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guess this is the part where I’m supposed to tell you a bunch of shit about what you’re about the read... [Thinking] I personally don’t believe that’s necessary. I along with the brothers & sisters have done enough typing about the topics in this issue within this issue. What I will do is use this section to talk my shit. (Smile) This year marks the 13th year for the TRAP DOOR brand. This company started on the compound of the Maryland Transitional Training Center in Hagerstown, Maryland on the back of a sick call slip. Thirteen years later we are still here. Have we crossed the finish line yet; Nah. Are we in the position to cross the finish line; yes. We have the format; we have the interviews, now all we need is you. Along with this issue, you will find that I’ve included two things for you to view: the TRAP DOOR CATALOG and the TRAP DOOR CALENDAR. In March I will present TRAP INK MAGAZINE and in July I’ll present TRAP DOOR RECORDS. The question you should be asking yourself is “Why?” Well because while I was behind enemy lines like some of you are now I realized that our problem as a community wasn’t the war on drugs is was simply just the lack of finance. In my hood the dope fiend wasn’t the problem. The dope fiend that couldn’t support his/her habit was the problem. Every face I seen out of a fraction of 22,696 men I was incarcerated with charges had one common denominator ;”Money” So instead of getting involved in the jail politics I focused my attention on creating a lane for my people because I understood that there was no such thing as economic stability outside the guide lines of the law. I’m going to open the door by giving you the necessary tools to build what you like to build by simply educating and giving you the necessary resources and contact information to contact every single person that you read about within the lines of these pages. However, what you must do first is contact me via email or mail and request them. With that I humbly thank you for viewing this edition of the TRAP DOOR MAGAZINE.

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LET’S WORK HNIC: Russell Tucker Haleem Shabazz PHILLY DIVISON KEY 2 LIFE PUB Graphic Design AKBAR ENTERPRIZE EDITOR Angie “Pepper "Davis”

D.C Division Frank Nitty

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Author Wasiim Pg12 100 BARS &RUNIN WITH DUTCH CAPITOL Pg 30 GANGSTA GIBBS Pg 42

“NO LIE” with Shanon Payne Pg 50

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t os c ly on t i ’ll sh 9.99 dI y n $ e a M p, som p ra . s t T igga at‌ a n l la ok Ho e you to lo giv hing t

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hat would you do for MONEY, POWER, RESPECT, REVENGE and everything in between? For Gage and Mills the answer is simple ANYTHING!!! But what happens when family intervenes, the streets become chaotic, plans back fire, and Gage has to choose between his blood and his bond with his closest friend and partner Mills? SEX, LIES and BETRAYAL spices things up when the women in Gage's life all aim to be his one and only. Wasiim The above paragraph is a descriptive paragraph from Author Wasiim The Prince of Urban Literature That was dirty novel. Wasiim comes out of the first state; For all you ignorant mother fuckers Delaware is a U.S. state located on the Atlantic Coast in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Recently the big homie Ace Capone sent word to get with the brother. I respect the O.G’s and when I’m given an order I do what’s requested of me.

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Trapp: Tell me about your first book? Wasiim: My first book was something I free styled. I was locked up I ain’t have nothing to do. I just got to writing to occupy my time I didn’t have nothing to do to get the time moving. I would let people read it and they liked it. I had gone to the hole so I had stopped writing. While I was in the hole I had got the idea for That Was Dirty and when I got out the hole I had hurried and finished up the book and I killed everyone. Trapp: That’s something that stood out to me in your bio, what you mean you killed them?

Wasiim: I got them all in one place and I had some body kill all of them.

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Trapp: {laughs} How was the response from it? Wasiim: Actually everybody liked it. I was surprised. It was a training ground for me. I never dreamed about being an author. It just came to me. Trapp: So after you killed all those characters you created the novel “ THAT WAS DIRTY” ? Wasiim: Yea, I created THAT WAS DIRTY. All the idea’s just poured down to me all at one time. So I formatted it. I feel as though I touched on the reality of the streets, you know the harshness of it. I don’t sugar coat it. You know not showing everybody selling a million bricks. The book is about a dude that got locked up and everybody turned their back on him. So he has a grudge against everybody except for this dude he met in

prison maybe a year before so he get out and both of them just go hard until the end. Trapp: So was that the book that was published by the young lady that you reached out to? Wasiim: Yea… Trapp: What made you do that, what made you reach out to her?

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Wasiim: Well actually when I reached out to her I didn’t know that she owned a publishing company. Someone had sent me a Quran and Prayer rug into the prison from her store. I just thought that being as though you know… she would know something about publishing. So when I reached out to her I enquired about her pointing me in the right direction to get published. So she had wrote me back and gave me another lady’s information and she had told me at the end of the letter that she was starting her own company and I could get in contact with her if I wanted to. So when I came home I called her up, we met up and I had a publishing deal a few days later.

Man I’ll never forget where I come from. I’ve met a lot of good brothers behind the wall.

Trapp: So how was that, does it take you long to get paid , etc. ?

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Wasiim: Well during my book sighing I was getting money every week from doing in store appearances but I would also get a check every 90 days from the publishing deals. But what happens when people sign a to small publishing company they don’t get what they think they gonna get. Now when I got my publishing deal I thought I was in. I thought I wouldn’t have to turn back to the streets to feed my family, but it’s not like that when you sign with a small publishing company.

bunch of books with you , auto graph them and sell them at the same time ? Wasiim: Yea and me and her would split the money. Trapp: So all a publishing deal is the publisher puts up the money to manufacture the project.

Trapp: So were your checks big or small? Wasiim: Man my checks was small, if it wasn’t for my grind I wouldn’t have made too much money off that book. Trapp: So during your book signing you would just bring a

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Wasiim: Yea, my pub took care of everything. The only thing I’ve ever had to come out my pocket with was my traveling expenses. Trapp: So going back to the novel THAT WAS DIRTY, what inspired the characters? Wasiim: Well all of my characters has a piece of me in them. I actually take a little from the people I’ve been around; like the dude Flip in the novel THAT WAS DIRTY WAS actually some body I was actually locked up with. Esco from Cinnamon is actually a rapper from around my way. So I use a couple of people I know than I also use a couple of made up characters.

Wasiim: Well I’m actually down with one of his codefendants. His codefendant had told me when Ace had started writing his book and everything. Sense I’ve been home I’ve been looking to get into the films and shit ,so I reached out to Ace’s Co-defendant and asked him to get some information from Ace. And you know from there Me and ace has been trying to work something out and we can help each other being that I’m home and he’s in the box. So we’re just working together so everybody can make money. Trapp: Which other projects are you working on ?

Trapp: So you know the big homie Ace Capone ?

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Wasiim: Right now I’m redoing my first novel THAT WAS DIRTY because I want to rerelease it under my own company. Plus also I write so much better now because while I was away I learned the technical aspects of writing, and I would like to incorporate that into my books. I also have another book I’m releasing in the spring entitled CONCIOUSNESS OF A KILLA.

Trapp: Are you interested in publishing your anyone else’s work? Wasiim: Yea, I’m actually working with a few different independent authors now , I’m just getting everything settled with myself first and then once I’m finished with that than I’ll present them. Trapp: Do you only write fiction novels?

Trapp: Who inspired you as an Wassiim: Yea but it’s based author? off of real experiences. Wasiim: Leondrei Prince, The reason being because Leondrei is actually from my city. He was like the first person from Wilmington, Delaware that was actually doing it. He has a book called Blood Money. He showed everybody from Delaware that somebody from the hood can actually write a book and sell a lot of copies.

Trapp: Tell me about your stay in Allenwood. Wasiim: It was real laid back. Trapp: This is where you also met your editor as well am I correct?

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Wasiim: Yea Mohammed . He actually had read a couple of my books. He was actually was the first person that have ever told me I needed to work on my writing. And it caught me off guard cause I’m looking at him like “Who the fuck are you”. Cause I’m use to people telling me how good my books are. But instead of him just telling me he was showing me what he meant. He started giving me books to read. He was actually going to school for it, and that’s how I learned and I’m fortunate I got a chance to meet him.

Wasiim: He got 20 to life so Insha Allah he’ll be home.

Trapp: are you still in contact with him?

Trapp: Well we’re gonna bring your this interview to close. Thanks for your time.

Wasiim: Yea that’s who’s going to do all my editing no matter what I do.

Trapp: That’s what’s up you still got ties with the brother behind enemy lines. Wasiim: Man I’ll never forget where I come from. I’ve met a lot of good brothers behind the wall. Trapp: Where can these brothers find your material? Wasiim: Black and Noble, and 9th street book store , and now they can get from the TRAP DOOR CATALOG.

Wasiim: Thank you for having me.

Trapp: He still in the box or he home?

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eet January’s Beauty in the Streets ~ B. B. Chambers

Trap Door: I understand you’re located in Michigan, what’s the best part about being a model in Michigan and the worst?

Trap Door: How and when did you get started in modeling? BB: MY MANAGER WAS AT A CLUB AND HE SAW ME WATCHING OTHERS ON THE DANCE FLOOR. HE SAID HE LIKED MY LOOK AND SMILE AND LEGGINGS AND THAT’S WHAT DREW ME TO HIM. FOR ABOUT 2 YEARS NOW I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO BREAK INTO THE MODELING WORLD. Trap Door: What do you like most about modeling?

BB: THE BEST THING ABOUT ME MODELING IN MICHIGAN WOULD BE THAT MY MANAGER IS IN MICHIGAN WHICH HELPS ME TO BE FOCUSED. THE WORST THING IS THAT I GET MORE SUPPORT FROM PEOPLE IN OTHER STATES INSTEAD OF MY HOME STATE.

BB: HAVING A NAME AND BEING KNOW IN OTHER CITIES AND STATES IS NICE. Trap Door: Where have we seen you before (in what publications

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BB: WELL, I HAVE BEEN BLESSED AND HIGHLY FAVORED TO BE IN SEVERAL MAGAZINES MY FIRST WAS ICANDY MAG DEC 2011/ SOFINE MAG IN ISSUE JAN THEN I WAS A COVER MODEL IN FEB/ SOFINE S.U.C.H.ISSUE MAG MAY/ BACKSHOTZ MAGJUNE /DIVA & GENTS MAG JULY / HP (HARD PRODUCT) MAG COVER MODEL IN SEPT / BABES MAG COVER MODEL IN NOV / EXIT 21 MAG DEC 2012/HP (HARD PRODUCT) COVER MODEL JAN 2013/ TRAPDOOR MAG JAN 2013 Trap Door: Where would your ideal photo shoot take place, and what would you be wearing? BB: HMM … I WOULD LOVE TO BE ON A BEACH FLIPPING MY HAIR DURING THE SUNSET IN MIAMI IN A SEXY SWIMSUIT.

Trap Door: Name one thing, no model should go without, and why? BB: I WOULD SAY HATERS. EVERYBODY NEEDS SOMEONE TO HATE ON THEM, THAT’S MY MOTIVATION. Trap Door: What do you think is your sexiest body part? BB: WELL, I LOVE MY SMILE AND MY GLUTEUS MAXIMUS AND I THINK BOTH ARE VERY SEXY. Trap Door: What turns you on? BB: WELL… MONEY, POWER, RESPECT, AND INTELLIGENCE, IS THE KEYS TO LIFE. Trap Door: What turns you off? BB: COUNTING HOW LONG I HAVE BEEN GONE, A BAD ATTITUDE, IGNORANCE, AND LIL’ BOYS TRYING TO BE MEN, BUT DON’T HAVE A CLUE HOW TO BE.

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Trap Door: What are your ultimate goals in this field, for example do you want to be a runway model, cover model, or are you interested in TV, videos, or movies? BB: I WOULD TRY IT ALL, RUNWAY IS NOT MY THING, BUT I WOULD LOVE TO BE IN VIDEOS, TV, AND MOVIES. I HAVE BEEN BLESSED TO BE ON COVERS OF MAGAZINES AND WOULD LIKE MORE OF THAT EXPOSURE TOO.

GOALS AND “STOP BS(ING) BECAUSE YOU DON’T KNOW YOUR FULL POTENTIAL.” I HAVE A PROBLEM I TEND TO WANDER OFF INTO OTHER THINGS WITHOUT FINISHING WHAT I STARTED. Trap Door: Do you have anything else you’d like to share?

BB: I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THANK YOU FOR THE OPPORTUNITY FOR HAVING ME APPEAR IN YOUR MAGAZINE. ALSO, THE FIRST TEN PEOPLE Trap Door: Do you have any WHO BUY A MAGAZINE I AM IN advice for other girls or wom- WILL RECEIVE A SPECIAL en that may want to consider PHONE CALL FROM ME, IF I SEE A PICTURE OF YOU HOLDmodeling? ING THE MAGAZINE. ALSO, I BB: I WOULD SAY BE FOWILL HAVE MY WEB PAGE UP CUSED ON WHAT YOU WANT THIS MONTH AND I’LL HAVE OUT OF THIS CAREER AND POSTERS, CALENDARS, AND HAVE A MANAGER WHO BESEXY IMAGES OF MYSELF ON LIEVES IN YOU TO KEEP YOU PILLOWS AVAILABLE THERE, ON TRACK. PLUS MANY MORE MAGAZINES. THANK YOU TO ALL MY Trap Door: What’s the best CURRENT & NEW FANS & TO advice anyone’s ever given to MY S.U.C.H. MODEL FAMILY & you in regards to modeling? TO MY MANAGER VINCENT BB: TO STAY FOCUSED ON MY THANK YOU ALL AND GOD BLESS.

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t's a cold January night and I happen to see DMV artist Dutch Capitol inside Club Axum (a small club where artist perform and network in the DMV) days after my boss Russell "trap" Tucker assigned me to do the interview for Dutch. I find myself scheduling a date to chop it up and enter the mind state of a serious DMV artist. DUTCHIE! About a week after our initial encounter I find myself at Dutch Capitol Studios preparing to record a track with Dutchie and Milly, Another up and coming DMV artist. In an environment that's conducive for us to make a hit. (drugs & liquor) I find myself observing his studio. I see obituaries and accomplishments. The first thing that I realize is that Dutch is a real nigga that has gone thru many obstacles to obtain and maintain his status as a professional rapper/ engineer in this music industry so enter the mind of DUTCHIE

as he shares his life and struggle as a DMV artist with TRAP DOOR MAGAZINE

THE INTERVIEW NG: So Dutch can you tell the world who you are? DC: I'm Dutch Capitol. D.C. is Dutch Capitol. I'm basically grinding. Trying to put my city on. And help make us rise to a different level that we haven't experienced before. Surpass any type of music that we have been known for and that's who Dutch Capitol is. NG: I once heard that you made your first song at age 15.

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DC: Actually I made my first official song at age 15. I made my first song recording myself on tapes at 9 years old. All of my uncles were rappers and my step dad rapped so as a kid I just wanted to be doing what people around me were doing. So yea I started rapping and spitting around age 9. But my first official song was at Ron Riley and Eddy B and they were signed to Columbia. That was the first time I had a song that was in the hands of some industry veterans.

tion of the song and how it became so big because really it was a freestyle. So shouts out to Beat the Knocker and everybody that's pushing this song real heavy right now and listening to it. NG: What projects do you have out now?

DC: Margaritas and Palm trees. I have a few other mix tapes I dropped before that, but Margaritas and Palm trees is the only project that I'm pushing and really looking forward to pushing to the next level. There are a lot of singles that are undisclosed yet NG: Whipping round wit that that need videos and visuals. shotty is one of your popular songs. DC: Yea, Whipping round wit that shotty. was produced by Beat the Knocker. Shout out to beat the knocker he one helluva producer. He is my in-house producer and he is crazy with the beats. Whipping round wit that shotty was a freestyle we came up with. I'm still surprised as to the reac-

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NG: Where can we listen to Margaritas and Palm trees?

and not the project that needs to be promoted right now. But you have to be willDC: You can download the ing to deal with a lot of cirproject at livemixtapes.com cumstances, as well as the and you can download it on whole idea of just being on datpiff.com the road. All in all being on the road is great. City to city NG: Let's talk about touring show to show you get to and the one you’re going on meet these guys you see on next. TV every day and I'm a reguDC: I’ve been on a couple of lar nigga so I still be like tours - I just be grinding, but damn when I see other artist like damn there go Future or being on tour is great. It damn that's French Montana lets you know who your right there I still be in awe friends are. Being on the when I see Chris Brown buts road lets you know who's it’s crazy because I go from really there for you and who’s there for themselves. watching these niggas to Because niggaz will start pro- actually being friends with them from being in the road moting themselves before with them. So it can get rithey will promote for you diculous. and that's how you know who’s down with the movement because some people wanna promo themselves

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NG: My condolences go out to you and the people who were affected by this loss but can you talk to the world about your friend Jamar Board aka Silent Assassin?

do my thing and we gonna meet up at the top. So that always sticks to me. Another thing that sticks to me is hoop dreams. One of my favorite lines is from Jay-Z when he said "I saw hoop dreams deflated like a true friend’s weight.� I don't think too DC: Me and Silent had a good relationship I would many people knew exactly what he was talking bout. I see him like every other day. I'll be grinding in the don't know what NIGHAZ studio he would be grind- thought he meant but when he dropped that line he mean ing on the basketball he has seen hoop dreams decourt. We always had a flated he mean he seen them relationship where as I go flat. So when I think about was always like he would tell me we gonna make it that type of metaphor I think to the top he would always about Jamar. I just think hoop dreams are just like rap tell me and solo that. This situation sparked up the idea dreams because I grinded those open mics the same hoop dreams which made way he grinded them basketme do a song called hoop dreams and I even mentioned ball courts. He had to grind to get on in the NBA and I have that in the song I said: "We still gonna meet up at the top to grind to get on with this rap industry. I got rap dreams and remember you would let us he has hoop dreams but the know" I mean that was his thing you do your thing imma grind is equal.

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NG: So you spoke about hav- MD reppin DC, it’s about taking ing a personal relationship over as one. But of course you With Chris brown. know NIGHAZ gonna rep their own thing like yea NIGHAZ gonna rep Landover of course niggas DC: Yeah - Chris that's the gonna rep but this DMV movehomey. Yea that's my bro. ment is about us becoming powWhenever he come to the erful enough to takeover some city he fucks with me. shit Last time he was here he played basketball game for the Goodman league we was with him there at the hotel, went to The Park nightclub and we went to Stadium Club. That's my brother.

NG: Tell us about a memorable time in your career.

DC: I shot a video in Marcy projects. I rapped over the song can I live beat. It felt so legendary and NG: This DMV movement it’s so crazy for me. Because I was new and it’s here. I remember rapping in front of Jay-Z’s old a time when DC wasn't reppin VA building. About 2 years ago durand VA wasn't doing it for MD ing a bad storm. and so on and so on. So what It was me and the chick that shot factors do you think contributed the video, Essence. So we were at to this movement? a park in Marcy projects and some dudes walked up. They asked me was I shooting a movie DC: I think this DMV movement came about from us being looked or something so I told them no I'm Dutch Capitol I'm from DC. I over so long as a region so it’s really not about DC reppin VA or fuck with Jay-Z and I'm shooting a video. So that's when they said

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well do it in front of Jay building 534. So we did it -- they gave me a slight tour. They showed me Jay's apartment and Memphis Bleek's so that was a legendary moment.

NG: Main stream or underground DC: Main stream

NG: So what's your hopes for you and the DMV?

NG: Rap or hip hop DC: Hip hop

NG: Pac or Big DC: Big

NG: I have series of questions NG: Louis or Gucci it’s gonna be two choices but DC: Louis you can opt for neither, you NG: Nike or New Balance ready? DC: Nike DC:Yea NG: Georgetown or Tyson Corner NG: Dark liquor or white liqDC: Georgetown uor? DC: Dark liquor NG: Before we finish are NG: Light skin women or dark there any shout outs or last words from you? skin DC: Light skin DC: SOLO DC and the whole LTE movement say thanks to NG :Winter or summer my nigga NITTY GRITTY and DC: Summer TRAP DOOR for putting this all together. NG: Jordan or Kobe DC: Imma go with Kobe NG: Feared or loved DC: Loved

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“I’m just a Gary nigga thuggin in some number 7’s / Rocks in my socks, couple ah felonies in my possession/ smith &Wesson, gotta go to court today, my mama stressing/ just wrought my dog in the feds I hope he got the message.”

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he above verse was said by an artist by the name of Freddie Gibbs. I think the thing that made me choose this verse as the introduction to this article was that I can relate to every word the brother spoke. Freddie Gibbs, formally known as Gagster Gibbs, comes from Gary Indiana and grew up at 17th and Virginia St. on the city's east side. Gary Indiana is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States, located in the southeastern portion of the Chicago metropolitan area. Gary is located approximately 25 miles from downtown Chicago, Illinois. From what sources have concluded it’s the real hood; not the rap hood. Freddie Gibbs has been orchestrating his thoughts through music since roughly his teenage years. I’ m not really sure how long the brother has been writing and recording music. I wasn’t able to get a hold of the brother ‘s bio directly from him due too our time difference and schedules;

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however I did manage to get a little bit of information concerning him online. From what is understood he’s been signed to Interscope in the past but was later dropped due to domestic issues. He has dropped a few different projects through the course of his career and not too long ago signed and parted ways with Young Jeezy. Recently I had the opportunity to sit down and speak with the brother.

Freddie Gibbs

hop scene down there.

interview...TAKE 1

FG: You talking to the hip hop scene down there. I am the hip-hop scene down there.

Trapp: What’s going on Gibbs? FG: Chilling my nigga.

Trapp: How long have you been doing the music?

Trapp: Man you’re a hard per- FG: I’m say about 10 years now. son to catch up with “Brother”. Trapp: Yo, I’ve listened to some of your music and FG: Cause I be on my grind you’re nice with it. Your music “Brother”. is a lot different than a lot of Trapp:[laughs] Aye man I hear the shit that’s coming out that. You’re from Gary Indiana commercially right now. correct? FG: Right. Trapp: Tell me about the hip-

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FG: Yea, I’m trying to bring that gangsta shit back. Don’t nobody do that shit no more you know what I mean. Trapp: Hell yea niggas put no thought into what they say any more. I believe after listening to your music, that you speak from the heart. FG: Right. You know lyricism that shit dying man. That shit don’t mean nothing to niggas no more. All niggas want to do is get on the radio. Trapp: Right. As far as artists are concerned who inspired you? FG: 2 Pac, Scar Face, and Pimp C. Those are the brother s I try to emulate. I’m from the mid-west , so I try to take something from every coast.

I ain’t got time to be dealing with no rap nigga beef. I’ll squash a rap nigga.

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Trapp: What is “STRAIGHT SLAMMIN CLICK” ? FG: Some Killers from Gary. It ain’t no basketball team. You can believe that. They ain’t even no rappers, they just the homies.

when I was signed to Interscope. When I got dropped from Interscope I put that out.

Trapp: When was it created? FG: Back in 2008. Me and the homies would always say straight slammin because a couple of niggas got straight slammed. So niggas starting calling us STRAIGT SLAMMIN CLICK. Man you call us whatever. We gonna gang bang and we going hard. But that was just a name the streets gave us. A couple of niggas got put on they face. Trapp: What’s The Miseducation of Freddie Gibbs? FG: it’s a tape that I put out composed of a lot of music I did

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Trapp: what happened with Interscope?

got my niggas I roll with and we got real beef. I ain’t got time to be dealing with no rap nigga FG: It was just bad timing. beef. I’ll squash a rap nigga. I’m not one of those niggas that Trapp: Are you still with LRG move like that. I don’t move with (Lifted Research Group)? no security, so if a nigga want to see me than he can see me and FG: Oh yea we just dropped a we will square up, and get the video. head up or we can go to someTrapp: You and Jeezy…what thing else. They can rap happened? about it, I aint got rap about FG: I’m just ready to push, and I it. Some niggas may be like I ain’t ride for Jeezy, and I’ll aint about to wait on no nigga. be like that’s some rap shit my nigga.” Now if we out Trapp: Did the Rick Ross beef somewhere and some shit have anything to do with your go off than I ain’t letting no decision? nigga with me get beat up FG: Nah, man I don’t even know but I’m not going involve Rick Ross. Me and him have myself in something that never even had a conversation. aint got nothing to do with So any comment I can make on me. him is from a fan stand point. I Trapp: You got a lot of nigdon’t even know what all that shit stem from. I don’t know why gas that would have killed to be in a position you was one don’t like the other . They was doing songs together. I just in. chose not to get involved I it. I

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FG: Yea they probably would until they got there and then they would know. Man I was doing this before I even knew Jeezy. We got together and we did some records, it was cool and it was what it was. Trapp: what’s your input on the Music business as a whole?

Trapp: If an up and coming artist wanted to feature you on a track how would they go about doing that? FG: Shit holler at my management. If a mother fucker pay how they weigh they can get what they looking for. We will work it out I’m not a hard nigga to bargain with. I’ll work with a nigga’s budget. I can drop their verse that same day that’s easy. I’m not an industry nigga, I get all the industry attention but I don’t move like that my nigga.

FG: It’s definitely shady and a lot of fakery, but the way the same is now my nigga it don’t even matter if your real or fake. I’m just gonna stay Trapp: Are you interested in real because that’s what’s real coming to the DMV (DC, Maryto me. I’m cut from a different land, Virginia) to perform? cloth. FG: I fucks with the DMV hard. I Trapp: which projects are you fucks with Baltimore hard. They working on now? play my shit on the radio...good FG: Shiiiiit, I’m in the studio with looking out to Baltimore. The rap game don’t give them much Dom Kennedy Right now. I’m love, I need to show them more working on EAST SIDE SLIM. love.

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Trapp: Well man look I really appreciate the time and shit, we are currently circulating in the jails man would you like to hear from those brothers?

Young Jeezy /Freddie Gibbs

FG: Yea man I got a lot of my Vice lord homies. I’m Vice lord, (9 TRAE VICE LORD) and my GD niggas (Gangster Disciples formerly known as Growth and Development) it’s all universal; one nation and my Crip niggas and my Blood niggas salute love man.

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rently building her portfolio and looking to start high fashion and commercial modeling. she plans to open up her own boutique for curvy women within the next few years. She went to school for Business and Fashion and she plans to use what she have learned plus her passion for Fashion to start something great. “I believe curves are beautiful and confidence is key. Beauty and Brains go hand and hand so it's important to know your stuff when it comes to your career. Out of all the things I do and being multi talented, I must say that my number one passion is singing which I have been doing professionally since I was 15 years old. I ailing from am currently working on a The Bronx, music project as well which is NY and now residing in Virgin- due to be released some time ia Beach, VA. 26 year old in 2013.” Check her out on Model, Singer, Songwriter, www.soundcloud.com/ Stylist and Make Up Artist ShannonPayne Shannon Payne. She’s been -with God all the possibilities modeling for about two years are endless and have done a couple of online magazines. She’s cur-

H

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Gangsta Gibbs