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EDITOR: Jon Cook CREATIVE DIRECTOR/DESIGN: Andy Hayes FASHION EDITOR: Kasha Malyckyj SALES & ADVERTISING: Iain Blackburn MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION: Justin Iriajen SOCIAL NETWORKING: Amy Stiff WEB: Daddison & Nick Hills COVER: Benji B by Ollie Grove. PICTURES: Ollie Grove, Gareth Rhys, Sarah Ginn, Satoshi Minakawa, Mark Read. WORDS: Oli Marlow, Kasha Malyckyj, Matt Riches Jason Gardener, Monki, Sam Bates, Gwyn Thomas de Chroustchoff, Sean Kelly, Jeryl Wilton, Justin Iriajen, Amy Stiff, Sophie Thomas, Oli Grant, Tim Rayner, James Rompini.

THANK YOU: Dane @ Two Plates, All @ Urban Nerds, Adam @ Backdrop, Ben @ Run, Rob, Tom & Ollie @ The Blast, Erin @ Columbo, Sam @ Red Bull, Lua @ Dutty, Will @ Coda, Jack @ Pack London, Saul @ Fabric, Andy @ The Bank, Louis, Rich & Syd @50/50, Carly @ Everything, Cheba & Sam @ WOC, Chris @ Cable, Chris & Joe @ Idle Hands, Danny Keston, Ollie Grove, Daisy & Christian @ UNOONE and everybody else we forgot.

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BUGGED OUT WEEKENDER TRAP CO-HOSTS MAIN STAGE

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On the weekend of 18 January, Bugged Out Weekender returns with a massive three-night party at Butlin’s flagship resort in Bognor Regis. As we announced last issue, Trap will be co-hosting the main arena on the Friday night with Union.

CONSORTIUM

We all know that the end of January is the most depressing time of the year, so this promises to be the perfect remedy for your post-festive slump. With on-site accommodation, an indoor water park and one of the heaviest line-ups of house, techno and bass music possible, there really is no better way to spend an otherwise miserable weekend in the depths of the British winter.

The Consortium has been a South Coast skateboarding institution for nearly 20 years, stocking the very best in skate and streetwear at its Bournemouth store. Bucking the trend of the recession, Consortium has just opened not one, but two new stores on the same road, giving more premium brands and skate hardware their own respective spaces. While the original outlet will stock street staples like Quiet Life, HUF, Herschell, Diamond and Penfield, the shop next door provides a home for more refined brands such as Pendleton, Norse Projects, Garbstore and Wood Wood, and two doors up is where you’ll find the best names in skate hardware.

Bass music royalty such as Loefah, Disclosure, Jackmaster and Oneman will be joined by house and techno gods such as Frankie Knuckles, Dave Clarke and Andrew Weatherall, while Chemical Brothers headline with a DJ set. Tickets start at £149 for the full weekend; get yourself online and grab one now before Christmas steals all your money. We will see you there!

If you’re in Bournemouth make sure you check the new stores, and if not, pay Consortium’s new website a visit.

c o n s o rt i u m . co.u k

b u g g e d o u t w e e k e n d e r. n e t

RESPECT TO RODIGAN

NIKE MUSEUM

Few figures deserve more respect than Rodigan. That respect was enhanced in November when Rodigan announced he was quitting KISSFM, following attempts to move his show. Replaced by Craig David (bahahaha), Rodi stood his ground. Salute.

Celebrating ten years of Nike SB, an online museum dedicated to the skateboarding sub-brand has just been ‘opened’ by Nike. Presenting every shoe from the last decade, split by year, go waste some time staring at shoes!

r od i ga n . c om

bi t . ly / s fv m vr

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CHILDREN OF THE CAN BRISTOL GRAFFITI & STREET ART

PLEASURE PRINCIPLE NEW FESTIVAL FROM NUMBERS & DEADBEAT

Bris to l is n ’t ju s t th e ci ty Tr a p ca l l s h o me ; i t’s a l s o o n e o f th e w o rld ca p ita ls f o r gr a ff i ti a n d s tr e e t a r t, w i th mu ra l-s tre w n s tre e ts a n d a vi b r a n t co mmu n i ty o f a r ti s ts fro m a ro u n d th e co u n tr y ca l l i n g i t h o me .

Glasgow’s Numbers collective is joining forces with the Deadbeat team for a brand-new festival in 2013. Taking place on the weekend of 26 April, in a ‘sprawling green valley’ near Newquay in Cornwall, the festival is called ‘Pleasure Principle’ and looks like it could be something pretty unique.

Be h in d e ve ry p ie ce is a n a r ti s t - s o me w o r l d r e n o w n e d , s o me s imp ly lo ca l h e r o e s . Ch i l d r e n Of Th e Ca n s e ts o u t to d o cu me n t e a ch a n d e ve r y o n e , p r o vi d i n g a n A-Z o f Bris to l’s mo s t imp o rta n t a n d ‘u p ’ a r ti s ts . Th i s i s th e s e co n d e d itio n o f th e b o o k , a n d f e a tu r e s 70 a d d i ti o n a l p a ge s a n d 30 n e w a r ti s ts , d e mo n s tr a ti n g th e co n ti n u e d vita lity o f th e city’s s ce n e . Ch ild re n Of Th e Ca n : Br i s to l Gr a ff i ti & Str e e t Ar t i s o u t n o w th ro u gh Ta n ge n t Bo o k s .

t a n g e n t b o o k s. c o. u k

Details about the actual festival set-up are yet to be fully revealed, but the first wave of acts has already been announced and, as you’d expect from these guys, features many of underground dance music’s most revered names. With HudMo and Lunice’s TNGHT topping the bill, alongside fellow Glaswegian superstars Rustie and Jackmaster, plus everyone from EZ and Oneman, to Maurice Filton, Robert Hood and even Aba Shanti-I, Pleasure Principle is aiming high. Tickets are on sale now, starting at £100 for a weekend ticket, on the Pleasure Principle website.

pl ea s u r ep r in c ip le. n et

LOVELY DAY After an amazing debut in 2012, despite the rain, Love Saves The Day has just announced it will return to Bristol’s Castle Park on 25 May next year. Expect amazing music and exquisite production in a citycentre park.

l o v e s a v e s t h e d a y. o r g

URBAN INDUSTRY One of the finest online streetwear emporiums around, Urban Industry is celebrating its tenth birthday with some impressive collaborations. Check the site for their exclusive link-ups with Quiet Life, Stussy and more.

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CRITICAL TURNS TEN

TRAP x UNO ONE YOUR CHANCE TO DESIGN THE NEXT TRAP TEE! As we announced last issue, Trap has linked up with the one of the UK’s finest screen printing companies, Uno One, for a special competition, giving you the chance to design the next Trap tee-shirt.

Among the most respected drum & bass labels in operation, Critical Music has been a conduit for deep, thoughtful takes on the genre for a decade now. In that time, label boss Kasra has taken the Critical brand to the forefront of the scene and helped break many of today’s most vital producers Celebrating in style, the label has just released the debut album from its latest signatory Enei (see page 66 for interview), and is readying ‘Critical X’ – an anthology of ten tracks from each of the imprint’s ten years in the game from the likes of Calibre, Breakage, Rockwell and Icicle. And that’s not all – if D&B is your thing and you’re looking for a spot this New Year’s, the Critical Sound NYE Warehouse party somewhere in East London is you. Check the Critical site for more on all of this, and a big ‘happy birthday’ to the label from all at Trap!

cr i t ic a l mu s ic. co m

You’ll have seen the Uno One guys’ handiwork before – they’re responsible for those Swamp81 x Donuts tees you’ve spied, as well as printing for Deep Medi, Ashes57, Hyperdub and loads more. With such a strong list of clients from the side of the music industry we love, we’re hyped to link with Uno One on this. To enter email competitions@trapmagazine.co.uk and we’ll send you a template and info pack to work from. All entries will then be posted on both the Uno One and the Trap facebook pages - the winner will be the entry that gets the most ‘likes’, The competition will be running throughout the next couple of months, so even if you don’t want to enter, make sure you get online and vote for your favourite.

fa c eb o o k. c om / t r a pm a ga z in e fa c eb o o k. c om / u n oo n e pr i n t

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TRAPMAGAZINE.CO.UK

011

Trap’s regular columnist swings by with the latest from her world. Make sure you check Monki’s show on Rinse FM every Saturday 6-8pm.

I LOVE…

CHAMPION ‘CANNON’ (DSB) Shy FX's Digital Soundboy imprint has seen many exciting releases this year, including 'Fever' from Radio 1's B-Traits, and DSB’s golden-boy Dismantle’s ‘Warp’ EP. 2013 is set to be just as exciting, kicking off with a new EP from Champion. Look out for 'Cannon', which has been smashing the festival tents, club floors and carnival street parties all summer. An all-round banger!

ONE TO WATCH DON'T PANIC

NIGHTS

CATCH ME AT:

BUTTERZ

AMP CHRISTMAS PARTY

You may already know of Butterz, the forwardthinking grime label from Rinse duo Elijah & Skilliam. But you should also know about Butterz the club-night, which has gained one hell of a following as the label has grown. Butterz is held at Cable and brings a steady flow of loyal ravers and line-ups to the London club. Regularly featuring the likes of Royal T, Swindle, Champion and plenty of special guests, this is one night you need to check.

THE NEST WITH MIKE SKINNER

Don't Panic is a Brum duo, individually known as Tom Shorterz and Markus Anthony. After working together on the Midlands DJ circuit for years, the pair finally decided to bang together and create a new project to capture their love for the raw sounds of 1980s Chicago House. Their first release, the 'Don't Panic’ EP, is set to be out on my label Zoo Music on 10 December. With the release gaining support from the likes of Redlight, Dusky and Huxley, teaming up was clearly a great move!t

If you’re planning to carry on the partying after New Year’s Eve and into January, maybe give the Nest a thought. Jumping into a DJ career this year was an exciting move for Mike Skinner, and if you’ve not yet, you can catch him on the decks on 4 January at the EastLondon venue. Supporting will be Melé.

I have thoroughly enjoyed being the resident DJ for Annie Mac Presents this year. We’ll be closing the year with a Christmas party, held at, of course, KOKO. The night will feature myself, Roses Gabor (Live), Duke Dumont, Annie Mac and Baauer. Damn son where d'ya find this!

IN:MOTION BRISTOL NYE The city that Trap Magazine calls home is one of the musical crown jewels of the UK. At any time of the year, you can always expect a solid line up at Bristol’s most heavyweight of clubs, Motion, and seeing you through into 2013 will be Sub Focus, Loefah, Pinch, Boddika, Caspa, Marcus Nasty, Melé, Martelo and more. All across two warehouses and two other rooms.

U N I T E D o f

d u b

N A T I O N S w e e k e n d e r

On the weekend of 22 March, the UK’s first ever dub, reggae and roots indoor ‘weekender’ will be taking place at Pontins Brean Sands inbetween Bristol and Weston-Super-Mare. Making the UK the focal point of the increasingly vibrant European reggae scene for the weekend, United Nations Of Dub will bring together the biggest and best artists, selectors and soundsystems from outside Jamaica for a massive three-day party. The line-up is, simply put, exquisite with most of the sounds, deejays and vocalists you’d hope for. Jah Shaka, Iration Steppas, Aba Shanti-I, Jah Tubby’s, Young Warrior and Channel One are some of the mighty sounds in attendance, all playing in traditional three-way sound-clashes in the dedicated clash arena, while Rodigan, Mungo’s Hi-Fi, Dubkasm and a whole

bunch of Europe’s top acts help complete a stunning line-up that’s rich in all forms of reggae music. Weekend tickets include accommodation on site, which ranges from four to eight-persons in size, and day-tickets will be available too. With two huge main arenas hosting the sound clashes and many performers, plus a smaller capacity space dedicated to the weekend’s educational side and, of course, the indoor water-park hosting pool partiesduring the day, UNOD looks pretty amazing to us here at Trap. We’ll be there with red eyes, a Wray & Neph and a massive grin... If reggae’s your thing, make sure you are too. w w w . u n o d w e e k e n d e r. c o m

22-24 M arch 20 13 Ponti Weeken ns, Brean Sand s d ti c ke ts include start at £ three 95 and Day ticke night’s accom modatio ts are av n ailable fr om £30 Chann Line-up includ el One, es:

David R Shaka, odig Ir Earthqu ation Steppa an, Jah s, ake, Ja h Tubb King Shanti-I y’s, , Pri Campb nce Jamo, M Aba ell, You artin + many ng Warrior more.

London’s finest party-starters are back with another run-down on their world.

www.urban-nerds.com

With the festive party season fast approaching, we’re gearing up for a number of BIG parties here at Urban Nerds HQ. First up, we’re heading to the MS Stubnitz (the 80-meter German deep-sea fishing vessel that those who went to Bloc queued for hours to never get on to) with an all-star secret lineup for our Christmas special. Then, all the focus is on our NYE show, where we’re teaming up with The Kool Kids Klub, Church and THEM, and heading to The Sidings (London’s newest warehouse space). We’re also pleased to announce that we’ll be heading to Ministry of Sound on NYD for London’s biggest after-party, where we’ll be teaming up with Eastern Electrics for four rooms of the best in house, techno, garage, disco and 4x4.

NEXT UP Where you can catch us over the coming months… 22 D ecem ber

U rban N erds Xmas Party @ MS Stu bn itz – Lon don 31 D ecem ber

U rban N erds NYE Party w/ Koo l Ki ds Klu b, Ch u rch & TH EM @ Th e Si d i n gs – Lon don 1 Jan uary

U rban N erds & Eastern Electri cs present: NYD @ M i n istry Of Sou n d – Lon don We’re just about to launch our next limited-edition tee-shirt design and, for the first time ever, we’ll also be selling limited-edition Urban Nerds beanies in two colours. Pre order yours on our website now.

RATTUS RATTUS HOT 5IVE >

2. Monkey Wrench ‘Fatal Attraction’ (Pasteman Rmx) Emerging talent Monkey Wrench get an awesome remix by the mighty Pasteman.

1. Kry Wolf & CVS ‘Turbo Steppa’ Given a revamp from Claude, last issue’s number-one is now turbo charged.

3. Duke Dumont ‘Street Walker ’ A deliciously deep bubbling bassline with infectious lyrics.

1 8 - 20 Jan uary

U rban N erds @ Bugged Out Weeken d er – Bogno r Regis

4. Moet & Benson ‘When I Come Tru’ Ones to watch in 2013, this masterfully fuses garage with the new bass sound. 5. Michael Jackson ‘Who Is It’ (MK Rmx) This was given out for free on MK's soundcloud, so go cop it - the second drop is dancefloor dynamite.

TRAPMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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JME celebrates his crew Boy Better Know winning the 2012 Red Bull Culture Clash at Wembley Arena on 7 November.

FA S H I

ON 12

yj M a l yc k Ka s h a d n e r Gar & Jaso n

S: WORD

9th WILLOW

facebook.com/9TH Willow

Middlesbrough is n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a city yo u would norma lly a s s o cia te w ith s etting trend s , b u t th a n k s to th e r e cent openin g o f 9th Willo w, the girls of the No rth Ea s t w ill b e giving the style -o b s e s s e d s o utherners a ru n fo r th e ir mo ne y. Located just a fe w s tre e ts a w a y f r om the tow n ce n tre , 9th Willo w i s a place of u n iq u e s a rto ria l delights, w ith s trip p e d b a ck d ĂŠ co r f i lled w ith q u irk y trin k e ts a p tly placed amongs t th e imp re s s ive s election of ga rme n ts a n d accessories th e s to re o ffe rs . With brands in clu d in g Bitch in g, Junkfood, Min k P in k a n d Dimepiece a lo n gs id e h a n d s elected 90s vin ta ge p ie ce s , 9th Willow p re s e n ts in d e p e n d e n t s hopping as it s h o u ld b e . Wa tch ou t for the we b s to re co min g s o o n . 10 B a k er St r eet , Mi d d l es b r o u g h

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JEZEBEL AND TOFF jezebelandtoff.com

With an o u tl a n d i s h a e s th e ti c th a t co mb in e s vi n ta ge fa b ri cs , J a p a n e s e d e n im an d h a n d -cra fte d p ro d u cti o n te ch n iq u e s, Ne w Yo rk -b a s e d l a b e l Je ze b e l an d To ff d o e s n o t d i s a p p o i n t w ith its late s t co l l e cti o n .

SILVER SPOON ATTIRE silverspoonattire.com

Keep wa rm in s tyle th is s e a s o n w i th Silver Sp o o n Attire â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s co lle cti o n o f headw ea r th a t tu rn s th e a ver a ge beanie f ro m s tre e t to ch ic. With style s ra n gin g fro m a ba s i c l o go feature a n d vin ta ge ca me o b a d ge , to the sligh tly o ve r-th e -to p me s h -b o w adornme n t, th e re 's a p rice po i n t a n d design to s u it e ve ry fa s h io n a b l e h e a d .

Li mi te d to j u s t 100 p i e ce s o f e a ch d e s i gn , o ve rs i ze d p ri n t s w e a ts h i rts , 90s b o mb e rs a n d d i s to rte d j e a n s cre a te a u n i s e x l o o k th a t w i l l a p p e a l to ma n y tri b e s o f th e s tre e tw e a r w o rl d .

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5BORONYC 5boro.com

New York brand 5boro gets stuck into the season in its own distinct style, offering a strong apparel selection, as well as several skate decks that reflect the brand’s aesthetic. Graphic prints feature on short and long-sleeved tees, including various takes on the 'Join Or Die' tag line and playful takes on famous branding.

FALLEN

fallenfootwear.com For AW ’12, Fallen has created a premium range of products that demonstrates skate brands’ steady progression into more mature and sophisticated territories. The products throughout the collection are a clear move on, offering cleancut, stripped-back options with a nod to a workwear-inspired look.

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The fifty fifty familia are back with another run down on all things skateboarding…

FIFTY FIFTY TURNS 15 Fifty fifty store is now celebrating 15 years in the game! We’ll be showcasing the new 15-year anniversary products at the store early in December, featuring some heavy-hitting collaborations, as well as loads of new graphics from our own camp. We’ve been working on all this for some time, but it’s somehow managed to stay under wraps. We’re well stoked on what we’ve achieved and there’ll be plenty more to come in the New Year. This line features new board graphics, apparel and headwear, including our first 5-panel cap, featured above in a pattern we created from a spot very close to the store. To follow the product launch, we’ll be staging an after-party, which will continue the 15 year theme with acts performing who we’ve always rocked in the store. We’ve also been busy filming a new edit to coincide with this, with a majority of the team visiting Barcelona last month to skate the vast array of ridiculous spots there and, of course, the DC Embassy. Be sure to keep an eye out for that! All of us here at fifty fifty would like to thank everyone for there continued support over the last 15 years; it’s been a blast! If you’re in Bristol, please come along and get involved in our anniversary celebrations!

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WWW.5050STORE.COM

SKATEBOARD CAFÉ Skateboard Café has just released its brand new holiday collection with another packed launch night at the store. This range focuses heavily on an ice cream theme, with a bunch of new graphics and colourways fresh for the season, as well as the brand’s first installment of 5-panels, which tie in with the cleverly themed line. The Skateboard Café boys recently took a trip to Bordeaux and dropped an edit that features the whole crew and includes a welcome to Korahn Gayle to the team section. Good work with that power move, and with the cracking edit – check it at the link below! http://vimeo.com/53158344#

Twitter: @fiftyfiftystore Instagram: @fiftyfiftystore

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One of the originators of the dubstep sound and revered as a DJ from Berlin to Bristol, Pinch is among bass-driven music’s most important figures. With the Tectonic boss’s ‘Missing In Action’ retrospective having just hit shops, Trap grabbed the chance to discover the ten tracks that helped shape Pinch’s sound...

GOING IN DEEP

Pinch JIMI HENDRIX – 'ALL ALONG THE WATCHTOWER' As a kid of around 12 or 13, I was fully obsessed with Jimi Hendrix. I owned and loved everything ever made by him - I even taught myself guitar (to a fairly basic level) just so I could learn to play some of his tracks (though sadly I never managed to do so with my teeth). I had the songs scribbled down on scraps of notepaper, written out in basic 'guitar tab'. I still can't read sheet music properly... This cover of Bob Dylan's classic is one of many, many favourites! COLOURBOX – 'LOOKS LIKE WE'RE SHY ONE HORSE' From all my childhood tapes of vinyls that my older brother recorded for me, the Colourbox album that this track is taken from struck an oddly strong chord with me throughout my life. I lost the tape in the mid 90s and spent a couple of years trying to find the album again. I was reunited a few years back thanks to the power of the internet! Strange, soundscapey, dub-wise, electro-licked tracks underpinned by a good sense of humour.

J MAJIK – 'YOUR SOUND RMX' Quite simply, my favourite ever jungle track! So many close calls, but this is a cold, cold classic with heart-racing amen cuts and chilling pads. All-round freezing cold beats! Early Dillinja, Metalheadz, Die and Full Cycle all featured very heavily in my favourites too... I could easily have done a whole top 10 just for jungle! I love the false start 'rewind' in this track too. Sick!

TECHNOTRONIC – 'PUMP UP THE JAM' Guaranteed to go off anywhere, anytime. I have to restrict myself to not playing this more than once, maybe twice a year max - special occasions only really. Who could resist its power? Who'd have thought the Belgians would have created one of the biggest house anthems ever? A (slightly) guilty pleasure.

BASIC CHANNEL – 'PHYLIPS TRAK 2' Basic Channel on tip-top form with this 100% perfect track. 20 years on, it sounds fresher than any new release dub-techno hitting shops these days. These guys were kings of their sound and able to make music that could transport you to a parallel universe in a hallucinogenic fashion. Seriously good music that will make you trip out with or without 'anything' to help you along your way.

SQUAREPUSHER – 'IAMBIC 5 POETRY' This could have been one of many Squarepusher tracks included here, as I've been into his music (the earlier stuff particularly) in a big way for a long time. This is him on a gentler note than his more usual psychotic-sonic-assault approach to things - making for an almost lullaby type experience, stunningly executed.

ANOTHER ENDLESS GROOVE – 'STONE COLD' My favourite garage track of all time! I used to have a Heartless Crew recording taken from a 1997 Mission FM pirate radio session and that's where I first heard this. It's one of the few garage tracks I bought on vinyl at the time, as I'd mainly committed myself to jungle/D&B purchases due to lack of funds. Faultless!

RHYTHM & SOUND FT CORNELL CAMPBELL – 'KING IN MY EMPIRE' This track actually got me out of my routine of buying just jungle/D&B in the record shops when I found it in early 2002. All of a sudden I stopped buying D&B and opened my ears to what else was going on in the record shop - which led me to mix techno with garage and grime and ultimately start my path to dubstep! A beautiful track with such a soulful vocal - it's impossible not to love it. Meditation.

PETER GABRIEL – 'WE DO WHAT WE'RE TOLD (MILGRAM'S 37)' I love the 'So' album a bit too much... I don't have anything else by Peter Gabriel in my collection, but must confess to having a soft (very emo) spot for that album! Also, the production is awesome - there’s such a great sound to it all. My girlfriend claims to hate Peter Gabriel, but when I played her this one without saying who it was, she said she loved it! Small victories...

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LOGISTICS HOSPITAL RECORDS

DARQ E FREAKER NU BRAND FLEXX

1. SUNDAY ROAST – ‘TAKE TWO’ (WE R BASS) 2. WOZ – ‘REACH’ (BLACK BUTTER) 3. PANTHA – ‘LOVE TO THE MAX HATE TO THE MINIMAL’ (WE R BASS) 4. KRY WOLF – ‘THE VERDICT PT2’ (SHADOW CHILD) 5. SHAY & SINISTA – ‘HAVIN IT LARGE’ (ANDY J & ST) 6. KIDNAP KID – ‘VEHL’ (BLACK BUTTER) 7. X5 DUBZ – ‘NASTY VIP’ (DUB) 8. DJ NAUGHTY – ‘DON DADDA’ (S.O.T.U) 9. TRUCE – ‘IMPURE SOUL’ (S.O.T.U) 10. TOM SHORTERZ – ‘MAINLINE RMX’ (DUB)

1. NU:LOGIC – ‘MORNING LIGHT’ (HOSPITAL) 2. HAZARD - ‘AIR GUITAR’ (TRU PLAYAZ) 3. NU:LOGIC – ‘TRIPPIN' IN SPACE’ (HOSPITAL) 4. NETSKY – ‘LOVE HAS GONE’ (OTHER ECHOES RMX) (HOSPITAL) 5. NU:TONE, LOGISTICS & S.P.Y ‘START AGAIN’ (HOSPITAL) 6. TWO INCH PUNCH - ‘LOVE YOU UP’ (XAPHOON BNFB RMX) (PMR) 7. WILKINSON - ‘DIRECTION’ (RAM)) 8. CALIBRE - ‘SWEET SOUND’ (SIGNATURE) 9. METRIK - ‘DRIFT’ ((VIPER)) 10. PHAROAHE MONCH - ‘SIMON SAYS’ (ETC! ETC! & BRILLZ RMX) (BOOTLEG)

1. TRINIDAD JAMES – ‘ALL GOLD EVERYTHING’ (DUB) 2. LIL REESE FT RICK ROSS & DRAKE – ‘US’ (RMX) (MAYBACH MUSIC GROUP) 3. BIG H VS DARQ E FREAKER – ‘HADES’ (LOGAN SAMA FREESTYLE) (DUB) 4. FAT JOE FT A$AP ROCKY & FRENCH MONTANA – ‘YELLOW TAPE’ (R4 SO VALID, LLC) 5. TNGHT – ‘EASY EASY’ (WARP RECORDS) 6. XXYYXX – ‘ABOUT YOU’ (DUB) 7. OBEY CITY – ‘NEVA KNEW’ (BAAUER REMIX) (B.YRSLF DIVISION) 8. C4 – ‘OFF TRACK’ (ADAMANTIUM MUSIC) 9. RUSTIE FT ALUNA GEORGE – ‘AFTERLIGHT’ (WARP RECORDS) 10. FREDO SANTANA FT CHIEF KEEF & LIL REESE – ‘MY LIL N*GGAS (LAY YOU DOWN)’ (DUB)

STARKEY CIVIL MUSIC 1. MR. MITCH – ‘BETHLEM ROYAL’ (SLIT JOCKEY) 2. KRUEGER & BOMBE – ‘HI BB’ (SLIT JOCKEY) 3. EOW FT VIRUS SYNDICATE & FOREIGN BEGGARS – ‘SON OF KICK’ (SMOG) 4. IGGY AZALEA– ‘DEMONS’ (MIXTAPE) 5. GODSPEED YOU BLACK EMPEROR – ‘WE DRIFT LIKE WORRIED FIRE’ (CONSTELLATION) 6. KANYE WEST & R KELLY – ‘TO THE WORLD’ (G.O.O.D MUSIC) 7. STARKEY – ‘COMMAND’ (DS1 RMX) (CIVIL MUSIC) 8. HOLY OTHER – ‘TENSE PAST’ (TRI ANGLE) 9. MYKKI BLANCO – ‘HAZE BOGGIE’ (MIXTAPE) 10. GILBERE FORTE – ‘PRAY’ (ANIGMA)

CATZ N’ DOGZ PETS RECORDINGS 1. TOM DEMAC – ‘LITTLE BITS THAT MATTER’ (PETS RECORDINGS) 2. MARIO & VIDIS FT BARBAROSSA – ‘RE:STACKS’ (DOP RMX) (CDR) 3. PACHANGA BOYS – ‘PACHANGA VOICE’ (KOMPAKT) 4. SERGE & TYRELL – ‘HOUSE COUNTDOWN’ (CLONE) 5. RACHEL ROW – ‘FOLLOW THE STEP’ (KINK BEAT MIX (PETS RECORDINGS) 6. SLG – ‘BLURRY’ (STUDIO BARNHUS) 7. MOTORCITYSOUL – ‘SIRENS’ (NIGHT DRIVE MUSIC) 8. JUSTIN MARTIN – ‘GHETTOS AND GARDENS’ (CLAUDE VONSTROKE RMX) (DIRTYBIRD) 9. PETE TONG FT SYF – ‘DAWN’ (JAYMO & ANDY GORGE RMX) (DEFECTED) 10. SANO – ‘DISCO NOCHE’ (COMEME)

LX ONE WHEEL & DEAL 1. ICICLE – ‘CAFFEINE’ (DUB) 2. SP:MC – ‘AIRLOCK’ (DUB) 3. LX ONE – ‘LOSING CONTROL’ (WHEEL & DEAL) 4. GENETIX – ‘SEQUENCE’ (DUB) 5. LX ONE & YOUNGSTA – ‘WELL TOKEN’ (DUB) 6. BEN VERSE – ‘IMMIGRATION’ (DUB) 7. DISTANCE – ‘SEARCHING’ (DUB) 8. LX ONE – ‘WHY’ (DUB) 9. MATTY G & J:KENZO – ‘SC CONNECTION’ (DUB) 10. LX ONE – ‘ON MY OWN’ (WHEEL & DEAL)

This issue’s Rise Up mixes come from two more names we’re tipping for MASSIVE things – Swamp81’s secret weapon Paleman and probably the finest female DJ in the capital right now, Deviation’s Moxie... Download the mixes from www.trapmagazine.co.uk

07 I Am...

PALEMAN I AM... Paleman, or Calum to most people. YOU MAY ALREADY KNOW ME FOR... Not too much yet... But possibly for the tune I wrote with Zed Bias, ‘Furrball’, or my debut EP. I’D DESCRIBE THE MUSIC I MAKE AS... Mainly just percussive beats, at the moment anyway...

YOU MAY BE SURPRISED TO KNOW THAT.. I'm currently working towards a degree in jazz. THE BEST ADVICE I’VE EVER HAD IS... Not too sure...I've been given a lot. I like ‘less is more’... THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE MY MIX ARE… Dark. Percussive. Minimal. IN 12 MONTH’S TIME... Hopefully, I'll be making better tunes! @palemanuk

WHEN I’M NOT WORKING, YOU’LL FIND ME... In uni for a few days, then mostly sitting around watching Peep Show. WHEN I WAS YOUNGER, I DREAMED OF BEING... Anyone or anything that had a bow and arrow. IF I WASN’T DOING MUSIC, I’D... Still be a barman! THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN THE WORLD TO ME IS... Friends, family and music. MY MUSICAL GUILTY PLEASURE IS... Cyndi Lauper, ‘Time After Time’. If I ever have a breakdown, I'll weep to it on full volume.

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M OX I E

MY MUSICAL GUILTY PLEASURE IS... Mariah Carey – ‘Fantasy’.

I AM… Moxie

YOU MAY BE SURPRISED TO KNOW THAT... I used to have a shaved head.

YOU MAY ALREADY KNOW ME FOR... DJing and running the London clubnight Deviation alongside Benji B. I’D DESCRIBE THE MUSIC I PLAY AS... A bit of everything really – I’m drawn to anything with soul. I’ll play anything from Moodymann to Mala. WHEN I’M NOT WORKING, YOU’LL FIND ME... Running late at night with Run Dem Crew, or catching up with the best soap ever made, aka Eastenders.

THE BEST ADVICE I’VE EVER HAD IS... Perception is everything. THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE MY MIX… Sexytime. Smooth. Soulful. IN 12 MONTH’S TIME... I hope to be traveling the world. @alice_moxie

WHEN I WAS YOUNGER, I DREAMED OF BEING... A fashion designer. IF I WASN’T DOING MUSIC, I’D... Be working in design. THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN THE WORLD TO ME IS... My family and friends.

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TRAP MIX 003 ADDISON GROOVE

>Download the mix now at www.trapmagazine.co.uk

For the third in our exclusive mixtape series, we are exceptionally proud to have one of the most electrifying producers of the last couple of years, Addison Groove, at the controls. One of dubstep’s original trailblazers under the Headhunter name, the Bristol bornand-bred producer singlehandedly shook the underground with his debut as Addison Groove in 2010, ‘Foot Crab’. A juke and 80s electro-inspired relentless groove comprised solely of sounds from an 808 drum machine and a single chopped vocal, ‘Foot Crab’ heralded a new direction for the producer that would ultimately lead to him signing for Modeselektor’s 50 Weapons label and releasing his stunning debut LP ‘Transistor Rhythm’ early this year. Now working on his own label, Lost In Translation, there’s clearly lots more yet to come from Addison Groove, and with mixes from him especially rare, you can understand why we’re so excited to have him build our next. Featuring tracks from artists who have released, or have forthcoming, tracks on Lost In Translation, including Hodge, Sly One, Chebus & Organ Grinder, Astronomar, Kamikaze Space program and the Luke’s Anger side-project, Bebop & Rocksteady, this is a taste of what to expect from the label in the year to come. You can download the mix now from our website, and we’ll leave it to the man himself to explain the thinking behind the mix...

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“The mix represents what I’m currently playing. I'm noticing when particular tracks hit a crowd at the right time of the night, they can be explosive and these producers have been providing me with tunes that have been essential to my DJ sets over the last year. In order for me to release a tune, I need to play it out for at least three months and after such time, it still has to feel and sound fresh - each of these tracks qualify. Dark, groovy and experimental enough for it to be interesting, look out for a lot of this material forthcoming on Lost In Translation.”

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favourite wrestler was U l t i m a t e W a r r i o r. I loved his entrance music.â&#x20AC;?

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an Pierce has managed to grab his fair share of attention over the last couple of years. Whether it’s his slinky house numbers on Futureboogie, or gigantic dirtybird releases, the Bristolian’s elastic basslines and boisterous beats have found their way into the record bags of those from far beyond the edges of simply house music. Talking to Trap, the man behind Eats Everything discusses his forthcoming Edible label, collaborating with Justin Martin and his very own entrance song… TRAP_You’ve got an unusual connection with ‘Don’t You Want Me’ by Felix… Is it something to do with wrestling? Ha. I was listening to The Pet Shop Boys host a Radio 1 show back in 1992; I wasn't an avid listener by any stretch of the imagination, but when they played ‘Don’t You Want Me’, which was a totally underground record at the time, I immediately stuck a cassette into my two-deck tape player and recorded the track. I guess it was my first real introduction to dance music and my obsession began from there.

I was also really into wrestling back then and I’d use it as my ‘entrance song’ when I was either wrestling against mates or a pillow! My favourite wrestler was Ultimate Warrior. I loved his entrance music. TRAP_That wrestling dream is no doubt on the back burner now you’re releasing tunes on dirtybird… We hear you’ve been working on a collaborative EP with label mate Justin Martin? Justin Martin is a hero of mine. His production skills and attention to detail are first class. And when we work together, we both bring something to the table the other doesn’t, so it works amazingly well. However, the main thing with Justin and myself is that, first and foremost, we like to have fun. As it happens we’ve taken to calling ourselves the San-Fran-Bristol House Mafia… Only kidding.

We recently completed a three track EP which is due out on Hypercolour in February next year. It’s packed with jungle influences, harps and banging basslines! TRAP_We’re guessing you’d like to rival releases like that on your own label. Have you found anyone who fits within the Edible imprint? This isn't a diss, but to be honest I haven't found any artists that are pushing the right buttons yet. I think most people play it safe and make stuff that sounds current. So the tracks I’m sent tend to sound same-y. I would like to hear someone with their

balls out saying: "This is what I make, it's a bit fucked up, but it’s great!" I don't care whether they’re deep records, or bangers, they just need to be different. Hopefully, we can get Edible running next year. TRAP_You sound a bit like your peer Claude VonStroke there. Don’t you guys have a similar story, where your other halves both gave you ‘one last year ’ to break-through? Well, after working in numerous jobs, I just wanted to give being a DJ one more shot. My wife was really supportive and told me to go for it, so I went on the dole and worked hard. The key moment came when, in the eleventh month of my year, I got ‘Entrance Song’ signed to Pets Recordings.

To be honest, though, I still don't think I’m at the point where I can say that this ‘career’ will definitely work out. It's still a massive work in progress and you have to keep pushing yourself to make sure you stay at the top of the tree. TRAP_Your edit of Adam F ’s ‘Circles’ has been huge and is still moving dancefloors. Do you send your edits out to the original artists? I’ve sent out both the Adam F and Basement Jaxx edits to the original artists. They both approve, which is nice! I haven't had anyone say they don't like an edit I’ve put together yet, although I am positive that there will be people that don't.

When you decide to remake or edit a big track, you have to be prepared for the trolls to chastise you with cries of blasphemy. I just make them for fun and to make my sets stand out. They work on the dance-floor and that's all that really matters to me. TRAP_ So what else is in the pipeline for Eats Everything? Later this year, I’ve got an EP coming out on Futureboogie. This release is going to sound closer to the stuff I wrote during my ‘Coat Of Arms’ days, so obviously it’s going to sound a bit deeper than my usual output.

I’m heading back to America for a few shows with Pete Tong in November, as well. Luckily last time I was there my music went down amazingly well. I can't wait to go back! I’m also looking forward to playing at Bugged Out Weekender in January. It will be great to see the Chemical Brothers, they are unreal! Will be fun catching up with my good friends Catz N’ Dogz, too. Eats Everything’s ‘Vertigo’ EP is out now on dirtybird, and you can catch him playing at January’s Bugged Out Weekender. @eats_everything

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s anyone that lives or works in East London will know only too well, in October 2012 cult print designer and street artist Shepard Fairey was in town. With an exhibition of his works on Brick Lane and an adjacent pop-up store for his ubiquitous Obey clothing brand, Fairey and his team plastered the East End with his unmistakable ‘propaganda’ posters during his time in the capital. Documenting Fairey ’s time in the city was ASHES57, the London-based illustrator and photographer who is an integral member of the SWAMP81 family and worked as Fairey ’s assistant in California a few years back. Trap is proud to present a selection of the photography ASHES took, documenting everything from postering wind-swept streets to the exhibition itself.

www.ashes57.com www.obeygiant.com

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en Westbeech is a name that means different things to different people. To some, he’s the Strictly Rhythm-signed house producer and vocalist behind the 2010 album ‘ There’s More To Life Than This’, while to others he’s the man behind the Breach moniker and one of the most innovative and consistent producers in the bass-driven underground. With club music currently awash with mediocre, 130bpm ‘UK bass’ music, it’s refreshing to find a true musician with a real ear for a groove, and a studio bursting with hardware ready to make it happen. ‘Fatherless’ was, without question, the track that launched Westbeech’s Breach project. Distinctly London sounding, its incessant, chopped-flute loop and nippy vocal jolts became one of the anthems of late 2010. Since then, he’s dropped ‘ You Won’t Find Love Again’, the synth-heavy introduction to his fledgling Naked Naked imprint, plus his recent stripped-back collaborative EP with Midland. With more much-hyped collaborations and new artist releases looming, Breach and his Naked Naked baby are assembling a showcase of authentically creative UK dance music. While taking a snoop around his memorabilia-laden studio, Trap caught up with the London-based producer to talk drum & bass, staying original and pushing the scene forward. TRAP_Where did music making start for you? We understand you produced drum & bass back in the day alongside Clipz, aka Redlight? I started producing when I was 18 and yes, I started with drum & bass. Having heard early bootleg rave tapes and LTJ Bukem's remix of ‘Return to Atlantis’, I was instantly hooked and mesmerised by the sound of the music and the atmosphere. The whistles and horns and crowd noise sounded amazing and I couldn't wait to go to a rave myself when I turned 18.

A couple of years later, I moved to Bristol and having met Clipz (Redlight as he's now known), I started making music with him and DJ Die. I met Roni Size and Krust and all the producers I'd looked up to for years! I was also producing for Bristol MCs such as Sirplus and Buggsy, as well as singing on my own stuff, which was secondary to becoming a DJ. TRAP_How did your break as Ben Westbeech happen? I got signed to Brownswood (Gilles Peterson’s label) by chance after he heard ‘So Good Today’ through a Saab 900 sound system in a field at Creamfields. Then, having made a Ben Westbeech album, I started making house records after hearing Osunlade’s remix of ‘So Good Today’. I went on to make an album with Strictly Rhythm, working with the likes of Motor City Drum Ensemble, Henric Schwarz and Midland. All the while, I had started working on the Breach alias. TRAP_So that trademark Breach bass/house blend was intrinsic to your productions from very early on… Yeah, I’d made ‘Fatherless’ about a year before anyone actually heard it. I was trying to bridge a gap between dubstep and house, as I was going to FWD at the time and was getting inspired. This was about four years ago. So that's when Breach started. As Breach, I’ve released on house imprints such as dirtybird, Pets Recordings and of course my own label, Naked Naked, all of which share affiliation with bass. Even with the new Ben Westbeech album, I’m featuring artists such as Bondax and Disclosure, so it all crosses over really. TRAP_How do you approach preparing for studio time and how do you set about creating something truly unique?

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Studio time is about having fun but being focused at the same time. With Breach, I just let go and concentrate on making dance records that have energy and emotion. Melody is important to me, but also the core of the track - the drums and the bass. I use a lot of analogue hardware, both synths and outboard to create the sound of Breach. It started off as a bit of fun and it still is; which is what I've always wanted to do as a producer. I think you just have to go with what you feel inside and hope that it works. I guess we are all striving to do that in music: be original and push the scenes forward. TRAP_What’s it like working to find (and create) great music to represent Naked Naked? Are you overly pedantic? Well, the first few releases have come from me or my collaborations with others, so I'm in control of the sound. I worked on the first single, ‘You Won’t Find Love Again’ for a very long time and was very meticulous with it. However, what I have forthcoming is from other artists; the likes of Dusky, Lorca and Lyon Vynehall. I've gone and seen them and A&R’d them to slightly tailor the tunes so they fit within my ideal sound. I know the sound I want, so I just give ideas on how to make the tunes fit a bit more. I’m really excited about releasing other artists’ music and creating a home for them. TRAP_We’ve heard the third Naked Naked release is coming from the Dark Sky boys. Can you disclose anything about the release and how it came about? Yes, that’s true; it’s a collaboration between me and Dark Sky called ‘The Click’ and it’s gaining a bit of buzz already. I have known those boys for a while and we talked about writing some stuff for the new Ben Westbeech record, but I wanted to make a banger with them so we decided to do a Breach vs Dark Sky release. ‘The Click’ came out of that and then we wrote something for the B-Side last week. I’m really looking forward to it! TRAP_Are you casting your sights strictly on the UK , or do you search further afield to find the next release for the label? If I get any records from abroad that I really like, then I would consider it for sure, but right now the sound is coming from the UK. That's what Naked Naked is about right now. Making a home for these artists and creating a sound out of a movement. TRAP_Has it been difficult to build up a label in the current industry climate? I think the industry is getting better and better! It's made people really think about what they’re releasing, especially on vinyl. Sales seem to be picking up and the digital market is booming. Yes, we do have a lot against us, but it’s an amazingly rewarding job to do as you have to think hard about what you are doing and creating. I think it's a great time for the industry, especially for dance music. TRAP_So what’s the future for Naked Naked? Well, I hope to release great records on vinyl and digital. I am also planning Naked Naked parties, the first one happening next March, which is going to be in an amazing space in London, with a line-up including all the people who are involved with or close associates of the label. I also plan to do art, prints and some clothing in the next two years and collaborate with artists, photographers and video artists to create forward- thinking art to go with the music. I see it as an open-ended, creative label that will expand organically and support its artists fully.

Breach & Midland’s ‘101’/’ Visionary ’ EP is out now. Watch out for the new Ben Westbeech album next year. @benwestbeech

â&#x20AC;&#x153; Yo u h a v e t o g o w i t h what you feel inside and hope it works.â&#x20AC;?

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HAKA is the latest Bristol graffiti artist to feature in the pages of Trap. A solo show of his work has just started at the city’s King Of Paint gallery, and is titled ‘Misspent Youth’. The exhibition looks at the sterotypes attached to graffiti culture through the mediums of brushes and acrylics. Like all good graff artists, though, HACKA is most at home outside with a spray can in his hand – here we present some images of his outdoor work, plus a sneak peak at some canvases from the exhibition. Get down to King Of Paint, right next to Bristol Coach Station, next time you’re in Bristol to check the show.

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Roses Gabor is the UK vocalist who’s spent the last couple of years collaborating with the underground’s biggest names. Working with the likes of Redlight, Shy FX, SBTRKT, Gorillaz and Buraka Som Sistema, Roses made a name for herself without any help from the media or the mainstream, before November saw the release of her debut solo single for Toddla T’s Girl’s Music label – ‘Stars’. A singer we’re sure we’ ll be hearing plenty more from in 2013, Trap tracked Roses down for a quick interview... TRAP_Hey Roses, for those who might not know you yet – who are you and what do you do? Hello! My name is Roses Gabor and I’m a singer-songwriter. TRAP_Your debut solo single ‘Stars’ is an unusual sounding record – how would you describe it? Hmm, that’s a tough one, but I guess I’d call it ‘future RnB’... TRAP_That track was produced by Redlight, who you worked with before on ‘Stupid’ – how did you link with him? I met Redlight through my old manager, who asked a producer he managed called Seiji to send me instrumentals. Seiji sent me a batch and in there was the instrumental for ‘Stupid’. I recorded on it in my brother’s room at my parents’ house immediately - it probably only took 20 minutes or something. I vibed to it for a minute, then sent it to my manager who confirmed my thoughts that it was a banger! Haha. It was sent on to Redlight who immediately called me saying let’s record it properly... I went down to Bristol and the rest, as they say, is history, I guess. TRAP_You’ve worked with some of the sickest producers around - are you the clued-up fan of underground music that you appear? Funnily enough, they all chose me… SBTRKT messaged me on MySpace years ago. Shy FX released ‘Stupid’ on DSB, so our introduction came from that. And Buraka Som Sistema... I used to see Kalaf out in London quite a bit and my DJ (Martelo) introduced us. I love what they do and they do me, so it was only a matter of time before we collaborated.

TRAP_What was the music that inspired you and that you grew up with? My background is ‘Music’. The constant has probably been hip-hop, but it ranges from reggae to soca, zouk to Motown, RnB to electro... A bit of folk, pop, jungle... All sorts! I’ve got no musical training, really. I played the cello for a bit but I was young, and it was too heavy! TRAP_You’ve taken the underground route with your career – was there ever the temptation to take a different, more commercial path? I’ve always done what feels right and what I feel suits me... I intend to stretch myself and do things a little out of my comfort zone, but everything I’ve done up to this point with regards to the ‘underground’ has only happened because, for me, this is what feels right. TRAP_Any plans for an album? I’m really working on singles at the moment... An album is always on my mind and I’d love for one to be ready for next summer, but I have no firm plans yet. TRAP_Fashion is clearly very important to you. What brands do you rate the highest? My favourite brand is KTZ. I’ve worn them at every opportunity for years now. I used to go and sit in the shop for hours; I just love everything about them. Because of this, they’ve become really good friends of mine - they’re doing amazingly well. Recently, I’ve noticed Kanye, Jay Z and other high profile celebs rocking the brand, which is great for them! Mawi is another one that people are really starting to pay attention to. I’m a sucker for gold and most of my favourite jewellery pieces are by them or MFP. There are loads of other brands I like, but just too many to mention! TRAP_So, who will you be working with next? That’d be telling! What I will say is that I’ve written some dope tracks with some dope folk... TRAP_And finally, is your name really Gabor? Or do you just own a lot of shoes? Both! Catch Roses Gabor on 8 December at Annie Mac Presents at Koko, London.

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The man behind BBC Radio One’s most specialist of shows and Deviation, London’s most erudite of club-nights, Benji B strides the vanguard of underground club m u s i c w i t h e v e r y t h i n g h e d o e s . Tr a p s e n t O l i M a r l o w o f f t o B e n j i ’ s E a s t L o n d o n studio to dig deep inside the mind of one of the UK’s true musical visionaries...

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t’s weird how things in life can come full circle. One of the most arresting and personal experiences I ever had at Benji B’s midweek basement club night, Deviation, was back in 2009 watching the Dutch producer Martyn perform there around the time of his ‘Great Lengths’ album. It was one of those fortuitous, ‘I’ve lost everybody I came here with but it doesn’t matter’ type of moments, where you’ve become just another person caught up in a totally captive audience. Tonight, at Martyn’s return to the midweek session three years later; although the venue is a little bit closer to Shoreditch’s Overground station - and it’s drapes that are cocooning the sounds, rather than the exposed brick work of Gramaphone, the club’s former home on Commercial Street - there’s a synergy between crowd and DJ that’s exactly the same. Admittedly, it’s always been that way, a fact no doubt due to the close proximity of the two venues, but Deviation is the one club-night this writer has frequented that’s always managed to attract the committed and most devoted of followers, those who’ve learned to trust the powers in charge to educate them and keep their midweek adventures in music a little bit secret.

Benji states animatedly, warming up to my rather haphazard line of questioning. “Every generation of people have to have those educational kind of experiences when they go out and, for me, going out at that early age was not about getting high or getting off with girls - they were interesting side notes - and really cool ones - but they weren’t the things that drove me go to somewhere far off like The Fridge in Brixton on my own. “I owe everything about my musicality and my taste in music and my experience as a DJ to my city and the clubs that I visited throughout my life,” he agrees. “There’s no question that with my own club now, every single element of every single detail is something I learnt in and owe to that time. It’s something that I’m not borrowing, but that I’m trying to keep alive. That’s important.”

Sitting in Benji’s East-London studio (one that’s actually got an N in its postcode) on a bitter winter’s evening, we’re a far cry from the humid, noisy environments in which our paths usually cross. It’s really quiet in here, clean and almost serene; an ordered haven that he busies himself tidying at a couple of points during our time together.

The reasons that this writer, like many others, holds the idea of Deviation in such regard aren’t really physical or malleable things. Sure, the custom-prepped soundsystem installed for each session is a massive part of why the actual sets are so enjoyable, but it’s the idea of that likeminded tribal mentality that Benji touches on so readily in conversation, the idea of a regular crowd that turns out week in week out, that really is a massive part of it. Developing that club family, people you co-exist with in those types of heightened situations, is an essential part of the euphoria of clubbing in general. Talking to Benji, even though he admits his experiences were a while ago now, he still understands the underbelly of clubbing as a lifestyle.

Flanking a wall loaded with the kind of big screen Apple products, turntables and other electronics you’d expect to see in the hideout of one of BBC Radio 1’s most specialist of DJs, he sits with poise. Visibly engaged he’s happy to look back over the past five years he’s spent trying to replicate the warmth and magic of his own early experiences in some of London’s most renowned dances.

“The thing about Deviation is that it’s nothing to do with trends,” he agrees, riffing on my own recalled experiences at the night, discussing landmark sets, the calibre of the surprise guests and especially Martyn’s performance back in 2009. “It’s about recognising a thread that runs through everyone that’s committed to any form of art that has substance.

“Club culture in its purest form is truly about being inspired by a generation and taking the baton and carrying that on,”

“Like, why did you have a different experience, listening to Martyn in a basement with 200 people on a Wednesday night

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rather than anywhere else?” He offers with rhetoric. “The answer is simple: it’s because he’s playing in an environment that, at a very grass-roots level, is the purest place where he can truly feel comfortable; a place he can really be himself without any constraints. An environment where the DJ feels powerful enough to have the confidence to go wherever they want.” Similarly to his specialist show on BBC Radio, Deviation is, first and foremost, an advocate of new and interesting music, but it’s never been its crux. Despite welcoming names such as Flying Lotus, James Blake, Hudson Mohawke, Kode9, Joy Orbison, Dam Funk, Floating Points and their ilk, the ambience of the evening is as much set by Benji’s warm-up sets as it is by the guests. Free from pretention or the constraints of DJs playing 60-minute octane sets, Deviation’s always offered party goers a little bit of an upper hand, an access to a higher learning from DJs whose sets range in focus, pace and hue. Even though it’s always felt like a little bit of an intimate secret that managed to avoid the more transient of clubbers, Deviation has never been that exclusive or cliquey in the way that you might imagine a regular, connected Londoner’s club to be. At its height, Deviation was booking unmissable acts most months, setting them up perfectly for a core audience hungry to learn and often it really did feel like Cheers - the place where everyone knew your name. “It’s not financially motivated,” Benji states in no uncertain terms. “When I started Deviation, the manifesto was very simple. It had to be somewhere completely off the beaten track, somewhere slightly out of people’s comfort zone. It’s hard to think of it now, as people are comfortable in the Shoreditch triangle, but where Gramaphone was, was out of the way. I wanted to do it on a Wednesday on purpose, because Wednesday is the hardest night of the week. I wanted to do it in a venue that had never been used for anything like that before and put somewhere new on the map. I wanted to bring my own soundsystem in every month and also represent the kind of music I play on my show because if I can appreciate all these different styles and find a thread that runs throughout them, then there’s surely more than one person who can appreciate that too.” Considering the success and reach of Deviation in the last year (well attended bigger club nights in Paris, Berlin and New York and the bigger warehouse events they’ve been throwing around London to mark their fifth birthday) you get the distinct impression that his original manifesto worked. In talking to Benji at length, he’s very methodical about his justification and appropriation of it all. Theorizing the affect and influence of his early formative experiences into the world of late nights, lie-ins and rum hangovers is all well and good, but there’s an immediacy and vitality to Deviation’s particular strain of incense-scented musical unity that’s pretty hard to ignore. You’re repeatedly welcomed by the same smiling faces and you’re free to go in and dance as hard as you want. You can stand at the bar talking, handing out CDs and talking up projects to the slew of recognisable faces inside, or you can just be there, drinking gin all the way to a slump at closing time if you want. There’s no pressure. “In much the same way as if I went to any of my favourite clubs in the history of London, it’s essentially about trust,” he ponders, bringing his initial point on London’s club heritage to an unintentional conclusion. “I don’t go there because this DJ or that DJ is playing; I go there because it’s the night.” Deviation has definitely cultivated a ‘vibe’ that precedes it, no matter where it goes. Bookings aside, it’s probably the most important thing it has got going for it, something Benji is incredibly aware of, letting it slip on more than one occasion that it’s the one thing he owes to his MC, Judah, to

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Alice and Zainab (and the team around him) and all those who’ve helped create such a welcoming, knowledgeable and ultimately addictive atmosphere. “We recently did Deviation at Horst in Berlin and there was an environment that really reminded me why I do what I do,” he offers, stifling a knowing smile. “Every DJ has that experience once in a blue moon, when you suddenly remember why it is that you love doing what you do; why you have the best job in the world and why you are the luckiest bastard in the world. But funnily enough, when DJing becomes a profession, those moments don’t come around that often. Hopefully, with Deviation, it is one of those moments [for the artists playing], which is why you can have Martyn just smashing it out of the park, or why you have Kode9 or Floating Points or Joy Orbison come through and play something completely deep. Because when you come in and look out at the crowd and you think ‘OK, this is a reminder of why I do what I do’, it’s the best feeling in the world!” Standing at the bar in Concrete, Deviation’s current home in the basement of the Tea Building, a few weeks before this article goes to print; it’s obvious to note that the people inside the new space are a little different from the people I was screaming along with to the intro of Martyn’s ‘Vancouver’ back when. The energy and intensity of the soundsystem is the same - truth be told the layout of the room probably suits it better - but rather than walking down the stairs and in on a thrum of bodies jockeying for position on the dancefloor as much as by the bar, where the conversing obstacles all stand firm, the whole venue feels calmer and a bit more clinical. It’s like, now the secret is well and truly out, there’s a new slew of people looking to Benji’s club night to try and find what I found so readily back in the halcyon days of Gramaphone. Discussing the changes in approache to London promoters’ programming that have yielded this newer, possibly more internet savvy, wide-eyed enthusiastic crowd there’s a little bit of vitriol in Benji’s voice; not towards the people attending the night, but towards the booking-by-numbers, name DJ, headliner culture in which he’s now having to operate. Deviation’s strength was always in the no-frills, proper DJ manner that the guests were set up. There was a magic in the way the warm-up sets worked with the room and took you through multiple styles, sounds and genres to the heavy hitters, and the way the guests were put completely at ease and encouraged to go on and play however they wanted. “I felt in the last six to eight months of the club’s lifespan, with the honourable exception of the club’s amazing fifth birthday event, that [the vibe] has changed,” Benji agrees, honestly, accepting my points. “I feel like club culture at the moment is very much guest and name based, so that if you put Hudson Mohawke on, you’re gonna get a Hud Mo type of crowd; it’s just different. It’s funny because I’m a bit out of step with how big people are and how popular they’ve become because I still see them as people who are on that DJ wavelength. “I’m a great believer that clubs go in five year cycles,” he continues, citing examples from his own personal experiences where his cherished nights transcended more into a catch-all term for a venue. “For me, it’s very important that the next step with the club is to take it to the next level and evolve it, but to take that original ethos with it. To take it up a notch and really expand, but keep that feeling of trust, so you’ve got that regular thing back of ‘It’s Deviation! I can’t miss this!’ I want to get that back…” In person, Benji’s acutely aware of the motivation behind my questioning, often reversing the roles and quizzing me on how I feel the club has changed, what I think about London’s landscape and certain DJs or artists. You get the sense that

“Once in a blue moon, you suddenly remember why you love doing what you do; why you have the best job in the world.”

“I owe everything about my musicality and my taste i n m u s i c t o m y c i t y. ”

however fumbling or short your answer is, he’s taking it on board, processing the information and storing it for some later use. Aside from digressing into a discussion on people’s predilection for experiencing a club-night online - his puzzlement in digitizing something that is a very physical thing and is subject to whimsy and personal experience is an outlook I share - he’s noticeably keen to focus on the positive aspects of what he’s built and look to the future. “What I want to do next is celebrate the fact that we’ve had some extremely memorable moments and touched people in different ways, and that our taste in booking is quite unique and has gone on to influence what’s possible on a larger scale. “Next year the plan for Deviation is…, “ he pauses, sighing a little at the task ahead as he searches for the right phrase. “Deviation 6.0. Five years is the cut off. I feel that our club night has contributed something meaningful to London club culture in that time and, even though it’s a small contribution and the club itself is small, in my experience, all the very best things have started from that scale.” Referring more to the power and reputation that trademark Deviation vibe brings, he continues: “We’ve created something that you cannot buy, something you cannot invent or create overnight. It comes with time, investment and the love for a project. It comes with experience and with dedication in giving back to a city that made you. As cornball and cheesy as that might sound, when you take a lot from anything, I believe it’s your karmic responsibility to contribute something back.” Catch Benji B on BBC Radio One every Wednesday night, 2-4am, or anytime via BBC iPlayer. With thanks to Danna Takako

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C L A R K S J a m a i c a PHOTOS:

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Out now through One Love Books, Clarks In Jamaica explains how shoes made by a Quaker firm from Somerset became the baddest footwear in The Caribbean. Referenced in reggae and dancehall since the brandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adaption by rastas and rudeboys in the 1960s, the book focuses on the artists whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worn and sung about Clarks over the years, through current and historic photography, interviews and unseen archive material. The work of Al Fingers, the London-based writer and graphic designer who is one of the forces behind the excellent ShimmyShimmy blog, and photographer Mark Read, Clarks In Jamaica is available from all good bookshops now.

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Russian Revolution WORDS:

J o n Co o k

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ne of dance music’s most enduring genres, drum & bass has a history and evolutionary path that’s fascinating to reflect on. From the London-only rudeboy swagger of jungle, through the dark cinematic styles of the late 90s, to the Millennial Brazillian invasion and the chart-troubling vocal anthems of recent years, this once uniquely British sound and its dedicated fans have spent the last 20 years proving its doubters wrong at every turn. D&B’s longevity is down to many factors, but the genre’s growth far beyond the shores of the UK and its ability to reinvent itself over and over, are the two obvious key drivers of its success. And while the gradual globalisation of the scene was always inevitable, the emergence several years ago of a movement in the unlikely location of Russia had many scratching their heads. First came the tales of 25,000-capacity raves; then came the producers and their music... Hailing from St Petersburg, Enei was already a huge-name DJ in his native Russia when he released his debut production for Dutch label Fokuz in 2007. Mood heavy, stripped-back and beautifully constructed, Enei’s music instantly turned heads and he began on a path that would see him sign tracks for a string of D&B’s most credible imprints. Releases for Metalheadz, Med School and CIA led to the Russian signing for Kasra’s Critical Music, with the enormous ‘Cracker ’ instantly establishing Enei among the sound’s elite and helping him earn ‘Best Newcomer ’ at 2011’s DNBA Awards. 2012 has seen things go from big to huge for Enei in anticipation of the release of his debut album ‘Machines’. With the album now out and receiving rapturous acclaim, Trap grabbed a few words with the St Petersburg-based producer to find out more about Russia, D&B and the future... TRAP_For those who don’t know you, please introduce yourself... Hello! My name is Alexey, aka Enei, and I’m from St. Petersburg , Russia. I’ve been making drum & bass music for about 10 years now. TRAP_Living in Russia, how did you first discover drum & bass? It was a long time ago! Years back, I discovered some old rave cassette packs, you know the ones... Loads of old-school jump-up vibes, all that sort of stuff. That was it for me, I loved it! I could see how big this music was and I wanted to get involved, so I got myself some gear and started to make my own beats.

TRAP_What were the records and the artists that inspired you to begin producing D&B? It was guys like Kemal, Ed Rush & Optical and Ram Trilogy that really turned me on. Now I’m trying to put a few of those older vibes in my music and make it have more of that flavour; more jungly and more warmth. TRAP_What’s the scene like in Russia? Where would you say is the ‘capital’ for D&B there? Everyone from Moscow and St. Petersburg thinks their own city is the capital, so in my opinion, the D&B capital of Russia is St. Petersburg! To be honest, there are so many proper parties here and lots of promoters who are doing it primarily to make people happy, money comes second, I think. In contrast, Moscow is totally about money and the raves there are massive, but there are some big parties in St. Petersburg, too. TRAP_We have seen the HUGE Pirate Station raves on the internet – have you ever attended or played at one? What are they like? Yeah those parties are really huge - about 15,000 people at least! There are huge sound systems, fire shows, girls on stilts, you know, just the usual! TRAP_You, and many other Russian D&B producers, make darker, more serious D&B – is there a jump-up scene in Russia too? You’re right, in the past more Russians have loved the harder stuff like Noisia, the neurofunk and techy D&B sound, as well as some more mainstream tunes. But actually, now it’s all changing a little bit. New producers are starting to make more intelligent and underground music and people seem to be really into it. TRAP_Do you like other styles of D&B? Or do you strictly prefer the darker, more thoughtful sound that you produce? I like all sorts, as long as it’s fresh and well made. I can go from the really hard stuff in my sets right through to a little more of the mainstream stuff. You always have to be prepared for where you’re playing and the crowd. TRAP_So you still live in Russia ? What do you love most and hate most about living there? Yeah I still live in Russia and I really love my country; it’s hard to explain why! I love our traditions, like our food for example. But there’s a also lot of annoying things here; there are some strange people around and some weird politics. I don’t understand anything about politics and don’t want to. Overall though, the good definitely outstrips the bad! TRAP_Do you have any plans to move to the UK ? Or anywhere else? I’m thinking that maybe I’ll move to the UK for a couple of months with my girlfriend when my new tour begins, but I wouldn’t want to live there forever. Much as I love

“Feed your mind and sooner or later it’ll all make sense.”

Russia, I want to travel around the world while I’m still young and able... I guess I have plenty of time! TRAP_The Album ‘Machines’ – tell us more about it... It’s all about my vision of music and drum & bass! I love it dark, cinematic and mystical, but actually, there are a lot of different styles on the album something for everyone. If you grab the CD you can hear what I’m thinking about... I’m over the moon with it and already want to start on the next one! TRAP_You are releasing the album on Critical – one of the most respected D&B labels – was it an easy decision to sign exclusively with them? It was so easy, because I respect Kasra [Critical boss] and his vision so much. I’m sure that the label will continue grow with every tune, and I’m confident in Kasra’s business strategy. He’s got a big brain in there... Haha. TRAP_You achieved a massive thing – coming from Russia and signing to one of the UK ’s best D&B labels. What advice would you give to others chasing seemingly impossible dreams? You’ve just gotta never give up and always do the right thing that works for you, listen to all types of different music and read a lot of books! Feed your mind and sooner or later it’ll all make sense. TRAP_Finally, what are your plans for the future, both personally and within drum & bass? I’m gonna lay down low for a while! I’ve just been on tour for the past three months, so I need to have a rest and then I’ll start work again, maybe on another album... I’m full of ideas! Oh, and I’ll be touring again around March or April, so look out for me!

‘Machines’ is out now on Critical Music. @eneimusic

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M U S I C R EV I EWS REVIEWED BY: OLI GRANT, MATT RICHES, SEAN KELLY, JUSTIN IRIAJEN, JON COOK, SOPHIE THOMAS, DJ DUBBOY, GWYN THOMAS DECHROUSTCHOFF, JERYL WILTON, SAM BATES.

FABRICLIVE 67 Ben UFO (Fabric) Hessle Audio figurehead Ben UFO steps up to provide the latest, instalment of the FABRICLIVE mix series. The result is an interesting yet accessible journey through forward thinking house and techno, in all its various forms. Firmly shaking off the 'bass music' cobwebs, the DJs’ DJ opts for a gritty, more analogue sound. Starting the selection with Delroy Edwards’ titanium tough drums and post apocalyptic synths is a real statement of intent, and just when you thought things couldn't get any rougher, Pev & Kowton's 'Raw Code' comes churning into the mix, pushing the energy and distortion levels well into the red. Tracks such as Tim Love Lee's percussive oddity 'The Tortoise' and Juniper’s lush, Manc- house roller 'Jovian Planet' cut through the hiss and crackle like shards of light from a storm cloud, offering some well needed respite from the sometimes relentless jack. Ben UFO is clearly a DJ of the highest calibre with a real ear for an unusual blend, but it’s his deep appreciation and understanding of house and techno that really shines through. Highly recommended.

T R ATPRM GA C EO. .CUOK. U K0 6 90 5 7 AA PM A ZGIANZEI.N

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KAHN ‘Dread’ / ‘Late Night Blues’ Ft Rider Shafique (Deep Medi)

PLANAS

‘The Long Game’ (Exceptional) It’s almost surprising that ‘The Long Game’ is Planas’s debut album. While he’s undoubtedly a busy operator (musical duties include production for Gentleman’s Dub Club, managing Ranking Records and numerous aliases), his inherent musical ability that spans a range of disciplines render ‘The Long Game’ an exciting prospect, and is a factor clearly apparent throughout this record. The release melds Planas’ varying creative directions together effortlessly, skipping from soulful cuts with vocalist Ed Thomas to the rasping, adrenaline-infused brute power of the eight-minute epic ‘Cry Wolf’, and the sinister, symphonic dynamics of Mr. Litvinekno, while maintaining a distinct narrative thread. There’s a real mix of synthesized and live instrumentation, beats for the dancefloor ruckus plus soundtracks for more pensive moods; a long overdue and cohesive debut from Planas.

BUSY SIGNAL ‘Come Shock Out’ (Juke Boxx) Busy is back! Out of jail and back in the booth, Busy's first effort since release sees him team up with the ever reliable Jukeboxx productions for a sensational comeback. ‘Come Shock Out’ is a proper dancehall tune – a sick old-school riddim and Busy's own unsurpassable flow bigging up his supporters and fellow artists and asking one and all to come shock out inna the dance. This is prime material.

I n d u cti o n to Mal a’s Deep Medi ran ks i s a fi tti n g w ay to ca p Kah n ’s s mo u l d e ri n g yea r, a nd he d ro p s s o me s e ri o u s f i r e her e. A To yan -s amp l i n g i n tro pa ves the w ay fo r tu mb l i n g s l abs of s u b -b as s an d re d -e yed, ha zy atmo s p h e ri cs o n ‘Drea d’, whi l e th e cru s h i n g p u l s e s of l ow-end ap p l i e d b e n e ath Ri d e r Sha f i que’s vocal s on ‘Late Ni gh t Bl u e s ’ make th i s a co n te n d er f or the Bri s to l b as e d p ro d u cer ’s w e i gh te s t re l e as e s yet.

VARIOUS ARTISTS ‘Evolution EP Series 4’ (Shogun Audio) This tune is taking over JA dancehalls right now. The energy god, Elephant Man, teams up with dancer-turned-deejay, Ding Dong, for a wicked combo that pays tribute to bashment’s rich tradition of famous dancers and their trademark moves, while also introducing us to their brand new dance... Do the Crocodile! Watch out for the official video. Bashment at its energydriven best!

PEDRO 123 'Slush EP' (Get Some) Newcomer Pedro 123 drops his debut release on Get Some Recordings. 'Slush' swaggers along, applying wide-ass, eski-style bass to a sparse percussive framework, complete with clattering toms and lo-fi arpeggios. Things get even filthier on 'Jetpack joyride' with woozing reverse stabs reverberating from within a dense mass of darked-out subs and igloo synth. Two hybrid cuts with a less than subtle nod to early grime, polished up and pitched down for the current dancefloor.

ENEI ‘Machines’ (Critical Music) After working away on the fringes for some years, Enei boldly established himself within D&B last year with a bunch of hard hitting, beautifully deep releases. Those releases helped the Russian producer’s profile grown, to the extent that he was entrusted by the mighty Critical Music for only their second ever LP from a solo artist. Enei made a name for himself with stomach-churning basslines and intricate percussion; and ‘Machines’ showcases the St Petersburg native’s exceptional flair for such productions, with the majority of the tracks here following his winning formula. There are glimpses of alternative flavours, such as the Kemo-voiced amen tearout 'Saligia' and soulful 'Runnin', both of which are outstanding, but for the non-D&B purists, ‘Machines’ could probably do with a few more tracks like these, to balance out the stripped back grooves the album predominantly offers.

DJ MADD ‘The Life You Chose’ (Black Box) Rounding off a stellar year of playing a significant role in defining the course of eyes-down dubstep, Black Box serve up a lethal cut from DJ Madd, backed with a remix courtesy of the don, Mr. Distance. Madd employs brutal licks of neurofunk styled synth manipulation on the original, with Distance cranking up the intensity to breaking point on his version; imperious bass pressure!

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TOM DEMAC ‘Little Bits That Matter’ [Pets Recordings]

FALTY DL ‘Hardcourage’ (Ninja Tune) The third album from New York’s Drew Lustman entails a progressive step into the tasteful, big-room territory of Four Tet and Jamie XX, with great success, if a few too many pleasantries. These songs are more roundly accomplished and digestible than the producer's earlier releases, in terms of cohesion and aesthetic. This rings with an almost bittersweet note, because it lacks the sexy dirt of FaltyDL's more roughly-arranged early works, but this is a common grievance when an artist finds that varnish they’ve been looking for. There’s a certain amount of borrowing going on within the woozy atmospherics and Martian-sounding synth-work – lead single ‘Straight & Arrow seems intent on aping the gleaming crescendos of Floating Points – you’ve just got to enjoy it and let the man work, though; it’s beautiful music.

P JAM ‘Oxygen’ EP (Beat Camp) Following his recent explosive collaboration with Big Narstie, grime veteran P Jam returns with a solo EP for his Beat Camp imprint. From the carnival infused, grime meets UK funky vibes of ‘Bubble Bum’, to the low-fi synths and 8-Bar styles of ‘Quantum’, through to the solemn funk-infused ‘Sky Boy’ that comes to life with an explosion of drums. This is an interesting, experimental and valuable release. Check it.

To m De mac h as go n e th ro u gh a h u ge e vo lu tio n in so u n d o ve r th e last 12 mo n th s. On H yp e rco l o u r a lo n e h e w e n t f r o m th e lo w -slu n g jack o f ‘Di rty H o n e y’ to the h e avy, me n aci n g te xtu re s of ‘Cr itical Distan ce P a rt 2’. I n h is late st E P th e se w o rl d s co me toge th e r. Le ad tr ack , ‘Li ttl e Bi ts Th at Matte r ’ b le n d s th i ck mo o d s w ith e th e r e al vo cals w h i l s t ‘Tan n e r s’ laye r s in f e cti o u s d i s co h o o ks w ith a massive p e rcu s s i ve bass-lin e . An o th e r ge m fro m P e ts Re co r d in gs.

VARIOUS ARTISTS ‘Critical X’ (Critical Music) Any aspiring drum & bass label boss would do well to take note of Critical Record's path to domination over the last decade. In that time, head honcho Kasra has established the imprint as a reference point for imaginative, credible and consistently deep 174bpm music. The labels impeccable ear for unbounded quality has seen them accumulate an enviable back catalogue. This anthology showcases some of their very best releases, with seminal tracks appearing from the mighty Calibre and Breakage, sitting proudly alongside more recent efforts from the likes of Icicle, Rockwell and Bladerunner. The album is essentially a celebration of Critical's integrity and perseverance in enriching an arguably saturated genre with slices of timeless brilliance. A label that deserves all the recognition it gets.

PLASTICIAN ‘Dubstep Allstars Vol.10’ (Tempa) Plastician, one of the pioneers of the dubstep sound, gets a long overdue invitation to mix the latest in the seminal ‘Dubstep Allstars’ series from stalwart imprint Tempa. Much more than just a compilation, the early instalments in the ‘Allstars’ series help define and cohesively unify the then emerging dubstep sound, so any addition to its illustrious ranks has the weight of history pressing down on it. With a pedigree as rich as his, the task clearly hasn’t daunted Plastician, and this is one of the finest collections of ‘real’ dubstep we’ve heard in a long, long time. Compiling 21 mood and emotion-packed tracks from the likes of J:Kenzo, Commodo and Jay Drop, and gilding the whole thing with vocal contributions from Doctor, Merky Ace and Footsie, ‘Allstars Vol. 10’ deftly proves that the good stuff is still out there.

DARK SKY 'Myriam’ EP (50 Weapons) Dark Sky are the latest bass music protagonists to dip their toe into techno’s icy waters. The 'Myriam EP' for Modeselektors 50 Weapons imprint see's them dim the lights and slow things down a little. Eerie atmospherics give way to a rugged groove on 'Shades', whilst 'Shutter Speed' comes across like DJ Oddz on a load of downers. 'Hequon' continues in the same vein, reducing the sounds even further to leave a layer of crusty drums.

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ASHLEY BEEDLE ‘Yardism’ Vol.1 (Girls Music)

VARIOUS ARTISTS ‘Afrobeats The Hits Vol.1’ (Green World Media) An exciting fusion of a range of West African sounds from Ghana and Nigera, injected with global influences such as hip-hop, dancehall and funky, afrobeats has been one of the hottest sounds in UK clubs over the last 18 months. Offering an infectious and uniquely African interpretation, the sound owes as much to the globalising nature of the internet as it does to distant relatives in the US or UK. Having taking big-city ‘urban’ raves by storm, 2013 could well be the year that afrobeats seeps into the wider dance music mainstream. This compilation is a worthy introduction to the movement, highlighting many of the main players, and demonstrating a buoyant and vibrant sound.

JUSTIN MARTIN ‘Ghettos & Gardens Remixes Volume 2 (Dirtybird) So-good-they-remixed it twice, Justin Martin’s ‘Ghettos and Gardens’ LP has been a big highlight for the high-flying Dirtybird crew. Staying true to their recent form, Claude VonStroke and Eats Everything’s respective garage twists and meaty basslines add some weight to the tough but tender cuts. However, surprises come from Leroy Peppers and Shadow Child whose high-octane reworks of ‘Riding Spaceships’ and ‘Don’t Go’ tap into Justin’s love for jungle and D&B.

‘Yardism’ see’s dance music and electronica legend Ashley Beedle debut for Toddla T’s ‘Girls Music’ imprint. Appropriately for a release on Toddla’s label, this is an EP grounded in soundsystem culture. However, this is by no pastiche of Jamaican music; at its core it is solid house music, wearing a wide range of influences on its sleeve. There’s talk of more from this project and, with this release in mind, that’s an exciting prospect!

RUFF SQWAD ‘White Label Classics’ (No Hats, No Hoods) A decade ago, before grime’s stars even registered on the pop consciousness, a group of kids from Bow created some of the most original underground bass music ever made. Tinchy Stryder’s crew Ruff Sqwad, more specifically the producers Rapid and Dirty Danger, experimented with square-wavefilled music that was simultaneously cold and devastatingly simple. This is a CD of 22 pirate radio instrumental grime anthems - a document of to the sound’s history and testament to what can be achieved with limited production resources.

STYLO G ‘Press Up’ (So Shifty) Stylo G, the UK's top bashment deejay, teams up with Germany's So Shifty crew to deliver an awesome throwback dancehall anthem that should be every bit as popular as ‘Call Mi A Yardie’. Stylo rides a wicked upbeat tinpan riddim with slackness lyrics delivered in his own inimitable style. Expect this to run dances over the next few months. Wuk up time!

PINCH ‘MIA 2006 – 2010’ (Tectonic) The dubstep original known as Pinch sheds light on some of the lesser known gems from his classic-strewn discography in this wonderfully diverse retrospective compilation of works released between 2006 and 2010. The relevance and sonic longevity of these tracks are not to be underestimated; ‘Chamber Dub’ hits harder and lower than the vast majority dark halfstep that’s emerged this year, while smoked-out dub flavours shine through on ‘Rise Up’, and the weight of the ethereal Bristol classic ‘136 Trek’ takes us back. Heaving basslines dominate tracks like ‘Qawwali VIP’ and ‘Motion Sickness’ and still feel so raw, glowing with warmth and that unpredictable, organically constructed feel. It’s a timely reminder of Pinch’s prowess on the buttons, and an essential collection from one of the UK underground’s great luminaries.

WILKINSON ‘Need To Know ’ / ‘Direction’ (Ram) Over the past couple of years, Wilkinson has laid down the foundations for big things to come in 2013. The forthcoming single 'Need To Know' neatly blends jungle undertones and a rolling dancefloor lead, all wrapped by a sing-a-long hook. 'Direction' goes down a more grimey route, with grinding bass and a rolling drop a real head-nodder of a B-side!

ASHES57 81 Shoreditch High Street. www.ashes57.com

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GAMES REVIEWS WITH CUTLINE

Ubisoft’s newest incarnation of the Assassin’s Creed series is undoubtedly its best. The latest version sees Ezio Auditore da Firenze and Renaissance Europe left in the past, as you’re transported into the body of Connor Kenway during the American Revolution. While Connor is an altogether more grumpy leading man than Ezio, he’s also learned a few new tricks and the game mechanics are set up perfectly to give you the best experience yet.

The scenery is glorious and the storytelling is impeccable, but it’s the gameplay that’s really gets a boost. While previous instalments have occasionally felt sluggish or repetitive, Assassin’s Creed III adds enough fluent upgrades to ensure fans will love it, while newcomers or naysayers would be doing themselves a disservice if they don’t give it a try. Incredibly accomplished and even more epic than ever.

Ubisoft Montreal (PS Vita) Out Now

ALL-STARS BATTLE ROYALE Sony (PS3, PS Vita) Out Now

Microsoft (Xbox360) Out March 2013

Now available in travel size! Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation isn’t a mere handheld mini-me shadow of the big-boy console game, but actually a fully-fledged Assassin’s Creed in its own right. Set in New Orleans during the American Revolution, right alongside Assassin’s Creed III, the Vita version comes equipped with a female protagonist and a very PS Vita way of doing things. Casual gamers may find themselves a little frustrated with the small screen experience, but Liberation looks stunning and there’s plenty here for fans to get into on the move.

Ever wondered what computer games characters do on their day off? Do they enjoy long walks in the park, socialising with friends, or perhaps battering seven shades of something out of each other in a brutal fight-to-the-death scenario? PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale seems to think it’s the latter, enlisting some of the gaming world’s best known personalities to duke it out for your entertainment. Everyone from Little BigPlanet’s Sackboy to BioShock’s Big Daddy is here, with a fresh twist on the fighting game mechanic that looks set to make plenty of thumbs sore this winter.

Looking ahead to one of 2013’s most anticipated titles, Gears of War: Judgement promises to be “the most intense and challenging Gears of War game yet.” Fans of the series can jump into a hefty campaign with three friends (via XboxLive), which focuses on Kilo Squad as they attempt to save the besieged city of Halvo Bay. Once again, this looks to be a furious piece of shoot-em-up action, backed up with a rich sci-fi warzone storyline (Microsoft really does know how to make them!) we can’t wait to play this.

ASSASSIN’S CREED III UBISOFT MONTREAL (PC, PS3, XBOX360) OUT NOW

ASSASSIN’S CREED III: LIBERATION

GEARS OF WAR: JUDGEMENT

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TOP 5 XMAS G IFTS PS Vita If yo u ha ve n’ t al re ad y go t on e, as k fo r on e! Hitman: B ec om e th A bsolution e ul tim at e st ea lth y ki lle r th is C Wonderb hr is tm as . ook: Boo C oo l ga m k of Spell in g te ch to s bu y yo ur yo un ge r si bl in g. Borderlan It’s be en d s 2 ou t fo r th re e m on th s an d it’s to pp in g th st ill e M et ac rit ic ch ar ts . iP h one 5 Wel l it do es ha ve a bi gg er sc re en ex tr a to uc fo r hy fe el y ga m ep la y.

HALO 4 MICROSOFT (XBOX360)

CALL OF DUTY: BLACK OPS II

THE UNFINISHED SWAN Sony (PS3) Out Now

Activision (PS3, PC, Xbox360, Wii U) Out Now

The Unfinished Swan is, without doubt, one of the most intriguing games we’ve played in some time. Starting out with a completely white screen, we almost thought there was something wrong with the game until we started to throw blobs of black paint around, uncovering a world beneath the white. With a storybook narrative, you’d be forgiven for thinking this game is just for kids, but push through that and you’ll find a genuinely engaging game with clever puzzles and an increasingly interesting plotline.

In the first half hour of Black Ops II, you’re subjected to burning children, evil dictators, a boat chase that culminates with firing rockets at a helicopter gunship and a rescue mission requiring stealth and the laying of animal traps. Black Ops II, we can safely say, paints a very dark picture of the year 2025. The story is overblown, the action is COD through-and-through and the game has received some tweaks that enable a little more freedom to the development. Essentially it’s a Call of Duty game – the fans will love it.

Out Now If there’s one thing that’s bound to get fans of a blockbuster nervous, it’s a sequel. But while Hollywood churns out flop after sequential flop for some of its biggest franchises, the games industry tends to fare a little better. So, while millions of Halo fans anxiously awaited 343 Industries new take on the series, they can all breathe a heavy sigh of relief: it’s good. It’s very good. Master Chief and Cortana return for the start of an all-new chapter in Halo history, with fresh enemies, new weapons and one of the most beautiful backdrops we’ve ever seen in a computer game. Meanwhile, the multiplayer has had an upgrade with updated maps, a Call of Duty-style progression and a little balancing-out of the finer aspects. Don’t be fooled though, the new gloss adds extra sheen to an impeccable Halo experience and fans of the game will not be disappointed.

S T U D I O S E S S I O N S #2 with BREAK Trap welcomes back one of dance music’s finest producers and engineers for a second exclusive production lesson. Whatever genre you produce, read on for Break’s guide on how to make that all-important bass...

SESSION TWO: MAKING FAT BASS It's not easy to sum this whole subject up in under 1000 words, but here are a few different techniques that can be applied or combined together to get you some extra-heavy bass. Synths, samples, and bass guitar can all be used, and a lot of the bass production techniques can be applied to any of these sources. Bass is only as fat as the relationship with other elements in the mix lets it be, so here are a few ways to improve that balance.

STEP ONE: FINDING YOUR SOUND

STEP TWO: LAYERING

Find a bass sound. In this example, I’ve used an 808 kick sample, as it’s a pretty standard sound that everyone has. On the other hand, there are thousands of bass samples like this, so finding a clean and weighty one to start with usually makes all the difference in the long run.

Layering the bass can be a useful way to add tone, movement and crunch to your sound. Copying the channel, or sending it to a Bus/Aux track, gives you the flexibility to play with this layer, without affecting the original. Using an Amp or Distortion unit will instantly give you noticeable results.

The same thing applies with synths - some softsynths sound pretty weak and thin, but using one with a warm heavy sound (I like Spectrasonics, Korg or a Virus) is essential to avoid a lame bass tone.

I've used Softube's Vintage Amp Room; it even sounds wicked on the standard preset. An EQ or Filter before or after this can be swept or shelved to give movement or separation from the original sub layer. If you do this for real with a guitar pedal, or by driving a mixing desk etc, it usually sounds even cooler, and less computery.

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STEP FIVE: GROUP ELEMENTS

Other effects can be added to this distortion channel, such as reverb, or additional busses can be set up with other effects, such as a Bass Enhancer or Stereo Widening to add width to the top layer of your bass.

All the bass elements can now be grouped together onto one fader. This aids mixing, as now all the bass can be muted with one click. Also, additional plug-ins can be added to glue all the bass together.

If you're using a synth, these effects can also be achieved by altering different parameters on various copies of the same synth, such as Detuning or Drive. This will fatten and widen your bass sound. If you move the filter on the tops on one synth/sampler and keep the other on sub only, you’ll have the movement and sub together, which sounds fat. I've put a touch of Pultec low end on the original sub for a bit more warmth.

I’ve used a FabFilterProQ to cut the very low flappy subs, an Api 560 EQ to shape the overall bass frequencies, and the C6 multiband compressor on the mastering settings with a few tweaks can be good for controlling your bass group. I've put a FabFilterPro L on the end to squeeze as much level as possible out of the bass group. I'm trying to get the bass to a level where it's very bassy and heavy, but just under the point where it farts or flaps. Going back and rebalancing all these faders is usually necessary to get the best blend of sub, mid and tops from the layers.

STEP FOUR: SIDECHAINING I've used a simple kick and snare to give us some context to mix to. This beat channel can be used as a sidechain / ducking trigger. I've sent the beat channel to Bus2 on the mixer, and then disabled the output so there’s signal but no sound. This is then activated as the external sidechain source for a Fab FilterPro C compressor that I’ve used on the bass. Any compressor can be used for this step, as long as it has external sidechain capabilities. This will then duck the level of the bass whenever the drums hit, which gives the illusion of more level on both simultaneously. This will give you a pumping sound, which can be great, but also horrible if overdone; tweaking the attack and release times will get the bass grooving with your drums.

STEP SIX: BALANCE AND MONITORING For me, fat bass is only as fat as the rest of the tune it sits in, unless it’s just bass on its own. So really, half the problem is the rest of the tune that isn't bass. The more bass you add the weaker the midrange becomes, so a lot of the trick with fat bass is having drums that can handle competing with it. Good monitoring makes all the difference; I've struggled with bad rooms and speakers for years. Getting your monitoring as good as you can makes way more difference than any plug-in or special techniques.

NEXT ISSUE: FINAL MASTERS

BASSPO I NTS

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080

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COMPILED BY: IAIN BLACKBURN

DECEMBER 2012 FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER 10 YEARS OF TERRORRHYTHM @ CABLE, LONDON P l as ti ci an , Tempa T, Stink a hbell B2B Ps y:am, Om Unit, Cri s s y Cri s s , MRK1, Ma ca br e U nit.

DOLLOP

D I G I TA L S O U N D B O Y X M AS PA RT Y

T H U R S D AY 2 0 D E C E M B E R BASING HOUSE, LONDON

@ STEALTH & RESCUE ROOMS, NOTTINGHAM Loefah, Scuba, Jackmaster, Blawan, Krystal Klear + more.

SATURDAY 8 DECEMBER NUMBERS WAREHOUSE PARTY @ OVAL SPACE, LONDON Six s e cre t guests over eight hour s .

HOSPITALITY BRIGHTON @ DIGITAL, BRIGHTON H i gh Co n tra st, S.P.Y, Nu-Tone, Stanza, Wrec, A.D.

BUNGA BUNGA @ WAREHOUSE LOCATION TBA, SHEFFIELD On e man , Mele, Pr edita h + mor e.

FRIDAY 14 DECEMBER RAM RECORDS XMAS SPECIAL @ FABRIC, LONDON An d y C, Ch a se & Sta tus, Ca lyx & Teebee, Loads tar, Bre ak + l o ad s mor e.

SATURDAY 15 DECEMBER NIGHT SLUGS ALLSTARS WINTER RAVE @ XOYO, LONDON Bo k Bo k, Gi r l U nit, J a m City, L-vis 1990 + more.

SHADOW CITY

Afte r a 2012 th a t h a s s e e n Di gi ta l So u n d b o y co n s o l i d a ti n g i ts p o s i ti o n a s o n e o f th e k e y d ri vi n g f o rce s fo r th e U K b a s s -d ri ve n u n d e rgro u n d , Sh y FX a n d co a re ce l e b ra ti n g w i th a ve ry s p e ci a l Ch ri s tma s pa rty o n Th u rs d a y 20 De ce mb e r a t E a s t Lo n d o n ’s Ba s i n g H o u s e . So u n d b o y b i g d o gs l i k e Bre a k a ge , B Tra i ts a n d Di s ma n tl e w i l l a l l b e p l a yi n g, p l u s o f co u rs e th e b o s s ma n h i ms e l f Sh y FX a n d a w h o l e h o s t o f s p e ci a l gu e s ts , w i th MCs GQ, Yo u n gma n , Dyn a mi te a n d I D. Ca p a ci ty i s l i mi te d to j u s t 300 p e o p l e a n d , i n k e e p i n g w i th th e fe s ti ve s p i ri t, 150 a re b e i n g gi ve n a w a y fo r fre e o n l i n e . Ma k e s u re yo u re gi s te r b y 10a m o n 19 De ce mb e r i f yo u fa n cy a tte n d i n g.

b a ss l a ce d . co m /d sb x ma s

RINSE

vs

FWD>>

W E D N E S D AY 2 6 D E C E M B E R FA B R I C , L O N D O N

@ THE RAINBOW WAREHOUSE, BIRMINGHAM Mo n ki , K arma Kid + mor e.

IN:MOTION PRESENTS: TOKYO DUB @ MOTION, BRISTOL J a h Sh aka Sound System, The Bug Feat Flowdan & Dad d y Fre d dy, Soom T, Kr yptic Minds + more.

THURSDAY 20 DECEMBER FWD>> @ PLASTIC PEOPLE, LONDON Me l e , Scra tcha DVA, Foa mo, XXXY.

SATURDAY 22 DECEMBER BORN ELECTRIC

Now esta bl i shed a s a n a nnua l f ea tur e of the f esti ve per i od f or those l i vi ng or l ef t behi nd i n the ca pi ta l over Chr i stma s, thi s yea r ’s Ri nse FWD> > boxi ng da y pa r ty a t Fa br i c comes good w i th a nother r i di cul ous l i ne-up tha t onl y the scene-sha pi ng r a di o sta ti on a nd le genda r y cl ub ni ght coul d ma na ge.

@ ELECTRIC BRIXTON, LONDON James Zabiela, DJ T., Pangaea, Glimpse, Gangcolours, + more.

SATURDAY 29 DECEMBER FACE WAREHOUSE RAVE @ THE RAINBOW WAREHOUSE, BIRMINGHAM Mo s ca, Du s ky, The Ma r tinez Br oth ers , Laura Jones .

Wi th nea r l y a l l the DJ s tha t pl a y on Ri nse i n attenda nce, ever y styl e of under gr ound ba ss-musi c wi l l be on the menu, pl a yed by ever yone f r om Zi nc a nd Onema n to Ma r k Ra df or d, The H ea tw a ve, J :Kenzo a nd Ma r cus Na sty. I f you’r e i n London over Chr i stma s a nd you’r e not too dea d-out by Boxi ng Da y, thi s i s you.

f ab r i cl o n d o n .c o m

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NYE & JANUARY 2013 R E G U L AT E P R E S E N T S :

S WA M P 8 1

X

NYE

M O N D AY 3 1 D E C E M B E R LIGHTBOX, LONDON

MONDAY 31 DECEMBER CRITICAL SOUND NYE @ SECRET WAREHOUSE LOCATION, LONDON Ro ckwe l l , K as ra, Cyan ti fi c, Ju b e i b 2b Vi ci o u s Ci rcl e , MC GQ + more.

DOLLOP NYE @STEALTH & RESCUE ROOMS, NOTTINGHAM Ju l i o Bas h mo re , Jo y Orb i s o n , Mi gu e l Camp b e l l , On e man , Wai fs & Strays , DJ E Z, Me l e .

THE ISLAND NYE @ OLD FIRESTATION, BRISTOL New Yea r ’s E ve i s ei th e r th e gr e ate st n igh t yo u ’ll ha ve out a l l yea r, or th e mo st d e p r e ssin g, d iff icu lt and di s a ppoi nti ng. All th at h yp e o f te n e n d s in def l a ti on, but i f you’r e lo o kin g f o r a gu ar an te e d pa r ty wi thout des tr oyin g yo u r b an k b alan ce , th e n Swa mp 81’s New Year ’s b ash lo o ks like th e o n e . Any r ea der of thi s magazin e w ill kn o w th at Sw amp ha s ba s i ca l l y bos s ed d an ce mu sic in th e last 18 months , wi th Loef a h an d h is car e f u lly co n str u cte d sta bl e domi na ti ng r a ve s an d air w ave s w ith th e ir DJ se ts a nd pr oducti ons . I f yo u kn o w ab o u t Sw amp , w e don’t need to s a y a nyth in g mo r e ... I f yo u d o n ’t, w e ll, yo u better get your s e lf d o w n to th is o n e .

fa c eb o o k. c o m/r egu l a t e.l d n

Su b mo ti o n Orch e s tra, Ze d Bi as , Dr Me ake r (Li ve ), Co n go Natty, Lami n ate Rad i o + l o ad s mo re .

AUDIO PRESENTS: TROPICAL NYE ALLNIGHTER @ AUDIO, BRIGHTON E ats E ve ryth i n g, H u xl e y, Du s ky, Maxxi So u n d s ys te m + mo re .

SUPERCHARGED @ CONCORDE2, BRIGHTON Sh y FX , Wo o ki e , H i gh Ran ki n + mo re

TUESDAY 1 JANUARY WHP CLOSING PARTY @ WHP, MANCHESTER Jami e Jo n e s , Se th Tro xl e r, De rri ck Carte r, Fo u r Te t (DJ s e t), Ju l i o Bas h mo re & Jo y Orb i s o n (b 2b ).

IN:MOTION

M O N D AY 3 1 D E C E M B E R MOTION, BRISTOL

THE HYDRA PRESENT: ELECTRIC MINDS NYD PARTY @ SECRET LOCATION, LONDON Henrik Schwarz, Mosca, Shed, Will Saul, Midland, Dusky.

FRIDAY 4 JANUARY IDIOSYNPHONIC @ CABLE, LONDON Wi l ki n s o n , N Typ e , Re s o , Bre ak B2B DJ Di e , Di me n s i o n .

FRIDAY 11 JANUARY BEN UFO FABRICLIVE CD LAUNCH @ FABRIC, LONDON

For all our West Country brethren, or for those looking for a New Year’s knees-up elsewhere, Bristol’s In:Motion looks a strong option to see out 2012. Celebrating the success of this year’s series, the club has booked a massive in-house party to round up the year, and invited one of Bristol’s most respected and legendary brands to host the second warehouse – Pinch’s Subloaded. Expect Sub Focus, Plastician, Caspa and Scratch Perverts in the main room, while Loefah, Boddika, and Pinch destroy the second space and Mele, Marcus Nasty and Martelo duppy up the tunnel. If house is more your thing, check the Shapes NYD party here the following day.

b ri s t o li n mo t i o n .c o m

Be n U FO, P e ars o n So u n d , P an gae a, X X X Y, P e ve re l i s t, Op ti mo + mo re .

SATURDAY 12 JANUARY WE FEAR SILENCE PRESENTS: BLACKOUT @ CABLE, LONDON H azard , Bl ack Su n E mp i re , P h ace , Op ti cal , Te l e ki n e s i s , Mi n d s cap e , Fo re i gn Co n ce p t.

FRIDAY 19 JANUARY XOYO PRESENTS: @XOYO, LONDON Jackmas te r, Bo n d ax, T Wi l l i ams , MS Dyn ami te + mo re .

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