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Inside cover

This new house designed by Scott West is a 3-D composition of intersecting vertical and horizontal planes. Turn to pages 16-23. Photography by Galina Coada. A leader in modern Italian kitchen design, Pedini is also a pioneer in eco-friendly kitchen production and green kitchen products.

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TOP 50 AMERICAN

HOMES

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CONTEMPORARY NEW HOMES Sound of water This lakeside home is shaped by its tricky site, the views and a quest for airy living spaces

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Outside the box Contrasting materials, layered planes and sculptural cutouts on the exterior of this new house inform the interior living spaces

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TRADITIONAL UPDATES In the frame Reshuffled and optimized for modern life, this grand home displays a touch of strong, simple industrial chic

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Case study: redecorate Not every home transformation involves structural changes. New paint and furnishings and a good eye for color and design can elevate an interior out of the ordinary

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Kitchens Rethinking a kitchen to match the style of the house can result in an improvement in light and spaciousness, as well as day-to-day functionality

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IN THE CITY Storybook ending Everything in this 19th-century Federal-style townhouse was replaced to create a magical retreat for a writer and his family

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Forever springtime To escape the harsh local winters, the owner of this apartment requested an interior that would remind her of sunnier climes

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New identity Every picture tells a story in this remodeled Washington, DC townhouse. The owners, one a photographer, moved from Guatemala

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USE OF MATERIALS With a twist Designed to have an intimate connection to the rural landscape, this house incorporates raw materials that have been left to warp and weather

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Commanding perspective A man’s home is his castle. It’s a saying that resonates with this new house, which explores myriad ways to balance solid concrete forms with lighter, more ephemeral elements

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INDEX

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Editor Kathleen Kinney – kathleen.kinney@trendsideas.com President Judy Johnson – judy.johnson@trendsideas.com

FROM THE PUBLISHER Building a new home, or renovating an existing one, will always be an exciting and challenging undertaking. The personal style of the designer, the constraints or opportunities presented by the environment, and the practical ways in which the owners will use the house are all factors that will come into play. @DavidJideas facebook.com/

In this issue of Home & Architectural Trends we feature houses and outdoor living spaces

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created and re-created by notable architects and designers, in a wide range of styles. Each project has its own personality, formed in response to all these elements, and an increasing awareness of the importance of sustainable design. But what’s most interesting about many of these projects are the elements that have been retained, not what’s been removed. It is these imperfect parts of a renovation that give it character. And that doesn’t only apply to homes with historic charm. The original elements of 20th-century homes also have this quality. What we would have once stripped away, we may now consider incorporating, and even highlighting. Lastly, our Trends publications are also available as eBooks. This exponentially increases the potential audience for our featured designers and advertisers. Our readers benefit from the enhanced multimedia experience that eBooks provide, and of course, the environmental footprint of our publications is minimised. Visit our website, my.Trendsideas.com. Happy reading

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Floor-to-ceiling glass doors in this great room can be pulled back to allow unobstructed views from the entry right out to the lake.

Shaggy sheepskin covers on these ottomans offer a playful element of textural contrast. The other furniture pieces are more clean-lined and understated.

Fu-Tung Cheng is known for his use of concrete, indoors and out. These walls were poured in shallow sections, with subtle streaks of warm color added.

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contemporary new homes

Private lives These bold, modern residences open up to the outdoors one way, but are screened from public view in the other direction


Sound of water This lakeside home is shaped by its tricky site, the views and a quest for airy living spaces

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A verse form with strict style constraints will often bring out the best in a poet. And for an architect, tight environmental restrictions can also inspire a particularly imaginative response. Such was the case with this new home, by principal John DeForest and project architect Ted Cameron of DeForest Architects. The owners had looked at several properties in the area before settling on a long, relatively narrow option that offered spectacular outlooks to the lake and mountains, says DeForest. “The site fronted onto the lake on one side and was bordered by a public lane on the other.�


“The owners naturally wanted their home to offer privacy on the laneway side, and open up to the views on the other. They also requested that the residence be modern, but warm and welcoming, and have strong indoor-outdoor connections.” With the existing house on the site razed, DeForest designed a generous, two-story residence to fit neatly into the available space. The issue of privacy from the lane was addressed in several ways, says Cameron. “First there are levels of separation between the street and the large pivoting front door.”

Preceding pages: This dramatic great room forms part of a lakeside residence. It features full-height stacking doors that retract to make the indoors and outdoors one. Above: As the house is edged by a busy laneway, architect John DeForest created a wood wall and entry courtyard to act as a buffer. Left: In addition to the main living spaces, a home office and exercise room share the water view

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Preceding pages: Green channel glass above the large pivot entry door provides privacy, yet filters natural light into the home. The soffit under the entry canopy is fir. Far right: The orientation of the house was tweaked to optimize views of a mature tree on the terrace in front of the outdoor living area. Suspending the ceiling from the steel structure has resulted in an openplan space with few support posts.

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“Planting softens a staggered ipê wall, and there’s a large entry court behind that.” While the wall and courtyard buffer the lane traffic, the exterior treatment of the house on this side adds to its tucked-away feel. “Despite being two-story, the house strikes a low profile when viewed from the street,” says DeForest. “We emphasized horizontal lines in the design – seen in the fence, the wood siding and in the shape of the house itself.“ “The siding has a thin profile, which is a more contemporary interpretation of the traditional clapboards seen on neighboring houses.

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The multitude of slender lines also help further the horizontal emphasis. “To optimize natural light and privacy we introduced a band of channel glass along the upper level of this side of the home. The translucent green glass adds texture, and casts a lovely light on the interior. This glass also features translucent insulation.” The entry path runs alongside the courtyard to a solid swing door that opens to a doubleheight entry space. Straight ahead is a dramatic great room that incorporates the kitchen, dining and living spaces in one volume. Beyond this


there are waterfront entertaining spaces, which include a contemporary excercise room and office. Stairs to the left lead up to the master suite and bedrooms, all pushed to the scenic side of the house, which opens out to a series of decks. The impact of the great room is even greater for its absence of structural support columns. “To keep the room uncluttered, the wood ceiling is suspended from the concealed steel framework above,� Cameron says. Floor-to-ceiling doors in the great room open to the entry patio and the lakefront terrace.

Above: Designer Nancy Burfiend chose clean-lined, low profile furniture, to avoid detracting from the outlook. A neutral palette with an emphasis on textural fabrics enhances the connection to the natural environment. The fireplace was designed by the architect and combines two of the main construction materials – steel and wood. Large area rugs help to demarcate areas and bring warmth to the stone floors.

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Right: The kitchen, at one end of the great room, is in white oak, with the raised section on the outer island in walnut. While it appears understated, the kitchen has a wealth of functionality, with a second island that is used for prepping. A large pantry, the appliances and a third counter are to one side of the space.

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DeForest says addressing issues of heating and cooling was vital, given the extreme climate of the region. “Pulled back, the large doors offer efficient cross ventilation in summer. In winter, in-floor heating and the centrally set, custom steel and wood fireplace keep the interiors warm and snug.� While the house nestles demurely beside the lake, the choices of materials tie it even more closely into the natural setting. The principal construction materials are wood, steel, glass and stone, but board-formed


Architect: DeForest Architects (Seattle, WA); project architect Ted Cameron; principal, John DeForest AIA, CORA Interior designer: Nancy Burfiend IIDA, ASID, NB Design Group Landscape designer: Randy Allworth, Allworth Design Structural engineer: Harriott Valentine Engineers Builder: Prestige Residential Construction Siding: Custom profile drop cedar siding; Channel glass by Pilkington Profilit through Technical Glass Products, installed by Eastside Glass Roofing: Standing seam Kynar-painted steel by Nucor, in Dark Bronze Doors and windows: Weiland-clad fir sliding doors and windows; Sierra Pacific-clad fir windows and swing doors; solid-core flush rift-cut white oak interior doors, Emtek Hercules levers Skylights: Velux Flooring: Walnut; Marley limestone by Exquisite Surfaces, laid by Michael Homchick Stoneworks, Dalle De France finish for interiors, Rustic for exteriors Paints: White Dove by Benjamin Moore Lighting: Juno recessed downlights, with Lutron RA2 controls Heating: Triangle Tube, radiant in-floor Furniture: Baker, Cameron Furniture, Plantation, Phoenix Day Lighting, Peter Alexander, Artemide Lighting, A Rudin, Altura, Meyer Wells, Bradley-Hughes, Room & Board, custom upholstery by Village Interiors Floor coverings: Rugs by Driscoll Robbins, Tamarian and Erik Lindström Blinds: Lutron, motorized Custom steelwork: Stair and railing with blackened finish and painted entry gate designed by DeForest Architects Kitchen cabinetry: Rift-cut white oak with bookmatched veneer; plain sawn walnut at raised bar

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concrete is seen outside the entry and behind the steel and wood stair. The raw, industrial look of the concrete contrasts the smooth polish of the wood finishes. “The generous use of wood seen on the front wall and siding is continued on the interior,” says Cameron. “A variety of species is used for textural interest – the ceiling is fir, for example, and the kitchen cabinetry and fireplace are in rich-grained walnut. Other natural materials include the limestone floors which feature throughout, with the exception of the entry passage, which has a walnut floor.”

The great room’s expansive volume offers subtle demarcations for different areas. The large fireplace buffers the living spaces from the dining area, and a tall island screens kitchen clutter from the adjacent dining table. The L-shaped kitchen has a second island to the rear for food prep. A large pantry and most appliances are to one side, out of sight. Interior designer Nancy Burfiend says lowprofile furniture with clean lines was selected to avoid detracting from the views. “Warm wood tones, a neutral palette, and textural fabrics foster the connection to nature.”

Above: An expansive deck that opens off the master suite is built on the roof of the excercise room below. Walnut and steel on the custom fireplace reference materials seen elsewhere. The bathroom beyond has a spa-like ambiance. Clerestory windows throughout the house provide efficient cooling by venting hot air in the summer months. Story by Charles Moxham Photography by Benjamin Benschneider

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Outside the box Contrasting materials, layered planes and sculptural cutouts on the exterior of this new house inform the interior living spaces Taking the less conventional approach to design is a sure way to give a house a strong identity and sense of place. Invariably, form is dictated by function, and building materials take on a whole new significance. For this project, architect Scott West created a bold, multi-layered facade where walls slice through windows and cutouts provide changing

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perspectives that blur the line between inside and out. The sculptural, geometric form of the architecture extends to the landscaping, where the entry path turns at right angles and is flanked by terraced gardens. “The house is on an exposed corner lot,” says West. “Consequently, the owner wanted the suggestion of a barrier between the street and the house without the

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unfriendly look of a fence. We turned the front door sideways so it is not an open invitation for just anyone to wander up the path.” Strong, bold materials and an absence of large windows on the corner elevation also create a visual defense. West teamed natural slate, ipê hardwood and stucco with a new proprietary bamboo tongueand-groove siding. Each

material defines a separate piece of the 3-D composition. “Rather than presenting rooms as a collection of little boxes, I designed the house as a sculptural assembly of spaces,” says West. “The gaps in between the solid planes create a negative detailing, which is where the windows are positioned.” At the front, a chimney-like element wrapped in ipê wood


encloses mechanical services, while a matching horizontal plane forms an awning above the entry. “The ipĂŞ and bamboo help to bring a little organic softness to the modern design and the hard-edged stone and stucco forms,â€? the architect says. Most of the materials appear to slice through the house to form interior walls. Slate flooring also runs from

the inside to the outside, creating a seamless transition between indoor and outdoor living areas. A semi-freestanding wall of wood defines the main circulation axis through the house. As with the exterior, this features cutouts that allow glimpses of the kitchen and dining areas on the other side. West says the wall is clad in prefinished wood flooring with mitered

corners, which was a highly cost-effective solution. Interior designer Catherine Cocke enhanced the gray tone-on-tone color palette in the house. In the large, galleystyle kitchen, gray cabinets are teamed with custom marble countertops and a Porcelanosa white tile backsplash. However, it is the extra-long island that forms the centerpiece of the room.

Facing page: This new house designed by Scott West is a 3-D composition of intersecting vertical and horizontal planes. The recessed areas of the puzzle, often called negative detailing, are where the windows are positioned. Above: The landscaping follows similar orthogonal lines, and incorporates a runnel water feature. The original plans continue the axis of the water feature on the other side of the house.

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Preceding pages, above and facing page: A long dividing wall clad in prefinished wood flooring defines the main circulation axis. The kitchen floor is on two levels, so a dining area could be accommodated at one end of the long island. The textural wall in the living room is faux horse hair. Right: A stone wall separates the master bedroom and bathroom, but a double-sided fire within the wall, allows views in both directions.

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“The lot has a slight slope, which is absorbed within the design,” says West. “The floor level steps down in the hallway and kitchen. We designed a continuous island countertop, but because the floor level is higher at one end than the other, the top is an ideal height for a dining table. At the other end the floor is 6in lower, which is the right height for working at the island.”


Set on the lower level, the living room has a high ceiling and a light, airy feel. This is helped by the seamless flow to a patio, which effectively doubles the size of the room. Here, the ipê wood appears to slide through the glass to form a large wall and a suspended ceiling element. In the master suite, it is the slate as well as the ipê, that flows from inside to out.

Architect: Scott West AIA, West Architecture Studio (Atlanta, GA) Interior designer: Scott West and Catherine Cocke, Catherine Cocke Interiors Structural engineer: PEC Structural Engineering Builder: Cablik Enterprises Siding: Stucco, bamboo, ipê wood Doors and windows: Dark Bronze storefront by Clearvue Glass Flooring: Custom stained oak Cabinet company: CKS Cabinetry Kitchen pendants: ET2

Countertops: Custom marble by Marmi Natural Stone Backsplash: Porcelanosa Faucets: Hudson Reed Kitchen appliances: Fisher & Paykel Porch fan: Big Ass Fans Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Galina Coada

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Facing page: Designed as an extension to the living room, the patio features the same materials – slate flooring, an ipê wood ceiling, and natural slate wall. Above: The master bedroom on the upper level opens out to a private balcony. Similarly, the adjoining bathroom has its own private terrace, with a garden and Japanese maple tree.

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traditional updates


With an accent These homes combine classic charms with an altogether more contemporary edge


In the frame Reshuffled and optimized for modern life, this grand home displays a touch of strong, simple industrial chic

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When it comes to traditional house remodels there can often be a design disconnect. Owners may fall for a grand historic exterior, but are less fond of the claustrophobic rooms and poorly oriented living spaces that are hallmarks of architectural times gone by. This was the scenario for the owners of a 1920s residence remodeled by architect William Massey. The owners loved the grand lines of the house, and the brick and limestone facade, but not so much the dark, cramped interiors. “In terms of exterior work, the facades were repointed and the house expanded with a new


After

Before

open porch and pergola at the rear and a new deck off the upstairs master suite,” says Massey. “However, on the inside, the remodeling was comprehensive with all three levels reworked. New spaces were added to the underused basement, including a gymnasium, games room and media room. However this project is more about the first and second floors, which were extensively updated. “Remodeling issues with older interiors are often about light and space. The formal rooms traditionally looked to the front of a home but suffered from poor connections to the rear.”

Before

Preceding pages: In this project, the exteriors were refreshed and the house opened to the back yard. Above left and left: The entry and living areas have glass and steel frames as a modern insertion. Heavy wood work was replaced. Legend: 1 entry, 2 hall, 3 living, 4 sitting, 5 dining, 6 study, 7 kitchen, 8 pantry, 9 bathroom, 10 sunroom, 11 mudroom, 12 breakfast room, 13 laundry, 14 bedroom, 15 porch.

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Preceding pages: Taking a cue from an existing arched opening, Massey broadened several connections between the living spaces, to set up oblique sightlines across the home. Above and right: The living room has been transformed into a light, welcoming space. The brick fireplace now features a marble fire surround, echoing the use of this material at the entry. Dark cabinetry has been replaced with light-toned cabinets and open shelving.

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Before

“Interiors were often cluttered and clogged by an excess of small ancillary spaces,” says Massey. “Moving around was time consuming and natural light often could not penetrate and flow through the generous public spaces.” To address these issues on the first floor, the architect stripped out a central bathroom and several closets. In their place, a stair and rear hall improve pedestrian connections and light flow. The living room, sitting room and dining area remain in the same place, but the connections between these spaces have been improved, creating vistas through the home


and further enhancing light penetration. The kitchen was moved to the other side of the house, replacing the master bedroom which is now in the former second-floor attic. A breakfast room and sunny laundry were added at the rear corners, replacing a sunroom and mud room. The hallway between these rooms leads to the new covered porch, creating a seamless connection to the rear yard. Upstairs, another bedroom and the master suite were added. The new master bedroom opens to a deck that had been a roof. This was achieved by removing a gable window,

expanding the opening and introducing French doors in its place. Rooms at this level were set back beneath the roofline, where possible, to optimize room heights – one owner is quite tall. “In terms of the interior look, we began by stripping all the original wall plaster, which had sagged over time, and swapped out the existing dark oak window surrounds,” says Massey. “The mouldings and baseboards were replaced with standard traditional forms that suited the house but were not as oppressive visually. Large dark beams in the dining room were also taken out, greatly lightening the space.”

Top: The corner sitting room had been under used in the original design. The architect opened the space up to the adjacent living room and added a bookcase for warmth. Above: Walnut kitchen cabinets are separated from the oak floors by stainless steel toekicks. The quartzite countertops and backsplash were chosen as they offer visual interest without overwhelming the space.

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Above: The new upstairs double bedroom has its own deck – a space reclaimed from a central roof. Two other roofs, slightly lower to left and right, feature black stone, like a Japanese garden, solely for the eyes of those standing out on the deck. Right: Low room heights under the eaves were a consideration in terms of room layouts upstairs. In this child’s bedroom the lowest point is given over to a seating nook.

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“The entry hall’s porcelain floors and marble walls create a sense of arrival that’s in keeping with the exterior,” says Massey. “And it is right from the front entry that you are greeted by a key accent in this design – two contemporary, industrial-look steel and glass freestanding walls. The screen at the entry is repeated at the edge of the adjacent dining area, as a divider from the hallway.” The elements are transparent, so they don’t affect issues of visual space or light penetration Massey says one owner owns a factory and wanted a little of its strong, simple aesthetic to


Architect: William Massey AIA, Massey Associates Architects (Chicago) Interior design: David MacKenzie Kitchen designer: William Massey Cabinet company: All Seasons Woodwork Builder: WZ Home Improvement Structural engineer: Sound Structures Doors and windows: Marvin Flooring: Rift-cut white oak Paints: Benjamin Moore Lighting: Halo, recessed Heating: Carrier Steel window walls: Series 500 by A&S Window Associates Kitchen cabinetry: Walnut and quartered brown elm Countertops: Luca di Luna Quartzite statuary marble and engineered stone Kitchen sink: Elkay Faucets: Tara by Dornbracht Oven, cooktop, ventilation, microwave: Wolf Refrigeration: Thermador Dishwwasher: Miele Waste disposal: KitchenAid

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inform and bring a sense of crisp modernity to the serene traditional spaces. The house has another less obvious modern inclusion. It has achieved the enviable merit of a Silver LEED project. The fact that the ratio of bedroom numbers to overall floor space was relatively low – tipped by the upgrade of the basement – had made this harder to achieve. “There was no room for solar panels, but everything else has been addressed,” says Massey. “Aspects included reusing existing building materials, minimizing construction waste, and specifying water-sense plumbing.

Natural ventilation was optimized and there is a new high-tech heat recovery air conditioning system. All paints and finishes are low VOC. Outdoors, efficient site irrigation and the choice of local plantings also contributed to the home’s eco-friendly rating.” The reinvented home is warm and filled with light – the rear hall, repositioned kitchen and corner breakfast room open the house to the rear yard, as does the new covered porch. The spaces are simpler and more user friendly, and the new master suite includes a private deck looking out to landscaped views.

Above: To the rear, a covered porch was replaced with an open porch and pergola, reached from most rooms by a new rear hallway. This established a strong indoor-outdoor flow. The new master bedroom and deck can be seen on the level above. Story by Charles Moxham Photography by Eric Hausman

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case study – redecorate


Change of heart Not every home transformation involves structural changes. New paint and furnishings and a good eye for color and design can elevate an interior out of the ordinary


Urban edge A country interior gives way to a more sophisticated modern look in this home – one that better reflects the personalities of the new owners

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No matter whether you have recently moved into a new house, or are simply in need of change, the transforming power of a cleverly redecorated interior cannot be underestimated. For the new owners of this house, Marie Tillman and Joe Shenton, it was the layout and flow that appealed, along with the space outdoors, which was ideal for a family with four children, and another on the way. The country-themed interior, on the other hand, was not so compelling. With


its gold walls, exposed brown beams and red-lacquered shelving units, the living area summed up everything they didn’t want, says Julia Buckingham Edelmann, the interior designer commissioned to transform the space. “Having worked with Marie on the couple’s former apartment I was well aware of her tastes, which were more urban and sophisticated,” Edelmann says. “We collaborated on every aspect – the design was a meeting of minds, which always makes a project run more smoothly. We

Before

Preceding pages: A new coat of paint has completely transformed this family home in a picturesque Chicago suburb. Interior designer Julia Buckingham Edelmann had the existing millwork in the living room painted in a dark charcoal shade, which highlights the books and modern artworks. Facing page: Black accents bring a touch of drama to the entry – the black contrasts soft gray walls and crisp white mouldings. Above and left: Country turns modern – an overpowering red bookcase at the opposite end of the room was also transformed with new paint.

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Before

Top and above: The existing bar that anchors one end of the bookcase in the living room was reworked to create an extension to the millwork, improving the visual connection. New mirror tiles on the backsplash enhance the sophisticated, urban look of the new interior. Above right: Two new Caracole wing chairs upholstered in Donghia fabrics provide a second seating area within the large living room. Facing page: The color gray also defines the family room. Because the setting is private, there are no drapes, which reinforces the clean lines.

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both knew we had to get rid of the country colors and the beadboard wainscoting on every wall. It was important that her modern furniture pieces could work in the new interior.” The solution involved a complete change of color, in varying shades of gray and charcoal. In the entry, this was sharpened to include crisp white and black accents on the railings, stair treads and picture frames. A softer look prevails in the living room, where the gold walls were repainted

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gray, and the bookcases were painted in a darker charcoal shade that offsets the colorful spines and collected objects. “We also made significant changes where the bookcase meets an existing bar,” says Edelmann. “I extended the millwork along the top and bottom of the bar so it is more integrated visually. And we added mirror tiles to the back to introduce a little more urban glamour.” The furnishings reflect a far more sophisticated look, and include Modernist chrome furniture by Milo Baughman.


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Before

Left: A touch of drama in the dining room – the walls are covered in a Lee Jofa peacock wallpaper, with the turquoise and soft gray shades echoed by the frosted glass bottles on the table. The wavy organic ceramic pots beneath the mirror, by Ohio artist Tara Lynn Winslow, contrast the sleek Modernist form of the sculptural light fixture. Top: Colorful sheepskin covers on two ottomans add an unexpectedly whimsical touch to this seating area in the master suite. Above: Before the renovation, the dining room was completely devoid of decoration.

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Before

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Edelmann added Caracole wing chairs, creating a second, intimate seating area away from the fireplace and the reupholstered sofas. “There are also textural, organic elements in evidence throughout the interior, often in the form of accessories and tables,” says the designer. “These add visual warmth and ensure the interior is not too predictable. I love a disparity – something a little unexpected.” In the formal dining room, a dramatic peacock Lee Jofa wallpaper fulfills this

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role. Formerly devoid of all decoration, this room is now vibrant, with turquoise tones picked out in the accessories as well as the wallpaper. A Modernist light fixture is the pièce de résistance. “While the wallpaper is inherently traditional, it does have a modern twist, especially teamed with the light fixture.” The kitchen also has had a complete makeover, with the cabinetry and island countertop painted in fresh white and taupe, respectively. Here again, light fittings create a real talking point.


Interior designer: Julia Buckingham Edelmann, Buckingham Interiors + Design (Chicago) Paints and varnishes: Farrow & Ball in Hardwick White, Pavillion Gray and Stony Ground Dining room wallcovering: Lee Jofa Byron in Teal & Graphite Entry lighting: Spellbound chandelier, Currey & Co Great room lighting: Waterloo chandelier, Currey & Co; Janus sconces, Robert Abbey Great room furniture: Equus coffee table; Forest Park side table; Silver Cooper side table from Arteriors; Caracole wing chairs upholstered in Donghia Bergamo and Castel fabrics; TCS tub chairs upholstered in Lee Jofa Threads fabric; antique bench

Kitchen backsplash: Calacatta marble Countertops: Calacatta on perimeter; painted wood Oven: Wolf Master bedroom: Viola Iron and Ivory beaded chandelier from Arteriors Master bedroom wallcovering: Romo Mark Alexander in Srinagar Chalk Powder room wallcovering: Phillip Jeffries Chain Link in Metallic Silver on Ivory Manila Hemp

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Above left and far left: Existing cabinetry in the kitchen was retained, but repainted to brighten the space. The wood countertop on the island was lacquered in a taupe shade to remove the country look, while the perimeter countertops were replaced with Calacatta marble. Top and above: A vintage silver bench adds a touch of glamour to the master bedroom (top). The powder room features a novel ceramic piece, and a Phillip Jeffries Chain Link wallpaper. Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Eric Hausman

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kitchens


Look twice Remodeling this kitchen has maximized the space and transformed the aesthetics – it is now more in keeping with the character of the 1920s home It often takes the eye of a designer to see the potential of a space, especially when it’s a kitchen that hasn’t changed for many years. This project is a case in point. Although the owners wanted to update the original kitchen, they were reasonably happy with its layout. Architect Linda Brettler could see a better alternative, however. “The existing kitchen had a U-shaped work area with a peninsula that effectively cut the kitchen in half. It felt chopped up and confined, and the peninsula blocked

Facing page: Light, bright and cheerful – this kitchen has been completely transformed by architect Linda Brettler. The original kitchen had a peninsula jutting into the space, blocking the flow. In the new layout, an island allows for circulation down either side, and ensures the view through to the outdoors can still be glimpsed from the dining room. The remodeling project included new French doors with side lights. Above: An extra-large farmhouse sink is positioned beneath the window. The perimeter countertops are a dark-colored, durable quartz.

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Above: To create a point of difference, a rich teal blue color was chosen for the island. Chamfered edges and legs enhance the furniture look. The quartz countertop on the island features embedded crystals that make the surface glow by day and night. Overhead display cabinets are enlivened by an acid yellow on the rear walls. Above right: The display cabinets are also characterized by the use of rolled glass, which creates a slightly rippled effect, reminiscent of old glass windows. The designer ensured there are no visible peg holes for shelving.

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the view through to the outdoors from the adjoining dining room.” Brettler’s solution was to wrap the cabinetry around the walls, with an island positioned lengthways. This allows for a circulation area on either side. It also makes the kitchen seem much larger. “It is sometimes surprising what you can fit into a kitchen,” the architect says. But this renovation was also about transforming the look of the space. “Because this is a 1920s house in an historic preservation area, we wanted to

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introduce a little more character through the detailing. Cabinets on the exterior wall have furniture-style feet with small arches. And the island, with its chamfered edges and legs like mini columns, also resembles a piece of furniture.” This effect is reinforced by the choice of a rich teal-blue paint finish to contrast the white on the perimeter cabinets. “The island is more highly lacquered for added durability and to create another point of difference,” says Brettler. “And we chose a lighter quartz countertop with


small embedded crystals that provide luminosity – the whole kitchen glows.” Color also appears on the rear walls in the overhead display cabinets. “The acid yellow has a bit of an edge to it that feels crisper and more modern than many other yellows,” says Brettler. “We didn’t extend the crown moulding all the way around the walls – this also helps to keep the look fresh.” Hexagonal Calacatta mosaics are another unexpected, fun element in a kitchen that doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Architect: Linda Brettler AIA, Linda Brettler Architect (Los Angeles) Builder: Metropolis Construction Cabinet company: Woodworking LA Cabinets: Painted wood Hardware: Rejuvenation and Restoration Hardware Countertops: Engineered stone on perimeter; quartz on island Backsplash: Hollywood mosaic in Calacatta marble from Walker Zanger Sink: Rohl single-bowl apron sink Faucets: Rohl bridge in polished chrome Lighting: Median pendants from Sundance Catalog Oven: BlueStar

Dishwasher and refrigeration: KitchenAid Bar stools: Baba in Canaletto Walnut from Design Within Reach Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Jim Simmons

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High performer As the pivotal point of a kitchen, the sink plays a key role. Houzer sinks combine pure functionality with good looks Cutting-edge architecture has had a strong influence on home interiors in recent years – today, designers bring their expertise to bear on many products, including items we use every day. The kitchen sink is no exception. As the center of the work triangle, the sink is pivotal. Houzer, a leading specialist in kitchen sinks, has long recognized the importance a sink plays in both the look and functionality of a kitchen. The Epicure apron front sink, for example, was designed to complement

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countertops that reflect today’s rich material palette – notably stone, quartz and solid surfaces. It was also designed to be an ideal match for professional-grade kitchen appliances. The series takes its cue from the classic farmhouse apron-front sink, adding a dash of sophistication to give it an urban edge. With its clean lines and generous size, the Epicure is right at home in both modern and more traditional kitchens. The Epicure is manufactured from premium-grade 16/18 T-304 stainless steel

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with a brushed satin finish. StoneGuard™ undercoating provides acoustic insulation to keep noise levels under control. The Bellus series is another popular option. This topmount sink displays crisp, clean lines that create a pleasing simplicity. Houzer says the refined geometry of the Bellus makes it particularly well suited to modern, high-performance laminate countertops. This sink is manufactured from the same high-grade stainless steel as the Epicure, and comes with Mega-Shield


sound insulation. Other features of the Bellus include a raised rim and four-inch back ledge area, which enhances the sleek simplicity of the sink. For additional information, contact Houzer Inc, 2605 Kuser Rd, Hamilton, NJ 08691, phone 800 880 3639. Email: info@ houzersink.com. Or visit the website: www.houzersink.com save | share Search 43814 at my.trendsideas.com

Facing page: A good sink is the finishing touch to a great kitchen. This kitchen features the Epicure apron front sink from Houzer. Although modeled on the traditional farmhouse apron sink, the Epicure has a distinctly modern appearance. It is made from premium-grade T-304 stainless steel and has acoustic insulation for sound deadening. Above and left: Topmount sinks are also finding favor – the Bellus from Houzer provides an especially generous sink for this new kitchen. This sink is also manufactured from premium-grade stainless steel. Both the Bellus and Epicure have a lustrous satin finish.

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Simply French Shades of vanilla and warm wood tones bring a French Country look to this kitchen

Above: The island in this kitchen features ample storage in the form of concealed cabinets and drawers at either end. The creamy painted cabinetry wears a distressed finish that suggests age. Right: Open shelving provides extra storage and gives a prominent place to display china, adding to the French Provincial feel. Natural light enhances the finish of the walls and the sheen of the granite countertops.

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Matching a kitchen to the architectural style and decor of a house makes good design sense, but it’s equally important to ensure the space is highly functional, with easy connections to adjacent rooms. Before this renovation by kitchen designer Pauline Stockwell and interior designer Heather Thorley, the kitchen was closed off from the casual living area and formal family room on either side. A large dining table made movement around the kitchen awkward, and the lack of storage and counter space also needed to be addressed, says Stockwell. “For the new design, the homeowners wanted to improve functionality, while retaining the traditional French Provincial theme that was in keeping with the rest of the house. It was also important to open up the space so it could become the social hub of the home. “The kitchen was blocked off from the casual living room by cabinetry and a refrigerator – the ceiling beam shows where it was situated. The cabinetry was removed to improve circulation and make the space more inviting.” In its place, a double-sided shelving unit was installed, adding to the French Provincial aesthetic and providing extra storage space. A new island also provided more storage and maximized the available counter space. “The owners have two children, and wanted the kitchen to be the heart of the home,” says Stockwell. “Introducing an island means cooking has become a more social activity. And opening the space up has created a gathering place for family and friends.” In keeping with the theme, the color palette is neutral, with a few tonal variations for the sake of visual cohesion. The cabinetry was given a distressed, aged look, and is complemented by the decorative finish on the walls, which suggests the color and texture of old-world plaster.

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Kitchen designer: Pauline Stockwell, Pauline Stockwell Design Interior designer: Heather Thorley Cabinet company: Hughes Joinery Cabinets: Recessed panels with distressed paint effect Countertops: Granite by Bramco; Blackwood by Hughes Joinery Range: Falcon Toledo with induction cooktop Refrigeration: Miele Dishwasher: Fisher & Paykel Hardware: Blum Tandembox Bar stools: David Shaw Furniture Story by Ellen Dorset Photography by Jamie Cobel

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Left: To make use of space, the refrigerator-freezer sits along the back wall and is integrated into the cabinetry. The formal living room is situated just behind the kitchen. Stockwell devised a layout that flows around a kitchen island, which ties in with the cabinetry and floors. Above: Before the renovation, the casual living room was blocked off from the kitchen by cabinetry. With this removed, the space connects easily to the adjacent living rooms.

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Storybook ending Everything within this 19th-century Federal-style townhouse was replaced to create a magical retreat for a writer and his family

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Preserving the architectural heritage of our cities has taken on a new significance in recent years, and historic neighborhoods, such as Manhattan's Greenwich Village, are clearly reaping the rewards. This townhouse in the West Village caught the eye of new owners, who had been planning and dreaming about the perfect home for several years. But it was the location, size


in the city

and potential that attracted the couple, rather than the interior. Architect Jane Sachs of HS2 Architecture, who was commissioned to design the renovation, says that at some time in the past the house had been torn apart and put back together badly. “There was nothing worth saving inside,” she says. “We gutted the entire house, leaving just the front facade and

Facing page: Return to splendor – the character and charm of this historic 19th-century Manhattan townhouse has been restored, following a major renovation designed by architect Jane Sachs. The entire five-story house was gutted, including the floors, and rebuilt on the inside. Above and left: The front door opens to the main living area, which is a single, large, open-plan space with the kitchen at the rear. The sculptural bookcase is in steel and walnut.

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two party walls standing. Even the floors had to be replaced.” Sachs says the townhouse is in a heritage district, so every part of the project had to be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. This also meant the front facade needed to replicate the original house, as it would have looked in 1828. Even the color of the front door was subject to approval.

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“The new white-painted double-hung windows were modeled on the originals. We were able to save the steel lintels, but these were refurbished and repainted. We also reintroduced shutters, which had been removed at some stage. ” On the inside, however, the focus was on creating a home well suited to modern living. Maximizing the available light was a priority, especially as

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natural light can enter only from the front and rear. “Typically, the living and dining rooms in these townhouses are on the entry level, while the kitchen is on the lower floor that opens out to the garden,” the architect says. “But everyone gathers in the kitchen, which means the main floor may be seldom used. “These owners love to cook and entertain, so we created

one large open-plan living space on the main level. The kitchen is at the rear, where the sun pours in. We pushed out part of the kitchen and the end wall is almost entirely glazed with 10ft-high windows. We also created a greenhouse off the kitchen, which is where we placed the dining area.” Materials are in keeping with the era of the house. A new fireplace in the kitchen


is built from reclaimed bricks, and the exposed brick of the exterior walls contrasts white walls and cabinetry. The new floors feature engineered hand-hewn walnut planks, chosen for their look and suitability – they can withstand the radiant heating built into each floor. Another key feature of the living area is a large bookcase made from steel and wood.

Above left: A 10ft-high wall of windows lets sunlight into the kitchen. Wherever possible, appliances are integrated – the refrigerator is next to the fireplace. Above: The kitchen opens to a pavilion-style dining area that overlooks the garden below. Left: The 7ft-square island has a concealed appliance shelf that can be raised by remote control.

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Left and top: An eyrie for a writer – the top floor of the house, which had been a separate penthouse, is now a large study with balconies front and back. New steel windows frame the view at the rear. The mobile cabinetry, which has a built-in desk for an assistant, resembles a traditional hinged trunk. Above: The bookcase on the main level soars up to the next level, which accommodates the master suite.

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“The bookcase is a very sculptural piece, which you can see when you first walk into the house,” says Sachs. “It soars up beside the stair balustrade, increasing the verticality of the space and leading the eye upwards. It’s also a recognition that one of the owners is a writer who works from a study at home.” This study occupies the entire top floor of the house,

and has doors leading out to balconies at the front and rear. “The traditional detailing on the main living floor is gradually pared back as you go up through the house,” says the architect. “In the study at the top, it is a much more modern sensibility. There are no crown mouldings for example. “We also introduced an entire wall of steel windows and doors at the rear. These

open right up to the terrace overlooking the garden. This is the owner’s private world, a place where he can escape to work on his projects.” The master suite is another private sanctuary for the owners. This occupies the third floor, with the bedroom opening to another balcony above the garden. The bedroom is also open to a large dressing room lined with

Facing page: Creepers and vines soften the brickwork at the rear of the building, where there is enough space for a small garden. This page: Each floor has a different ambiance – the garden level has a rustic look, which is enhanced by a wall of reclaimed barn wood cabinetry. Flush doors are hidden within the wall. This floor incorporates a guest suite, and a kitchenette and media room that open to the garden.

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Architect: Jane Sachs, HS2 Architecture (New York) Owners' representative: Laura Lanuly Structural engineer: Robert Silman Associates Builder: Regele Builders Kitchen cabinets: Dirk Auferoth Bathroom vanities: New England Fine Woodworking Doors and windows: Custom steel by Bliss Nor-Am; custom wood by Architectural Components, Inc Flooring: Hand-hewn engineered walnut from LV Wood Paints and varnishes: Benjamin Moore Heating: Mitsubishi Kitchen cabinets: Painted Countertops: Hammered black granite from ABC Marble Backsplash: VI8 field tile from Urban Archaeology Sink: Whitehaus Kitchen faucets: Barber Wilsons polished nickel Main kitchen range and ventilation: Wolf Refrigeration: Sub-Zero Dishwasher: Fisher & Paykel Bathtub: Waterworks Vanity: Custom walnut Basins: Kohler Caxton Bathroom faucets: LeFroy Brooks polished nickel Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Gross & Daley Photo

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custom walnut shelving. This in turn leads to a spacious bathroom reminiscent of a five-star resort. A freestanding oval tub takes pride of place in the center of the room, and there is a cozy gas fire for cool evenings. Children’s bedrooms, a guest bedroom and study are on the fourth floor, and there is another guest suite and media room at garden level.

“This is a self-contained space with its own fully equipped kitchenette,” says Sachs. “We wanted to create a different atmosphere on each floor, and because this space opens directly onto the garden, we gave it a more rustic look. The cabinetry features reclaimed barn wood, which makes a strong contrast to the white concrete floor.” To maximize the ceiling

heights on every level, ducting for mechanical services was hidden in walls and cabinets, the architect says. “Major projects such as this do tend to take on a life of their own,” Sachs says. “But the attention to detail and close collaboration with the owners every step of the way has created a home where every floor is used to the fullest extent, and nothing is wasted.”

Facing page and top left: The spacious master suite has a custombuilt dressing room between the bedroom and bathroom. This features walnut cabinetry. Shutters filter the light and provide privacy. Above left: A freestanding oval tub is the pièce de résistance in the master bathroom. The new fireplace is flanked by symmetrical walnut vanities designed to resemble furniture.

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Forever springtime To escape the harsh local winters, the owner of this apartment in a 19th-century row house requested an interior that would remind her of sunnier climes

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Closing the front door on the world and entering into your own private retreat is the perfect antidote to a hectic professional life. With the right interior design, it can also be a way to escape a bleak winter. Both of these factors influenced the design of this remodeled apartment in a 19th-century row house opposite the Charles River in Boston. Architect and designer Jonathan Cutler says the apartment has views in two directions – there is a spectacular river outlook and an enchanting view of city rooftops

back the other way. The interior design needed to maximize these views, but the owner was also interested in creating another world on the inside. “My client grew up in Florida and does not like the Boston winters,” Cutler says. “She wanted an interior that would be an escape – a retreat that would remind her of the warmer climate in the south. She also wanted colors that would make her happy.” To create a restful backdrop, Cutler specified a soft gray tone for all the walls.

Above left: Soft shades of chartreuse and lavender contrast light gray walls in this remodeled Boston apartment. The interior, designed by architect Jonathan Cutler, also features a custom-built angled sofa by Avery Boardman. Top and above: Light floods the stairwell from a large skylight. Two framed square mirrors belonging to the owner found a new home on the wall beside the living room. The balustrade, designed by the architect, serves as a screen near the entry on the lower level. Built-in furniture includes a small desk area, with drawers.

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He then introduced plenty of white, which gives the interior a distinctive Miami vibe, and added accents of spring in pale chartreuse and lavender. The living room, on the penthouse floor of the building, features a customdesigned angled sofa by Avery Boardman. This is large enough for two people to stretch out with their legs up. “The sofa is a deep blue shade, which references the water beyond the window,” says the architect. “There is a lot of water imagery in the artwork as well.”

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Small, acrylic cubes provide side tables that can be moved easily. The textured surfaces refract light, and because they are small, the cubes make the room look less cluttered than a coffee table, says Cutler. “I also introduced built-in furniture to every room, which provides storage and shelving, in addition to other practical uses. The suspended cabinetry that runs beneath the main windows, for example, also provides bench seating. And the cabinetry that is a focal point in the living room forms a fire surround.”

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Because the owner likes to entertain, there is an all-white bar in the living room. Mirrors wrap around the walls beside the bar, so the view can be enjoyed by guests, no matter which way they are facing. “After much searching, we found a beautiful Knoll fabric for the bar stools,” Cutler says. “But this island is not just a bar – it is also the prime spot for the owner to have late dinners with friends, and work on her laptop in the evening.” Cutler says he also changed the color of the window frames, which were white.


Above left and above: Existing mouldings, which were not original to the house, were removed to enhance the crisp, streamlined look. The all-white bar is at one side of the living room. Left: Mirrors wrap the walls in the powder room, adding a touch of whimsy. Far left and following pages: Originally two rooms, the kitchen and dining area are now one light-filled space. Dark-stained American white oak cabinets help to anchor the main wall, contrasting the pure white of the sculptural island. A suspended display cabinet matches the dimensions of the windows.

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Above and above right: In the master bedroom, the artwork, a soft blue pure silk rug, pleated curtains and striated wallpaper all help to reinforce the connection with water. Right: A line of mirrors bounces light around the remodeled bathroom. Although this is an internal room, LED lighting above and below the mirrors conveys a sense of daylight. The architect says he set out to create a “happy room”, which was just what the owner ordered. Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Eric Roth

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“I like to paint the windows black so they recede and create a better frame for the view. In this apartment, they are a very dark blue.” Cutler designed a new balustrade for the stairs, choosing a white-painted ply, which is punctuated with small squares – an abstract reminiscent of the row houses. On the lower level, a wall between the kitchen and dining room was removed to create one large space. A curved sofa belonging to the owner now forms part of the seating at a new round table. The


kitchen island is shaped to follow the curve of the table. “The island has a sculptural role to play, like a piano figure in the parlor,” he says. “The cabinetry on the rear wall is in dark-stained white oak, to contrast all the white. The mosaics on the wall were chosen to match the wood tones.” The master bedroom also underwent a transformation, with soft watery tones creating a restful sanctuary. Curved perimeter cabinets create a tabletop, which is the perfect spot for a breakfast tray.

Architect: Jonathan Cutler AIA, Jonathan Cutler Architecture & Interiors (Brookline, MA) Cabinet company: Gangemi Woodworking Flooring: Refinished stained white oak Paints and varnishes: Benjamin Moore Lighting: Lightolier recessed lighting; Zaneen flush mount lights; Artemide sconces; Ingo Maurer Bedroom wall covering: Maharam Furniture: Avery Boardman sofa; reupholstery by Richards Upholstery; Knoll Blinds: Hunter Douglas blackout shades Drapes: Dreamscapes of Boston Kitchen cabinets: American white oak, stained Countertops: Engineered quartz

Backsplash: Ann Sacks tiles Oven, cooktop and dishwasher: Miele Ventilation: Zephyr Master bathroom vanity: Lacquered Basins: Kohler Faucets: Hansgrohe Floor tiles: Ann Sacks glass mosaic tiles Wall tiles: Ann Sacks glass

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New identity Every picture tells a story in this remodeled Washington, DC townhouse. The owners, one a photographer, moved from Guatemala

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A house is not a home until you stamp your own personality on the interior, at which point it truly comes alive. This remodeled townhouse is living proof of the transformation that’s possible, says architect Andreas Charalambous, who was responsible for the interior design. “The original interior was very dated, and visually cluttered, with a lot of different materials used in the various rooms,” he says. “The new owners, who were moving to Washington, DC from Guatemala, wanted to modernize the entire space. They wanted to incorporate some


interesting furniture pieces they were bringing with them, and because one of the owners, Manuel Morquecho, is a photographer, they also needed an appropriate backdrop for his photography collection.” The changes begin at the entry, which leads directly into the dining area. To enhance the sense of arrival, Charalambous created a dramatic dropped ceiling with LED cove lighting and a sculptural pendant by Artemide. “The lowered ceiling helps to contain the space, visually, and makes it more intimate,” the architect says. “It also creates a contrast to the

more spacious living area, which is three steps lower and therefore has a higher ceiling.” A large photograph by Morquecho, a walnut buffet in the modern style, and a crisscross wood base to the table are other key features of the dining area. The table has a glass top that enhances the light, spacious look, and highlights the sculptural quality of the base. To reinforce the visual drama, Charalambous widened the narrow steps leading down to the living room so that they run the entire width of the room. New wide-plank flooring is ebonized to provide a strong contrast to the walls.

Facing page: This brick townhouse in Washington, DC has been extensively renovated by architect Andreas Charalambous. Above: The dining room is the first point of entry to the living space. To create a sense of drama, Charalambous designed a dropped ceiling with an LED cove and a sculptural pendant light by Artemide. New wide steps lead down to the spacious living area, which has a mix of new and collected furniture pieces.

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Top: Orange accents add visual warmth to the living area. With new, taller glass doors, the room now benefits from more natural light. Above and right: The dining area is furnished with a square glass-top table, and a mix of chairs and bench seating. The bench seat can be moved down to the living room for extra seating if required. The large photograph is by one of the owners, photographer Manuel Morquecho.

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The fireplace in the living room was also transformed by the addition of stacked stone, with recessed niches for the fire and television. “We concealed the audiovisual equipment in two low wood cabinets either side of the fireplace,” says the architect. “These provide a perfect base for two of the owners’ traditional Guatemalan statues. “To create a restful look, the furnishings are neutral, but we introduced orange accents – this is a color the owners like. We added a sculptural Shell chair, traditional Guatemalan stools, and a custom Cha-Cha coffee table that appears to

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Top: Red on white makes a bold statement in the remodeled master suite. The existing wood floors on this level were retained, but were stained to match the ebonized flooring on the main level. Above: The upper landing was widened to accommodate a new shelving unit. Above right: An antique rug is a feature of the study, which doubles as a guest bedroom.

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float above the orange wool and silk rug – the table features concealed wheels.� To ensure the interior would be flooded with natural light, Charalambous raised the height of the glazed doors in the living room. Other changes to the main floor include new cabinetry in the kitchen, which is open to the dining area and the entry hall. The open layout ensures the natural light penetrates the interior from both ends of the townhouse. A dividing wall between the kitchen and hallway incorporates a large niche and floating shelf where artworks can be displayed.

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On the upper floor, the stair landing was widened to allow space for floor-to-ceiling shelving, where various art books, small artifacts and travel mementos are displayed under LED lighting. A new skylight floods the landing and stairwell with light. Crisp white walls and bed linen create a restful retreat for the master suite. The bedroom also features a dropped ceiling highlighted by LED lighting, and a bright red Womb chair and matching footstool. The tranquility extends to the master bathroom, which incorporates a shower lined with natural pebbles.


Above: Hidden pocket doors at each end of the wall behind the bed open to a walk-in closet. The suspended ceiling is echoed by the floating design of the nightstands. Far left: The wall between the kitchen and hallway was designed to accommodate artworks. Left: The master bathroom incorporates a shower with natural pebble walls.

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Renovation architect and interior designer: Andreas Charalambous AIA, and Juan Gutierrez, Forma Design, Inc (Washington, DC) Builder: MCA Remodeling, Inc Cabinet company: Metropolitan Woodworking, Inc Paints: Benjamin Moore Classic Colors Dining room pendant: Artemide Wallcovering in dining room: Wolf-Gordon Dining room table: Falo by Riva Dining chairs: Frame from Apartment Zero Buffet: Sussex tall credenza from DWR Fireplace surround: Rustic stone from Architectural Ceramics Living room furniture: Cielo from KMP Furniture; Cha-Cha coffee table by Forma Design; Shell chair; Saarinen side table; Line media console from DWR; Rubik service coffee table from DWR Living room rug: Cha-Cha area rug in wool and silk by Forma Design Master bedroom rug: West Elm Chair in master bedroom: Saarinen Womb chair Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Geoffrey Hodgdon

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Right: Alterations were also made to the rear of the townhouse. The new glass doors in the living area open to a balcony and steps leading down to a laneway. A fixed awning provides shade in summer.

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With a twist Designed to have an intimate connection to the rural landscape, this house incorporates raw materials that have been left to warp and weather

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A home in the country is increasingly seen as an antidote to city living, so it’s not surprising to see contemporary rural architecture is also finding a different expression. This house, on a 40-acre ranchland site in California, challenges the local building styles to provide a home that melds with the rugged landscape – architect Neal Schwartz says it was conceived as a base camp for the owners and their children who love to explore the surrounding hills and tracks.


Preceding pages and facing page: Raw materials are a feature of this rural house. The roof and sides of the entry bridge are in Corten steel, which weathers to a rusty patina. Much of the siding is board-formed concrete, chosen for its understated, textural quality. Translucent bands of acrylic within the concrete transmit light through the wall. A solar screen that wraps along the south side comprises eucalyptus planks that have been left to twist and warp. Above and left: With its long, low-slung form, the house is reminiscent of rural shed structures in the region. Photovoltaic and solar thermal panels on the roof generate all the energy required on site.

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“The architecture is a direct response to the need to link with the outdoors,” Schwartz says. “For example, the approach involves a series of thresholds, including bridges over a seasonal watercourse, that foster the idea of movement and exploration. “The geometry of the house also helps. With its long, angled wing, the building appears to embrace the hills behind. And the forced perspective created by a tapering 100ft-long solar screen on the exterior guides the view back into the landscape.”

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Positioning the house low on the site was another way to focus attention on the hills beyond. “For many architects, the first impulse is to conquer a hill by placing the house at the very top. We wanted to flip that idea, so that the hill rises up behind the house, creating a much more powerful experience. It also made sense to build on the flat in terms of construction costs, and there is less noise from the local road. “It was important to keep the house as abstract as possible – we were not looking

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to reference residential architecture. And it was only later that we realized we were probably influenced by the traditional long, low-slung shed-like structures that hug the wide, horizontal landscape in this part of the county.” Raw materials were specified for the exterior, including Corten steel that weathers to a rusty patina, board-formed concrete, cedar and eucalyptus wood, which forms the solar screen. “All materials have a natural tendency towards movement and change, and we


often make futile attempts to stop this process,� the architect says. “For this house, we embraced the inevitable weathering and warping of materials. The steel rusts, the cedar grays and fades, and the eucalyptus planks on the solar screen crook, cup, bow and twist, becoming slightly more deformed every day.� Schwartz says the screen is a gesture to the natural and man-made landscape. It recalls the movement of native grasses in the wind, and is reminiscent of lumber stacks at the local mills of Marin County.

Facing page: A wood plank walkway over a bridge leads directly to the pivoting front door. The floor at the entry features a mosaic-tiled artwork by Karen Thompson, depicting a topographical map of the 40-acre property. Above and left: The front door opens to a long corridor that wraps around the south side of the house, helping to insulate the rest of the building from the sun. The passageway kinks to the left as the house turns to embrace the hillside.

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Much of the house is hidden from view, however – it is only on the inside that the true size, and the view, become apparent. The front door is aligned so that when it opens, there is a sightline right through the house to the highest ridge on the hill behind – one of several direct connections to key topographical features. “The circulation corridor of the house runs along the southern edge, coinciding with an uninterrupted loop running through the home to the ridgeline above,” says the architect. “A ‘hinge’ in the

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circulation spine breaks open the space for a moment, directing views to the north ridge and south courtyard. A secondary loop forms a figure eight connecting a series of boardwalks with a stand of oak trees to the east and a rock outcropping to the west.” Together, the house and a separate work studio cover approximately 4000sq ft. The main house is divided into two simple blocks, providing a day zone and a night zone, which are separated at the hinge by the south courtyard.

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Natural and raw materials feature inside as well as out. Internal soffits, wall paneling and cabinetry are in Douglas fir, and the flooring is a polished colored concrete slab. The gray and natural wood tones are repeated in furnishings, which reflect a Mid-century Modern influence. The attention to detail extends to a custom-designed topographical pattern in mosaic tiles on the floor at the entry. And a fireplace screen mimics the warping pattern of the solar screen, with the fire animating the shadows at night.


Facing page: The open-plan family living area is a social space where the family and guests can chat with the owners preparing meals. A raised bar top on the island keeps the kitchen clutter hidden from the dining area. Above and left: A cantilevered concrete hearth doubles as a seat. The pattern on the fireplace screen replicates the irregular warping of the eucalyptus planks on the exterior screen. At night it casts flickering shadows from the fire.

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Top and above right: Mid-century Modern furnishings enliven the family living area, with the fluffy seats on the chairs adding a touch of whimsy. The colors evoke the sky and the natural landscape that is so much a part of the view. Above: The board-formed concrete gives the walls of this bathroom a raw, textural finish.

Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Bruce Damonte

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Not surprisingly, given the strong links to the land, sustainable design initiatives feature throughout the property, which generates enough energy to be off the grid for most of the year. There are solar thermal panels on the roof to provide radiant heat for the floor slab. Any excess heat is transferred to the hot water system, and any left-over heat is diverted to the swimming pool. The roof also accommodates photovoltaic panels that generate electricity. The system was computer modeled by an environmental

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consultant to ensure maximum efficiency and self sufficiency. “Further energy savings are provided by the building skin,” says Schwartz. “The Corten steel roof is lifted up on risers, like a second skin on top of the waterproofing membrane. Hot air forms in the gap between these layers, and is then sucked out, with the continual air movement helping to cool the house. The solar screen also helps to keep the interior cool.” The property has a well that provides all the water used by the household.


Architect: Neal Schwartz, Wyatt Arnold, Aaron Goldman, Masha Slavnova, Paul Burgin, Erik Bloom, Schwartz and Architecture (San Francisco) Interior decorator: Alison Damonte, Alison Damonte Design Structural engineer: David Inlow, iAssociates Contractor: Hammond & Company Landscape design: Randy Theume, Randy Theume Design Lighting design: Jody Pritchard, HE Banks & Associates Daylighting/energy/sustainability: Loisos + Ubbelohde Mosaic designer: Karen Thompson, Archetile Mosaics

Cabinet company and architectural millwork: Western Designs Siding: Wood; board-formed, cast in-situ concrete; western red cedar Roofing: Corrugated steel; weathered Corten, T2 Pattern from Metal Sales Manufacturing Corporation Flooring: Integral color concrete slab Doors and windows: Tuscany Brown aluminum-clad exterior with Douglas fir interior by Loewen Drapes: Susan Lind Chastain Fine Sewing Dining table: Designed by Schwartz and Architecture, sourced from Evan Shively of Arborica, fabricated by Peter Santulli of Circle Tree Studio Cabinetry: Douglas fir

Countertops: Engineered quartz Oven and cooktop: Wolf Ventilation: Custom stainless steel by Abbaka Hoods Refrigeration: Sub-Zero Bathtub: Kaldewei Saniform Basins: Kallista Original by Barbara Barry Faucets: Hansgrohe Axor in chrome Wall tiles: Progetto in Gesso Mood stacked bond from Ceramic Tile Design

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Commanding perspective A man’s home is his castle. It’s a saying that resonates with this new house, which explores myriad ways to balance solid concrete forms with lighter, more ephemeral elements

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Initially contracted to design a remodel, the designer of this new house says the project escalated until it became clear the only option was to simply start over. Fu-Tung Cheng of Cheng Design says the owners of the existing house on site required a larger home that simply could not fit into the same footprint. Building anew was a better way to achieve what they wanted, and it did not need to cost much more than a total renovation. “Their home sat in a neighborhood of houses in a similar traditional style – there

Before

Above left and left: Before and after images tell the story of this transformation by designer Fu-Tung Cheng of Cheng Design. The original, traditionally styled house on the site was removed to make way for a new home with a much more modern aesthetic. The main house features solid concrete walls, poured in situ. The garage wing is stucco, and the cube-like volume near the entry is made from reclaimed wood from vinegar barrels. Above: A lightweight translucent canopy balances the more austere, solid form of the concrete walls. Bamboo guttering is used for water run-off.

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were plenty of quaint gabled rooflines,” Cheng says. “But what they wanted – and what was ultimately proposed – was a complete departure. The owners had seen my work with concrete on smaller jobs and loved the modern aesthetic, and we could see there was a potential to do something similar on a much larger scale.” Cheng says that in experimenting with concrete walls, he wanted to move away from the “ordinary”. In doing so, he took a very hands-on approach to the house construction.

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“We chose to pour the concrete in stages, so it could be manipulated every step of the way. The formwork of each stage was just 4ft high, and was wrapped in shiny Formica, which imparted a great sheen to the concrete. Concrete can appear as a very cold, forbidding surface, but these walls have a blue-black tint and are hyper smooth and inviting to touch. “Once the concrete was poured into each section, I introduced streaks of amber-colored concrete that could be pushed down into the walls. For added

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visual interest at the front of the house, the upper concrete walls were striated to resemble geological strata bands.” Cheng says the resulting walls, which are 14in thick, with 3in of foam insulation, convey a strong sense of substance and permanence. And because they make up the entire wall, there is no need for wallcoverings or veneers. “We introduced porthole windows to the walls in irregular positions, and added an elliptical-shaped window to the upper level. These apertures highlight the


thickness of the concrete and you get a strong sense of the real mass of the house – it is almost castle like. And it has a solidity that simply cannot be replicated in a house built from wood.” In contrast, a lightweight, translucent canopy defines the entry, which is through a large zinc and brass pivot door. The concrete side wall extends right into the house, forging a connection between inside and out, and helping to screen the living area from view. An outdoor-indoor fishpond beside the entry,

flows beneath the wall to the inside of the house. To relieve the austerity of the concrete walls and flooring, another wall beside the entry is covered in Japanese plaster in a rusty brick tone, with a glowing, illuminated yellow shelving niche. “It was important to keep the interior warm and inviting, and this applied to texture as well as color,” says Cheng. “We were constantly looking for materials that would have a tactile finish, to contrast the very smooth concrete.”

Facing page, top and lower: A zinc and brass pivot door makes a bold statement at the entry. The water plants in the foreground are emerging from a long fishpond that flows under the wall and into the living room on the other side. To introduce a splash of color, the wall opposite the door has a Japanese plaster finish in a rusty brick shade, with a bright yellow shelving niche. Above: Solar tubes positioned at irregular intervals in the ceiling bring natural light into the center of the family living area. A large Japanese lanternstyle fixture further enlivens the space.

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Two suspended ceilings in the main living area feature Japanese plaster mixed with a fine wood fibre. This imparts a textural quality that helps to warm the space, visually. Similarly, a large red paper lantern with twig-like framing, is a bold contrast to the gray concrete. To bring natural light into the heart of the open-plan living space, Cheng introduced irregularly spaced solar tubes to the ceiling. These mimic the form of the port holes on the exterior walls and serve a similar purpose.

Facing page: Alno cabinetry was specified for the kitchen, along with concrete and stainless steel countertops, and a Cheng Design Zephyr hood featuring Venetian plaster. The backsplash is an Italian porcelain tile with the look of rusted steel. Top: The master suite reflects a Japanese influence. The artwork at left is by Dave Ward of Sticks ’n Stones. Above: This stainless steel soaking tub drops down lower than the level of the floor. It is paired with a concrete sink with mosaic-tiled trough.

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Above: Cheng introduced a concrete Nemo kitchen island from his own collection. This conical piece incorporates a perforated stainless steel door that conceals garbage bins. The adjoining lightweight table, with its wood top and sculptural steel legs, provides another contrast to the solid form of the concrete. Facing page: An extra-wide opening at the side of the main living room opens to a private terrace. Clerestory windows above the opening help to create the illusion that the heavy concrete is supported by the lightweight glass.

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In the main living room, the focus of attention is the inset fireplace within the massive concrete end wall. Here, the concrete poured for the cantilevered hearth is a soft olive green shade. Concrete also appears in the kitchen, where it forms a conical island with a 5in-thick countertop, sculpted to create an organic form, and to provide estuary drainage from a cutting board. The solid, anchoring bulk of the island is balanced by the lightweight form of an adjoining wood table top, which has fine steel legs.

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Another concrete countertop runs along one wall, while the rest of the work surfaces are stainless steel. The kitchen features another of Cheng’s designs – the rangehood with Zephyr ventilation is from the designer’s own collection. All these elements are complemented by a bank of European Alno cabinetry in a light wood veneer. Other highlights of the living space include extra-wide openings to two terraces, which enhance the connection with the outdoors. One opening is straddled


Above: At the rear the house opens up to a landscaped swimming pool area. The existing pool was refurbished, with the deck forming the coping. A round spa pool was also added. The existing mature trees lend an established look to the house. Rooms on the second level include a study and guest suite. Right: The original house also opened to the pool. The multi-gabled form of the roof was similar to those of other homes in the neighborhood.

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Before

by a massive steel I-beam, with clerestory glazing above. This creates the illusion that the heavy concrete wall is suspended on top of the fine glass, which suggests a contradiction in terms. “On the outside of the house, we did keep a reference to the original property,” says Cheng. “The swimming pool is essentially the same organic shape, but we added a spa pool, and re-paved and re-landscaped the entire area. There is now a much better flow between the indoor and outdoor living areas.”


Designer: Principal Fu-Tung Cheng; architects J Chan and Ann Kim; designer Frank Lee, Cheng Design (Berkeley, CA) Landscape designer: Ron Emerson Garden Design Structural engineer: Calin Smith Engineering & Development Co Builder: Chuck Hunt, foreman, Carlson Construction, Inc Concrete subcontractor: Richard Sullivan, Artemio Zavala, FWS Construction Concrete polishing: Gary Gan, Ganco San Francisco Geocrete: Cheng Design, Inc Plaster artisan: Thom Bruce Metalwork, including canopy: Alan Sklansky Front entry door: Hans Rau

Cabinet company: Alno Cabinets: Oak veneer in Moccapine Countertops: Stainless steel; maple bar top; Geocrete cast concrete Nemo island by Cheng Design in Celadon Backsplash: Italian porcelain tile in Argento Hood: Zephyr Cheng Collection Padova with Venetian plaster in aubergine Cooktop: Gaggenau Range: Wolf Dishwasher: Miele Flooring: Plyboo Dining room light fixture and bedroom art installation: David Ward, Sticks ’n Stones Decorative sconces: Studio Technico

Recessed lighting: Elco Exterior lighting: Shaper Lighting sconces; Lightology LED uplights Bathroom sink: Ikea Hollviken Bathroom faucets: Vola Tub: Custom stainless steel by Cheng Design Story by Colleen Hawkes Photography by Matthew Millman

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index A Rudin

15

Carrier

A&S Window Associates

35

Catherine Cocke Interiors

Abbaka

93

Ceramic Tile Design

ABC Marble

67

Chan, J

Alison Damonte Design

84-93

35 16-23 93 94-103

Gutierrez, Juan

76-82

Halo

35

Hammond & Company

93

Hansgrohe

Charalambous, Andreas AIA 76-82

Harriott Valentine Engineers

75, 93 15

MCA Remodeling Inc

76-82

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corporation

93

Metropolis Construction

48-51

Metropolitan Woodworking Inc

Shaper Lighting

93

Sierra Pacific Windows

15

Sklansky, Alan

35

Cheng Design

94-103

HE Banks & Associates

Allworth Design

15

Cheng, Fu-Tung

94-103

Houzer Inc

52-53

Meyer Wells

Allworth, Randy

15

58-67

Michael Homchick Stoneworks 15

Stockwell, Pauline

Miele

Studio Technico

Circle Tree Studio

93

HS2 Architecture

Alno

103

CKS Cabinetry

23

Hudson Reed

Altura

15

Clearvue Glass

23

Hughes Joinery

Ann Sacks

75

Cocke, Catherine

Apartment Zero

82

Corten

Arborica

93

Cosentino

IBC

Archetile Mosaics

93

Currey & Co

45

Architectural Ceramics

82

Cutler, Jonathan

82-75

Ingo Maurer

75

Architectural Components Inc

67

Damonte, Alison

84-93

Inlow, David

93

84-93

David MacKenzie Inc

26-35

Jonathan Cutler Architecture

Artemide

15, 75, 82

David Shaw Furniture

Arteriors

45

DeForest Architects

6-15

Juno

15

Avery Boardman

75

DeForest, John

6-15

Kaldwei

93

Baker

15

Design Within Reach

51, 82

Kallista

93

Barbara Barry

93

Dirk Auferoth

67

Kim, Ann

Barber Wilsons

67

Donghia

45

KitchenAid

Arnold, Wyatt

Benjamin Moore 15, 35, 67, 75, 82 Big Ass Fans

23

Bliss Nor-Am Bloom, Erik

67 84-93

16-23 93

57

Dornbracht

35

Dreamscapes of Boston

75

Hunt, Chuck

23 54-57 80-103

Hunter Douglas

75

iAssociates

93

Ikea

& Interiors

KMP Furniture Knoll

103

82-75

94-103

76-82 15 35, 57, 75

Mitsubishi NB Design Group

103

Slavnova, Masha

All Seasons Woodwork

93

103

Shively, Evan

67

Sound Structures

35

Sticks ’n Stones

103 54-57 103

Sub-Zero

2, 67, 93

Sullivan, Richard

103

New England Fine Woodworking 67

Sundance Catalog

51

Nucor

Susan Lind Chastain

93

Tamarian

15

TCS Furniture

45

Pauline Stockwell Design PEC Structural Engineering Pedini

6-15

84-93

15 54-57 23 IFC-1

Technical Glass Products

15

Peter Alexander Furniture

15

Thermador

35

Phillip Jeffries

45

Theume, Randy

93

Phoenix Day

15

Thompson, Karen

Pilkington Profilit

15

Thorley, Heather

Plantation

15

Trends Publishing International

93 54-57 24, 46

51

Plyboo

82

Porcelanosa

23

True Professional Series

75

Prestige Custom Builders

15

Urban Archaeology

67

Pritchard, Jody

93

Velux America Inc

5, 15

93

Village Interiors

Driscoll Robbins

15

Kohler

67, 75

Eastside Glass

15

Kraus

25

Randy Theume Design

103

47

15

Vola

103

BlueStar

51

Edelmann, Julia Buckingham 36-45

Kynar

15

Rau, Hans

Blum

57

Eero Saarinen

Laura Ianuly

67

Regele Builders

67

Walker Zanger

Bradley-Hughes

15

Elco

103

Lee Jofa

45

Rejuvenation

51

Ward, David

103

57

Elkay

35

Lee, Frank

Restoration Hardware

51

Waterworks

67

Emtek

15

Lefroy Brooks

67

83

Weiland

ET2 Contemporary Lighting

23

Lightolier

75

Richards Upholstery

75

West Architecture Studio

Exquisite Surfaces

15

Lightology

103

Falcon

57

Linda Brettler Architect

Riva

82

Farrow & Ball

45

LindstrĂśm Rugs

Robert Abbey

45

Robert Silman Associates

67

Rohl

51

Romo

45

Bramco Brettler, Linda AIA

48-51

Bruce, Thom

103

Buckingham Interiors + Design 36-45 Burfiend, Nancy Burgin, Paul Cablik Enterprises

6-15 84-93

Fisher & Paykel

82

23, 57, 67

23

Forma Design Inc

76-82

California Closet Company OBC

FSW Construction

103

Calin Smith Engineering & Development Co Cameron Furniture Cameron, Ted Caracole Carlson Construction Inc

Gaggenau 103 15 6-15 45 80-103

103

Loewen

94-103

48-51 15 93

Loisos + Ubbelohde

93

Lutron

15

LV Wood

67

Rev-A-Shelf

23

Sachs, Jane

35

Santulli, Peter

103

Western Designs

93

Whitehaus Wolf Appliances

67 2, 35, 45, 67, 93, 103

26-35

75

Marmi Natural Stone

84-93

16-23

WZ Home Improvement

Maharam

103

Goldman, Aaron

82

West, Scott AIA

48-51

103

Geocrete

West Elm

Woodworking LA

Ganco San Francisco

Marvin Windows & Doors

15 16-23

Wolf-Gordon

Gan, Fary

75

51

Ron Emerson Garden Design 103 Room & Board

Gangemi Woodworking

103

15 58-67 93

Zaneen

Massey Associates

26-35

Schwartz and Architecture

84-93

Zavala, Artemio

Massey, William AIA

26-35

Schwartz, Neal

84-93

Zephyr

82

75 103 75, 103


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HOME & ARCHITECTURAL TRENDS USA Vol 30/05  

Contemporary New Homes, Traditional Updates, In The City, Use Of Materials

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