court. “We chose to made a feature of the massive stone structural columns on this level,” says Erotas. “To introduce a rough, textural element the mortar was spread thickly over the stone and later treated with a blow torch to give them an aged look. The arched stone vestibule behind the bar has doors on either side leading to two climate-controlled wine cellars – one for red wine and one for white.” The owners can also entertain outdoors. The house has an outdoor kitchen area with built-in grille, and a shaded alfresco dining area.


Far left: The long island in the kitchen has a Geriba granite top. The island is deep enough to have doors and dishwashers on both sides. Left: The master bedroom features a barrel-vault ceiling. The curved form is repeated in the high oval window, the mirror and the arch of the French doors that lead to a terrace. Hand-carved detailing enhances the character of the custom marble fireplace surround. The walls have a waxed Venetian plaster finish.

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Right: An outdoor kitchen and alfresco dining area on the sunny side of the house can also be used for entertaining. Story by Colleen Hawkes Exterior photography by Jamie Cobel Interior photography by Susan Gilmore

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Look twice Stone facings from Natural Stone Veneers International add lasting beauty and character No matter whether you are planning an exterior wall, interior project, fireplace or water feature, thin natural stone veneers provide a highly versatile and appealing building material. Natural Stone Veneers International, Inc (NSVI) manufactures Canyon Creek™, an ideal design solution for both traditional and contemporary residential projects. For the house featured at top left, designed and built by JR Custom Homes, the owner desired a collected look, with a design that reflects California, Florida and Midwest architectural influences. The resulting mix of natural stone defines the outdoor living spaces. For the great room in the contemporary residence at left, designed by JKimber Design, NSVI’s Canyon Creek natural stone is teamed with zebrawood floors, and cherry wood cabinets. A signature stair well and a large fireplace with a tall natural stone chimney are key features. Because NSVI natural stone is sliced thin, it is light, which saves installation and shipping costs. It also negates the need for heavy structural supports. The stone is highly durable, scratch resistant, colorfast and weathers beautifully. NSVI offers more than 60 product lines quarried from around the world. These are categorized into 11 collections. For more ideas, high-resolution photo galleries, and to download the 40-page catalog, visit www.nsvi.com. save | share Search 44761 at my.trendsideas.com This page: Stone facings from NSVI enhance these homes. Photography by Alan Gilbert Photography

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Outside the box With its intersecting planes, right-angled forms and layered living spaces, this new home has a strong sculptural presence that provides a dramatic contrast to the natural leafy setting

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Above: This contemporary urban home on a lakeside lot has a bold, geometric form that maximizes the picturesque outlook while providing privacy from the street. The 6200sq ft house was designed by Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design and constructed by Streeter & Associates. Left: A long wall screens the lower living level from neighboring properties and a park. Planting along the front of the wall helps to soften the look. The upper level accommodates the master suite, an additional bedroom, guest suite and study.

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Curb appeal and privacy don’t always go hand in hand, but this home achieves both, and at the same time maximizes a picturesque view out to a lake. Designed by architect Charles Stinson AIA of Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design and built by Streeter & Associates, the home is beside a park on a lakefront that attracts many visitors in summer. “Privacy was obviously an important consideration,” Stinson says. “To provide this, we designed a three-level home, with elevated living areas and a garage tucked

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underneath. We also wanted to create a dramatic entry that would provide an easy transition to the raised living area.” The architect says this was achieved by placing the entry at the halfway point between the lower two levels, and glazing the double-height void. “At night it is almost like walking up to a lighthouse. We also created a floating roof at the front of the house, which gives it a very sculptural look. The roof is pulled away from the entry, which allows sunlight to pass through.

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“The geometry of the house may look complicated, but in reality is really quite simple. It also fits with the height and scale of the homes in the neighborhood, albeit in a very expressive way.” The intersecting horizontal and vertical planes that define the architecture are a signature of Stinson’s homes. The roof, walls and first-floor balconies appear contiguous, wrapping right around the upper level of the house to create a sense of enclosure, while simultaneously framing the views from inside.


Contrasting materials are also used to good effect, says builder Steven Streeter of Streeter & Associates. “The triple garage doors, chimneys and fascias are all in copper, which will weather naturally over time. We introduced Italian limestone as well, at the front of the house. This has a textural appeal.” The interior reinforces the emphasis on high-end materials. The wood flooring throughout the house is solid walnut, milled in five-inch planks. This is matched by quartersawn walnut interior doors.

And the Loewen windows and doors feature solid fir, which is in keeping with the natural, leafy setting. As with all Stinson’s homes, there is an especially close connection with the outdoors. The living area features floor-toceiling glazing, with large doors opening to a pool terrace and outdoor living area. “The floating roof at the front of the house extends right out past the pool to provide a sheltered seating area, complete with outdoor fireplace,” says Streeter. “This canopy is lined with cedar.”

Above left: Contrasting textures are a feature of the interior. The chimney is copper and the floors are walnut. Floor-to-ceiling windows wrap around the living area, reinforcing the close connection to the outdoors. Top: The stairwell creates a sculptural element in the center of the house. Above: Formal and casual dining areas are all part of the large open-plan living space, which reflects the owners’ relaxed lifestyle.

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Above: European Elm veneer features on the lower cabinets in the kitchen, which was manufactured by Valcucine Italian Cabinetry. The elm was cut to emphasize the veneer’s strong graining. Overhead cabinets are in matt Fire Grey glass, which reinforces the bold, contemporary nature of the interior. Right: Cabinet faces on the inside of the island are in Glossy Ruby Red glass. Facing page, top and lower: The master suite is positioned to maximize the view through the tree canopy to the lake beyond.

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The home features a Valcucine Italian Cabinetry kitchen from Valcucine Minneapolis. Emily Little, showroom manager and senior designer, says the company has collaborated with Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design and Streeter & Associates on eight projects using Valcucine cabinets. “Our highly refined cabinets are very architectural in their detailing and overall look, which really complements Charles Stinson’s design aesthetic. For this kitchen we used a matte Fire Grey glass for the upper cabinets. These can be seen from


the open living and dining rooms. For the island and base cabinets, the owners picked our European Elm veneer.” Little says the veneer incorporates the character of elm’s twisted grain and color variations. However, Valcucine cuts the veneer into narrow 6cm flitches. “This gives the veneer a subtle but noticeable horizontal linearity, which is a perfect complement to the horizontal architectural detailing of the home.” To add a bright accent to the otherwise refined color and material palettes, the

clients selected Glossy Ruby Red glass for the cabinet faces on the inside of the island. “It makes for a fun surprise when you walk into the kitchen, and brightens the work space,” says Little. Another key feature of the interior is the sculptural steel and wood staircase with a glass balustrading. This leads up through the void to the master suite, second bedroom, guest suite and study. Here again, the high-end materials and finishes reflect the close attention to detail.

Streeter says the main challenge in building the house was the tight city lot. “There were a lot of regulations that affected the design and construction, but we have been able to fit in so much, without making any lifestyle compromises.” The owners say they love watching the changing seasons. “The house looks so different when the leaves on the trees change color. And we love how the light plays on the walls, and the way the copper is changing over time. It is as though the house itself is evolving.”

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Architect: Charles R Stinson Architecture + Design, 18304 Minnetonka Blvd, Deephaven, MN 55391, phone (952) 473 9503 Email: info@charlesrstinson.com www.charlesrstinson.com Builder: Streeter & Associates, 18312 Minnetonka Blvd, Deephaven, MN 55391-3232, phone (952) 449 9448 Email: info@streeterhomes.com www.streeterhomes.com Cabinet company: Valcucine + Dom Minneapolis, 275 Market Street 145, Minneapolis, MN 55405 phone (612) 341 4588 Email: info@domminneapolis.com www.dominteriors.com www.valcucine.com

Left: The elevated living areas open out to the pool terrace on the same level. A long fixed canopy provides shelter for an outdoor seating area. This is lined with cedar wood. The pool is angled to comply with required setbacks from the boundary. Above: An outdoor fireplace comes into its own in the evenings and on cooler days.

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Calming influence Modern bathroom design is all about enhancing a sense of retreat through crisp clean lines, with natural materials and organic forms providing warm accents


design directions


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Upon reflection There are several key trends influencing bathroom design today, and they all reflect the desire to create intimate spaces that are tranquil, private sanctuaries Design trends for bathrooms rarely change overnight, but there are clear differences when you look back over the past decade. Jennifer Palumbo, a leading Boston interior designer, says homeowners are still wanting to create a sense of escape, but the look is a lot more streamlined and crisper than in the past. And it’s the materials that are leading the changes.

“In recent times there has been a proliferation of largeformat porcelain tiles,” says Palumbo. “These have had a huge impact on the overall aesthetic of modern bathrooms. The large square, rectangular and plank-shaped porcelain tiles are very cost effective and provide a sleek, clean-lined look. They are often paired with natural stone tiles that help to warm up the space.”

The designer says two key styles have emerged in Boston. On the one hand there are designs for the classic New England houses with their traditional architecture, and on the other, designs for the everincreasing number of high-rise apartments. “Bathrooms in the older homes reflect a more international influence, compared to a decade ago. The owners are

Preceding pages: This bathroom in a Georgian house features contemporary fixtures with a traditional sensibility. The exterior wall is lined with decorative wateretched tiles. All the bathrooms on these pages were designed by Jennifer Palumbo. Facing page and above: These two bathrooms, in a vacation home in the mountains, reflect a sense of escape. The master suite shower is lined with colourful wave tiles.

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often young and well traveled, and interested in transitional styling, rather than replicating original bathrooms of the era. Designs are a lot more streamlined, but also soft and respectful of the architecture. Palumbo says other projects reflect a more contemporary approach, with clean-lined, modern fixtures. “However, we are seeing a move away from looks that are

too clinical,” says Palumbo. “A bathroom needs to be an inviting retreat and this often translates to warm tones and organic forms, materials and textures. There may even be a tile that mimics wood – maybe bleached wood for a summer house. One bathroom we completed, in a vacation home, is lined with wave tiles. Another bathroom in the same house has a pebble-tile floor.”

The designer says good bathroom design is a question of balance. “We recently completed an all-white bathroom with a high ceiling. We created separate functional zones, but keeping it all white helps to avoid a choppy look. We added mosaic tiles to the shower, specified a gray-blue tile for the floor, and added a mahogany vanity to ground the space visually.”

Left: Many homeowners today are opting for a fresh, clean look for their bathrooms. Interior designer Jennifer Palumbo specified white walls for this large bathroom, to help bring together the separate bathing zones. The floor features large-format porcelain tiles – another popular choice for modern bathrooms. Above: The shower in the same bathroom is lined with marble mosaic tiles that are subtle, yet add another visual dimension.

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Above: Powder rooms lend themselves to dramatic looks. This room features a wood veneer wallpaper that creates a 3-D look. The white vanity top and basin provide a visual link to the rest of the house, which is light and airy. Above right: This wood vanity was chosen to balance the all-white walls of the bathroom shown on the preceding pages. Modern lighting sconces are decorative, rather than utilitarian.

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Palumbo says other key trends include the increasing use of trench drains in showers. These are less obtrusive and allow a flush entry, with no step or curb. LED lighting is another popular option today, as homeowners look for energyefficient alternatives. “Bathroom lighting is also not as utilitarian as it once was. The modern bathroom is

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a living space – a place where people go to relax – and the lighting needs to reflect this. Consequently, a lot more thought goes into the choice of fixtures.” There is one bathroom in the house that stands alone, however, and that is the powder room. Palumbo says these are the most fun spaces to design. And because they are occupied for such a short time, they

provide an ideal opportunity to be a little adventurous. “They lend themselves to dramatic treatment, be it bold color accents or interesting fixtures and wall coverings. The powder room shown here features a wood veneer wallpaper with a distinctive 3-D effect.” save | share | video Search 43293 at my.trendsideas.com


Left: This bathroom, in a suburban Boston home, has a classical look. Earth-toned mosaic tiles and a mahogany wood tub deck bring visual warmth to the space, yet the contemporary tub keeps the look crisp and streamlined. Above: Mahogany frames the mirrors of the vanity in the same bathroom. Here again, the faucets and lighting add a touch of modernity. Story by Colleen Hawkes

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It’s all about the look It has been proven time and again – a unified style brings tranquility to a bath environment, and Gessi knows just how to deliver it Above: A long soak in a hot bath is one of the simpler luxuries in life. The Gessi Rettangolo tubs coordinate with all the other Gessi Rettangolo fixtures and fittings to bring a crisp, contemporary look to the bathroom. With its open shelving, it can be personalized to match your decor. Right: Gessi’s freestanding tubs enhance the sense of a private retreat.

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Elevating the aesthetics of a bathroom design depends on the coordination of all the elements, both large and small. When the total look melds seamlessly, the result is an experience of tranquility, quiet pleasure and wellbeing. Because Gessi supports the idea of the home as a place where everyone’s lifestyle can be fully expressed, the firm has curated a collection of

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bath furnishings that fit with the Total Look Concept. This concept, launched by Gessi, ensures that everything you consider for your bathroom – from statement showers, tubs and sinks, to the most subtle soap dispenser or towel bar, shares the same fundamental aesthetic. Yet, by offering such a huge range of products, in a variety of models and


installation methods, Gessi allows for unlimited freedom in designing bathroom retreats. Larry Allen, CEO and managing director, Gessi, North America, says nothing illustrates this philosophy better than the new Rettangolo sinks and tubs. “These complement our streamlined Rettangolo faucets and accessories, which have become a design icon

since they were first created by renowned sculptor Prospero Rasulo a decade ago.� The Rettangolo bathroom sinks include pedestals, as well as vessels and undermount models. They look totally at home with the six new freestanding Rettangolo tubs, including two models with innovative open shelving. And with all the coordinating faucets and matching bath

accessories, any spa bathroom can be remodeled to enjoy the Total Look Concept. For more information on these products, and details of your nearest supplier, contact Gessi USA. Email Larry Allen: lallen@gessiusa.com. Or visit the web: www.gessiusa.com save | share Search 44315 at my.trendsideas.com

Above left: With its wide variety of Rettangolo sinks, which include vessels and pedestals, Gessi provides unlimited freedom of design. Top, center and above: Minimalist Rettangolo shower heads and hand showers (top) meld into a contemporary spa environment where relaxation is a daily experience. Also shown are Rettangolo faucets and a pedestal lav. Companion accessories, such as soap dispensers, complete the look.

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Bare essentials Calm, soothing decor and a neutral, natural color palette are two of the leading trends in bathroom design. Kraus has many products that reflect this trend Above: Pared-back design is a key trend for modern bathrooms. In this suite, a Kraus Ventus faucet in polished chrome makes a bold counterpoint to the soft gray color palette. Right: Polished chrome faucets also suit the trend towards sleek, minimalist designs. This bathroom features a Kraus Arcus faucet.

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For many years, it seemed luxury bathrooms were all about bling – the shinier and flashier, the better. Today, that whole idea is turned on its head, as designers and homeowners take their cue from nature. Soothing design, natural colors and simple detailing spell modern luxury. It’s a trend that leading faucet and sink manufacturer Kraus has embraced in its recent collections. The company says its new products are designed to complement the neutral colors, gray tones and minimalist designs that define luxury bathrooms today. “These bathrooms feature seamless fixtures

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that are practical, yet beautiful,” a spokesperson says. “Pairing earth tones with metallic accents is also growing in popularity. Bold accents can enliven a space without making the bathroom look too busy. We are also seeing bathrooms with plenty of natural light, which highlights a fresh, nature-inspired decor.” To complement these trends Kraus offers simple, polished faucet designs in a range of finishes. Faucets also come in a variety of heights and installation types, so they can coordinate with most sink styles and sizes, while maintaining a universal design sensibility.

Highlights of the Kraus collection include the Ventus, which is a sleek counterpoint to a soft neutral palette; polished chrome finishes that create an edgy, modern contrast, yet coordinate well with textured, natural tones; and faucets in highly polished metallic finishes. These also contrast well with earth tones. For further information on Kraus, phone 1800 775 0703. Website: www.kraususa.com. save | share

Above left: Modern luxury is defined by simple, sculptural forms. Shown here is a Kraus Ramus faucet in polished chrome. It is teamed with a Kraus ceramic vessel sink. Top, center and above: Other Kraus faucets include the Virtus in polished chrome (top), and the Unicus in polished chrome (centre), and oilrubbed bronze (above).

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Perfect fit You don’t need a large bathroom to enjoy a therapeutic bath experience. BainUltra® has baths well suited to condos and small urban homes Above: Bathing is a simple pleasure, yet it can provide enormous therapeutic benefits. This bathroom features the new Citti™ tub from BainUltra. The tub, which is ideal for an alcove situation, has a 15° angle on the backrest, making it particularly comfortable, even though it is not a huge bath. Suggested therapies that can be incorporated include chromatherapy, aromatherapy and thermotherapy. A moulded integrated skirt is available if required.

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Not all homes and bathrooms are suited to large therapeutic spa baths. There simply may not be enough space, or a condo building may not allow mechanical tubs because of the noise and vibration. But this doesn’t mean you have to forgo all the benefits of a therapeutic bath. On the contrary, you can still create a wellness space in a small bathroom or condo, when you choose a Thermasens® bath from BainUltra. With a Thermasens bath, you bathe in calm water, with no motor or jets, and enjoy a range of other therapies – namely chromatherapy,

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aromatherapy and thermotherapy®, created by the Warmtouchshell™ heating zones that keep the heat right where you need it. Chromatherapy provides changing color vibrations that impact on your mood, while the Aromacloud™ essential oils diffuser can be used to re-energize and stimulate your senses. Two of the BainUltra tubs that make this possible are the Citti™ and Ora™. The Citti is a new bath that can be installed in an alcove. It can include a moulded insert to accommodate the Aromacloud diffuser or faucets. Even though this tub is only 60in by 32in, a 15° angle on the


backrest optimizes the space for the bather. Freestanding tubs are another option that can enhance a sense of space in a smaller bathroom – the BainUltra Ora bath, for example, measures 66in by 36in. Other suggestions include the Cella, which has a classic design, and the Evanescence – a more modern tub. To contact BainUltra, phone 1 866 344 4515. Or visit the website: www.bainultra.com save | share Search 44314 at my.trendsideas.com

Top: This bathroom also features a Citti alcove bath from BainUltra. Positioning the tub by the window enhances the sense of relaxation. Above: The Ora™ is a freestanding tub from BainUltra. This tub is also designed for key therapies. As with the other baths, it features Warmtouchshell™ heating zones. Left: This bath features an aromatherapy diffuser, and chromatherapy colored lighting.

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In character Remodeled bathrooms often work best when they respect the era of the house, while introducing every modern convenience


remodeled bathrooms


Glory days 1930s Hollywood glamour is recaptured in the lavish tiling and Moorish motifs of this remodeled master suite in a designer’s own home

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There was a fair amount of serendipity behind the design of this remodeled bathroom in a classic Hollywood house built in 1926. Architect Linda Brettler, co-owner of the house, says she always wanted a vintage Art Deco bathroom that would reflect the glamour of old Hollywood, and consequently specified a soft lavender-blue custom tile for the walls.


“The tiles in the first batch were rejects – they had been double glazed and were very uneven,” Brettler says. “But I opened up the box and loved the variations, which gave the tiles a very handmade look. So the mistake turned out to be a blessing in disguise.” Brettler says the color also was slightly different from what had been specified. But it matched the bluish bark on

a beautiful sycamore tree just outside the window, so that was also serendipitous. The green and yellow shades of the leaves are captured inside as well, in the custom-designed Moorish tile border pattern that encircles the lower walls. Visual continuity is a key part of the design, and can be seen in the use of materials, and in a stepped Deco motif that features throughout the

suite. The motif frames the opening between the dressing room and bathroom, and can also be seen in the shape of the soffits that enclose the vanity area and tub. Even the mouldings have a similar stepped profile. And the tops of the mirrors and facings on the vanities are also stepped. “This Art Deco ziggurat detail and the mosaic tiles are often seen in Spanish and

Preceding pages: More than 20 types of tile feature in this Art Deco ’30s-style master suite in a heritage home in Hollywood. Architect Linda Brettler chose lavender-blue wall tiles, with decorative customdesigned border patterns. These pages: A black-and-cream striated marble frames all the fixtures, mirrors and windows. The main window, formerly in a closet, was enlarged to maximize the view. The floor features natural stone tiles.

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These pages: Lavender tiles are teamed with cream-colored grouting throughout the bathroom, but the ceiling in the steam shower reverses this. Small mosaics provide a slipresistant floor for the shower. Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Tim Maloney

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Moorish architecture, which has long been a strong design influence in Hollywood.� Visual continuity is also provided by a black-and-cream striated Venetian marble. This frames the mirrors, windows, vanities and shower entry, and also forms the vanity top and a pedestal beside the tub. In keeping with her desire to recycle materials where possible, the designer created

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a decorative window from a wrought iron balustrade that once graced a balcony in Paris. And a recessed light fixture above the bathtub features a recycled brass radiator cover. The vanity cabinets, which are made from straight-grain wenge wood and burled birch, are also in character – the drawers features vintage Italian Moderne pulls with Deco-style Bakelite discs.


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Serene air This reinvented master bathroom offers a refined, peaceful aesthetic – compartmentalized areas optimize functionality and a sense of space Above: A custom vanity provides a leading transitional element in this reworked master bathroom created in a house built in the early 1900s. Modern handles and a clean-lined mirror balance the paneled doors and drawers and classic faucets. Right: A traditional freestanding bathtub with pedestal skirt and wrought iron towel rack were fitting inclusions. The original window shutters were retained.

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Remodeling a master bath in an older home is likely to be something of a balancing act between connecting the design with the overall decor and introducing a fresher, more modern accent. This was the fine line that architect and designer Taunya Nelson had to follow to create this airy master bathroom. First of all, some structural changes were made by builder

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Ed Roskowinski, of Vujovich Design Build, to enlarge the available space. “We carved out part of an adjacent porch to make room for a tub in the new bathroom,” says Nelson. “To optimize function we defined areas of use – the tub and vanity are separated from the shower, and the toilet and linen storage are in a niche at the far end of the space.”


Above: Dark floor tiles contrast the lighter marble on the shower stall, grounding the space visually. The designer chose pale green paint for the walls to draw all the tones in the room together. Right: An exterior porch on the corner of the house was appropriated to create the large master suite. The tub sits in the reclaimed area now. The plan shows the generous scale of the shower within the bathroom.

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The other end of the porch was remodeled into a bright, sunny bedroom, complete with an adjoining walk-in closet. “We wanted to tie the bathroom to the era of the home, which was built in 1909, but with a more modern sensibility,� says Nelson. “To achieve this, we repeated traditional millwork profiles from other areas, and included a green accent tile above the


vanity and in the shower area – a little like a modern crown moulding. “Green glass shelves set in a niche in the shower connect with this band of tiles. The niche also optimizes the space.” The homeowners wanted the bathroom to have a spalike feel, so the shower walls are wrapped in Devonshire Carrara marble with Hampton Carrara hexagonal tiles on the

floor. For a modern feel, the walls are in a long subway tile. The shower fixtures are brushed nickel and offer a variety of showering options, creating the luxury bathing experience requested by the homeowners. The custom-built vanity resembles a furniture piece, and is painted to match the soft white trim throughout. While the door profiles and

faucets are fairly traditional, the handles are modern, as is the clean-lined mirror above. “Overall balance was key. Darker travertine on the floors and a lighter stone on the walls make a soft contrast. Walls in Monterey White paint tie everything together.”

Above: A high band of green tiles provides a contemporary contrast to the traditional crown mouldings. The compartmentalized layout ensures the toilet area has a measure of privacy. Linen storage beside the toilet is accessed by sliding doors, another way of optimizing the available space.

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Story by Charles Moxham Photography by Troy Thies

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Extended welcome This run of traditional bathing spaces ends in a view of mature trees, giving an overwhelming sense of peace and refinement

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Together with stone surfaces and high-end fittings, one of the greatest luxuries to bestow on a bathroom is an abundance of natural light. And there are many ways to achieve this, from clever room layouts to knocking through walls. Architect Scott Javore completely reshaped this master suite as part of a comprehensive remodel of a 1930s home. The bathroom had been reworked in the ‘60s and Javore created a run of light-filled bathing spaces from that somewhat dark and cluttered design. “Two awkward rooms had resulted from the earlier makeover, with a similar footprint to the

new volumes but a different configuration. There was a closet and vanity area and separate toilet, sink and shower. We stripped these areas right back and gained space for the new design by introducing his-and-hers dressing rooms at the opposite end of the bedroom,” says Javore. Now, when viewed from the entrance, there is a series of three new bathing spaces – a bathing room followed by a vanity-and-dressing table zone, culminating in a separate volume for the toilet and shower. A large window in this final space allows light to flood back through the passage to the bedroom.

These pages: This master bathroom remodel by architect Scott Javore continues the aesthetic of the 1930s home. Classic mouldings in most existing rooms, including the bedroom, also feature on the ceiling and arches in the new spaces. The bathroom suite comprises three rooms. The first contains the bath tub. Here traditional-style faucets and detailed panels on the tub surround tie in with the wider look.

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Above: The second room contains the dressing table and double vanity. The walls were painted a light gray, a color that picks up on the veining in the Carrara marble surfaces. The polished stone reflects natural light through the rooms. Right: A floor plan shows the linear orientation of the three spaces. Story by Charles Moxham Photography by Eric Hausman

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“We gained even more natural light and another leafy outlook by unblocking an old bricked-up window in the wall next to the tub. “The shape of the restored window frame is picked up in the soft arch over the tub, which helps give the area a sense of height. The arch is repeated in two mosaic-lined wall niches at either end of the alcove,” says Javore. In keeping with the traditional style of the home, the architect chose a classic polished Carrara marble with a gray veining for the tub surround, all countertops and the shower stall. The same stone features in large-format floor

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tiles, the diagonal layout creating another oldworld accent. Overlay style cabinet doors and the drawers on the vanity, dressing table and storage cupboard are also appropriate to the aesthetic – as are the ornate mirror frames and wall sconces. The shower stall at the end of the space also has a soft arch, tying the bathroom and this zone together. Another bricked-up window in this area remains blocked to ensure privacy. The architect added a panel of marble tiles set on the diagonal over the old brickwork. This contrasts with the straight-set tilework that lines most of

the stall. The panel is framed in small mosaics, forming a link with the interiors of the wall niches in the tub alcove. “While most of these rooms are open to each other, the shower and toilet area does have a door, with a full-length mirror. When this door is closed, the leafy outlook is transformed into a reflection of the passageway that runs through the spaces,” says Javore. resource list | images | plan

Above: A bricked-up window in the new shower stall remains blocked, for privacy. The architect introduced a rectangle of diagonally-set tiles over this area. The mosaic border around the panel is echoed in the wall niches in the bathing area and similar minute tiles form the stall floor. Foor tiles in the bathroom are laid on the diagonal – another classic touch to the refined master suite.

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By special request This remodel has transformed the master suite in a 1990s house, while simultaneously making it wheelchair friendly Upgrading a master suite is an ideal time to consider future proofing – will the design and functionality still suit your needs in the years to come? The owners of this house took this into account when they planned a remodel, says architect Mark Evans of CG&S Design-Build. “Because one of the owners has a disability, they wanted to ensure the bathroom would

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be accessible for a wheelchair,” Evans says. “The existing bathroom was not well suited to their needs. There was a step into the shower, which only had a single wall-mounted showerhead. The bathroom also had a gigantic Jacuzzi and a make-up vanity, both of which were never used.” Evans says the dated decor, which included purple wallpaper, inexpensive cabinetry,

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bright brass hardware and carpet on the floor, was another reason to change. “Fortunately, the bathroom is large, with a 10ft-high ceiling, so space wasn’t an issue.” New his-and-hers vanities are in a similar position to the former cabinets, but that is where any similarity ends. The new cabinets, in knotty alder, include two tower units, which provide plenty of storage.

“To enclose the vanities and to make this area more intimate, we created a furr down. The towers meet this lowered ceiling, which gives a much neater finish than would have been possible with a 10ft ceiling.” One of the vanities is open beneath the sink to provide easy wheelchair access. And drawers alongside put items within easy reach.


A new bathtub features a polished granite tub deck that extends through to the new shower, forming a bench seat. “We added curves to soften the look,” says Evans. Major structural changes were undertaken to create wheelchair access for the shower. Floor trusses were cut and the floor re-engineered to allow seamless entry. The shower also features

a hand-held showerhead as well as a wall-mounted fixture, and there are matching bronze handrails. Evans says the color palette for the bathroom was largely determined by the porcelain floor tiles, which feature in another bathroom in the house. “The owners liked this tile, so we used the same tiles for this bathroom floor and the shower walls, and we chose

smaller versions for the floor of the shower. We then teamed these tiles with a beautiful natural quartzite stone tile, which runs along the front of the tub and into the shower.” Evans says the lighting was another area of concern in the original bathroom. This has been greatly improved with recessed can lighting, a central light and decorative sconces either side of the two mirrors.

These pages: Knotty alder wood vanity cabinets with polished granite tops are positioned either side of the door in this remodeled suite. One of the vanities is open beneath to accommodate a wheelchair. The remodeling project also included widening the door to the toilet room. Following pages: Large corner windows bring in plenty of natural light. The new tub is positioned so the owners can enjoy the leafy green outlook while bathing.

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These pages: The threshold of the shower was lowered to provide a flush entry. The shower was also equipped to cater to the needs of an owner with a disability. The bench seat is an extension of the tub deck. Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Tommy Kile

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index Alape Alkco

8-17

Dreamscape Lighting

8-17

8-17

Dugally Oberfeld Inc

52-59

All-Star Roofing

62-70

Dynacoil

Anderson-Ladd

62-70

Dynamic Architectural Windows

Antares Iron Workshop Arte Design Imports Artistic Tile Asko Assured Corporation BainUltra

8-17 96-101 20-29 62-70 8-17 94-95

8-17

Studio Pali Fekete architects (SPFa)

Pimentel, Jose

20-29

52-59

106-109

PPG Industries

8-17

Pratt & Lambert

62-70

Eagle View Glass Works 102-105 Enspect Engineering

8-17

Erotas Building Corporation 62-70

96-101

Fleetwood Windows & Doors 8-17, 52-59

Bristolite

52-59

Bulthaup

8-17

Fong Construction

20-29

California Closets

OBC

Franke

52-59

Carrier

42-51

Galerie Van Der Straeten

42-51

Carson Concrete

30-37

Gessi

90-91

Halo Harold O Schulz Co

8-17

20-29

Henry Built Kitchen

20-29

Hinkley Lighting

62-70

Hope’s Windows

8-17

Hormuth, Jo

8-17

Hubbardton Forge

Coastal Tile

42-51

Hudson Valley Lighting

Cochran, Andrea

52-59

IBC Engineering Services

Daltile Delta Faucet Delta Lighting Delta Light Domus Vita Group Dorma Dornbracht

102-105

110-115

110-115 110-115 110-115 52-59 8-17 62-70 8-17 8-17, 52-59

Studio Joan Chan Architecture

8-17

Brian Hughes Design

Custom Tile of Austin

102-105

92-93

42-51

42-51, 62-70

Panasonic

Kraus

Finton Construction

Conrad

42-51

Kraemer, Paul AIA

96-101

102-105

KNA Engineering

119 72-79

30-37

Brettler, Linda AIA

Circa Lighting

Streeter & Associates

Dynia, Stephen AIA

96-101

+ Design IFC-1, 38-39, 72-79

Strasser Woodworks

82-89

20-29

F Schumacher & Co

Charles R Stinson Architecture

52-59

Palumbo, Jennifer

62-70

8-17

Charles Gemeiner Cabinets 42-51

Pali, Zoltan E FAIA

30-37

52-59

Boilini Company

Chan, Joan AIA

110-115

KL & A

Perrin & Rowe

110-115

CG&S Design-Build

Ken Switzer

62-70

Parklex

Evans, Mark

96-101

Stonewerk

Kohler 96-101, 102-105, 106-109

30-37

Benjamin Moore 96-101, 102-105

Castle Antiques

New Concept Renovators 106-109

30-37

& Doors

102-105

8-17

110-115

Dynamic Custom Homes

Eull Woodworks Inc

Baldwin Hardware

Kelly-Moore Paints

110-115 106-109

Kravet La Finestra

42-51

Landry Design Group

42-51

Landry, Richard AIA

42-51

Larson Associates

8-17

Larson, George

8-17

LC Pools

42-51

Lightyears

8-17

Linda Brettler Architects Lindal Cedar Homes

Liz’s Antique Hardware

96-101

Loewen

62-70

Louis Poulsen

8-17 8-17, 52-59

MechoShade Miele

52-59 52-59, 62-70

Mike Jarvi

8-17

Minnesota Standard Showplace

8-17 Minnesota Tile & Stone

Javore, Scott

106-109

Mirabelle

82-89

MSK Lighting

42-51

MTI Baths

Joan Behnke & Associates 42-51

Munchkin Boilers

John Makepeace

Native Tile & Ceramics

8-17

Rabideau, Mitch

20-29

Rajack Hardware

8-17

Ramsey Engler Ltd

62-70

Ramsey Engler, Laura

62-70

Randy Burkett Lighting Design 8-17

96-101, 102-105, 106-109 Rheinzink

52-59, 62-70

Sugatsune

8-17

Rohl

106-109

Rohl

62-70

Sun Valley Skylights

42-51

106-109

96-101

Swiss Woodworking

52-59

The Nanz Company

8-17

The Tile Shop

102-105

THG Paris Tithof Tile & Marble

96-101 106-109

Tonka Building Supply

62-70

Topo LLC Toto

62-70 102-105

Trends Publishing International 6-7, 18-19, 40-41, 60-61, 80-81, 116-117

Romar Cabinet & Top Company

Salt River Roofing

8-17

Sunshine Glass

106-109

Marvin Windows & Doors 106-109

106-109

Jim’s Heating & Air

R Scott Javore & Associates

120-IBC

Lucifer Lighting

110-115

Restoration Hardware

Idlewood

Jennifer Palumbo Inc

96-101

Push Pull Open Close

Sub-Zero

Valcucine + Dom Minneapolis 72-79

30-37

Schonbeck

106-109

Sharratt Design & Co Sharratt, Mike

Velux America

3, 8-17

62-70

Vinci Hamp Architects

8-17

62-70

Vinci, John

8-17

VM Zink

30-37

102-105

Sherwin-Williams

20-29, 62-70

62-70

Silverman Roofing

42-51

Vujovich Design Build

Siskin Valls

20-29

Water Furnace

Siskin, Paul

20-29

Waterworks

Sonoma Tilemakers

62-70

White Space Architecture 102-105

110-115 20-29 110-115 8-17

Sponholtz, Karl

106-109

96-101

SR Mechanical

62-70

Stephen Dynia Architects

30-37

Steven Cabinets

62-70

Natural Stone Veneers

JR Custom Cabinets

106-109

Kallista

102-105

International Inc

5, 71

Kate-Lo Tile & Stone

102-105

Nelson, Taunya AIA

102-105

Stone City

106-109

102-105 8-17 96-101

Wirtz, Peter

8-17

WLS Bath & Kitchen Outlet 106-109 Wolf Zaneen

62-70 8-17


Turkel Design for Lindal Cedar Homes


Striking a balance between change and tradition, the distinctly modern designs of Turkel Design are produced and delivered worldwide by Lindal Cedar Homes. To find a local independent representative or learn more go to:

Lindal.com


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HOME & ARCHITECTURAL TRENDS USA Vol 30/08  
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