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The increasing numbers of murders of women by their partners or former partners is symptomatic of a significant transformation, which requires responsible attention. While I agree that each case of violence must be considered in its singularity, I do not think it appropriate to refer to this violence as a mere private matter. In Puerto Rico gender violence is alarming. I think that in a country where this kind of violence is present in everyday life, we have to ask what is happening to its citizens. It seems to me that we are experiencing a paradoxical situation concerning the subjective formation of women: as more women seem to claim their right to selfgovernment, freedom and dignity, the desire to control their bodies and the denial of their social being becomes ever stronger. Very often, when a woman is murdered by her partner, she is trying to break up with him. So I insist that it is not the discourse of victimization that can enforce the human rights of women. It is important to emphasized that the stronger the desire of women for self government and empowerment is, the more violent the desire to control their bodies. While these are part of our everyday drama, in recent years we have seen a new kind of violence that is gaining ground in the local arena. This is the link between drug related violence and the murders of women and children, who are often victims of the ways in which drug cartel revenges are carried out. Recently there is an increase of the number of women who are linked to the world of drug trafficking. This link refers to a mimesis of the violence of patriarchal capitalism in which drug trafficking became an alternative to make a decent living for many families in Puerto Rico. When the social arena reinforces the link between the precarious living conditions of women and gender violence, the conditions for the elimination of any real guarantees of women's rights as citizens are created. The frailty of these rights is that they rely solely on the respect the nations give to citizenship. Hence, there is a reasonable suspicion that there is never a real guarantee of rights. These have to be constantly defended, and rethought from the ongoing review of the concept of what it means to be a citizen. We should not naturalize the rights, because human nature can not be trusted, Spanish philosopher Reyes Mate reminds us. So, that’s why it seems necessary to refer to the critique of Hannah Arendt remarks on human rights discussion. When human rights were linked to the fact of belonging to a nation, they were identified with the nation, and not the individual. For this reason, these can be suspended, leading the individual to a state of abandonment and helplessness at any time. This led Arendt to argue that claiming the right to have rights was a call for responsibility (in Reyes: 2010, pp. 241-243). With this in mind, I think that in Puerto Rico, today more than ever, we must report all instances in which women abuse is considered justified.

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