Page 1

travel world

SPRING 2019

Springtime

I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E

in North America California’s Super Bloom

Colorado Rockies Beartooth Highway Brandywine Valley Nantucket Island The Magazine Written by North American Travel Journalists Association Members


Letter from the Editor Finally! Our anticipation becomes a reality as the frozen,

TravelWorld International Magazine is the only magazine that showcases the member talents of the North American Travel Journalists Association

silent landscape begins to tintillate our senses with sights, sounds and smells we've longed for. Icy, white scenes melt away and hibernating, living wonders awake to the changed form of frozen water as it becomes the running, bubbling crystal clear liquid that supports all life. Our earth tilts forward on its axis and provides the hemisphere with a warmer, closer, more comforting sun, unfreezing the world into a busy, buzzing wonderland of color and growth! SPRING! So welcome!

Group Publisher: NATJA Publications Publishers: Helen Hernandez & Bennett W. Root, Jr. VP Operations: Yanira Leon Editor: Joy Bushmeyer Staff: Brittney Hernandez Staff: Andrea Velazquez Staff: Nicolas Adams

From the top of the world, the Beartooth Highway (the highest and, arguably, most beautiful highway in North America), to the

Contributing Writers & Photographers:

spectacular Super Bloom in sunny Southern California, and all

Alison Abbott Kimberly Fisher Rich Grant Jeffrey Lehmann

between the oceans east to west, a new chance at life, a renewal and rebirth to all, is coming with Spring! People are excited!

Rose Palmer Deborah Stone Bennett Root, Jr. Priscilla Willis

They want to get out! They want to free themselves from the confines of their warm homes and comfortably enjoy activities in the great outdoors. Travel is inspired now more than ever, and a surge of anticipation and excitement is in the air. This issue of TWI takes you to places of special or little known springtime treasures. We hope you enjoy this new and beautiful

Editorial /Advertising Offices: TravelWorld International Magazine 3579 E. Foothill Blvd., #744 Pasadena, CA 91107 Phone: (626) 376-9754 Fax: (626) 628-1854 www.travelworldmagazine.com

sampling of the experiences told in interesting stories and shown in beautiful photography by the talented writers and photographers of the North American Journalists Association.

Enjoy!

Joy Bushmeyer, Editor To submit story queries, please email Joy at: joy@travelworldmagazine.com

2

Volume 2019.01 Spring 2019. Copyright Š2019 by NATJA Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Advertising rates and information sent upon request. Acceptance of advertising in TravelWorld International Magazine in no way constitutes approval or endorsement by NATJA Publications, Inc., nor do products or services advertised. NATJA Publications and TravelWorld International Magazine reserve the right to reject any advertising. Opinions expressed by authors are their own and not necessarily those of Travel World International Magazine or NATJA Publications. TravelWorld International Magazine reserves the right to edit all contributions for clarity and length, as well as to reject any material submitted, and is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. This periodical’s name and logo along with the various titles and headings therein, are trademarks of NATJA Publications, Inc. PRODUCED IN U.S.A.


travel world SPRING 2019

F E A T U R E S

& S T O R I E S

I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E

6 Springtime in the Rockies of Colorado Story & Photos by Rich Grant

14 The California Super Bloom

Story & Photos by Jeffrey Lehmann

22 Springtime Comes to the Beartooth Highway

Story & Photos by Bennett W. Root, Jr.

31 Spring Blossoms in the Historic Brandywine Valley

Story & Photos by Rose Palmer

6

14

22

31

3


We’ve been stirring up history and culture for over 375 years.

4

Rich history, astounding architecture, unspoiled beaches, celebrated restaurants and world-class events – they’re just a part of what makes Newport the shining gem in the coastal crown of New England. Come discover the City-by-the-Sea people have been talking about for centuries.

DiscoverNewport.org Media Contact: Andrea McHugh AMcHugh@DiscoverNewport.org


travel world SPRING 2019

F E A T U R E S

& S T O R I E S

I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E

38 Daffodils Welcome Spring in Nantucket

Story & Photos by Alison Abbott

42 Set Your Clock to Island Time, Ohio Style

Story & Photos by Deborah Stone

48 Springtime Dining in Portland, Maine

Story & Photos by Kimberly Fisher

Story & Photos by Priscilla Willis

52 World Class Golf in Branson, Missouri

38

42

48

52

5


Springtime in the Rockies of Colorado

Biking in April-May on Cherry Creek Bike Path in Denver

Story and Photos by Rich Grant he best thing about springtime in the Rockies of Colorado is that it lasts four months. That’s because altitude plays such an important role when plants and wildflowers come out. In May, you can smell the lilacs of the Denver plains. The lower mountain towns like Georgetown will see lilacs in June. By early July, you can still enjoy their light blue flowers blooming in higher elevation resorts like Breckenridge. Go even higher, up above Timberline, there is a place known as “the land above trees” because it stands above 12,000 feet of elevation. There, you won’t see your first wildflowers until July.

6


Wildflowers like these Columbines don't come out in Colorado's high country above timberline until July

Hiking in Indian Peaks in early June

Pearl Street Mall tulips in Boulder, April-May

7


here’s a tradeoff, of course. While May is springtime for much of the country, in the Colorado mountains it’s “mud season.” It’s a time when snow banks are still close. Many of the trails, roads and even the weather changes by the minute. Sometimes offering all four seasons in the same day! The popular road to the summit of 14,260-feet-high, Mount Evans – the highest paved road in North America - is usually open only from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Some years it’s mid-June before snowplows can fight through 20-foot snowdrifts.

Lake Isabel, Indian Peaks Wilderness Area, early June

Hiking to Mount Toll in July shows much how snow there is in Springtime in the Rockies

8


SO HOW DO YOU ENJOY SPRING IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS? THINK LIKE A PLANT AND PLAN YOUR ELEVATIONS TO GO WITH YOUR DESTINATION.

APRIL-MEMORIAL DAY

April is Denver’s second snowiest month (after March) and May is a delightful time to see green and spring flowers all along the Front Range. When it’s not snowing, it can be gorgeous. From the red rocks of Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs, to the beautiful tulip beds on the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder, to pedaling on Denver’s 850 miles of bike trails -especially along Cherry Creek lined with gorgeous cherry trees that burst into color.

EARLY JUNE

All roads are open, but it’s still winter up in the high country. A Basin ski area has stayed open in June and Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park can be lined with high snow banks. This is a great time to don a wetsuit and begin rafting rivers like Clear Creek in Idaho Springs, where spring flowers will just start spurting along the riverbanks.

MID-JUNE

Most trails are snow-free. Due to melted snow, you may have to get muddy if you venture above timberline. The resorts of Vail, Beaver Creek, and Aspen will be a burst of color with flower baskets and gardens. It’s time to start mountain biking, fly fishing, kayaking and camping, though always bring a light jacket at night.

LATE JUNE TO JULY 4TH

While most people think it’s summer and time for backyard grills, on top of Colorado’s fifty-four 14,000-ft. peaks, spring is finally arriving with dozens of wildflowers bursting into bloom. Their harsh life at this altitude is short, but they make up for it with a dazzling display of color. If you’re not up to hiking a 14er, you can drive to the top of Pikes Peak and Mount Evans that even has a wildflower trail which goes high above the trees.

Hiking in Indian Peaks in early June

9


Hiking in Indian Peaks in early June

The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad in Colorado in May, before the trees have come out. The railroad operates from Memorial Day to Oct.

10

Kayaking in Eldorado Canyon near Boulder in late May


Hiking in June above Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Denver when the surrounding hills are spring green.

Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs in May

Columbines (the state flower of Colorado) don't make an appearance in the high country until early July

Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs in May with snow on Pikes Peak in the background

11


Photo credit: Robert Demar / aerial view, Mark Gardner / bikes, Mike Bertrand / Friday Harbor, Jim Maya / whales

Lopez Island • Orcas Island • San Juan Island / Friday Harbor

InspIratIon For the senses VisitSanJuans.com

Explore Historic Friday Harbor Find Endless Adventure

12

Discover Nature’s Splendor


A FAMILY THAT SCREAMS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER. In Branson, we believe in a few things. And the only way to experience an unbelievable vacation is to be here with us. Branson. You won’t believe it, until you do.

877- BR ANS O N

13


Eureka! -California’s state flower causes a new type of gold rush.

14


California Super Bloom The

Photos and Story by Jeffrey Lehmann

POPPY APOCALYPSE AT LAKE ELSINORE! fter years of drought, this year’s rains have California in a wildflower season of epic proportions. The current epicenter of this bloom is the small town of Lake Elsinore that was evacuated in August for wildfires and again in February for flood. This year’s high rainfall and the natural fertilizer caused by the wildfires are causing a “Super Bloom” that is visible from space. Super blooms only happen once a decade on average in California. The word has been spreading since the beginning of March of this flower-covered mountain, clearly visible from the I-15 freeway. The most popular viewing area is about a half mile from the Walker Valley turnoff. As we approach we can barely make out individual people as they are winding up the mountain in a solid line through the poppies like a gargantuan

snake. Cars are parked bumper to bumper as far as the eye can see on the normally deserted, two-lane frontage road. The mayor of Lake Elsinore, Steve Manos, is being interviewed on the radio, “We have survived fires and floods, but it looks like the flowers are going to do us in!” Manos continues that the city has never had this many visitors. Visitors were estimated at over 100,000 during the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The mayor also refers to it more positively as a “Poppypalooza”. Lake Elsinore has been caught totally unprepared for this instant fame fanned greatly by posts on Instagram and other social media outlets. The crowds have overwhelmed city services and led to the closing of the Lake Elsinore freeway exits on St. Patrick’s Day. For this reason, it has come to be known as the “Poppy Apocalypse”.

We have come early on a Tuesday to avoid the weekend crowd. Still, the closest freeway is completely congested. There are crowds everywhere you look, but finding a parking place is ultimately not that hard. It is a quarter mile or so walk to the trailhead, and there are people taking pictures all along the way. Maybe this situation is just overwhelming to the residents of Lake Elsinore because they are not used to large crowds that most Southern Californians deal with everyday. The poppies alone are beautiful, but in some places there is a profusion of different colored wildflowers mixed in including yellow, white, and purple. Once on the trail, people are spread out. The experience is a friendly one. It is unbelievably scenic in every direction, and as avid photographers it leaves us a little overwhelmed as to where to start taking photos.

15


“Poppypalooza� Lake Elsinore Mayor's description of the rock concert appeal of poppies.

Yellow Mustard Grass, Wild Canterbury Bells and California Poppies

16

Blue Lupine and California Poppies


This year’s flower craze has been driven by pics on social media

Wild Canterbury Bells & California Poppies

alking among the poppies crushes their roots and kills plants. Really, we don’t find it necessary to leave the dirt path, especially since this is rattlesnake territory. If you shoot straight down on wildflowers, the blooms are spread out. By shooting from the side, the flowers stack and intensify the color. The path causes a break in the flowers allowing us to easily shoot them from the side by bending down. This Super Bloom will persist throughout the spring. Although the lower deserts like Anza Borrego are already nearing the end of their bloom, the higher and cooler areas of California are only beginning to come into their own. I found this not to be a “Poppy Apocalypse” but rather an extraordinary wonder of nature. Everyone should take the time to experience it this year.

Blue Chia Salvia & California Poppies

17


Poppies cover such vast areas that they are visible from space.

Wild Blue Canterbury Bells

Wildflower bonanza brings a new focus on preserving California’s wild open spaces.

18


“Poppies, poppies, poppies will put them to sleep” -Wicked Witch in the “Wizard of Oz"

POPPY VIEWING TIPS

Trampling these delicate flowers for a selfie has led to social media shaming.

• Go early • Wear cool clothes it’s hot and hiking uphill makes it hotter • Bring water • Use sun protection • Stay on the path to protect wildflowers and avoid rattlesnakes • Do not pick the flowers! • Be patient and courteous with everyone • Most likely no restrooms • Get low, flower level, for the best photos

19


3

Great Destinations in Central Missouri

s named the a w o M , s k r a z Lake of the Oational Lake in the Nation!" "Best Recre

adlined the he e in r P n oh J d an e ic umbia, Mo. Margo Pr ol C in l va ti es F Q Roots n Blues n BB

Winston Chur when he deliver chill made history in Fulto ed his "Iron Cu n rtain" speeach, inMo 1946. We’d love to host you! Let’s start planning your customized press trip to Lake of the Ozarks, Columbia and Fulton. Contact Jo Duncan at Jo@TBWGroup.net or by calling 573-636-8282.

20


21


The top of the world as seen from the Beartooth Highway.

Springtime Comes to the pring comes late to this high country. If it’s early June, bring your long underwear. Likely the snow has just been plowed from the Beartooth Highway, the road newly opened from Cooke City, Wyoming, at the Northeast Gate of Yellowstone National Park, to Red Lodge, a small town in southern Montana, a bit west of the Custer National Forest and the Little Big Horn Battlefield memorial.

The Beartooth Highway twists and turns some sixtyeight miles through the Absaroka and Beartooth Mountains, a mile or two above sea level and a billion miles from hustle of city traffic and job deliverables. Thirty-plus years ago, CBS newsman Charles Kuralt, one of America’s most beloved travel journalists, dubbed the Beartooth Highway, “the most beautiful drive in America.” His accolade has been reaffirmed by Beartooth travelers ever since.

Across the Pass, groundwater water is still and fully transparent, revealing both its floor and its reflected walls.

22


Beartooth Highway Story and Photos by Bennett W. Root, Jr. By the time we reach Vista Point, we have left the streams and wildflowers behind, from here to the Beartooth Pass, it is rocks against the wind and time is measured in millennia.

It is still early for resplendent alpine meadows, but a few brave flowers are breaking through.

Minimalist landscapes of pure form and abiding quiet.

23


e came to Red Lodge for the wedding of craft brewmaster Sam Hoffmann, the son of one of my lifelong best friends. After the celebration, and a couple of tasty Red Lodge Ales at Sam’s Taproom, we packed it in for the night. The next day, we were off at dawn, and we were awed at what we found: Rushing mountain streams and early wildflowers just peeking out, snowcapped peaks above the tree line as we breasted the pass, and finally mirror lakes, the pilot peak and an alpine meadow with a massive buffalo, looking irritated that we were invading his space.

Courtesy of the National Scenic Byways Program which is part of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

24

Here, the top of the world meets the skirt of the sky.

The Beartooth is home to at least 20 peaks towering over 12,000 feet, sparkling, primeval alpine lakes reflecting cumulus cloudscapes that stretch towards the heavens, countless alpine wildflowers, chilly streams and waterfalls swollen with runoff from the first snowmelt. Not surprisingly, there were also a few dozen hearty souls braving early spring conditions to ski, to bike, or just to venture out and be awed by, and one of a half-dozen vistas along one of the most stunningly beautiful four-hour road-trips in North America.

A pause in the morning’s ascent offers this cyclist a tapestry of greens and blues, whites and blacks, and occasional sparkles of reflected sunlight.


e stopped to talk with bicyclists clunking around the rest area in their studded shoes. The bikers climbed up the slopes in knots of five or eight, stopping at turnouts, partly for a bite or drink of water, but like us, to marvel at the sweep of majesty looking into the Beartooth mountain range stretching out north into the Gallatin national forest. Nice people. With time to talk. Locals mostly, but people still drawing succor from a raw beauty where mankind’s heavy hand has not marked the land. Later, we stopped to chat with a couple of guys who were loving Beartooth skiing. They said conditions were ‘’perfect,” and the “rockin” downhill was worth the rigorous climb up. There was no lodge, no parking lot, no lift. Just the waking mountains, and the exhilarating free descent in an envelope of white light. Here, where the Great Spirit inspired Shoshone, Crow and Blackfeet for hundreds of years, it is impossible not to feel the Grace of the Creator as your feet hit the ground, a cool breath of air nips your ears, and your eyes feast looking out across the top of the world.

Pilot Peak, enveloped in swirling winter storm clouds, stands tall at the western end of the Beartooth trail.

Alpine lake still locked in winter’s grip.

Caleb and Jonathan exude excitement of downhill skiing in Spring conditions.

25


The natural symmetry of this vista anchored me, and gave time for thoughts to settle, making way for my own peaceful reflection.

26


A handful of campers start the day as sun floods over the peaks into this Beartooth valley.

A buffalo greets us (No!) at Yellowstone’s Northeast Gate. I am happy to have a long lens.

27


We can hear the falls before we locate the pathway carved into a peak on the south horizon.

Minutes southwest of Red Lodge, the weight of our world drops away in favor of chill morning air and the rush of a mountain stream.

Looking upstream, a billion drops of liquid snow rush down a thousand tiny steps in a forever dance.

28


The earth pushes up an array of crystal plates strong against those there before, which have crumbles down the face of the expanse.

y the end of day, we had traveled about forty miles as the crow files (crows were not flying at this altitude), almost seventy miles with the switchbacks, and nearly a mile vertically, though multiple climate zones. Each turn seemed to present different views, many breathtaking, each a treat for the senses. I wasn’t driving, so I had the best of the trip. It was a high-country meditation—at once relaxing and deeply satisfying, and at the same time, an energizing experience in the present tense. At the end, there was Yellowstone, but that is a different story. What we learned on this day was that the Beartooth Highway is a joy unto itself, in its beauty, its intensity and its serenity.

e

The movement of the water is mesmerizing, each moment distinct unto itself as the water slides away down rocks anchored in the streambed.

29


BE IN THE CENTER OF IT ALL. Greensboro offers the perfect combination of small town charm and big city appeal. Home to award-winning restaurants, museums and historic trails. You will be surprised by all it has to offer. See what’s new –– you’ll love it.

visitgreensboronc.com 30


Siberian squill and magnolia in bloom at Winterthur

Spring Blossoms In the Historic

BRANDYWINE VALLEY Story and Photos by

Rose Palmer

31


n 1771 a young chemist by the name of E. I du Pont left France and settled on the banks of the Brandywine River in Delaware where he started a gunpowder manufacturing operation. He and his descendants built both a lasting business empire and a lasting legacy of estates and gardens in the Brandywine Valley area of southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware.

A patchwork of tulips on display at Longwood Gardens

32

The family history starts at the Hagley Museum, Library and Gardens in Wilmington, DE where the first gunpowder works were established. The site includes the restored mills used for making black powder, a worker’s community and the ancestral house and gardens of the du Pont family. A variety of tours provide insight into the black powder manufacturing process, its uses and its impact on American history. In the spring, the property glows in shades of pale green and white as the wooded landscape and the many dogwood trees comes to life. The du Pont story continues at nearby Winterthur Museum and Gardens. Here, H F du Pont indulged in his passion for collecting early American furniture and decorative arts which he displayed in the expanded 175

room mansion. As a trained horticulturalist, he also had a personal hand in designing the various elements of the expansive gardens. The colorful spring show starts with the March bank where a succession of bulbs bloom in the early spring months. Waves of yellow winter aconite and white snow drops give way to shades of purple crocuses and then to periwinkle blue Siberian squill. A progression of color spreads throughout the gardens as a variety of Magnolia trees burst into flower followed by the strong violet scents in the lilac garden. The climax is in early May when acres of white, pink, salmon, red and lavender azaleas bloom alongside white dogwoods under a canopy of oaks, beech and tulip poplar trees.


French inspired mansion and gardens at Nemours

The French inspired Nemours garden

The one acre sized pool at Nemours

33


Sunset in the Azalea Woods at Winterthur

cross the border at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, Pierre S DuPont purchased a track of land in 1906 in order to protect an arboretum with tress that were over 100 years old. This farm became the centerpiece of his summer residence which he developed into a showpiece for entertaining friends and family. The formal outdoor spaces were inspired by the French and Italian fountain gardens he discovered on his European travels. Pierre added conservatories and an outdoor theater, all of which became the core of one of the country’s premier horticultural display gardens. The outdoor spring show peaks in April as a succession of bulbs, bushes and trees flower throughout the property. The highlight is toward the end of April when the 600 foot long Flower Garden Walk blossoms in a rainbow of tulips, hyacinths and other spring flowers.

The preserved black powder works at Hagley

34


In contrast, the younger Mt. Cuba Center puts on a naturalized display of native woodland plants which also peak toward the end of April when the dogwood path and the trillium garden are at their best. In the 1960’s Lammot du Pont Copeland and his wife chose to focus their efforts on the conservation of wildflowers and other local native species.

Shades of blue Siberian squill carpet the March Bank at Winterthur

Opening for the season in May, A I duPont’s Nemour’s Estate will make you wonder if you’ve left the country. The largest French style gardens in North America and the French inspired mansion were built by Alfred du Pont in 1907 to show his love for his much younger second wife Alicia. There is something to do and see in the Brandywine Valley all year, but spring is an especially colorful time to experience both the history and the horticulture of the area.

The Flower Garden Walk is filled with tulips and spring blooms at Longwood

35


Be inspired by the light of the Aurora Borealis. Renew your energy under the Midnight Sun. Experience the warmth of Fairbanks—Alaska’s Golden Heart—and the gateway to Denali, Interior and Arctic Alaska.

36

Call 1-800-327-5774 for your free Fairbanks Visitors Guide. Explore your Alaskan vacation at explorefairbanks.com.


Uniquely Palm Springs In Palm Springs, we are proud of the many locally owned and operated, mostly small, businesses that make up our city; retail shops with hand selected merchandise, small inns and boutique resorts, chef-owned cafes and locally run tours. Known as the Capital of Cool, come experience the true small gems of Palm Springs.

uniquelyps.com

37


Daffodils Welcome Spring in Nantucket Story And Photos By Alison Abbott

solated off the coast of Cape Cod, shades of yellow blanket a small island 36 miles out to sea. More than three million Narcissuses have been planted throughout the 48 square miles of what many consider to be one of the most beautiful islands in North America. The annual

Nantucket Daf fodil Festival is a bright and uplifting harbinger of spring. Fair weather has arrived to this corner of New England. Taking place the 4th weekend in April, the massive celebration of all things Daffy officially asserts a new season has begun for the Grey Lady.

38

Now in its 45th year, the annual event features specimens of the perennial flower in tones of sunshine yellow, creamy white, salmon pink and every gradation in between. While normally the stunning beaches and rose covered cottages take center stage on this summer playground, for these two days, it’s all about spring and the popular daffodils. What started as a simple celebration in the 1970’s featuring antique cars, is now an event that includes art shows, tours, contests, lectures and a flower show featuring every form of Amaryllidaceae one could imagine. Children colorfully paint the windows of storefronts. As a dog-friendly island, an extra dose of humor comes in the form of goodnatured furry friends in priceless costumes. This is one instagram-worthy event!


The Pine Woods Morris Dancers perform regularly at different venues on the island. They bring their special brand of English folk dance and music to the family oriented festival. The island itself is overflowing with talented creatives who stretch their limits with designs for the antique car parade; this is truly the main event. After making their way through the town’s cobbled streets, the parade winds along Milestone Road to the other end of the island. The gigantic picnic in Siasconset is a crowd pleaser. Complete with candelabra, tablecloths and a plethora of food and drink, the picnic finishes off the day’s celebration. New Englanders are a hearty bunch. Many would argue there is no group happier to see the arrival of spring in North America. Visitors return to the island year after year for a beloved festival that says good-bye to what is usually a cold and dark season. Residents plan their costumes and classic car dÊcor for months in advance, perhaps getting them through weather that chases many off-island to warmer climes. On this seaside destination, the annual celebratory event of renewal is wrapped in nostalgia, filled with tradition and tied with an enormous yellow floral bow.

Everyone gets daffy during Nantucket's Annual Daffodil Festival. Costume creativity comes in all shades of yellow.

The island's favorite seaside resort, The Wauwinet, decorates one of their nostalgic vehicles for the parade.

Vanity plates are part of Nantucket's vehicle culture and add some humor to the family oriented Daffodil Festival.

Celebrating English folk dance, the Pine Woods Morris Dancers add a special touch to the weekend's festivities on Nantucket.

39


Uncover NY’s Finger Lakes

Welcome to Ontario County in the heart of the Finger Lakes region. With lush farmland, rolling hillsides, glacier-carved lakes, outdoor adventure, delicious food, and award-winning wineries and breweries, our area is ready for you to uncover.

Share your #FLXPERIENCE

40

ÂŽ I LOVE NEW YORK is a registered trademark and service mark of the New York State Department of Economic Development; used with permission.


41


Picturesque Put-in-Bay is an island paradise

Golf carts line the streets of Put-in-Bay

42

When it comes to Put-in-Bay, this sign says it all!


Set Your Clock to Island Time,

OHIO STYLE

Story and Photos by Debbie Stone LAKE ERIE

fter a colder than usual winter for most of the U.S., spring is finally here and it’s time to leave our dens of hibernation and head outdoors. For a new type of playground, consider the Lake Erie Islands of Ohio. Most people are surprised to hear there are islands in Ohio but look at a map and you’ll see these bodies of land clustered together in the lake’s western basin, north of the state’s mainland. They are the Jersey Shores of the state and a prime vacation destination. There are over two dozen islands, a few of which are Canadian, but only five are inhabited and only three have ferry service. Begin your adventure with a trip on the Jet Express, heading from Sandusky to South Bass Island. The high-speed passenger ferry makes additional stops at Kelley’s Island and Cedar Point, a top-rated amusement park in the U.S. Put-In-Bay is an idyllic village on South Bass Island. Historians believe the origin of the town’s name refers to the bay’s use as a shelter from bad weather. Some, however, think it’s derived from the harbor’s shape, which according to an 1879 journal entry was described as a “pudding bag with a soft bottom.” Visitors have been coming to Put-In-Bay since the 1850s, when Jose DeRivera, a Spanish merchant, bought several of the islands and began developing them. He was responsible for getting the grape-growing and winemaking industry started in the area, a business that still thrives today.

43


he majority of folks get around the island via golf cart or bicycle. Both are practical methods of transportation to explore the miles of roads, parks, preserves and trails. Golf carts, which are available to rent from various shops in town, are in abundance and it’s quite a humorous sight to see rows of them lining the streets.

Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial

With its diverse mix of architecture, Put-In-Bay charms visitors. But this little village, is more than a pretty face. History was made here during the War of 1812 in the Battle of Lake Erie, which marked the only time a British fleet had been defeated.

The Glacier Grooves on Kellys Island is a must-see treasure

44

You’ll learn all about this pivotal conflict when you tour the U.S. Brig Niagara. The ship is a reconstruction of the original, a two-master, squarerigged sailing vessel, which plies the Great Lakes preserving and interpreting the story of the Battle of Lake Erie. History enthusiasts will also enjoy Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial, which commemorates the Battle of Lake Erie and Commodore Perry’s victory, as well as the subsequent peace between America, Canada and Great Britain. Managed by the National Park Service, the imposing, 352-feet, Greek Doric monument is made of 2,340 blocks of pink granite. Head up to the observation deck for picturesque views of the lake and surrounding islands. The island is home to the world’s largest celestite geode, called Crystal Cave. Discovered in 1897, the cave is known for its translucent blue celestite crystals. Another subterranean attraction is Perry’s Cave. This Ohio Natural Landmark boasts formations created by encrusted calcium carbonate deposits from centuries of water dripping from the ceiling.


Enjoy fresh seafood at the Boardwalk

The Jet Express whisks passengers from Ohio’s mainland to the islands

45


History aficionados will like touring the U.S. Brig Niagara

hoppers will enjoy the eclectic stores and galleries dotting the town center. And when it comes to food, you’ll find numerous restaurants to choose from with a variety of offerings. At night, the area is a live entertainment district with musicians performing everything from country to rock. If you want to take the laid-back pace down a notch further, head to Kelley’s Island. Known as the Emerald Isle, Kelley’s is a peaceful mecca for nature lovers with hiking trails, rocky shorelines, a pristine beach, lush forests and quarries. It’s also the site of the Glacial Grooves, a National Natural Landmark. The grooves are the largest glacial striations in the world and were scoured into solid limestone bedrock eighteen thousand years ago by the ice sheet covering North America. They represent the powerful force of nature, while providing a record of our earth’s history.

IF YOU GO:

www.shoresandislands.com www.visitputinbay.com

There’s plenty of outdoor fun at the lake

46


RHODE ISLAND

FREE Southern Rhode Island Vacation Guide 800.548.4662 SouthCountyRI.com

47


Springtime Dining In Portland, Maine Story and Photos by Kimberly Fisher Portland, Maine is home to almost 400 different restaurants and ranks among the top cities in the US for restaurants and bars per capita. Portland was named “Foodiest Small Town in America” by Bon Apétit Magazine in 2009 and was named “Restaurant City of the Year” in 2018. Great food paired with coastal air make a perfect blend of stylish and casual sophistication, which is what you get dining in Portland.

Fireside at Blue Fin

48

In Portland you can find microbreweries and brewpubs, the historic Portland Farmers Market (in existence since 1768), high-end restaurants, casual fare and everything in between. The food focal point is based on local, organic, farm-to-table and plantbased foods. Portland has also been noted as one of the most Vegan and Vegetarian-friendly cities in America. Portland Hunt & Alpine Club


HERE ARE 5 PLACES TO EXPLORE: J`s Oyster

J’s Oyster is a family-owned eatery that has been open since 1977, and is still run by the family heirs. Situated steps from the water, J’s is popular with locals and tourists alike, and conversations overheard at the bar span from who is dating who in town to best reductions for short ribs. This no-frills diner serves up local brews (like Allagash Belgian-style beer, Gritty’s Seasonal beer, and Geary’s Seasonal Ale) along with fresh local seafood. Not to miss: The Lobster Stew. www.jsoysterportland.com

Blue Fin

A timeless dining experience, Blue Fin has the ambiance of a swanky New England home, creating comfort chic with contemporary fireplaces, book stacks, rustic touches and muted dark colors. Chef Tim Labonte

is a Maine native, and the Maine staples are reflected in his menu: fresh lobster rolls, local bread, artisan cheeses, seasonal fruits and vegetables paired with classic cocktails and a pleasant wine list. Enjoy the gorgeous patio seating in the spring and summer months, or grab an after-dinner drink around the coziness of the fire pit. www.bluefinportland.com

Hot Suppa

Hot Suppa is located in a Victorian building dating back to 1860, and you can’t miss it with the usual long lines outside. Known for their fresh ingredients, this trendy brunch spot only has 10 tables and 5 bar seats, so come early! (No reservations are accepted). Original recipes are made from scratch, inspired from a road trip by the owner-brothers that took them across the US, sampling barbeques, drive-ins, and more. http://hotsuppa.com/

The Holy Donut

A unique take on the classic donut, the Holy Donut’s tasty treats are handmade with mashed potatoes and fresh local ingredients. Even though there is usually a line, it moves fast. Favorites include the cheddar bacon, cinnamon sugar, and coconut. https://theholydonut.com/

Portland Hunt & Alpine Club

For a chic weekend cocktail, head to the Portland Hunt & Alpine Club on Market Street. An extensive cocktail list greets you, divided up into classics, refreshing, adventurous, and wild card. Guests love the small bites, especially the popcorn with green chile powder, butter and parmesan, daily selection of deviled eggs, and Smorgasbord. www.huntandalpineclub.com

One of many Egg Benedict options at Hot Suppa

The popular Bacon Donut at The Holy Donut

Lobster Stew at J's Oyster Bar, a longtime staple in Portland, Maine

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HOLY DONUT

49


DINE - SHOP - PLAY The heartbeat of a New York City suburb featuring the vibrant retail, dining, entertainment, and recreational lifestyle of a thriving coastal community.

START EXPLORING 50

NorwalkNow.org


Serenity is more than a state of mind, it’s a county in New York.

All you need is a weekend in Dutchess County to relax, rejuvenate and reinvigorate the mind, body and soul. Plan the perfect getaway at DutchessTourism.com

Dover Stone Church, Dover Plains Credit: Justin P. Goodhart Photography

ÂŽ NYSDED

51 3152_TravelWorldInt_ad_M.indd 1

4/12/19 3:04 PM


WORLD CLASS GOLF IN BRANSON, MISSOURI Story by Priscilla Willis

Legends of Golf Tournament at Top of the Rock

or sports enthusiasts, Spring in North America is marked by NCAA March Madness and the Final Four, MLB Spring Training camps and Opening Day, and a longawaited return to the links heralded by golf ’s esteemed Masters Tournament in April. For amateur golfers, whether you’re a scratch golfer or a casual duffer like me, the verdant green and undulating curves of a perfectly manicured golf course are a most welcome sight after a long, gray winter. And, if you’ve been dreaming of your next golf vacation, Spring is the time to start planning. One golfing destination that may not be on your radar is Branson, Missouri. Yes, that Branson –better known for its

52

Courtesy of Big Cedar Lodge

bright lights and music, Branson is not only the family entertainment capital of the Midwest but also a golfer’s dream.

Championship Golf at Big Cedar Lodge Bass Pro Shops founder and noted conservationist, Johnny Morris, has teamed up with the biggest names in golf to bring Branson up to par with world-class links. Morris’ love of golf and nature comes together at Big Cedar Lodge with award-winning golf courses designed by Tom Fazio, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and, coming soon, the first public 18-hole championship course designed by Tiger Woods.

Ozarks National at Big Cedar Lodge Adding to an incredible list of world-class golf courses, Ozark’s National is Missouri’s first and only 18-hole golf course designed by Ben Crenshaw and architect Bill Coore. At 7,036 yards from the back tees, the course showcases the terrain of the Ozarks with breathtaking views. On April 22-28, 2019, Ozarks National and Top of the Rock hosts the sixth playing of theBass Pro Shops Legends of Golf Tournament.


Payne's Valley Course

Buffalo Ridge Springs

Top of the Rock Course

Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris collaborating with Tiger Woods and the Payne Stewart family to produce America’s first TGR Design public access golf course. The extraordinary 19th hole known as "The Rock" is set on a natural cavern system which takes you to the clubhouse after completing the 19th hole. This dramatic geological wonder is a unique feature you won't find anywhere else in the world.

Designed by Tom Fazio, this course is recognized as one of the region’s top golf courses by GOLF Magazine and Golf Digest. It was purchased in 2009 by Bass Pro Shops founder and visionary conservationist Johnny Morris. With a shared passion for nature and golf, Morris and Fazio redesigned the course to highlight the abundance of nature and wildlife in the Ozarks, including native grasses and free-ranging buffalo from nearby Dogwood Canyon Nature Park. Even if you're a duffer like me, this course is a must-see!

Finally, there's the Jack Nicklaus’ signature course known as the first Par-3 course included in a professional championship. Top of the Rock Golf Course is one of the first courses that was created over a period of seven and a half years with the help of Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson, and Arnold Palmer. The Top of the Rock driving range is also an Arnold Palmer design. World-class golf is just a 15-minute scenic drive from downtown Branson, so start planning your visit now. For more information and to book tee times, visit Big Cedar Lodge's website.

During your visit to Big Cedar or Top of the Rock, be sure to catch the Top of the Rock sunset celebration. Witness a magical moment as a traditional bagpiper plays in the background, the sky above Table Rock Lake a blaze of color, the sun's last glistening rays announced by the roar of a Civil War cannon as you raise your glass. Photo by Priscilla Willis

53


DESTINATION INFORMATION UNITED STATES ALABAMA

GREATER BIRMINGHAM CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU 205-458-8000

inbirmingham.org HUNTSVILLE/MADISON COUNTY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU 256-551-2235

huntsville.org

CALIFORNIA

PALM SPRINGS BUREAU TOURISM 760-322-8425

visitpalmsprings.com CATALINA ISLAND CHAMBER & VISITORS BUREAU 310-510-1520

catalinachamber.com

ST. AUGUSTINE, PONTE VEDRA & THE BEACHES VISITORS AND CONVENTION BUREAU 904-209-4425

FloridasHistoricCoast.com NAPLES, MARCO ISLAND, EVERGLADES CVB 239-252-2425

paradisecoast.com

SAN MATEO COUNTY/ SILICON VALLEY CVB

SANTA ROSA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

visitsanmateocounty.com

getrelaxing.com

650-348-7600

ALASKA

850-981-8900

FAIRBANKS ALASKA EXPLORE FAIRBANKS

VISIT CENTRAL FLORIDA

explorefairbanks.com

INDIANA

863-551-4707

visitcentralflorida.org

907-459-3770

SOUTHEAST ALASKA TOURISM COUNCIL 907-321-7231

alaskasinsidepassage.com

ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS & TOURISM 501-682-7606

Arkansas.com

Gateway to San Francisco and home of San francisco International Airport and Stanford University, is graced with both Scenic beauty and the excitement of a cosmopolitan community. We invite you to explore the land between the bay and the Ocean, and discover for yourself its charm and natural beauty.

LITTLE ROCK CVB 501-370-3248

littlerock.com

NORTH LITTLE ROCK CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU 501-758-1424

NorthLittleRock.org

CONNETICUT NORWALK NOW

203-561-9878

norwalknow.org

FLORIDA

BEACHES OF FORT MYERS & SANIBEL 239-338-3500

54

fortmyers-sanibel.com

VISIT SOUTH BEND MISHAWAKA 574-400-4025

visitsouthbend.com

KANSAS

KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE PARKS & TOURISM 785-296-4922

travelks.com

MARYLAND VISIT FREDERICK 301-600-4023

visitfrederick.org

MICHIGAN

DETR OIT METRO CONVENTION & BUREAU 313-202-1999

visitdetroit.com


DESTINATION INFORMATION (Cont’d.) MISSOUIRI

BRANSON CONVEN TION & VISITORS BUREAU 417-334-4084

explorebranson.com

NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILL/ORANGE COUNTY VISITORS BUREAU 919-245-4323

visitchapelhill.org

VISIT EL PASO

915-534-0685

visitelpaso.com VISIT PEARLAND 281-997-5972

visitpearland.com

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI, CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

GREENSBORO AREA CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

springfieldmo.org

VisitGreensboroNC.com

LYNCHBURG OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM

BAKER COUNTY TOURISM

LynchburgVirginia.org

basecampbaker.com VISIT TILLAMOOK COAST

BELLINGHAM WHATCOM COUNTY TOURISM

tillamookcoast.com

bellingham.org

WASHINGTON COUNTY VISITORS ASSOCIATION: THE TUALATIN VALLEY

SAN JUAN ISLANDS VISITORS BUREAU

417-881-5300

NEW YORK DEVELOPMENT COUNSELORS INT. 212-725-0707

aboutdci.com

DUTCHESS COUNTY TOURISM 845-463-5446

dutchesstourism.com

336-335-1578

OREGON 541-523-1589

503-842-2672

VISIT SYRACUSE

503-644-5555

VisitSyracuse.com

RHODE ISLAND

315-264-6024

tualatinvalley.org

434-485-7269

WASHINGTON 360-671-3990

360-378-6822 ext. 6

visitsanjuans.com

CANADA

DISCOVER NEWORT, RI

QUEBEC CITY TOURISM

DiscoverNewprt.org

quebecregion.com

401-845-9117

It’s time to rally your passion. Find life’s shining moments and celebrate them in a place where true colors never fade, a placewhere independent, spirits and an energetic community come together in perfect harmony. Here is where you find your center. Reconnect the dots with the things that truly matter and make memories on historic streets. Do what makes you happy. Syracuse. Do Your Thing.

VIRGINIA

SOUTH COUNTY TOURISM COUNCIL 401-789-4422

southcountyRI.com

TEXAS

VISIT BIG BEND

432-837-3915

visitbigbend.com GALVESTON ISLAND CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU 409-707-5121

galveston.com

418-641-6654, 5427

MEXICO PUERTO VALLARTA TOURISM BOARD

212-633-2047 x103

visitpuertovallarta.com

TRAVEL SERVICES CITYPASS

503-292-4418

citypass.com EXODUS TRAVELS 647-880-1581

ExodusTravels.com 55


Everything

California

VisitsanMateoCounty.CoM SMCCVB - Food & Travel Magazine Ad 2019.indd 1

#PlayBytheBay 3/27/2019 9:20:34 AM

Profile for TravelWorld International

TravelWorld International Magazine Spring 2019  

Advertisement
Advertisement