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RoverXchange Newsletter

Spring 2010


PresidentialROVINGS Spring 2010 Let me start by saying “I can’t wait for spring!” It signifies renewed life, and that’s what we have here in the Solihull Society with me as the new club president, Eugene Higby as the vice president, and Hans Schulze as the treasurer. We’re working on putting together the list of club events for the next year, looking for guest speakers for the club meetings, and checking on trails to run. Look for two official runs per month: typically an easier/moderate one, and a difficult one. The National Rally committee is working hard on the plans for this year’s Moab Rally in mid-October. We understand the late date may affect those with families in school, but were left with little option due to lack of availability of the facilities on our usual rally dates. The spring BBQ is coming on May 15th, and is will be a great way for us to get together, meet new members, and get outdoors. Last year’s BBQ had the best turn out in years, and I expect this one will draw even more people. We’ve planned for the BBQ to run from 2-5pm; this way some can run local trails beforehand and have stories to share. This winter has been brutally cold, keeping many trails closed or impassable for longer than usual, but I for one needed my fix of dirt and rocks and incredible mountain views. I did discover that a few trails that were reopened last year down in the Hayman burn area (Hackett, Longwater & Metberry) have been slightly less snow covered due to the lack of trees blocking out the sun. However, we need to be careful when running these trails, as they are probably very susceptible to damage from water and mud. Many clubs and enthusiasts spent countless hours working to reopen these trails; let’s all do our part in keeping these trails (and every trail) open. Finally, I’d like to thank Karen Kreutzer, our outgoing president, Andy Snow (VP), and Graham Jackson/Jenny Burris (Treasurer) for a great job. Looking forward to a great year, Jeffrey Corwin Solihull Society President

RoverXchange The Rover Xchange is a mostly quarterly publication of the Solihull Society 4-Wheel Drive Club, Inc. All material in Rover Xchange, unless otherwise noted, is the property of Solihull Society and may not be reproduced without permission.

Solihull Society Contacts President Jeff Corwin jeff.corwin@solihullsociety.org VP Eugene Higby eugene.higby@solihullsociety.org Treasurer Hans Schulze hans.schulze@comcast.net Secretary/Membership Paul Donohue secretary@solihullsociety.org Trail Events Coordinator Jim Hall jim.hall@solihullsociety.org Special Events Coordinator Wendy Vaughan vaughans_5@msn.com Rally Coordinator Chris Doty chris.doty@solihullsociety.org Rally Sponsorship Coordinator Mike Pomponio mike.pomponio@solihullsociety.org Land Issues Coordinator Jim Hall jim.hall@solihullsociety.org Newsletter Tate Crumbley tate.crumbley@solihullsociety.org Website Admins David Garbs admin@solihullsociety.org Dan Russo dan@solihullsociety.org Website – www.solihullsociety.org Newsletter Articles and Photos – Articles must be submitted in either Word (.doc) or text (.txt) format. Digital photos can be emailed or mailed on CD in either a JPEG, TIFF or EPS files. The articles can be submitted either via email (tate.crumbley@solihullsociety.org) or mailed on a CD to Tate Crumbley at the following address: 2010 E 98th Ave, Thornton, CO 80229. Materials will be returned upon request.

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RoverXchange

A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


RoverXchange Volume 14, Issue 1, Spring 2010

IN THIS ISSUE Presidential Rovings

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The Beauty of a Crank Start

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Trip Report: Hacket Gulch

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Vintage Content

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Trip Report: Georgetown Ice Racing

11

The Ten Commandments

13

Winter Wheeling in Utah

14

LR3: Your Next Discovery

16

Membership Application and Renewal

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Editor’s Note This issue is so jam packed with fun stuff, I don’t get my own page. The club has been operating for over 20 years now, and this issue pays tribute to that. As I was digging through the old newsletters, it was fun to see how the Rovers and the newsletters have evolved in that time period. I hope you enjoy this issue’s classic style. Thanks go to all who submitted content, and please send me your trip reports, pictures, and tech notes for inclusion in our summer issue!

RoverXchange

Spring 2010

–Tate Crumbley

www.SolihullSociety.org

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The Beauty of a Crank Start

by Paul Donohue

There was a recent posting on the Leaf Sprung List about pull starting a vehicle with a dead battery. It reminded me of a story about needing to do that once. Several years ago, I went with a friend in our two Land Rover Dormobiles on a winter trip into the Canyonlands of Utah. My friend wanted to look at some cliff dwellings and take a few photographs for a book he was writing about the Anasazi. One evening we camped at a place selected for its spectacular view: it was on the edge of a cliff overlooking miles of canyons. It was located at the bottom of a long, steep and very bad road. It might not even have been a road at all, just a dry creek bed. It was a beautiful but very remote place where the hand of man had never set foot. We awoke the next morning to discover that the batteries in both Land Rovers were completely dead. Neither Rover would start. Lights and stereos were the likely culprits. While this was a beautiful place, none of us wanted to take up residence. There was not enough food or water, and most of us had jobs or a real life to which we wanted to return. We had seen no other people during the week we had been in the Canyonlands and were about three days walk from a paved road. Without a phone or radio, we couldn’t call AAA for a jump start.

Land Rover, however, lacked the starter dog on the front of the crankshaft. Due to the tight space at our scenic campground, it was not possible to get close enough to use jumper cables. We needed to pull start the second Rover, in reverse, while backing up a steep hill. With the other Land Rover in high range overdrive reverse and with chains from its tow hook to the front of my Rover, I backed up the steep trail,pulling it very slowly. When we reached a somewhat straight stretch of the steep trail, the other driver let out his clutch, and after thirty or forty feet his engine came to life. After loading our astounded passengers we continued our expedition. This kind of recovery is no big thing for the experienced back country driver. For our passengers, however, this was nothing short of miraculous. I am thankful that my Land Rover had a hand crank, another thoughtful feature brought to you by the folks at Solihull. This little adventure illustrates one of the many reasons our old Series Land Rovers are so well suited to serious back country travel. My wife was reading the newspaper recently and asked if I had seen the article about the guy who drove his Series Land Rover over a 100 foot cliff. Taking her seriously, I asked if the Land Rover were totaled. She replied that they don’t know yet since the damned things are so slow it hasn’t hit the bottom yet.

There was no space to push start the Rovers since we were at the bottom of a steep hill with no room to move. Some of the folks with us were worried. Of course, they did not know about Land Rovers, the world’s most versatile vehicle. My Land Rover was easily started with the hand crank, much to the amazement of our friends. Most of them only knew about starting cranks only from history books. Our other 4

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A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


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Spring 2010

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Trip Report: Hacket Gulch

by Jeff Corwin

Hackett Gulch trail run 2-13-10 This was just a preliminary run by Jeff Corwin and Eugene Higby. We wanted to evaluate current trail conditions and difficulty level for future runs for our club.

slippery sections were scattered about on the trail, and then we reached a large rock slab.

We met in Sedalia at about noon, headed west on towards Deckers, then went south on 67 to Westcliff. Once in Westcliff, we were on forest service roads for over fifteen miles before reaching the trail head. The snow levels were pretty high on the forest service roads, but luckily they were already packed down a bit over the last week since the last snow came though.

It was completely clear of any snow, so I figured I’d just drive right up—not so. The rock was deceptively slick, so it ended up taking a bit of momentum with both lockers to climb the slab. Of course, I did take what appeared to be the harder line. Gene followed and ran into the same issue, but he got hung up at the bottom and was not able to start off with any momentum, so I jumped out of my truck to take some pictures. That’s when I realized how slick it was, nearly falling down on what felt like tiny marbles embedded in the rock.

Hackett Gulch trail started with a snowy descent and some rolling terrain. The trail was easier than I remembered (from before the Hayman Burn, back when I had a J**p on 31’s). There were a few minor ruts between the

After some spotting, Gene climbed the slab, and we were off to the next obstacle, Hackett Rock. Oddly, such a memorable obstacle from my past outings on this trail was not even noticed until our return trip (the trail is currently

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A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


an out-and-back arrangement, neither joining nor intersecting with any others). Personally, I hope Hackett Rock becomes more difficult as this trail gets used again. After the rock, we had a few steep and snowy climbs and descents to the end of the current trail. We stopped for a late lunch before the snow started falling, and then we returned the way we came. At the trailhead, we decided to head south east towards Woodland Park as the trip in took so long. It was still quite a distance to the main roads, but finally our outing was complete. I’d say with a full day available, one should fairly easily be able to complete all three trails in that area: Hackett, Longwater, and Metberry.

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Vintage Content: Series Swivel Ball Rebuilds The article below was taken from the March/April 1990 issue of the club newsletter, loaned to the editor by Paul Donohue, the club’s historian. Early newsletters were typed on typewriters and then photocopied.

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RoverXchange

A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


From the March/April 1990 Newsletter

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Spring 2010

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Vintage Content: Covers from the Past

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A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


Trip Report: Georgetown Ice Racing I almost didn’t make it. When we reached the wall of traffic before we’d even gotten to Floyd Hill, I knew we were in for it. After barely moving for what seemed like an eternity, turning around seemed valid. My plan was simple: head up to Georgetown a bit late in order to miss the majority of the ski traffic and take a few pictures of the ice racing for the newsletter. My wife, eight months pregnant, sat patiently in the passenger’s seat of the Rover as I dropped it into low range. It’s never a good thing when you have to drop in to low range on the interstate. It either means that the weather is so nasty that other vehicles are threatening to slide into you or that traffic is so bad, “1st low idle” is an appropriate speed. Neither is all that fun. Near the Highway 6 merge, I’d nearly given up. We pulled off to hit a bathroom (an all too frequent experience for the both of us lately) and turn around when my cell phone rang. Jeff and Chris had made it up to Georgetown and were wondering if I were coming up. So far, they were the only ones on the ice. I told them we were en route and plowed onward. The lake in Georgetown is an interesting feature of the mountain commute up I-70. In summer, it’s a pretty reservoir next to a quaint mining town. In winter, it comes alive as the ice is thick enough to support not only droves of ice fishing shelters but also vehicles. Over the years,

by Tate Crumbley

I’d seen Hummer clubs, Jeeps, station wagons, Kias, and police vehicles battling their way around cones on the polished surface. Today, though, it was the Rovers’ turn. Both of them. On arrival, I pointed Norma to the restroom and skittered on foot out onto the ice, camera in hand, vectoring towards an obvious target of a Discovery 2 and a P38 Rangie. Juxtaposed to the lowered, roofless Jeeps with deafening engines and tiny spiked tires, the lifted Rovers looked tall and clumsy, like teenagers who hadn’t yet grown into their feet. Jeff and Chris were getting the lowdown from the ice racing representative. In addition to rules and course layout, he was offering driving tips on throttle, braking and appropriate racing lines. Big wheels spun as the bare rubber tires cut through the two inches of snow and found the polished ice beneath. The tires spun a lot; the vehicles spun as well when the driver misjudged a corner and whipped around. It was a good environment to experience this feeling: the middle of the perfectly flat lake with other vehicles safely away. From my safe vantage, I could watch both the driving techniques and the technology at work. On starts, I could see the traction control working on the Discovery as the computer tried to figure out how to make the best of what little traction there was. On stops, anti-lock gives up when all four wheels lock up. Wide lines around corners worked the best, with the route-markings at the apex of the turns. Steering input was a suggestion at most, and throttle steering controlled the day. “Slow is fast” seemed to work. “Second low” seemed to work. As Chris and Jeff came to grips with this new driving style, speeds around the track improved and the finishes became more competitive. Jeff ’s P38 had narrower tires, and he dropped the air suspension down to the lowest setting as he discovered the engine’s rev limiter on the finishes. On giant, brand new Michelins, Chris’s Discovery swayed deeply around corners and it was obvious why the purpose-built Jeeps on the ice had nearly no suspension travel. Each driver experimented with technique on each passing lap around the dog-bone shaped track. Then Mike, our guide du jour, drove over his ice racer. The real competitors of the day had purposebuilt ice racers. Most were Jeeps from the 60s and 70s: lightweight and simple, with lowered leaf springs, roll cages, and massive V8 engines with no mufflers. It was fairly

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unpleasant to stand beside them even at idle. Mike’s jeep was no exception­—a CJ-5 from 1973, It had been an ice racer for 30 years, in his possession for eight. He took each of us for a lap around the same course we’d been driving. With the spiked tires clawing at the ice, eye protection was as mandatory as the seat belt. The stupid grins on our faces at the end weren’t required, but they were very large and very consistent. A specialized tool in the hand of a craftsman, it pains me a little to say that the Jeep was a heckuva lot of fun. However, like their Moab-bound rockcrawling brethren, the ice Jeeps weren’t road legal and both arrived and departed on trailers. The Rovers arrived and left under their own power while filled with friends, family, lunch, and tools, and that versatility has always appealed to and impressed me. Mike had a baseball cap and a black hot rodder’s jacket, his eyes shielded from the reflected sun by mirrored Oakleys. Ice racing was a family affair to him, and his wife and kids often accompanied him. Despite heavy competition on the track, he described how the ice racers were friendly off the track. Similar to how Rover owners jump to assist others, he’d once loaned a carburated air filter assembly to someone who’d lost the wingnut off of his, and that racer ended up taking third place that day. He spoke of his sport

with great pride, and told me about how the ice racing club practiced Leave No Trace in their use of the lake. In addition to having rules requiring that vehicles have no severe leaks, volunteers walk the ice at the end of each day to clean up any accidental spills. He reminded me that we weren’t supposed to dump anything on the ice, as some biodegradable fluids looked like automotive fluids: coffee looks like oil, and Mountain Dew looks like coolant. Since the lake is really a source of drinking water, it’s good to see such diligence. After having our fill of laps around our track, we rumbled over to watch the real racers on a different track. There were street stock races going on, with a newer Jeep Wrangler with a giant lift riding on tiny spiked tires racing a Kia Sportage. It truly seemed the club would take all comers to prove the driver’s prowess on the ice. Overall, it was a very good day, and I’m really glad that we didn’t turn around because of the traffic. As with so many fantastic activities in the high country of Colorado, playing on the weekends just means paying your dues on I-70. In addition to the wickedly fun thrill of the ride in the Jeep, we got to practice driving skills that will come in handy on the slick winter roads of our state. We owe many thanks to the Our Gang 4 Wheelers Club for hosting us that Saturday. www.ourgangiceracing.com

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A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


The Ten Commandments

by Jeff Aronson

The Ten Commandments of the Land Rover Life I. I am thy Land Rover who brought you out of the muddy field, sheltered you from the winter’s snow, and causes the non-believer to cast furtive glances thy way. Worship me. II. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s Range Rover Sport nor his heated garage, nor his battery charger, for you may need them one day. III. Thou shalt remember to feed thy children after purchasing all needed Land Rover parts, for they, too, deserve nourishment as much as your Discovery. IV. Thou shalt not deceive thy spouse or significant other into thinking that thee is partaking in a romantic picnic when indeed thou art going out to look at the Series Land Rover parked in a field for the past 10 years. V. Thou shalt not love thy spouse and children more than thy Land Rover. VI. Thou shalt not despise thy neighbor’s Land Cruiser, nor his XTerra, nor even his Lexus, for he knows not of his sins. VII. Thou shalt not tell thy spouse the entire cost of thy latest restoration - at least not all at the same time - nor shall thy share the sacred invoice with a spouse who lacks the appropriate enthusiasm. They, too, can be saved. VIII. Thou shalt not prepare a carburetor rebuild on the same table as supper, for unclean foods will foul the jets. IX. Thou shalt not allow thy sons and daughters to wed in holy matrimony during sacred holidays, such as the Mid Atlantic Rally, the Solihull Society National Rally, the British Invasion, or the Maine Winter Romp. X. There is only one Green Oval. One must not worship false idols, such as three-pointed stars.

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Spring 2010

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Winter Wheeling in Utah

by Shawn Davis

Shawn sent these pictures from a recent wheeling trip near her home in Salt Lake City, Utah. Shawn is the daughter of Bill Davis, owner of Great Basin Rovers.

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RoverXchange

A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


LR3: Your Next Discovery Editor’s note: Dave is the Service manager at Land Rover Flatirons

The LR3 is Land Rover’s replacement for the Discovery. A lot has changed since its introduction to North America in April of 2004. Flatirons Superior, Colorado Most of its service related problems have been software issues, and almost all of those have been corrected with newer software updates for the early models. Since the introduction of the LR3, we have not replaced a single transmission and have only replaced one engine. Keep in mind we are now seeing 2005 and 2006 models with well over 100k miles. With the reliability issues being a part of the past, we can now focus on the affordability and capabilities of the LR3. 2005 LR3s are selling from the low to mid 20s with the 2006 ranging from the mid to upper 20s. That makes this vehicle an exceptional buy and here is why. LR3 comes with a 300-hp V8 that pulls those mountain passes with ease or a base V6 version with 216 hp. The V8 has a

by Dave Worster

6-speed automatic transmission with manual shift gate. All-wheel drive with low-range gearing is standard and includes a locking center differential for severe off-road conditions. A locking rear differential is also available. Standard features include anti-lock 4-wheel disc brakes, anti-skid/traction control, hill descent control and Land Rover’s Active Roll Mitigation designed to detect an impending tip and activate the anti-skid system to reduce the chances of a roll. The V8 LR3 offers SE and HSE models. HSE has 19-inch wheels but keep in mind if you’re an avid off roader you are very limited in larger aggressive off road tires verses the SE’s 18inch wheels, plus additional equipment and unique trim like standard heated leather seats and much more that will make an off road drive into comfortable luxury. Replacing the Discovery’s solid axles and metal springs, LR3 has an independent air-spring suspension with four available ride heights and automatic load leveling. LR3 also incorporates Land Rover’s Terrain Response system as standard. With Terrain Response, you can change suspension and

Photo by Norma Crumbley

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power train electronic calibrations to accommodate different driving conditions. There a five different settings for the Terrain Response System: Normal, Grass/Gravel/ Snow (also includes ice), Mud–Ruts, Sand, and Rock Crawl. In slippery conditions, Grass/Gravel/Snow is idea and will start off in a higher gear­—second gear in high range or third gear in low range. When traveling ground that is not only muddy or deeply rutted but possibly soft and uneven, use the Mud–Ruts setting. This program is available in High and Low range, and when using low range the suspension will raise automatically from normal ride height of 7.3in to 9.5in.

brakes during a hill descent if engine braking is insufficient. HDC automatically operates the brakes to slow the vehicle and maintain speed. Land Rover offers many accessories for the LR3 to dress it up and make it even more functional for that daily drive or a rugged off-road excursion. Some of the more popular accessories are roof racks, brush guards and lamp guards. One popular accessories not offered by Land Rover but available from the aftermarket are rock sliders. They protect the rocker panels from wheel to wheel, under body components like the air compressor and tank, and highly recommended if you are an aggressive of road enthusiast.

Another popular item is a lift kit, a very inexpensive way Sand mode is used when driving on dry beaches, dunes, to get 2.5in more in ride height allowing bigger tires. This sand deserts, or deep gravel and is available in High or Low kit consists of new ride height sensor rods to replace the range. factory rods and has a cost of around $125.00. Rock Crawl mode, just the name says, is for when you will be maneuvering over boulders or river beds with large rocks submerged below water. Unlike the other functions, Rock Crawl only works in low range and will raise the suspension to maximum height unless it suspects a trailer is attached by sensing an electrical load from the trailer socket. Three other special features include Dynamic Stability Control (DCS) / Electronic Traction Control (ETC) and Hill Descent Control (HDC).

You Know Your Rover. I Know Your Real Estate.

DCS identifies unstable driving conditions such as under steering and over steering and helps keep the vehicle under control my changing engine output and applying the brakes at individual wheels.

Tom Cryer Broker Associate The Kentwood Co. 303-773-3399 303-638-3202 tcryer@kentwoodco.com www.MyTownCryer.com

ETC improves vehicle traction when one or more wheel is spinning by automatically applying the brakes to the spinning wheel until it regains grip. HDS Works with the anti lock 16

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Several larger tires are available for the 18 inch wheel. 285/60/18 is about the biggest you should go without raising the suspension. There are few choices for the 19inch wheels.

A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


Bill Burke’s

4-Wheeling America 970-858-3468 … bb4wa@bb4wa.com

Premier Training for all users of 4-wheel drives and all skill levels. Driving Techniques. Recovery. Safety. Environmental Awareness. Getting Prepared. Trail Spotting. Navigation. Field Fixes.

“Though I have driven off road many times before, I learned some great driving techniques from the class. It was fun to learn more about trail prep, recovery and trail fixes. Bill, I appreciated the mix of serious instruction with fun days on the trail and a good dose of patience for my slightly reluctant Disco.” Sam W., ‘07 “Being new to the sport, I was a little intimidated going into this class. But, thanks to Bill’s easygoing teaching style, I felt right at home. Not only did I learn a lot about the mechanics of my truck and the importance of being prepared, but we tackled some terrain that I wouldn’t have thought possible on my own.” Linda P., ‘08

www.bb4wa.com We hold BLM & USFS permits to operate on public lands.

●Private Instruction One-on-one with Bill Burke.

●Group Training Comprehensive training programs that include all you need to know about going into the remote back country safety.

●Industrial & Government Training Programs

“A few of us had the chance to spend the weekend wheeling with Bill here in the Northeast…. I have to say it's time well spent and one of the best investments you can make for your wheeling experience and knowledge.” David M., ‘03

DVDs by Bill Burke ●Getting UNStuck

●Getting PREpared

Safe recovery techniques. Real life situations!

Watch this DVD before you head out! Includes 8page booklet!

Custom safety programs for organizations that use 4WD vehicles in their operations.

●Trail Leader Training Trail leading is serious business not to be taken lightly. It is also fun if you are prepared for all situations. Learn skills needed to safely lead clubs, friends, and other groups.

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MembershipInformation

Application for Membership/Renewal Please print all information clearly. Name:_________________________________________________________Email:____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:______________________________________________________State_____________________________Zip:_________________________ Home Phone:_______________________________________________Cell Phone:____________________________________________________ Occupation:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Present Land Rovers:______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Past Land Rovers: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ May we share the above information with other club members? Type of Application: New member Renewal

Yes

No

Type of Membership: Single (S) -- $40.00 Family (F) -- $50.00 Out of state (O) -- $30.00

Waiver: I/We, in consideration of my/our participation in the Solihull Society Land Rover Club, [hereafter referred to as club] do hereby release Solihull Society, its members, officers, sponsors, successors and assigns from any and all responsibility or liability for any and all claims, arising from or related to the activities and my/our participation in and all events sponsored and/or involving the club. I/We understand and acknowledge off-highway driving is a hazardous activity with inherent dangers, which can result in severe property damage, serious bodily injury and/or death. With full knowledge of such risks, hazards and potential for damage, injury or death, I/We voluntarily and knowingly assume such risks and hazards and agree, that the club, its members, officers, sponsors, successors and assigns shall not be liable in any way, to me/ us for any claims for damages, injuries or death resulting from my/our participation in the club’s events. I/We acknowledge my/our vehicle is in good mechanical condition, and said vehicle is insured for bodily injury liability insurance and personal injury protection insurance and/or medical payment coverage, as required by its’ state of registration. I/We are advised to consult with our insurance broker/agent about availability of and adequacy of present medical payment coverage should I/We and/ or our passengers sustain bodily injury, while operating my/our motor vehicle. I/We further acknowledge the driver/operator of the vehicle is licensed to operate a motor vehicle and the license is not under suspension. This waiver/release of liability is binding on our heirs, insurers, personal representatives or assignees.

Signature______________________________________________________________Date______________________________________________ Club Use Only: Cash Check # Quicken Deposit slip

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Email to member Roster Member card # Welcome packet

A Newsletter for Land Rover Aficionados


DealershipDISCOUNTS

Our members receive exclusive discounts at Denver area Land Rover dealerships

The Colorado Denver East Dealership offers:

15%

DISCOUNT ON PARTS & LABOR Includes courtesy vehicle. Will install customer parts. Contact dealer for details.

The Colorado Flatirons Dealership offers: Flatirons

15%

DISCOUNT ON PARTS & LABOR

Superior, Colorado

The Colorado Springs Dealership offers:

15%

DISCOUNT ON PARTS & LABOR

JC’s Rover offers:

10%

DISCOUNT ON LABOR Parts typically 10%-20% cheaper than list

Green Diamond Tires offers:

10%

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OFF TIRE ORDERS

Spring 2010

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Solihull Society PO Box 480864 Denver, CO 80248-0864

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