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G EGTE T AWAY AWAY C ACRA R


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CONTENTS T H E

H I G H L I G H T S

46 Keeping history alive in Iran.

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ULTIMATE GALLERIES

LOCAL HERO

TASTEMAKERS’ TRAVELS

Affordable Art Fair founder Will Ramsay chooses his favourite places to view art.

Andrew Eames finds out more about the photographer from a Quechua peasant family who shot for Nat Geo and introduced Peru to the world.

Architect Bill Bensley and fashion designer Matthew Williamson are just two of the gurus who reveal their favourite holiday destinations.

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PICTURE PERFECT

WORLD’S OLDEST GYM

GOLDEN HOUR

National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry chooses his favourite images from his archives.

Photographer Jeremy Suyker finds out more about the original warriors of Iran.

Margie Goldsmith travels to Mongolia to see one of the world’s most unique events — the Golden Eagle Festival.

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CONTENTS

9 Meet The Guest Editor Multi-hyphenate designer, architect and artist Bill Bensley was the perfect person to take the reins of our Culture issue.

12 Contributors This month’s writers and photographers talk about their favourite cultural sojourn.

14 Take Me Here From outdoor galleries to reclaimed Ming buildings. We reveal the places that you need to visit.

21 Face To Face Photographer Serge Anton celebrates 30 years of portrait photography in one new tome.

22 Art House The new museums that are almost as pretty as their contents.

24 Capital Of Culture Why the city of Matera in Italy deserves to be crowned Capital of Culture for 2019.

26 Ultimate Galleries Affordable Art Fair founder Will Ramsay talks about his favourite places to see art.

28 Local Hero Andrew Eames travels to Peru to walk in the footsteps of National Geographic photographer Martin Chambi.

34 Tastemakers’ Travels Gurus from the worlds of fashion, design, food and wine tell us about their favourite holiday destinations.

40 Picture Perfect Nat Geo photographer Steve McCurry chooses his favourite photographs.

46 World’s Oldest Gym We take a peek behind the doors of one of the world’s most ancient gyms – the zurkhaneh in Iran.

54 Golden Hour Margie Goldsmith travels to the wilds of Mongolia for the Golden Eagle Festival.

60 Novel Idea The biblio boltholes that will want to make anyone want to become a bookworm.

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The Sir John Soane’s Museum in London.

64 Living Art Jill Ferguson discovers a catwalk show with a difference in New Zealand.

70 Haute Fashion A hillside clothing brand in Tibet that’s taking on the world of fashion.

74 Fun Of The Fair Chic music festivals that the whole family can enjoy...

76 Island Farms Shelley Seale proves that there’s more to Hawaii than Elvis and surfing.

81 Chef’s Guide To London Chef Anton Manganaro takes us on a foodie tour of the UK capital.

82 If You Do One Thing… ...Take a private jet tour of the Middle East.


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You gain the reassurance that while you are travelling, we are constantly on hand to make sure that your holiday runs seamlessly.

Clockwise from top: Let your cares drift away. Picturesque Positano in Italy. Young boys from the Karo tribe in Ethiopia. A view to take your breath away.

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Hotel designer extraordinaire — Bill Bensley.

P PHOTOGRAPHY: BILL BENSLEYBACKSHALL

MEET THE GUEST EDITOR

B

ill Bensley’s CV could be mistaken as a magazine feature on the world’s hottest hotels. This American multi-hyphenate who can put his name to more than 200 luxury properties, is the man behind such legendary resorts as The Siam Bangkok, The InterContinental Danang, Four Seasons Chiang Mai and Four Seasons Golden Triangle Tented Camp. He is now working on creating another masterpiece, Shinta Mani Wild in the Cambodia jungle. His life is all about travel. If he’s not in his design studio in Bangkok (housed in the former Iraq embassy), he is doing site visits or stopping by his philanthropic project, the Shinta Mani School of Hospitality in Siem Reap. “As an architect, interior designer and landscape architect for some of the world’s best resorts it is my job to travel extensively to understand first hand what is happening in the hospitality world. Last year I visited my 88th country and before I turn 60 I plan to visit the 100th country, which might just be Madagascar.”

BILL BENSLEY

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TRAVEL

D I A N A

Brought up in Hong Kong and the Philippines, Diana was introduced to travel at an early age. My Most Memorable Trip: “Watching a sandstorm in Mongolia.”

B Y

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L U K E

Senior Travel Designer Luke had already toured Belize, Guatemala, the US, Canada and Africa before he turned 19. My Most Memorable Trip: “Diving in the Galapagos. A sensory overload.”

E D I T O R I A L GUEST EDITOR Bill Bensley EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Claire Turrell ART DIRECTOR Claire Lambert CONTRIBUTORS Andrew Eames, Jill Ferguson, Margie Goldsmith, Steve McCurry, Jo Upcraft, Shelley Seale, Jeremy Suyker

MEET THE EXPERTS

The Lightfoot Travel team visit all four corners of the globe to create the ultimate itineraries

M A R K E T I N G A N D A D V E R T I S I N G M AT T

Born and raised in South Africa, Matt has travelled around Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Tanzania. My Most Memorable Trip: “A self-drive road trip around the Ring Road in Iceland.”

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Head of Guest Communications NIkki was born in the USA and raised in Hong Kong. My Most Memorable Trip: “Yangshuo, with its towering karsts and winding rivers.”

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WINNER: TRAVEL MEDIA OF THE YEAR 2017

S T E P H

Head of Product Steph has lived in Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America. My Most Memorable Trip: “Patagonia – the scenery of Torres del Paine National Park in Chile is mind-blowing!”

Visit www.lightfoottravel.com Printed by Naili Print Media Pte Ltd, Singapore. For advertising enquiries contact info@lightfoottravel.com Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Cover image: Discover the Pink Mosque in Shiraz, Iran. Photography: Paul Biris/Getty Images


S T E V E M C C U R RY

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Nat Geo photographer Steve McCurry, who is the man behind the world’s most famous photograph, the Afghan Girl, tells us about his favourite images. My favourite cultural trip: “One very hot day I saw these women picking clover in a field in Yemen. They were covered from head to toe. I still haven’t found out why their [pointed] hats are that shape. That’s what I love most about travelling; seeing different people and different ways of doing things.”

S H E L L E Y S E A L E

J I L L F E R G U S O N

Award-winning travel writer Shelley Seale produces stories for USA Today, National Geographic and Fodor’s. My favourite cultural trip: It was during my first trip to India, in 2005. I was travelling with a friend and group of volunteers to work in a children’s home there. Little did I know that this group would become my second family, and I would return to India nine more times over the years. It truly is my soul culture.

The California-based author and writer contributes to numerous titles, including Woman’s Day and the Huffington Post. My favourite cultural trip: I spent a week in Homer, Alaska, where I got to experience many facets of a town that has been formed by Native American culture. I photographed bears on Katmai Peninsula with documentary makers. We also visited galleries with a local artist and enjoyed supper with the owners of a farm-to-fork restaurant. It was amazing.

M A R G I E G O L D S M I T H

J E R E M Y S U Y K E R

French photographer and reporter Jeremy Suyker specialises in sociocultural issues. He has seen his stories published in The Sunday Times Magazine, The Washington Post and Time magazine. My favourite cultural trip: I’m in love with one of our neighbouring countries, Belgium. It’s a fantastic place both for culture and people. It has a long and rich history. Brussels and Antwerp have a very dynamic art scene, great museums, amazing food and unforgettable beer.

Margie Goldsmith’s award-winning stories have appeared in Travel + Leisure, the Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. Her adventures take her all over the world and this issue she travelled to Mongolia for us. My favourite cultural trip: It was to Bhutan, a few years ago. It was a time when there were no luxury hotels and the main road was a dirt path shared by men directing yak trains, women leading their toddlers on small ponies and children on their way to school. The friendliness of the people was matched only by the beauty of the country with its 15,000-foot sacred mountains and verdant forests with rhododendrons in full bloom everywhere.

PHOTOGRAPHY: BRUNO BARBEY

Contributors

We asked our writers and photographers about their favourite cultural adventure


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#TAKEMEHERE —

OUTDOOR GALLERY Art lovers get excited! You will now be able to view the critically acclaimed Field Of Light Uluru installation by Bruce Munro until 31 December 2020. With 50,000 lights, covering more than seven football fields, this solar-powered artwork in the Australian desert is truly a sight to behold. And then of course, there is the striking monolith itself — Uluru. Talk to your Lightfoot Travel Designer now about organising a private tour of the Red Centre. Field Of Light Uluru by Bruce Munro.


#TAKEMEHERE —

LIVING HISTORY When plans for a much-needed reservoir put the future of 50 Ming and Qing dynasty villas under threat, Chinese philanthropist Ma Dadong paid for the ancient buildings to be moved stone-by-stone, 700 kilometres away to safety near Shanghai. And he didn’t stop there — he decided to add to this monumental conservation project by moving the nearby camphor forest. The result is now a breathtaking resort called Amanyangyun, which has just opened to guests. Go back in time at Amanyangyun near Shanghai.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: AMAN RESORTS

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#TAKEMEHERE —

DIRTY DANCING Sadler’s Wells Theatre has just given you 20 new reasons to visit London in 2018. The acclaimed venue has announced 20 landmark commissions to celebrate the 20th anniversary of its theatre. One such production is Icon, which was created by Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui and Turner prize-winning artist Sir Antony Gormley. The set features three-and-a-half tonnes of clay, which the dancers will then mould into masks during their performance. Art lessons at school were never this interesting. Icon on stage from late November.

PHOTOGRAPHY: MATS BACKER/SADLER’S WELLS THEATRE

Icon by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui and Sir Anthony Gormley.

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ON THE MAP

PHOTOGRAPHY: SERGE ANTON, FACES/LANNOO PUBLISHERS

W H A T ’ S

H O T

N O W

Face To Face Photographer Serge Anton collates some of his favourite shots in a new tome Belgian photographer Serge Anton has spent the past 30 years travelling the world. Landscapes have featured in his work, but it’s portraits that have become his greatest passion. “Since my childhood I have been fascinated by faces. I keep observing them, trying to read them, to understand what they feel and express,” says Anton. He has now put together shots of favourite works from as far away as Africa to Asia in Faces by Serge Anton (USD$48, Lannoo Publishers). One of Serge Anton’s striking muses.

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Louvre Abu Dhabi

ON THE MAP —

Art House These jawdropping museums are almost as pretty as the exhibitions they contain inside. We highlight the new spaces that culture addicts will want to visit this year

Jean Nouvel’s flying saucer-like structure on Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi looks like a piece of art itself. The museum not only features works from its sister museum in Paris, but it has also made acquisitions of its own such as a page of the Quran in Kufic script from the ninth century. STAY: The St Regis Saadiyat Island Resort can be found near the new art enclave, which includes the Louvre Abu Dhabi, the Manarat Al Saadiyat and soon the Guggenheim.

Musée YSL Marrakech

Top: Louvre Abu Dhabi. Above: The Rain of Light installation created by sunlight filtering through 7,000 stars in the roof.

Above: Musée YSL Marrakech. Right: Yves Saint Laurent in Place Jemaa el-Fnaa, Marrakech. One of the museum’s exhibitions.

The new Grand Egyptian Museum.

Grand Egyptian Museum

The city of Cairo is about to launch a dramatic new attraction – the Grand Egyptian Museum. Taking inspiration from its ancient neighbours, the pyramid-like structure is set to hold 100,000 antiquities, including the Tutankhamen collection and an 83-ton statue of Ramses II. The state-of-the-art museum will feature exhibition galleries, 3D cinema, restaurants, boutiques and restoration centre. Launches May 2018. STAY: Visit the Four Seasons Cairo for sweeping views of the Nile.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: REGINALD GRAY, ROLAND HALBE/LOUVRE ABU DHABI, NICOLAS MATHÉUS/FONDATION JARDIN MAJORELLE

The life and work of one of the world’s most iconic designers Yves Saint Laurent is celebrated at this new museum in Marrakech. The architects say that the building’s facade is designed to look like the warp and weft of fabric, while the inside of the museum is said to represent the lining of a couture jacket. Within the exhibition spaces you’ll find some of his most famous garments, ateliers’ sketches and more than 1,000 prints by photographers such as Richard Avedon and Helmut Newton. STAY: Five riads have been combined to create La Sultana Marrakech. Picture high vaulted ceilings, fire places and lavish bathrooms.


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The hilltop UNESCO World Heritage Site of Matera.

ON THE MAP —

Capital Of Culture

The cobbled-stone streets of Matera are about to attract culture vultures in their droves when it becomes the European Capital of Culture in 2019. The UNESCO World Heritage Site has recently undergone a resurgence, which has seen new restaurants, bars, hotels and tech startBut while Piano’s concert hall is sure to become the focus ups move into its famed “Sassi” cave dwellings. Now plans are underway to help make the hilltop city of many an Instagram photograph, there’s no doubt that more accessible for the one million visitors expected next this ancient city is already a star on its own. Hidden among its alleyways you’ll find year. The cathedral has recently opened after artisanal ice cream shops such as I Vizi Degli a 12-year restoration, roads will be created STAY A LITTLE Angeli, which found fame with a recent and a small underground will be completed LONGER review in the New York Times; gourmet in 2018. But there’s no fear of the event Embrace la dolce vita and add the Baroque turning the quaint city into a theme park, restaurant Ego; Area 8 that serves up capital of Lecce, the as the artistic director mouthwatering cocktails in a subterranean enchanting town of Matera 2019, Joseph location and Sextantio Le of Otranto and the Grima said he will create Grotte della Civita hotel, medieval town of Ostuni a refined event that suits which comprises 18 different to your journey of the region of Puglia. the city’s aesthetic. A popcaves over three different levels. up concert hall created by The city is already bubbling the Centre Pompidou architect Renzo away with cultural activities, including art Piano will form the centre of event, shows, a women’s literary festival and the but then at the end of the celebrations Gezziamoci Jazz Festival that runs from Visitors enjoying the the striking stage will be taken down to August through to December. So if this is Gezziamoci jazz festival. leave the city in peace. anything to go by, we can’t wait for 2019.

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Clockwise from left: Sextantio Le Grotte della Civita hotel. Take a seat at the Area 8 bar. The slow life in Matera. Chef Nicola Popolizio returned home to Matera recently to launch his new restaurant Ego.

PHOTOGRAPHY: @BARBIGIANGIU, @RAFFAELELAMACCHIA

We reveal why the UNESCO City of Matera, Italy deserves to be crowned the European Capital of Culture for 2019


Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe.

Left: Life Mounds, 2005 by Charles Jencks. Below: Suck by Anish Kapoor, 2009.

SCOTLAND

Jupiter Artland “I love sculpture parks. There’s a fantastic one near Edinburgh called Jupiter Artland — you couldn’t get a cooler name than that could you? It also has the best Anish Kapoor I’ve ever seen.” Visit www.jupiterartland.org

GERMANY

ON THE MAP

Sir John Soane's Museum.

ENGLAND

Sir John Soane’s Museum and Wallace Collection “I love London. It’s got some quirky museums and art galleries. Two that are worth visiting are the Sir John Soane’s Museum and Wallace Collection. They’re not big, wellknown museums, but they have got really good interesting things." Visit www.soane.org or www. wallacecollection.org

The Wallace Collection.

The Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe “The Kunst museum in Hamburg has my favourite piece of art — The Wanderer Above The Sea Of Fog by Caspar David Friedrich. It features a big mountain that this guy’s climbed and the guy’s got style… He’s got a frock coat and a The Wanderer Above swagger stick… For me The Sea Of Fog by it’s about the stunning Caspar David Friedrich. scenery and wind on your cheeks. It’s about conquering the world — so it’s sort of entrepreneurial as well.” Visit www.mkg-hamburg.de

Ultimate Galleries Affordable Art Fair founder Will Ramsay highlights his favourite venues Affordable Art Fair founder Will Ramsay flies all over the world in an attempt to bring art to the masses. "We’ve got fairs in places such as Hong Kong, Seoul, Hamburg, Stockholm and Singapore, so I’m away about a third of the year," he says. However, when the art aficionado isn't in the air, he is relaxing at his farm in the Scottish Borders. "I’ve lived there for about 14 years. We have our little HQ for the global business in a farm cottage," he explains. While Ramsay may own more than 200 pieces of art, his choice in souvenirs can be a little quirky: "I think that souvenir shops can be tacky. So I take that to the extreme and every time I come home from travelling I gift my wife an airline refreshing towelette."

The Hermitage. Below: One of its eye-catching galleries.

RUSSIA

The Hermitage “The Hermitage in St Petersburg is extraordinary for quality and quality. It’s said that if you spend a minute in front of each picture you’ll be there for seven years.”

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Virgin and Child with Saints and Donor by Van Eyck.

PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN FISCHBACHER/JUPITER ARTLAND, ALLAN POLLOK-MORRIS/JUPITERARTLAND, GARETH GARDNER/ JOHNSOAMESMUSEUM

USA

The Frick Collection “The Frick Collection in New York is the best small museum in the world. The standout piece that I remember was Virgin and Child with Saints and Donor by Van Eyck. However, there are just lots of good quality pieces there and I love the modernist architecture of Manhattan.” Visit www.frick.org


CULTURE —

LOCAL HERO Andrew Eames travels in the footsteps of National Geographic photographer Martin Chambi

DESTINATION

Peru LOCATION

Cusco


Photographer Martin Chambi was inspired by his homeland.

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EXCLUSIVE A PRIVATE DINING EXPERIENCE WITH CHEF SCHIAFFINO

I

’m 3,400 metres up in the Andes, following in the footsteps of a photographic hero. There’s a rumour that some of his work can be seen in the Palacio Tupac Yupanqui, a former Inca palace in Cusco, but at street level the palace is occupied by the regional branch of a Peruvian bank, busy and bright. It doesn’t seem the right place for an exhibition of classic images, but when I mention the photographer’s name to security, I’m ushered towards a corner staircase that leads up to a dimly lit first floor. In the end the lighting really doesn’t matter, because I’m already familiar with much of what I find there. In these dimly lit rooms are black and white prints from the 1930s and ’40s, a time before the rest of the world knew much about Incas and alpacas, condors and cordilleras. Among them are portraits of leathery-faced Andean miners resting after a shift, and a Quechua family sitting proudly on top of their potato harvest, their immediate future safely secured. In one corner, an indigenous porter stands next to his llama on a mountain top, while playing his flute to pass the time. Next to him is a striking studio-based wedding photo complete with a deeply worried-looking bride and groom, lit like a painting; a whole novel right there, in just one photo. In another room, rich colonial families photographed in their finery and with their thoroughbred horses, pompous and proud against the austerity of the Andes, are contrasted with local street children, grubby and defiant in the narrow stoneflagged lanes of Cusco. And then of course there are the iconic photographs of Machu Picchu itself, looking like engravings in black and white, taken barely a dozen years after the Inca city was first discovered. These are images that every traveller with a camera aspires to, captured by a photographer who clearly had a tremendous rapport with his subjects. And they are images which continue to attract travellers to this corner of the world, with its ethnically mixed population, razor sharp air and intensity of light. My photographer hero is called Martin Chambi, and his assignments for the early years of National

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Above: The salt works of the Sacred Valley. Below: Photographer Martin Chambi and his family.

Geographic were instrumental in bringing the exoticism of Peru to the attention of the wider world. But whilst other photographers for that magazine were scientists and explorers from privileged backgrounds, Chambi was from a Quechua peasant family, working with castoff equipment. Technology may have moved a long way since then, but his standard of photography remains hard to emulate. It hasn’t stopped me from coming here to try. As well as the exhibition, I have tracked down Chambi’s archive in Cusco. Here his grandson, Teo, shows me Chambi’s cameras and the studio backdrops and tells me the story of how his grandfather, as a 15-year-old boy from peasant background, got a job with an international mining company as


“His shots were instrumental in bringing the exoticism of Peru to the attention of the wider world ”

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW EAMES AND ISTOCK

Clockwise: A campesino (farmer) photographed by Eames in Cusco. A woman weaving colourful local cloth. A Peruvian girl on horseback.

a camera bearer. It was the British photographer he worked for who first encouraged him to have a go behind the lens. He was a fast learner, and for the next 40 years he ranged all over the Andes, lugging a heavy plate camera and tripod. With it he documented both his own people and the middle-class settlers from mainland Spain whose studio fees kept him in business. All of this is in the archive. After we have admired Chambi’s delicate touching-up of many of his glass negatives, I ask Teo where I should go to get a flavour of his Peru today. He directs me to the city’s San Pedro market, and sure enough, I find stalls manned by eyecatchingly handsome ladies wearing traditional Quechua wide-brimmed hats. There they are surrounded by the likes of rams’ testicles, smoked guinea pig, and bags of offerings to the gods. It is all good Chambi-like material.


“Gradually, the sun burns off a petticoat of mist, revealing an intricately engineered city” And there are more potential subjects in the lanes around Cusco’s main square, where Inca-descended and colourfully-dressed locals in woollen chalecos (traditional waistcoats) stand with their llamas – but these people are waiting to be photographed, for a fee. I feel sure that Chambi wouldn’t approve. Travelling out of the city, en route for Machu Picchu, I have more luck. Village life and a salt works provide a good source of modern-day images, but Machu Picchu draws me on. Sadly I don’t have time for the four-day Inca Trail, and the only other access — the train ride down the valley of the fast-flowing Urubamba River — is visually unrewarding. But I like the final stop at Aguas Calientes, where porters and railway locomotives share the streets with tourists and souvenir shops.

Machu Picchu itself sits astride a high shoulder of land, some 400 metres above Aguas Calientes. Surrounding it, in a protective semi-circle, is a ring of high Andean peaks. I make sure I get in when the gates open at 6am. Gradually, the slow climb of the sun burns off the morning petticoat of mist, revealing an intricately-engineered city, Inca meets Escher in a labyrinth of hand-polished stones. There are divisions and subdivisions with fountains and plazas for farmers and rulers and temples and nobody really knows what. Or even why such a perfectly-placed jewel of Inca geometry was abandoned so suddenly. Chambi’s photographs of Machu Picchu are mostly empty of people, barring the occasional campesino in a hat to give a sense of scale. My challenge is to crop out the avalanche of gap-year travellers blazing away with selfie-sticks, calling everything ‘awesome’, announcing


Clockwise: Machu Picchu — the Inca citadel found high in the Andes. The Sacred Valley that lies at the heart of the Inca empire. Three Peruvian women take a seat in the town square for a spot of people watching.

that they are about to ‘do a pano’ as they swing their arms in front of my camera. I get a couple of pictures I like. A local in his cape, with echoes of one of Chambi’s lone campesinos, and a tourist interacting with one of the llamas. And as I review them, on the back of my digital camera, with all its adjustable settings, I think of Chambi, who never knew what he’d got until he returned to the dark room weeks afterwards. His handful of images, however, are still admired today by people from all over the world. And while the shots of today’s visitors will excite family and friends, Chambi’s shots have inspired generations of travellers.

GETTING THERE For more information on travelling to Peru email your Lightfoot Travel Designer at info@lightfoottravel.com

H I G H

L I F E

Instagrammable-worthy stays

THE MONASTERY

THE CONQUISTADOR’S VILLA

THE PERUVIAN VILLAGE

Belmond Hotel Monasterio Rest your head in this ancient monastery that lies at the heart of Cusco. Dine by candlelight in the ancient cloisters and explore the antique and art-filled rooms.

Inkaterra La Casona This exquisite 16th-century colonial manor that’s set around a courtyard is now a Relais & Chateaux hotel. Spend the day discovering the sights of Cusco and the night, relaxing on your terrace.

Hotel Sol & Luna Tucked away among the undulating terraces of the Sacred Valley, you will find 43 casitas that are inspired by traditional Peruvian homes. To book email info@lightfootravel.com Travel By Lightfoot | www.travelbylightfoot.com

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INSPIRATION —

TASTEMAKERS’ TRAVELS

Five gurus from the worlds of fashion, design, wine and food reveal where they love to go on holiday

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T H E M O D E L : N A DYA H U TAG A L U N G

PHOTOGRAPHY: @ANSELMINELLO, @GAETANOTRISCARI, GIRAFFEMANOR,@ISAIDZAHRA, @JOAOAROUNDTHEWORLD, NADYA HUTAGALUNG/FLYENTERTAINMENT, ISTOCK

KENYA

Clockwise from left: Giraffe Manor in Kenya, which is one of the places Hutagalung visited during her time in Africa. A suite at the manor. Elephants at a watering hole in Kenya. Nadya Hutagalung and her husband.

The wildlife campaigner and supermodel Nadya Hutagalung fell head over heels for this African country. “Visiting Kenya really changed my life, the incredible beauty and the sense I was somehow going home to the land of origins was almost overwhelming. Being able to see so many wild animals, especially the elephants was deeply moving,” says Hutagalung. And she’s not the only member of the family who enjoyed the trip. “The kids loved hearing the sound of lions when they went to sleep at night and watching the elephants stroll past their bedroom in the morning. But the best moment was having the kids meet the last of the big bull elephants called Tim. You need to take your loved ones to see these endangered animals now before you can’t,” she adds. Travel By Lightfoot | www.travelbylightfoot.com

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Clockwise: Monks enjoying some quiet time in Cambodia. Bill Bensley. Angkor Watt. A dish from Vibe Café. Vibe Café in Siem Reap.

T H E A R C H I T E C T: B I L L B E N S L E Y

CAMBODIA Award-winning architect and designer Bill Bensley may have his company headquarters in Bangkok, but his heart is in Cambodia. It’s here that he launched the Shinta Mani Angkor Bensley Collection hotel and the Shinta Mani School of Hospitality. Here his team train underprivileged students and help graduates find employment free of charge. Apart from staying at the Shinta Mani hotel, Bill Bensley recommends that you get out and explore the neighbourhood. “Vibe Café is an amazing vegan restaurant in the hipster neighbourhood of Kandal Village.” A little later in the day, Bensley recommends stopping for cocktails at Miss Wong. “Always a great mix of locals and tourists. An artistic crowd.” But there is one thing you should do before you leave says Bensley. “Watch the sunrise at Angkor Wat.”

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T H E W I N E M A K E R : E D D I E M C D O U G A L L

ITALY Australian TV presenter and winemaker Eddie McDougall flies all over the world to find the perfect vine or film for his TV show. But there’s one place he says that he would travel to time and time again. “The island of Elba off the coast of Italy may be famous for being the home of Napoleon Bonaparte when he was in exile, but it’s also the home of gob-smackingly delicious sweet wines,” he says. “A great way to see the area is to hire a vintage car, take the top down and cruise around with the sun blazing on you. It’s a stunning island and the views that you will be treated to are breathtaking.”

Clockwise from top right: Eddie McDougall. The Elba coastline. Nature in action. The harbour in Elba. A traditional stone shepherd's hut on the hillside.


T H E C H E F: K I R A N J E T H WA

MOZAMBIQUE Kenyan born celebrity chef Kiran Jethwa says that a trip to this island off the coast of Africa is hard to beat. “The fact that Quirimba Archipelago in Mozambique is one of the most beautiful archipelagos on the East African coast, is reason enough to visit. But it’s also worth visiting this island as it’s where you’ll find dogtooth tuna.” The only way to catch these fish, says the adventurous TV chef, is to spear them while free diving. "It’s extremely challenging, but when you enter this underwater paradise and are eventually successful it is incredibly rewarding," says Jethwa. "Then you have the fish itself, the flesh light pink in colour, the same texture as tuna but a far more delicate flavour. It’s fantastic and worth the effort.”

Clockwise from top left: Chef Kiran Jethwa. A mural in Mozambique. Another day in paradise. The shores of Mozambique. Fishermen bringing in their catch.

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Clockwise: Belmond La Residencia in Mallorca. One of Williamson's favourite coffee stops, Cappuccino Valldemossa. Nama Bar designed by Williamson. A Nama Bar cocktail. Matthew Williamson.

T H E FA S H I O N D E S I G N E R : M AT T H E W W I L L I A M S O N

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY IL SAN PIETRO HOTEL

MALLORCA British fashion designer first flew to Mallorca to design a suite for the Belmond La Residencia hotel. But from the moment he landed on the Spanish island he was hooked — so much so, he bought a house there. “I fell in love with Deià from the moment I first visited: it’s charming, simple and relatively underdeveloped,” says Williamson. When the designer isn’t working he likes to get out and explore. “On my day off I will take a walk up the hillside to an old, derelict monastery with my dog, Mr Plum,” he says. But if you visit, he also has a few recommendations: “Visit the Gaudi cathedral, then get lost in the narrow streets of the old town. If you keep walking you’re sure to see one off the many hidden squares with original buildings, stores and cafēs."


PICTURE PERFECT Nat Geo photographer Steve McCurry, the man behind the world’s most famous photograph, chooses some of his favourite shots from his career. He tells us why each shot is so special

T

he award-winning photographer Steve McCurry has proved time and time again that there’s nothing he won’t do to get the perfect shot, including sewing rolls of film into his clothes when escaping from an Afghan war zone. He has covered numerous conflicts and his work has regularly been seen

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in National Geographic magazine. It was his June 1985 cover shot for National Geographic that caught the world’s imagination. His portrait the ‘Afghan Girl’, was named the most recognised photograph in the history of the magazine. From the thousands of photographs that McCurry has taken throughout his career we asked him to tell us more about some of his favourite images.


WOMEN GATHERING CLOVER

“One very hot day I saw these women picking clover in a field in Yemen. It must have been around 35°C and they were completely covered from head to toe. I still haven’t found out why their hats are that shape – maybe it’s where they keep their lunch! That’s what I love most about travelling; seeing different people and different ways of doing things. I think it’s a shame that, due to growing globalisation, gradually the world’s wonderful cultural differences are being lost. These days everyone just wants to wear the same baseball cap.” Steve McCurry, Women Gathering Clover in Wadi Hadramawt, near Shibam, Yemen © Steve McCurry. Photo courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery.


PROCESSION OF NUNS

“Seeing nuns walking through the streets of Yangon is a very common sight. But this particular morning, it happened to be raining when I ran into a group of nuns walking silently in a singlefile procession. They were collecting their daily ration of food from the community with their colourful umbrellas up. Even with the vibrant colours, the moment was very serene and still.” Steve McCurry, Procession of Nuns, Yangon, Myanmar, 1994 © Steve McCurry. Photo courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery.

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DUST STORM

“One picture that I am really fond of is the image I took in a dust storm in India. I was driving down a road in Rajasthan and it was about 110 degrees, when a dust storm whipped up suddenly. Through a big cloud of dust, I could see these women huddled together, singing a prayer for rain. I didn’t want to get out of the car at first because I was concerned that my cameras would be damaged by the dust, but then I realised you can always replace your camera or your lenses, but that moment was a fleeting thing. So I got out and shot a roll of film, and it was magical. After only moments, the storm disappeared and it was as if nothing had happened.” Steve McCurry, Dust Storm, Rajhasthan, India, 1983 © Steve McCurry. Photo courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery.


PHOTO © 2016 JÜRGEN WETTKE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

RED BOY

“I took this image on a visit to Bombay during Ganesh Chaturthi. I was looking for opportunities when I came across this boy drenched in red powder. He and his friends threw the powder all over me as soon as they saw me. After a few pictures he got really serious. It was a brief encounter, but maybe he felt this was something important. The intensity of his expression is extraordinary. I think the simplicity creates this timeless quality. It is far more important to just be in the moment, to be aware of your surroundings, and to be prepared to seize the moment when it presents itself.” Steve McCurry, Boy Covered in Red Powder Participates in the Festival of Ganesh Chaturthi, Mumbai, India, 1996 © Steve McCurry. Photo courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery.

EDITOR'S NOTE — “I wanted to see this as I am a huge fan of Steve McCurry.” BILL BENSLEY

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The zurkhaneh is a family affair.

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CULTURE —

WORLD’S OLDEST GYM In the time of the Persian Empire, zurkhanehs were where men learnt how to be warriors. Jeremy Suyker visits one of these traditional gyms

DESTINATION

Iran LOCATION

Tehran


O

ne freezing winter’s night, down a remote and narrow back alley, loud sounds of drums and a metallic roar erupt from a non-descript house behind Tehran’s Grand Bazaar. Its unmarked door gives way to the surreal world of the zurkhaneh [ancient Iranian gym]. Such places — reserved exclusively for men — are not easily accessed by foreigners. But with the help of an Iranian friend and a little patience, it was possible to enter the gym and be accepted by the men. Zurkhanehs are holy places for the athletes practicing varzeshe pahlevani, an ancient sport combining bodybuilding, moving skills, music, dramatic art, and religious worship. In this centuries-old ritual, men perform rhythmic movements with great passion, using tools that symbolically represent ancient weapons. At first, their strong devotion might seem intense, but it soon becomes clear that it is a fundamental aspect of the pahlevani ceremonial rites. Training at Talachi zurkhaneh usually starts after 6pm. This is when the participants finish work and meet at the gym. Pahlevani operates very much like a ritual ceremony. The athletes remove their shoes and wash their

hands when entering the training room. And before each session they sit together and drink tea. The zurkhaneh plays an important social role for these men; it’s a place to discuss politics, religion and soccer. Most athletes have known each other for years and feel at ease expressing themselves inside the zurkhaneh. Their cultural and social backgrounds suggest that they are inclined to share the regime’s values. Undoubtedly, they hold in admiration the Ayatollah Khomeini, the founder of the Islamic Republic, and respect his moral heritage. And like the majority of Iranians [at the time of writing] were looking forward to ending the sanctions that are weakening the country’s economy. But any political conversations end as soon as the morshed (guide) begins to play. As master of ceremony, the morshed sits overlooking the group, he bangs upon the zarb (drum) and conducts the rhythmic music. The athletes then enter the arena and start moving in unison to his drumbeats. The main portion of a varzeshe pahlevani session is dedicated to weight training, notably using a pair of mil (wooden clubs), sang (metal shields), and a kabbadeh (bow made of iron with metal rings and coin-like pieces hanging from its body). Each piece weighs some 20kg.


Clockwise from left: Metal discs add weight to the kabbadeh, which the athlete swirls around his head and body. A young member. The sang metal shields that the athlete drives into the air.

Below: The members moving in unison to the sounds of the drum player.

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Historic photographs of fellow athletes adorn the wall of the zurhaneh.

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“They are postmen, butchers, shopkeepers or taxi drivers. But when they enter a zurkhaneh, they become fighters, singers, worshippers and poets�

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This part of the training is followed by exercises like Sufi whirling and juggling, which are intended to build strength as well as reinforce the virtues of sportsmanship, modesty, humbleness, and all while avoiding arrogance. Traditionally, the zurkhaneh demands no payment from its athletes and instead depends on public donations. In return, the zurkhaneh provides community services and protection. All those who attend are strong believers in Allah and praise him and the Prophet Mohammad repeatedly during each session. They also pray for the good health of each participant and his family, regardless of his social rank, wealth or religion. Indeed, varzeshe pahlevani itself fuses elements of pre-Islamic Persian culture with the spirituality of Shia Islam and Sufism. This unusual religious blend is a reflection of the great mix of ethnic groups, languages and cultures that coexist within Iranian society. Talachi zurkhaneh is far more than a theatrical centre for synchronised wrestling. This is where a group of men perpetuate a sacred heritage they pass onto future generations—as it has been passed on to each of them. Indeed, fathers, as “masters,” transmit skills and manners to their sons, as well as essential moral values. Most of these athletes are simple men living ordinary lives. They are postmen, butchers, shopkeepers, or taxi drivers. But when they enter a zurkhaneh, a transformation takes place. They become fighters, singers, worshippers, and poets. This gripping metamorphosis can also be seen as an echo of the remaining pre-Islamic culture and its strong legacy in modern Iran.

Clockwise from top left: The athletes practising their martial arts meets yoga moves. A demonstration of mil (wooden clubs). Passing the skills on to the next generation. Exercises are designed to boost sportsmanship and avoid arrogance.

EDITOR'S NOTE — “I love this feature as I am a gym rat.” BILL BENSLEY

CULTURAL FIX Iran’s rich history makes this the perfect place to explore

VISIT A ZURKHANEH IN YAZD

The Pink Mosque in Shiraz.

Tucked away between two of Iran’s largest deserts, you’ll find the UNESCO World Heritage City of Yazd. Feel history come alive when you walk through the maze of alleyways and view the wind towers. Then go back in time and visit Saheb A Zaman Zurkhaneh, one of the few zurkhanehs open to the public.

Above and right: Fin Garden in Kashan.

VISIT THE SILK ROAD Shiraz was the beating heart of Persian culture. As it was part of the Silk Road, Shiraz became a cosmopolitan hub that attracted travellers, traders and poets. Discover the 18th-century Vakil Bazaar, which comes complete with caravanserais, teashops and a bathhouse; the striking Pink Mosque; and the Tomb of Hafez, a poet whose phrases all Iranians can quote at the drop of a hat.

CITY OF ARTISANS Go where the rich and famous of the Persian empire used to holiday — head to Kashan. This captivating city is home to architectural wonders, textile artisans and rosewater perfumiers. Discover a 16th-century hammam, Iran’s oldest garden and an ancient bazaar. The mud city of Yazd.

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CULTURE —

GOLDEN HOUR Follow Margie Goldsmith to Mongolia to see one of the world’s most unique festivals

DESTINATION

Mongolia LOCATION

Bayan-Ulgii


A hunter with his prized eagle.

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EXCLUSIVE PLAY WITH THE BEST POLO TEAM IN MONGOLIA

Clockwise from right: An archer taking aim with a homemade arrow. Getting ready to show their skills. The next generation of golden eagle hunters.

A

horseman gritting his teeth and pulling as hard as he could on a dead goat’s back legs came thundering towards me on horseback. Galloping equally fast was another rider pulling the goat’s front legs in a viscous tug of war. I was at the annual Golden Eagle Festival in Mongolia’s westernmost province, Bayan-Ulgii. There were no bleachers or chairs and the only way to watch the event was either on horseback or standing. As both riders refused to give in, their horses kept changing direction. Suddenly I was completely hemmed in and was sure I would be trampled. I screamed. Three small boys riding one horse pointed to me and laughed. Finally, the tug of war moved off in a different direction and I could breathe again. Ever since reading Jack Weatherford’s book, Genghis Khan, the Making of An Empire, I’ve wanted to come to Mongolia and this seemed a perfect time to do so. I spent some time in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia’s capital, then drove with a private guide and driver through the Gobi Desert where I tried to gallop through the plains. Mongolian horses might be small, but they’re very fast. They also

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PHOTOGRAPHY: MARGIE GOLDSMITH AND ISTOCK, PAULO FAZINA/WIKIFREE TAYLOR WEIDMAN/WIKI FREE

"They come to compete in a two -day display of traditional hunting skills based on the eagle's speed, agility and accuracy." know immediately if you’re afraid like my horse, who sensed my terror and refused to budge; that’s why, when my guide asked if I wanted to rent a horse for the festival, I couldn’t say no fast enough. Kazakh herders are not only excellent horsemen; they train golden eagles to hunt fox and rabbit, a tradition passed down from their Turkic ancestors. Each October, around 60 eagle hunters gallop across the Altai Mountains to Bayan-Ulgii, many riding from as far as 150 miles away to a barren valley, void of a tree or bush or single blade of grass. They come to compete in a twoday display of traditional hunting skills based on the eagle’s speed, agility and accuracy. Now in its 20th year, the Golden Eagle Festival is a way of preserving the Kazakh’s traditional heritage of hunting with eagles. The festival began this morning when way in the distance I saw the eagle hunters with the large birds of prey perched on their arms. When they arrived, they were happy to pose for photos, proudly showing off their eagles’ seven and eight-foot wingspans. Little by little, more and more spectators, most on horseback, trickled in. The families of the hunters and crafts sellers also arrived, mainly in 4WD vehicles. I watched as they quickly set up their gers, round felt tents which they

filled with painted wooden beds, kitchen utensils, and colourful rugs. The first event was the parade of competitors, each with a hooded eagle perched on his gloved hand and each wearing an embroidered robe and red silk hat lined with fox fur. A group of judges sat at a table and rated the participants from one to 18 for the most elaborate clothing and accessories. I couldn’t stop staring at the eagles, all females because they’re fiercer birds of prey. I wondered what would happen if one broke away and attacked me with her long talons and sharp beak. I moved further back. When the parade was finished, the Clockwise from top: The riders ready to cross the finishing line. A hunter preparing his eagle hunters had to ride their for the competition. A traditional ger. horses while carrying their eagles up a 1,000-foot cliff strewn with boulders. They left their eagles up top with a helper and rode back down the steep cliff face. Back on level ground, the goat tug of war declared a winner and the eagle agility skills began. In the first Travel By Lightfoot | www.travelbylightfoot.com

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event, the hunter on the ground broke into a gallop while calling his eagle who rocketed down towards the hunter. Whoosh. Eagles can dive at speeds up to 200mph and ancient tribal cultures have always regarded them with mystic reverence. Everyone was in awe. One after another, they swooped down. Suddenly one of the eagles chose not to land on his owner’s arm and flew away as the crowd laughed hysterically and the red-faced eagle hunter charged off in search of the missing bird. The Golden Eagle Festival offers many different types of sports, some going back to the era of Genghis Khan. I wandered past the area to watch a horse race in the distance with jockeys as young as seven years old racing along the plains as parents in 4WD followed, screaming

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out their encouragement. Closer by was an archery event where archers shot home-made arrows from hand-made bows to a small target about 30 feet away. Each time an archer hit the mark dead centre, which was most of the time, the spectators screamed out “HEE-da!” In another event, a horseback rider had to pick up a coin on the ground while riding full gallop. I watched for a while and then went to peruse the crafts. Just then, two riders galloped away at full speed in a game for unmarried couples known as “Girl Chase”. The object was for the female rider to whip the male. When I asked my guide why, he said, “If you can’t be whipped, you can’t survive.” As I walked away from the crowd two boys rode towards me on a bicycle carrying some large eagle

Living history: The golden eagle hunters of Mongolia.


L I V I N G H I S T O R Y Experience life as it was in the times of Genghis Khan

RIDE WITH THE EAGLE HUNTERS It may be too late to train your own eagle, but thanks to the Kazakh eagle hunters you can still experience life on the Steppes. If you have riding experience, Lightfoot Travel can arrange for you to join them on their hunting trips. Or if you would rather go at a more leisurely pace, you can go for a picturesque ride around Lake Mongolia.

LEARN MONGOLIAN WRESTLING Mongolian wrestling is just one of the traditional sports that feature at the Naadam festival — the Mongolian Olympics. If you want to see if those CrossFit classes have paid off, you can pull on your Zodog (jacket) and Shuudag (briefs) and take part in the Khongoryn Els Naadam.

PRACTISE ARCHERY feathers. They stopped and looked at me. “Salem,” I said, the only Kazakh word I knew. They didn’t smile and I didn’t know what they were going to do. Finally, one of them approached and handed me an eagle feather before breaking out into a smile. I keep the feather on my desk as a reminder of the young boy’s smile and the fierceness and bravery of the golden eagle hunters.

GETTING THERE For more information on travelling to Mongolia email your Lightfoot Travel Designer at info@lightfoottravel.com

Mongolia’s archery skills could probably put Robin Hood to shame. However, here you can take part in a masterclass with the Steppes as your backdrop.

JOIN A CAMEL CARAVAN Enjoy tea with a nomadic family in their ger, before you saddle up and ride across the desert on a Bactrian camel.


Above and right: The striking Livraria Lello.

INSPIRATION —

NOVEL IDEA Book lovers should dust off their passports and visit these divine biblio boltholes Portugal

LIVRARIA LELLO

You can certainly judge this bookstore by its cover. This neo-gothic facade features ornate reliefs and painted figures representing science and art. The inside of 100-year-old Livraria Lello in Porto is just as magical, with a stained-glass ceiling, arched shelves and intricate curled staircase. Visit www.livrarialello.pt READING CORNER: Hunker down with a good book at the The Yeatman. This glamorous hideaway that features its own two-star Michelin restaurant comes with its own tome — The Wine Book, which is an anthology on the best Portuguese wineries. Worth thumbing over.

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USA

BRATTLE BOOK SHOP

In summer, Bostonian readers head to the parking lot of one of America’s oldest and largest paperback pushers, Brattle Book Shop. This store holds three storeys of general, used and antiquarian works, plus the open air sale section comes with an urban scene of street art and fire escapes. Visit brattlebookshop.com READING CORNER: Choose one of the suites at the Boston Harbor Hotel. Here you can kickback with a good book on your terrace that overlooks the water. Need to up the indulgence factor? Order champagne and chocolate-covered strawberries from room service. Above: The Brattle Book Shop and its al-fresco sale section.

Japan

TSUTAYA BOOKS DAIKANYAMA

The tri-level store in Tokyo is stocked with every kind of reading, listening and watching pleasure. You can peruse for page-turners in the extensive English section, then saunter upstairs to the Anjin lounge and take an artisan brew while you fall into the first chapter. Visit real.tsite.jp READING CORNER: If you have finished your book in the Anjin lounge, you can grab another at the Library in the Park Hyatt Tokyo. Here you’ll find an array of books on art, travel and culture to inspire you for your next trip.

WORDS: LUXE CITY GUIDES (LUXECITYGUIDES.COM). CHECK OUT THE LUXE APP, AVAILABLE FROM ITUNES OR GOOGLE PLAY STORES. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: CLAIRE TURRELL

Clockwise from right: The Tsutaya Books Daikanyama store. Its sleek and chic Anjin lounge.

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USA

THE LAST BOOKSTORE

Situated in Downtown Los Angeles’s historic core, the last word on opus emporiums stocks best sellers and records on its stately, columned first floor… But it’s the mezzanine level that’s the true treasure, an uncategorised literary labyrinth with tunnels constructed from outdated encyclopedias, storybook sculptures and hidden alcoves. Best of all: everything up here is only one dollar. Visit www.lastbookstorela.com READING CORNER: Want the Hollywood Hills as a backdrop when you devour your latest blockbuster? Then book into the Montage Beverly Hills. Clockwise from top: The Last Bookstore in Los Angeles. Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice.

“A literary labyrinth with tunnels constructed from outdated encyclopedias.” 62

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Clockwise from left: Maison Assouline's vintagelooking sign. The Swan Bar in Maison Assouline. BooksActually in Singapore.

England

MAISON ASSOULINE

This luxury bibliotheque set in a Grade II-listed building in Piccadilly, London, boasts not only a back catalogue of 1,400 cultural and coffee table tomes, but also a room devoted to furnishings for your at-home library. Its suave Swan Bar provides coffee and classic cocktails for you to sip while you scan the shelves. Visit assouline.com READING CORNER: If you're looking for a tranquil spot to enjoy a good read, head to the Rosewood London. Take a stroll through the picturesque stone archway to discover a grand Edwardian courtyard and one of the prettiest hotels around.

Italy

LIBRERIA ACQUA ALTA

With rambling rooms, steps made from old opuses and an oh-so charming canal-side location, Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice is certainly one of the most enchanting book stores to be found anywhere. But its position just inches above sea level means the vast stash of new and used English and Italian titles is at risk of being washed away as the water rises each winter. Owner Luigi Frizzo came up with a novel idea — he stores the works in gondolas and bathtubs, so when the water gets high, the books stay dry. READING CORNER: Where better to relax with a literary classic than in a suite at Aman Venice? Featuring works by some of Italy’s greatest artists, this fresco-filled delight is a must-visit for someone who likes the finer things in life.

EDITOR'S NOTE — “My passion is art and books.” BILL BENSLEY

Singapore

BOOKSACTUALLY

Nestled in the arty Tiong Bahru enclave, this curiocrammed confection is packed with fiction, classic literature, local works and poetry. But it holds more than just books, actually: the back room showcases an adorable assemblage of hand-stitched notebooks and stationery. Visit booksactuallyshop.com READING CORNER: Old meets new at the Capella Singapore. Two colonial buildings on the shores of Sentosa island have been combined to create the perfect tranquil enclave within reach of the city. Take a seat on a lounger by the pool with your book. Travel By Lightfoot | www.travelbylightfoot.com

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CULTURE —

LIVING ART

Jill Ferguson visits one of the most dramatic catwalk shows of all – the World of Wearable Art

DESTINATION

New Zealand LOCATION

Wellington


Clockwise from left: Nano Solar 2017 by Helen Millen from New Zealand; The Maw 2017 by The Baroness from the USA; the World of Wearable Art awards show; Lux Operon 1.3 2017 by Erica Gray from Australia. Travel By Lightfoot | www.travelbylightfoot.com

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T

he soulful music from a folk band fills the arena. Their rustic costumes highlighted by orange lights that illuminate the stage. Chocolatecoloured fabric has been draped over platforms that sport trees which appear to have been stripped bare. The look is only softened by the white puffy “clouds” that hang overhead creating a dreamy sky. And if you were under any doubt that you were about to be treated to a night of fashion meets drama, a man wearing huge articulated wings then drops in from the sky… TSB Arena in Wellington is usually a basketball stadium, but for a few weeks each autumn, the court transforms into the home of WOW—the World of Wearable Art. New Zealand’s most significant arts event and competition, which recently celebrated its 30th anniversary, encourages contestants to “take art off the wall and adorn the human form”. Competitors travel from as far away as Hong Kong, China, Australia, Poland, the United Kingdom and the United States to push the limits of design and create an array of breathtaking pieces. No wonder that it attracts more than 55,000 visitors from around the globe. Former guest judge and President of Time Warner Mark D’Arcy said, “The WOW awards show makes Lady Gaga look like a librarian, and has more originality and creativity per minute than any show I’ve seen.” I saw Lady Gaga perform live in Las Vegas and her costumes definitely take some beating so I’m keen to see if WOW really lives up to the hype. The WOW website promises a “glorious rebellion against the mundane”. More than 120 designers and fashion students have entered costumes into the competition. For the next two hours, I’m exposed to sensory sanctuary. WOW proves to be a mash-up of Cirque du Soleil (who

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EXCLUSIVE ENJOY A BEHIND-THESCENES TOUR OF NEW ZEALAND’S NATIONAL MUSEUM TE PAPA

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF WORLD OF WEARABLE ART

Clockwise from left: Sporadica 2017 by Renee Louie from New Zealand; The Seeker 2017 by Carolyn Gibson from New Zealand; The Broken Doll by Florence Dosdane from New Zealand.

sponsor one of the categories), a haute couture show and a psychedelic journey down the rabbit hole with Alice in Wonderland. And if to emphasise my point they really did have a dancing lop-earred silver rabbit, and an oriental-style Queen of Hearts’ costume sculptured from playing cards take to the stage for the first act. The show starts with the children’s theme – featuring said lop-earred rabbit and then takes us through four other acts: Other Worlds, Architecture, Avant-garde and Aotearoa (Maori word for New Zealand). Time suspends as we journey through between-section skits by homegrown comedians Trygve Wakenshaw and Jimmy James Fletcher, and through dramatic scenes a la Cirque du Soleil that needs no narration nor has language barriers. We are treated to vivid soundscapes and vibrant, pulsating lighting, and death-defying acrobatics. The music helps guide us through each act as it matches the atmosphere of the scene. Creative director Jason Smith later tells me, “I really enjoyed the scale of the production and the fact that music is such a strong feature. As a soundtrack composer I am usually required to support and enhance a dialogue driven story, but with this show, music is front and centre. That was both a challenge and an exciting opportunity.” However, the music needs to be powerful to compete with the costumes that take to the stage. From the tropical-looking Perspex piece Kaleidoscope by Tess Tavener Hanks that glows when the model takes to the stage, to the wire and aluminium creation Tinker by Jeff Thomson that pays homage to the Slovakian tinkers who would go from house to house wearing the tools of their trade and The Piper of Lights by Chris and Gary Wilson, who own a glass studio and reinvented the uniform of an army piper with a striking glass uniform. With the famed Weta Workshop also on board as one

The Stitch Witch 2016 by Sarah Seahourse and Luna Aquatica, Australia.


I Want More & More 2017 by Hsieh Yi-Ting, Lai Yi-Ting & Liao Pei-Chen from Taiwan; Black Hole 2017 by Yang Mengtong from China and The Spirit 2017 of Waitomo by Maria Tsopanaki & Dimitri Mavinis from UK.

of the sponsors, offering the most theatrical prizewinner an internship, several of the costumes had blockbuster appeal. Japan’s Scott Sutcliffe sent his Bane-like Apocalyptic Warrior down the catwalk wearing gladiatorstyle boots, a billowing cape and a look that is sure to terrify Batman. While Flow of Creation by Kirsten Fletcher from the UK features a 3D cape that curls around the model like a cobra. Other scene stealers include the neon fringed The Stitch Witch by Sarah Seahorse and Luna Aquatica from Australia, and Starship Girl by US designer Julian Hartzog with its futuristic and Star Trek-worthy outfit. But it is the fibreglass, steel and wood gravity-defying dress Diva’s Dreamscape, by New Zealander Peter Wakeman that steals the show, the judges’ hearts and the NZ$30,000 supreme award prize. WOW founder Dame Suzie Moncrieff says the entry has “a strong simplicity that works from every angle. The

use of such hard materials creates a sophisticated garment that demonstrates great skill and creative ability” and that the entry captured the year’s theme of connecting architecture and fashion. Although Wakeman reveals that this win didn’t come easily as his winning piece took 400 hours of work to put together. WOW has been called a “choreographed collision” and many other things, but mostly, its message is one of creativity and the magnitude of the imagination. As the curtain fell on the stage, I was soon to find out that this was just the first act as the World of Wearable Art would now go on tour all over the world. They would be showing this year’s winners alongside previous stars. Moncrieff said that WOW is, “a unique onstage spectacular that will inspire us all.” And I have to agree, the creative energy of WOW is contagious. WOW will be on from 27 September to 14 October 2018.

“It makes Lady Gaga look like a librarian”


A

C ON NOISSEUR’S

ES CAPE

There’s more to New Zealand than mountains 1 VISIT A PRIVATE ART COLLECTION Lightfoot Travel can arrange for you to view the Connells Bay Sculpture Park, which is by appointment only. This collection features works by some of New Zealand’s most renowned artists.

2 LEARN MAORI WEAVING Join Maori weavers at the Maori Arts and Crafts Institute in Rotorua.

3 SEE THE WORLD OF WEARABLE ART MUSEUM View the work of previous contestants at its permanent museum in Nelson. It has to be one of the most eclectic museums around.

4 TOUR AN AWARDWINNING VINEYARD Visit some of Waiheke’s award-winning coastal vineyards, such as Mudbrick or Stony Ridge. Then enjoy lunch among the vines.

5 SAIL WITH A MAORI TO A HIDDEN COVE Join a Maori elder on a journey to a cove where you will discover hot pools and ancient Maori carvings.

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Carol Chyau (centre).

DREAM LIFE —

HAUTE FASHION

Tibetan herdsmen are now about to shake up the fashion industry thanks to the help of one entrepreneurial woman

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Model sporting a scarf from the Shokay collection.

he dizzying plateaus of Tibet are known for many things — glittering temples, statuesque mountains and being the home of the Dalai Lama. But if one social enterprise is set to have its way, it will also be known for fashion. For among the lush Himalayan valleys can be found a textile that’s as soft as cashmere and warmer than wool, and it is now being spun by Tibetan women into buy-me-now scarves, sweaters and throws for your home. Harvard graduate Carol Chyau first stumbled across yak hair when taking part in a university field trip in the Yunnan province in 2006. The aim of the trip was to see how social enterprises were developing in other parts of the world, but after she saw the nomads weaving the soft yak hair into clothing, she decided that rather than just write a thesis about social enterprises she would launch one of her own. Chyau's efforts have now caught the attention of Forbes, Cartier and G2000 who made her part of its Gen2 Campaign, which features entrepreneurs whose goal is beyond material success. As soon as Chyau felt the yak hair she was blown away by its softness. But she was even more surprised to learn that while the countryside was abundant with yaks, Tibet's version of cashmere had not yet been embraced by those who live in the city. The herders were in no doubt about the yaks’ value. They used their milk to make cheese, hair for tents and clothing and dung for fuel. But these shaggy creatures Travel By Lightfoot | www.travelbylightfoot.com

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“Among the lush Himalayan valleys can be found a textile that’s as soft as cashmere and warmer than wool ”

Clockwise from top: A young Tibetan herder. One of the women spinning the wool. The Tibetan women getting a peek at the new collection.

were their only riches. The herders were cash poor, and struggled to achieve a sustainable income. Chyau could immediately see how she could change that. With each herder owning around 30 to 40 yaks each, Chyau realised she could kickstart a new business venture without having to change their traditional lifestyle. They could combine the skills that had been passed down through the centuries with their abundant assets to create a hillside textile industry. “The nomads’ connection with the yaks was exceptionally beautiful. I fell in love with the land and the people,” says Chyau. However, while Chyau had studied not-for-profit businesses, fashions and textiles were new to her. So she returned to the USA to do her research. “I found this 300page paper from the United Nations that said ‘Yak fibre is comparable to cashmere.’ This line gave me the courage to move forward and launch Shokay,” says Chyau.


She then Googled, cold called and flew to China to make numerous factory visits. As they tried to produce the products on a larger scale they faced constant trial and error. From finding the perfect dye, to challenging the mix of materials and blends. As they wanted to create a luxury product they also needed to work with the herders on which yak fibres to collect. “They needed to know that we want the down and not the hair; that we want separation by colours, and that it’s better to comb rather than cut the hairs in order to prevent short hairs,” says Chyau. The Shokay team also tested the skill of the factories. They were used to working with traders, but Chyau’s exacting standards really put them to the test. However, Chyau’s team soon earnt the respect of the factory owners as they stuck to arranged prices, continued to demand quality, and made it clear that they were serious about working in the area. The knitters that they found on Chongming Island were adept at creating beautiful buys, but they were also challenged as the Shokay team wanted to change styles, which meant that they had to keep learning new designs. And at the end of it all they were able to make their first buy — the incredibly soft Serene scarf, which is

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D A Y S

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Left: The Shokay collection being shot in Tibet. Right: The nomads whose work has been embraced by Forbes.

still their best-selling item 10 years later. Chyau says Shokay’s success was due to a lot of goodwill. “From the herders who chose to sell their precious fibre to complete strangers, to factories who were happy to work with a fibre for which there was no demand, to the Fashion Institute of Technology professors and students who experimented with the yarn… We couldn’t have done it without them,” says Chyau. The aim of Shokay was to amaze buyers. “We like to give them an element of surprise. Most people haven’t felt yak products before, so are generally surprised by how soft and warm it is,” says Chyau. “Our products spark a lot of curiosity. We want people to think that we have really considered the making and value of our products — every thread of the way.” Chyau went on to sell Shokay buys online, through Banyan Tree boutiques and they also opened two stores in Shanghai and Taiwan. Today they are also working with other brands and designers to help them use Shokay fabric in their own designs. “It’s been a long and challenging journey, but through this I have met many passionate and interesting people, and their encouragement gives me the motivation to keep on going,” says Chyau. “We discovered that the textiles industry is full of opportunities for innovation, and has a tremendous social and environmental footprint, globally. There is a lot of opportunity to create a wide impact.”

GETTING THERE For more information on travelling to Tibet email your Lightfoot Travel Designer at info@lightfoottravel.com

T I B E T

Have your own Tibetan adventure

PHOTOGRAPHY: SHOKAY AND ISTOCK

STAY The St Regis Lhasa is the perfect place to rest your head. Overlooking the Potala Palace, the former home of the Dalai Lama, it gives you the chance to start sightseeing from the moment you arrive in Tibet.

EAT Tibetan Family Kitchen not only serves up eggplant stew, mouthwatering momo and yak yogurt with peanuts. You

can also stop and do a cooking lesson too.

PLAY A visit to the capital Lhasa is a must do, but within seven days you should be able to view the temples of Lhasa, journey to the former kingdom of Gyantse and stop at Shigatse to view the Stupa of the 10th Panchen Lama that is covered in precious stones.

Clockwise from left: Yamdrok Lake. Potala Palace in Lhasa. St Regis Lhasa.

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OUTDOOR ADVENTURE Lost Paradise Festival, Australia

Plan ahead and make this New Year your best one yet — visit Glenworth Valley in New South Wales for the Lost Paradise Festival from 28 December 2018 to 1 January 2019. The Kids Paradise area will keep the kids entertained when mum and dad want to throw some shapes to their favourite bands. Visit www. lostparadise.com.au WANT TO STAY LONGER? Take a VW Kombi ride to a lighthouse in Byron Bay. Then visit the artists’ hub of Bellingen that's filled cafēs and galleries.

FAMILY —

FUN OF THE FAIR

Looking for non-stop entertainment for you and your little ones? Take them to a festival where you can enjoy hours of endless fun DESERT PARTY

Joshua Tree Music Festival, USA

Clockwise from above: Piano practise at Lost Paradise Festival. All of a flutter at the Joshua Tree Music Festival. Camping in the Californian desert.

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Music lovers large and small will enjoy the Joshua Tree Music Festival near Palm Springs, California. This family friendly music festival even includes a kids’ area where your tots can practise arts and crafts, watch magic shows and learn how to do yoga. On 17 to 20 May and 4 to 7 October 2018. Visit www.joshuatreemusicfestival.com WANT TO STAY LONGER? Head to Los Angeles where you can enjoy a paddleboard lesson in Marina Del Ray, visit the Hollywood sign and see one of the world’s most beautiful bookshops.


Jamming at the Rajasthan International Folk Festival.

ROYAL AFFAIR

WORDS EMMA BURGESS. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CLAIRE TURRELL. PHOTOGRAPHY CAMPBESTIVAL, JODHPUR RIFF/OIJO, JACOB AVANZATO AND MIKE SMALLEY/JOSHUATREEMUSICFESTIVAL, LOST PARADISE, RAINFORESTWORLDMUSICFESTIVAL

Jodhpur RIFF, India

What could be more exciting than a festival backed by Sir Mick Jagger in one of the world’s most picturesque forts? Each October, musicians from throughout the world gather at Mehrangarh Fort in Jodhpur for the Rajasthan International Folk Festival. See singers, musicians, acrobats and fire walkers in this fun fourday festival. (Extra parenting points: Mini superhero fans might also recognise the fort as the setting for one of their favourite Batman movies.) On from 24 to 28 October 2018. Visit www.jodhpurriff.org WANT TO STAY LONGER? Book into Umaid Bhawan Palace. Designed for the Maharaja in the 1920s, this hotel is filled with Art Deco touches. Take a dip in the pool, visit the private museum or burn off some calories with an adrenalin-filled zip line ride through Mehrangarh Fort.

MEDIEVAL FUN

JUNGLE FEVER

Fun loving families are sure to enjoy this party at Lulworth Castle that takes place in July. Parents can listen top DJs, comedians and bands. While tots can let off steam on the world’s largest bouncy castle, learn a circus skill in the Big Top Mania, or even build a house for fairies. The jury is out on who will have a better time. From 26 to 29 July 2018. Visit campbestival.net WANT TO STAY LONGER? You can’t visit the UK without making a trip to the capital. Take a ride down the Thames on the Queen’s barge, say hello to the Yeoman Warders who guard the Queen’s jewels at the Tower of London, and catch a show at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.

If you go down to the woods of Sarawak in July, you’re sure of a big surprise. Music acts from all over the world will perform in the jungle setting. Previous entertainers have included whirling dervishes, American folk musicians and percussionists. Kids can join their parents at the concerts or sign up for the Pustaka Bookaroo Children Workshops, which include music, art and storytelling sessions. From 13 to 15 July 2018. Visit rwmf.net WANT TO STAY LONGER? Take a long boat down the river in Kuching and visit a local family in their longhouse. Make sure that you look out for fireflies on your journey.

Camp Bestival, UK

Rainforest World Music Festival, Malaysia

Getting into the party spirit at Camp Bestival.

Clockwise from above: A jungle adventure at the Rainforest World Music Festival. A drum line with a difference.


FOOD & DRINK —

ISLAND FARMS

Leave the surf behind and follow Shelley Seale into the mountains of Hawaii to discover an array of boutique farms

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he Hawaiian island of Maui is a beachand-ocean lover’s dream. Known as the “Valley Isle,” the coastline is dotted with pristine white and black sand beaches and a diverse array of waterbased adventures. But a lesser-known side of Maui is its Upcountry: fertile slopes on the high elevations around Haleakala, with soaring views over the mountains and cool breezes that are a refreshing change from sea level. Here, you’ll fine numerous farms, ranches and botanical gardens; with a variety of makers that are open to the public for demonstrations, tours or tastings. Spending a few hours, a day — or more — exploring this uniquely Maui region offers a glimpse into a completely different side of Hawaiian life. My small group had arranged to meet our guide for a day tour around some of these Upcountry spots. She

was easy to spot in a white van with her logo emblazoned across the side, and she immediately came bounding up to us with a wide smile, friendly hello and seemingly endless exuberance. After introductions and bottles of water were passed around, she escorted us into the van as she explained briefly what the itinerary would be: visits to a lavender farm, vodka distillery and winery, with a stop for lunch at Ulupalakua Ranch Store. We would end the day with a spectacular ocean view at Ho`okipa Beach Park, near Paia Town. Personally, I was getting a kick out of the guide’s slightly zany but infectious personality; and her homemade audio rigging — instead of a modern headset connected via bluetooth to the van’s stereo system, she had a regular stick microphone duct-taped to the side of her window frame. I tried to suppress a giggle as she adjusted the


The island of Maui.

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Clockwise from above: Ocean Vodka Farm & Distilleries sugar cane fields. Open for business. Owner Shay Smith leading a tour of his family's distillery.

“Our Hawaii deep ocean mineral water originated as Greenland glacier melt over 2,000 years ago”

preposterous contraption and set off; all the while giving a running, enthusiastic commentary on Upcountry history of sugar cane and pineapple farming. Even though it was barely 10am, the first stop was Ocean Vodka Organic Farm & Distillery, run by the Smith family. Situated on 80 acres with stunning views across the valley below, the rich volcanic soil found on these slopes makes for the perfect growing medium for the organically farmed sugar cane used in Ocean Vodka. Our guide, Kyle, began by showing us the sugar cane plants, where roosters popped in and out of the tall stalks around us. We then moved into the distillery, where the Smiths create the world’s only vodka made with organic sugar cane and deep ocean mineral water. After the sugar cane is selectively harvested by hand, stateof-the-art distillation machinery separates out impurities with its precise heating and cooling process. “We are careful to employ responsible processes and use the most earth-friendly raw materials we can find, beginning with our water source,” says Shay Smith, founder of the company that his family has run for 10 years. “Our Hawaii deep ocean mineral water originated as Greenland glacier melt over 2,000 years ago, travelling gradually around the globe through deep ocean currents until arriving in Hawaii.” Since all 80 proof vodkas are made up of 60 per cent water, the mineral content of the water makes a huge difference to the depth of flavour in the end product.

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Which brought us to the best part of the tour: the tasting. Kyle poured us a couple of different varieties of the vodka produced, as well as rum that they also make. It was crisp and smooth for sure; I’m not at all one to sip straight alcohol, but this went down really easy. We all were leaving with our shot glasses and some of Ocean’s popular vodka goat cheese truffles. I also bought a small bottle of the vodka, which is packaged in a unique blue glass fishing float, and angled at the earth’s axis points. The second stop ended up being my favourite. The 13.5 acres of Ali’i Kula is much more than just a lavender farm; it’s also home to dazzling tropical gardens that create a tranquil oasis, filled with a diverse variety of flora such as olive trees, hydrangea, protea and succulents. At an elevation of roughly 4,000 feet, Aliʻi Kula grows around 55,000 lavender plants within 45 different varieties — I

EXCLUSIVE HIRE A 1957 PORSCHE TO DRIVE AROUND MAUI.

Left: One of the farmers at Ali'i Kula Lavender bringing in its fragrant crop. Below: The tranquil gardens at Ali'i Kula Lavender.


PHOTOGRAPHY: ALI'I KULA LAVENDER, ISTOCK OCEAN VODKA ORGANIC FARM & DISTILLERY, SHELLEY SEALE,

Clockwise: The picturesque surroundings of the Ocean Vodka Farm & Distillery. The landscape that inspired a vodka.

had no idea there were so many kinds of lavender! After trying to soak in the gorgeous explosion of colour and the peaceful ambience it exuded, our group was led to the back Japanese garden where we were served aromatic lavender tea; and the most delicious scones I’ve ever had, made with lemon and, of course, lavender. I could have easily eaten two or three more of them. Afterwards our guide led us on a tour of the gardens, pointing out various interesting plants and breaking off leaves here and there for smelling and even tasting. A highlight of Aliʻi Kula is the boutique, which sells all kinds of products made from their farm including soaps, lotions and oils, teas and culinary salts. If you are a wine lover like me, you’ll enjoy Maui Wine at Ulupalakua Vineyards — the island’s only wine producer, open since 1974. The winery is built around historic buildings from the original Rose Ranch, now called Ulupalakua Ranch, which encompasses 23 acres of gorgeous pastureland. Before hitting up the tasting room, our group stopped in at the Ulupalakua Ranch Store & Grill for lunch. Located across the street from the wine tasting room and shop, the store is filled with cowboy hats and fun home gifts. The grill serves up much more gourmet fare than one might expect from either the name or the unprepossessing setting, with walk-up counter ordering and picnic table dining. Burgers can be made with lamb,

elk or beef; while other specialties such as slow-roasted Maui Cattle Co. beef brisket with homemade barbecue sauce and olive-oil-and-parsley smashed potatoes are also very popular. “We’re becoming a food destination,” says Executive Chef Will Munder. “Before, it was ‘There’s the winery,’ or ‘It’s a nice drive,’ but now people are coming here from the West Side just to have lunch.” Munder’s goal is to serve only Maui-grown produce, much of which comes from his own microfarm. Dessert was, of course, wine. The cute restored 1870s home is equipped with an 18-foot bar crafted from a single piece of mango wood at which to taste the vineyard’s handcrafted wines — including the signature pineapple wine. For a really unique experience, tastings are also conducted at 11:15 am daily in the Old Jail, with a more detailed, exclusive look at grape growing and wine making on the island. The entire estate makes for a really nice stroll; my favourite part was the huge banyan tree out back — perfect for photos. As we headed back to town and the Maui coastline at sea level, I kept sneaking glances back at the misty mountain road receding behind us. Discovering the entirely different world of Upcountry is an experience that can only be had in Maui, in a setting about as close to paradise as it gets.

GETTING THERE For more information on travelling to Hawaii email your Lightfoot Travel Designer at info@lightfoottravel.com

1 K N O W Y O U R I S L A N D S Possibly one of the most dramatic places to go island hopping. 1 KAUAI It’s nicknamed ‘The Garden Isle’ thanks to the fact that most of its surface is covered in tropical rainforest. Hikers love the Waimea Canyon and Hollywood loves the dramatic Na Pali coastline, which has starred as the backdrop in many a blockbuster film.

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2 MAUI The second largest island in the archipelago features the Haleakala National Park, which is home to those breathtaking waterfalls. The 30-mile long beaches are also a huge attraction.

3 BIG ISLAND The largest island boasts everything from black sand beaches and lava deserts to snow-capped peaks and rainforests. It's here you'll spy Waikiki Beach, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park.

4 OAHU Oahu, known as 'The Gathering Place' is the third largest island. It’s where you’ll find the state capital, Honolulu, Waikiki beach and of course, Pearl Harbor.

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2

5 LANAI Lanai was known for its pineapple plantations. It’s the least touristy island you can visit. It’s been owned by Oracle founder Larry Ellison since 2012, so he seems keen to keep it that way.

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Y E L L O W

B O A T

O F

H O P E

P R E S E N T S

Hope

FLOATS

When your country is made up of 7,000 islands, not everyone’s journey to school is easy. The Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation plans to change that

Clockwise from top: The new school buses. How the children used to commute. One of the schools.

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n 2010, IT entrepreneur Jay Jaboneta heard a story that would change his life forever. He was told by a volunteer at a summit, that he had seen a group of children in mangrove-filled area of Layag-Layag who had to swim to get to school. The volunteer said it took him a while to work out what the floating objects were in the water then he realised it was schoolchildren, each holding a plastic bag above their head, which contained their uniform and school supplies. Jaboneta had heard about children walking to school, but never swimming, so Jay Jaboneta together

with Doc Anton Lim and Josiah Go launched a fundraising campaign to help buy the povertystricken community a boat. However, they soon learnt this wasn’t the only place in the Philippines where children had to swim to school. The project then grew and they have now launched 4,516 boats, built classrooms, dormitories and bridges to help children get out of poverty, by giving them access to the education they were striving so hard to achieve. Visit www.yellowboat.org


The glittering City of London.

Cheese heaven: Paxton and Whitfield.

Anton Manganaro.

Shop for ingredients at… Turnham Green Terrace. You can get great meat and poultry from Macken Brothers, fish from Covent Garden Fishmongers and vegetables from Natoora. You should also visit Paxton and Whitfield on Jermyn Street. To be surrounded by their cheese and fresh produce is a real treat.

Create your own mini food tour… Go for a bike ride along the Thames and stop off at Brentford Market to pick up lunch. Or head to Borough Market where you can sample bread by Justin Gellatly at Bread Ahead before checking out the artisanal stalls at the Maltby Street Market. Then take a trip to Harrods’ food hall.

Fortnum & Mason.

FOOD & DRINK —

A N T O N

M A N G A N A R O

CHEF’S GUIDE TO LONDON

Maltby Street Market.

Anton Manganaro, Head Chef of BAFTA 195, reveals his favourite gourmet hangouts in the capital city

PHOTOGRAPHY: @THESOMMANON,

Evans and Peel.

Enjoy a cocktail at… Evans and Peel in Earls Court. It’s a 1930’s-style prohibition speakeasy that’s hidden from the street behind a detective agency and has really good cocktails and an amazing atmosphere. My wife had no idea where she was going for our wedding anniversary and I had to make up a story to be allowed in. Really fun to dress up to really add to the spirit of the evening!

The foodie souvenir to take home… The classic would always for me be a selection of tea from Fortnum & Mason in Piccadilly.

Celebrity chef Anton Manganaro takes us on a whirlwind tour of his home town. The man who provides London’s glitterati with a showstopping meal each year at the BAFTAs reveals where you can find the best ingredients, the finest restaurants and foodie inspiration in the bustling metropolis. Berners Tavern. Right: The City Barge.

Get inspiration at… Foster Books, a second-hand book shop on Chiswick High Street. You will find me there at some stage during the week, scouring the shelves for vintage cookbooks.

Restaurants to try in London before you leave… The City Barge in Chiswick for a lovely Sunday roast with a view of the Thames; Counter Culture in Clapham, which is a great snack-bar that showcases what amazing things can be done in the smallest of spaces and Jason Atherton’s restaurant Berners Tavern in the West End. It is an amazing room with fabulous art, delicious food and cocktails.

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IF YOU DO ONE THING THIS YEAR…

Clockwise from top: Your private jet awaits. Anantara Al Baleed Resort in Salalah. Dine at Anantara Al Jabal Al Akhdar Resort overlooking the canyon.

Take A Private Jet Around The Middle East

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANANTARA HOTELS AND RESORTS

Take to the skies for a journey that you will never forget. Lightfoot Travel has joined with Anantara Hotels & Resorts to create an exclusive private jet tour of the Middle East. Your VIP flight will take you from the rich dunes of the Rub’Al Khali desert to the golden beaches of Salalah and then high into the rugged mountains above Muscat. You will never want to travel any other way again. You will start your seven-day stay at the luxurious Qasr Al Sarab Desert Resort by Anantara in the Empty Quarter. From here you will fly by jet to the coconut-fringed beaches of Salalah in Oman. Next you will fly to Anantara Al Jabal Al Akhdar Resort, which nestles on top of Oman’s fabled Green Mountain. You will then be whisked back by your jet to Abu Dhabi where you can catch your next flight. Need another private jet? We’ll see what we can do. Email info@lightfoottravel.com for more details.

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W W W . L I G H T F O O T T R A V E L . C O M

Travel by Lightfoot: Edition 5 - The Culture Issue  

The theme of our fifth edition is Culture, and was produced in conjunction with guest editor Bill Bensley, the designer behind some of the w...

Travel by Lightfoot: Edition 5 - The Culture Issue  

The theme of our fifth edition is Culture, and was produced in conjunction with guest editor Bill Bensley, the designer behind some of the w...

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