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KING CLOUD New heights of exceptional comfort

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BIO PLANK Introducing a new collection of porcelain stoneware with a faithful interpretation of the warmth and pleasure of wood effect surfaces. With excellent performance and antibacterial protection Microban, Bio Plank blends practicality and aesthetic taste while dialoguing with the most cuttingedge technologies.

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DESIGN: ABBOTSON

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CLASSIC MEETS CONTEMPORARY FOR PERFECT ELEGANCE AND STYLE

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a. Solid Bronze Hardware b. Chatham Basin Set in Oil Rubbed Bronze c. Astor Deco Double Vanity d. Victoria Sideboard and Mirror e. Celina Pendant Light f. Fontaine Nickel Plated Bath g. Lorraine Nesting Tables h. Bentley Club Armchair i. Wing Armchair and Newton Ottoman in Vintage Cigar Leather j. Maderno Marble Tiles

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FURNITURE

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HOMEWARES

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BATHROOM

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TILES AND FLOORING

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FIREPLACES

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OPEN 7 DAYS 400 Hoddle Street Clifton Hill Victoria

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Schots Home Emporium has been an institution in Melbourne for decades, and has recently opened in Geelong. Both stores have huge showrooms with an extremely broad range of items, from renovation treasures to bathroom vanities to ooring, and everything in between.

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We invite you to Schots Home Emporium to unearth the uncommon.

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k. Chesterfield Sofas and Ottoman in black leather l. Vannes Encaustic Tile m. Melbourne Marble Mantle n. Marie Antoinette Parquetry Panel in Antique Brown o. Tolix Replica Dining Chairs p. Sabina Buffalo Leather Armchairs q. Vernon Solid Oak Extension Table and Savoy Leather Dining Chair with Sardinia Replica Antler Light

LIGHTING

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DOORS AND HARDWARE

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TEAK AND GARDEN FURNITURE

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AND MORE!


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CONTENTS 211 138

A U S T R A L I A N ISSUE OCTOBER /NOVEMBER 2013

SPY Belle’s pick of the top design trends from around the world. [viewa] 45 RIGHT NOW Our round-up of who, what and where. 37

46 NEWS From Kelly Wearstler to Christian Liaigre, it’s all here. 50 WHO Architects Archer & Wright keep high-flying clients under the radar. 59 BAZAAR Design destinations with great breeding. 60 ARCHITECTURE It’s two for all and all for one as architects partner up. 62 ART The art’s incandescent as the scene runs white hot. 64 BLOG Beautiful minds dig deep to unearth their creative visions. 66 WHO Toby Osmond champions indigenous artists and others in Moree, NSW. 69 ICON Peter Marino’s exterior keeps them guessing – his interiors simply amaze. 72 LUXE FILE Collette Dinnigan addresses her passion for the finer things in life. 75 ICON Vale David Collins – an homage to the dazzling British designer. 77 ICON Jeff Koons’s joint project with Dom Pérignon bubbles up. 80 FOCUS Fertile visions from a band of Australia’s hottest landscape designers. [viewa] 90 WHO Tradition plus innovation steer Martin Kornbek Hansen’s design brand. 93 READER DINNER Join Belle for a feast of food, wine and art. 95 MAN Trench coats, crepe soles and more for sharp dressers. 96 WOMAN Talking turquoise with a slinky feline slant. 98 CLOTH Vibrant fabrics for living large indoors and out in the field. 104 WHO Furniture and interiors maestro Phillip Silver loves to layer. 109 LIBRARY Ultra-glossy volumes to inspire and divert the home-loving. 110 MY SPACE Sydney interiors guru Sarah Davison’s sanctuary. [viewa]

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICK BRUZZESE, BRENTON COLLEY, NICHOLAS WATT, MICHAEL WEE

113 114 122 130 138 146 154 160 170

HOMES

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SYDNEY Sorbet colours and gold accents bring Miami glamour to this home. SYDNEY Collected treasures find their niche in an inner-city terrace. [viewa] MELBOURNE A palatial garden apartment adopts a sophisticated European air. NORTHERN BEACHES A once dark and dated home shines up as a chic retreat. MELBOURNE Bespoke interiors uplift a 1930s character home to super sleek. MELBOURNE An austere facade belies a quirky, ultra-luxe neoclassical interior. NORTHERN BEACHES Slick dark materials earth a spectacular residence. GARDEN An extract from Myles Baldwin’s new book, Australian Coastal Gardens.

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CONTENTS

FOOD & TRAVEL

179 181 183 188 190 193 200

TRAVEL Hotel Indigo makes a splash on the Hong Kong scene . MENU Artist Colin Pennock in the spotlight at a Belle dinner in Adelaide. LOUNGE Deliciously different design destinations to savour. MENU A Belle dinner in Daylesford celebrates the art of Joshua Yeldham. PASSENGER Dazzling Australian accommodation, from city to outback. PASSPORT Jet off to one of these heady destinations.

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KITCHEN & BATHROOMS Ideas, trends and inspiration. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2013

AUSTRALIAN ISSUE

KITCHEN & BATHROOM PLUS pages of AMAZING IDEAS

LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

OUR GARDEN DESIGNERS TAKE A BOW

David Collins

REMEMBERED

‘g e n o a’ a r o b y n c o s g r o v e e x c l u s i v e r u g d e s i g n. h a n d k n o t t e d f i n e w o o l & s i l k , c u s t o m s i z e s a v a i l a b l e.

sparkling

NEW LOOKS Beautiful AUSTRALIAN homes embrace the arrival of Spring

REGULARS

28 Contributors 31 Editor’s Letter 33 InBox 203 On the Town 257 Address Book 258 My City... Hong Kong [viewa] OUR COVER Gilt complex, page 114. Photographed by Anson Smart

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TO BELLE OR RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION for $49.95 and receive a stylish metal and enamel photo 16 8 q u e e n s t r e e t w o o l l a h r a n s w 2 0 2 5 t 61 2 9 3 28 76 92

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frame from Becker Minty valued at $49.95. See p70 for details.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MARK ROPER

AUSTRAL IA

TASMANIAN coastal garden DINING IN Adelaide & Daylesford LUXE ESCAPES


©T&CO. 2013. DESIGNS ©PALOMA PICASSO


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF NEALE WHITAKER Creative director Jack Milenkovic Managing editor Tanya Buchanan Deputy art director Joshua Morris Interior design editor Steve Cordony Chief sub-editor Judy Pascoe Editorial coordinator Harry Roberts, (02) 9282 8634 Sub-editors Janice Hogg, Connell Nisbet Senior design consultant Jean Wright Editor-at-large Anne-Maree Sargeant Contributing editors David Novak-Piper (Fashion & Beauty, Textiles), Carli Philips (Melbourne), Richard Unsworth (Gardens)

CONTRIBUTORS WORDS Myles Baldwin, Nigel Bartlett, David Harrison, Kendall Hill, Tony Magnusson, Chris Pearson, Carli Philips, Mitchell Oakley Smith, Stephen Todd, Sue-Ann Wilkinson PHOTOGRAPHY Mick Bruzzese, Sharyn Cairns, Earl Carter, Brenton Colley, Felix Forest, Prue Ruscoe, Anthony Scibelli, Anson Smart, Sue Stubbs, Derek Swalwell, Nicholas Watt, Michael Wee, David Wheeler

EDITORIAL OFFICE GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028 Tel (02) 9282 8634, fax (02) 9267 8037, email: belle@bauer-media.com.au ADVERTISING Group national brand integration manager Julie Hancock, (02) 9282 8671 Group direct sales manager Lyndsay Hunter, (02) 9282 8470 National brand integration manager Sandra Chachaty, (02) 9282 8471 Brand integration executive Wil Jamison, (02) 8114 9484 Direct sales executive Gabriella Danswan, (02) 9282 8159 Direct sales executive Erin Brennan, (02) 8622 9265 Sales coordinator Chloe Skipp, (02) 8268 6292 Victoria sales director Andrea Salmon, (02) 9823 6341 Victoria head of brand sales Christine Lester, (03) 9823 6382 Victoria sales manager Nabula El Mourid, (03) 9823 6330 Victoria sales executives Christie Cathcart, (03) 9823 6323, Jacqui La’Brooy, (03) 9823 6395 Victoria account coordinator Julia Fitzgerald, (03) 9823 6326 Queensland sales director Kelly Healy, (07) 3101 6501 Queensland group sales manager Jo Moroney, (07) 3101 6502 South Australia group sales/strategy manager Meghan Ritchie, (08) 8267 5032 Western Australia group sales/strategy manager Vikki Stacy, (08) 9207 1855 Directories account executive Andreya Djurovic, (02) 9282 8910 Production controller Lara Kerr, (02) 9282 8338 Advertising production Dominic Roy, (02) 9282 8691 Head of creative Pete Bunce, (02) 9282 8389 Advertising creative director Carolyn Innis, (02) 9282 8157 Group advertising art director Rachel Lintin, (02) 9282 8140 Promotions art director Jennifer Mullins, (02) 9282 8280

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BAUER MEDIA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MATTHEW STANTON Publishing director Gerry Reynolds Group commercial manager Anna Quinn Director of sales Tony Kendall NSW sales director Jo Clasby, (02) 9282 8726 Group manager – Brand advertising strategy Simon Davies, (02) 9282 8731 General manager, media, public affairs and brand development Deborah Thomas Business manager Davide Di-Pietro

Published by Bauer Media Group ACN 053 273 546. Colour separation by Bauer Media Colour Graphics, Sydney, NSW. Printed by PMP Print, 31 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170, for Bauer Media, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, tel (02) 9282 8000, fax (02) 9267 8037. Vic: 102-108 Toorak Road, South Yarra, Vic 3141, tel (03) 9823 6333. Qld: 17 Brereton Street, West End, Qld 4101, tel (07) 3000 8500. SA: tel (08) 8361 9999. WA: tel (08) 9481 4127. Distributed by Network Services, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, tel (02) 9282 8777. ISSN 0310-1452. Contributors’ manuscripts should be typewritten, and all text, photographs and illustrations must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope stamped to the appropriate value. Bauer Media does not accept responsibility for damage to, or loss of, material submitted for publication. Material contained in Belle is protected under the Commonwealth Copyright Act, 1968. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders.


AUSTRALIA: SYDNEY - DEDECE - TEL. 02 9360 2722 MELBOURNE - DEDECE - TEL. 03 9650 9600 NEW ZEALAND: AUCKLAND - ECC LIGHTING & LIVING - TEL. 09 379 9680

SEATING SYSTEM HAMILTON DESIGN RODOLFO DORDONI

www.minotti.com


C ONT R I BUTOR S DAVID WHEELER photographed Archer + Wright (p50), and the Hecker Guthrie projects in Kitchen and Bathroom Focus (pp 232 & 246). “My favourite experiences are when a creative group gets together and we produce something amazing.” How would you describe your aesthetic? Being at the start of my career, my style is still developing, but it could be described as clean, fresh and perhaps influenced by current European fashion photography. Where is home, and what do you love about it? Sydney. I love its city lifestyle right on a vibrant coastline, and that it houses an amazing mix of artists. Your ultimate Australian holiday escape? It’s a tie between the Far North Queensland beaches and the rich, red sands of the Northern Territory. How would you define Australian style? In terms of photography, it’s influenced by our amazing landscape. By the same token, our country is so young that it allows for bolder, ‘younger’ styles to emerge. Who or what is exciting you in local design? My background is in industrial design, so I’m inspired by the beautiful furniture and homewares that Belle has introduced me to. SHARYN CAIRNS is a Melbourne-based photographer, whose work encompasses interiors, food, travel and lifestyle. She shot the elegant Robson Rak Architects Melbourne home (p146), imbuing a moody quality to her images that elevates the home’s air of understated drama. “The space is quite simple,” says Sharyn, “but simplicity can be hard to carry off.” How would you describe your aesthetic? I want to bring emotion to a space, using light and shadows to create depth and evoke a three-dimensional quality, so it is inviting and people want to be there. Where is home for you? Prahran in Melbourne. I travel a lot, so it’s a great base and very me, a small space that’s a retreat from the bustle below. It looks out to the city, where the weather is always changing, so it has that moody quality I love. Your ultimate Australian escape? Lord Howe Island is incredible. The landscape is so diverse – one side is reef, the other rugged coastal terrain. I feel I could go again – five days felt like two weeks, it just feels so remote. How would you define Australian style? It’s so broad. An interior should be a reflection of the person who lives there, full of things collected from travels. DAVID NOVAK-PIPER, Belle contributing editor, produced Cloth (p98), as well as Man (p95) and Woman (p96) in this issue. “Fabrics play such an important part in the home and are as expressive as what you wear,” he says. What was the concept for your Cloth shoot? Australia and the great outdoors. The bush, and the countryside in its many shades, from incredible neutrals to vibrant colours. I love capturing the feeling of movement in these fabrics. Where is home for you, and what do you love about it? Surry Hills in inner Sydney. I love the diversity of people in the area, and the vibe and energy in the restaurants and cafes. And the proximity to so many parks, as we live with two beautiful dogs. Your ultimate Australian escape? We love heading to the NSW south coast, where country meets the ocean. We cook, relax and walk the dogs on the beach. How would you define Australian style? Warm, kind and carefree. Who or what is exciting you in local design? The fabric designs from Sixhands, which have a quintessentially Australian feel. And I love the sophisticated eye of people like Jason Mowen, who bring collectables to Australia from all corners of the globe.


arflex is available exclusively from poliform

poliform.com.au arflex.com


EDITOR’S LETTER

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PORTRAIT BY KYLIE COUTTS OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS ANSON SMART, SHARYN CAIRNS

onan Sulich started married life in London with a single tea-chest of possessions

sent on from Australia. “We came back six years later with a container full of furniture and art!” laughs Christie’s Australian representative, his Sydney home today housing one of the most intriguing and personal art collections I have seen (p122). It reminds me of my own reverse move from London to Sydney, arriving with just a single bag. Even when my container arrived a few months later it was an inauspicious start for Belle’s editor-to-be. At the time, however, it was liberating to travel so lightly, so unencumbered. While it wasn’t much to show for a life well-lived in London, starting over felt like a rite of passage and a rare privilege. Fast-forward just 14 years and my partner and I share an innercity house that feels as if it’s bursting its century-old seams with dogs, furniture, books, art, clothes and, yes, stuff. But this time it’s the stuff of a shared life and everything has relevance. Having vowed I could never be so precious, I admit to recent mild anxiety (aka borderline hysteria) in the 24 hours before our home was photographed by another venerable Australian magazine. Where could we hide all this stuff? Fortunately, it dawned on me just in time that the stuff was what made it home and that without it there was no story. Nothing was hidden away. Well, not much. In our Feb/Mar 2010 issue, we featured the London home of David Collins. Shot with his signature blue, it was a study in balance and tone, and remains one of my favourite homes. It was a pleasure to receive a note of thanks from the designer who was delighted with the story. Just before this issue went to print we were saddened to hear of his passing, and our tribute to this stellar designer is on p75. Our Focus on Australia’s landscape designers (p80), photographed by Mick Bruzzese, feels quirky and affectionate. The element of surprise is pure Belle, and our annual Australian Issue felt like the right time to pay tribute to these creative dynamos.

Belle is also available to buy as a digital magazine for iPhone and iPad, through Magshop, which is a free app to download from the App Store and from Google Play.

NEALE WHITAKER, Editor-in-chief

belle@bauer-media.com.au twitter.com/nealewhitaker

WINNER Home & Garden Magazine of the Year

facebook.com/ BelleMagazineAustralia

NOTE TO SELF: PICK UP BELLE'S HOLIDAY ISSUE on sale November 4.


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DOWNLOAD the free viewa app from the App Store or Google Play. Hold your phone or tablet over the page with the viewa logo and see the content come to life.

viewa IN THIS ISSUE

SPY Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony opens his style files and reveals the season’s trends (page 43). FOCUS Introducing the country’s top landscape architects and designers, who share their creative visions (page 88).

WANT MORE?

CREATIVE HOME Join us for an exclusive tour of interior designer Sarah Davison’s atmospheric Sydney home (page 111). SYDNEY HOME Meet Christie’s Ronan Sulich, who reveals the stories behind his art and antiques collection (page 128). MY CITY Tour vibrant Hong Kong, adoptive hometown of art gallerist Mandy d’Abo, via Google Maps (page 258).

DOWNLOAD THIS FREE APP FROM:

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iPhone is a trademark of Apple Inc, registered in the US and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. viewa is available on Android devices, versions 2.2-2.3.7.


BELLE INBOX

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Edited by TANYA BUCHANAN

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SPLENDOUR FROM THE LE

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Celebrating Australia is the latest collection of fine-art images from internationally acclaim ed lensman Nick Leary (lef t). Renowned for his fashion and portrait photography, Nick’s per sonal work is a catalogue of what charms and insp ires him. Browse the qui ntessentially Australian images at MCM House or nicklearycollections.com .

The anatomy of style Wild horses and dashing sources for your review. SENT ITEMS >>

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1 Kyneton-based botanical stylists Prunella have a new calendar of workshops. With their guidance you’ll be arranging tableaus fit for a Dutch Master. prunella.com.au 2 Lisa Black’s stunning handcrafted jewellery is designed using elements from old pieces. Her environmental design and landscape architecture background lends a fresh approach to combining old and new with a tribal twist. lisablackjewellery.com

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3 Adorn your walls with this new collection of traditional Eastern-inspired papers, ‘Shoji’ in Prussian Blue, ‘Morph’ in Indigo and ‘Shoji’ in Vermilion. quercusandco.com

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4 Daylesford Macedon Ranges Open Studios initiative lets art lovers visit the studios of artists such as sculptor Ashika Ostapkowicz and view his monumental outdoor work, From Here to Eternity. First two weekends in November. dmropenstudios.com.au 5 Jo Malone’s luxe new ‘Peony & Blush Suede’ candle with notes of jasmine, red apple and clove will inject a welcome hit of spring fragrance to your abode. jomalone.com 6 Congratulations to style couple, and regular Belle contributors, photographer Tim Street-Porter and interior designer and author Annie Kelly, who will be honoured with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s prestigious Design Leadership Award at the launch of the LA Antique Art + Design Show in October. losangelesantiqueshow.com

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7 Charlotte Coote has launched a range of glamorous plateware in vibrant hues, designed with her late father, interiors legend John Coote. charlottecoote.com.au

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTIN MARKMANN (TIM STREET-PORTER)

8 Watchmakers for 180 years, Jaeger-LeCoultre’s embellished classic, the Grande Reverso Lady Ultra Thin Duetto Duo, is a serious head-turner. jaeger-lecoultre.com 9 Aboubakar Fofana is one of a few textile artists using the traditional art of indigo dyeing, which produces shades of incredible intensity. His cushions, throws, shawls and bedcovers will soon be available at Hermon & Hermon. hermonhermon.com.au

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10 Landscape guru Paul Bangay’s new tome celebrates the beauty of his own garden, Stonefields. The scale and attention to detail are breathtaking. penguin.com.au

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11 Indigo is certainly the colour of the moment – inject some of the hot hue into your home entertaining with gorgeous vessels from Simon Johnson, including the geometric ‘Pico’ round platter from the exclusive Jme Collection. simonjohnson.com 12 Mira Nakashima, the daughter of renowned 20th-century furniture designer George Nakashima, pays homage to her father’s work with an exhibition of her new work titled Nakashima Woodworkers: An Evolving Legacy, at Philadelphia’s Moderne Gallery, September 20–November 2. nakashimawoodworker.com

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SENT ITEMS >> 13 Libretto’s architectural stationery, including the ‘Pagodas’ journal and note cards, and the ‘Belvedere’ lantern are a fitting gift for the design lover. libretto-group.com 14 Ross Didier has launched these new ‘Cocktail’ lights. Handcrafted in beautiful American ash, the menu includes ‘Manhattan’, ‘Margarita’ and ‘Martini’. rossdidier.com

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15 Rowena Martinich is known for her vibrant abstract expressionism in giant public installations and storefronts for companies like Mecca Cosmetica. martinich.com.au 16 Royal Apothic, a new line of personal and home fragrances inspired by an 18th century royal apothecary manual, are imbued with nostalgia. everydayluxuries.com.au

PAINT FOR ELEPHANTS

17 Diamonds are forever and so it seems are Hardy Brothers Jewellers with the society jeweller celebrating its anniversary of 160 years in business. This stunning five-carat white and pink diamond ring is from The Vault Collection. hardybrothers.com.au

Artist and textile design er Chris Chun (above) has turned his creative hand painting life-size baby elep to hant statues – to aid Asia n elephant conservation. Elephant Parade is an ann ual exhibition bringing artists and celebrities (Pau Smith is a previous contrib l utor) together to create vibrant public artworks to raise funds for The Asia n Elephant Foundation. elephantparade.com

18 Hardy Brothers offers more than just fine jewellery, including this yellow-gold and coral-beaded bracelet that has a stylish tribal vibe. hardybrothers.com.au 19 Toast the sunshine with the latest release from Moët & Chandon. The maison’s Grand Vintage 2004 is now available from your favourite fine wine store. moet.com 20 These hand-loomed Turkish delights – organic bouclé towels that are luxurious and beautiful – will sweeten up your bathing spaces. ottomanhamam.com.au

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21 Sydney, Yoko’s calling... MCA will present the first major Australian exhibition of the legendary artist, musician and activist’s work including Telephone in Amaze, a maze-like structure with a phone at its hub. If the phone rings, answer it as Yoko calls in from her mobile from time to time. November 15–February 23. mca.com.au 22 One of a new collection from designer Dennis Abalos, this elegant ‘Wired Fruit Bowl’ is available in high-gloss black, white, red and chrome (pictured). abalos.com.au

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23 Looking fabulous in a stack, these stunning jewel-coloured woven rope trunks come in three sizes and deliver a vibrant storage solution. kovalifestyle.com

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24 As part of the 40th birthday celebrations for the Sydney Opera House, Danish Design at the House will showcase iconic pieces from 25 Danish companies such as this Poul Kjærholm ‘PK20 Easy Chair’, made by Fritz Hansen, as a tribute to the design of Jørn Utzon’s enduring masterpiece. sydneyoperahouse.com/Celebrating40 25 Timothy Oulton is a maestro of industrial luxe. You’ll find the Brit designer’s vintage-style pieces, such as the ‘White Star’ trunk and the ‘Gyro & Crystal’ table lamp, at Coco Republic in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne. cocorepublic.com.au 26 Store your teatime tipple in style in these chic new ‘Cube’ canisters. t2tea.com

CAL END AR

DON’T MISS ... Coco Republic’s Design School Speaker Sessions – get up close and personal with leading architects and designers including acclaimed interiors guru Meryl Hare on October 15 and 18, and Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony on November 12 and 15. cocorepublic.com.au/designschool 34


www.hermonhermon.com.au


STYLING ASSISTANTS SARAH EGAN, NICOLE ARVELA

Inhale the vibe of old Havana, pare back to perfect basics or create a bohemian theme. CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Oly ‘Baptiste’ buffet, $6600, from Coco Republic. Ceramic ribbed bowl, $245, from Becker Minty. Lankan brass pot, $345, from Garden Life. ‘Tamegrout’ Moroccan ceramic plates, $55/each, from Jason Mowen. The Red Door photograph by Tom Evangelidis, $3650, from Poliform. Vintage ‘Caribbean’ glasses, $450/ set of 8, and gold holder, $450, from Napoleon Perdis Life.Style. Bamboo mirror, $395, framed Victorian tile, $155, and Renaissance tile, $175, all from Elements I Love. French tin-work lantern, $2400, from The Country Trader. Kentia palm, $425, from Garden Life. Vase, POA, from Jason Mowen. Hickory Chair ‘Gunnison’ distressed leather chair, $1880, from Laura Kincade. Cushion in Donghia ‘Amalfi’ fabric, POA, from South Pacific Fabrics. Rosewood and mahogany chessboard with antique brass chess pieces, $1400, from Laura Kincade. Bamboo and rattan side table, $395, from PAD. Rattan-covered glasses, $12.50/each, from Manyara Home. Antique brass chess pieces (part of chessboard set, above). Vintage serving tray, $285, from Becker Minty. B&B Italia armchair, $6125, from Space. Panama hat, $600, from Strand Hatters. Anatolian kilim, $975, from Garden Life. I Gattipardi floor tiles, POA, from Di Lorenzo. ‘Moroccan Tile’ wallpaper, POA, from Publisher Textiles. For stockists see Address Book.

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H AVA N A C L U B Light the cigar, pour the rum and dream of Cuba.

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1 Kolor spring 2014. 2 Givenchy resort 2014. 3 McGuire ‘Kissling’ table, POA, from Cavit & Co. 4 Zoffany ‘Berkeley’ wallpaper, POA, from Domestic Textile. 5 Adam Goodrum ‘Volley’ chair, $640, from Tait. 6 ‘Lubna Chowdhary’ tiled storage unit, $699, from West Elm. 7 ‘Speedy’ tumbler, $137/set of 6, from Noritake. 8 C1950 T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings armchair, POA, from Jason Mowen. 9 Tom Ford Private Blend ‘Neroli Portofino’ EDP, 50ml, $290, from David Jones. 10 Space-dyed laundry basket, $129, from West Elm. 11 Vintage Balmain ‘Squares’ cushion, $400, from Napoleon Perdis Life.Style. 12 Ray Ban sunglasses, $289.95, from Sunglass Hut. 13 ‘Elton’ settee in Moss Velvet, $699, from West Elm. 14 ‘Beehive’ wool and silk rug, $6950, from Robyn Cosgrove. 15 C1930 ‘Cobra’ cane chair, POA, from Our Space Interiors. 16 Jonathan Adler ‘Lava’ bud vases, $132/ set of 4, from Temperature Design. 17 ‘Ahoy!’ cross, from $60, from Fenton & Fenton. 18 Designers Guild ‘Azulejos’ wallpaper, POA, from Emily Ziz Style Studio. 19 ‘Santa Monica’ sideboard, $2935, from Coco Republic. 20 Vittorio Bonacino ‘Gala’ armchair, POA, from De De Ce. 21 Fruitwood vintage stool, $395, from The Country Trader. 22 ‘Elysian’ decanter, $399, from Waterford Crystal.

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SPY TRENDS

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Kentia palm, $425, from Garden Life. ‘Tin’ wallpaper, POA, from Scandinavian Wallpaper and Decor. Antique zinc letter, $265, from Elements I Love. Indian decorative teak piece, $450/pair, from Elements I Love. Spanish tin-work lantern, $6500, from The Country Trader. Maso Prague framed photograph by Tom Evangelidis, $2800, from ECC Lighting + Furniture. ‘Verandah’ cane dining chair, $750, from The Country Trader. Christian Lacroix ‘Gemini Grenat’ cushion, $210, from Radford Furnishings. Cabinet with hand-carved fretwork, $2680, from Laura Kincade. Lankan brass spittoon, $295, from Garden Life. C1960 Japanese ‘Mingei’ pottery vase, $1850, from Jason Mowen. Iron candlestick, $1400, from The Country Trader. Rattan chair, POA, from MCM House. Panama hat, $280, from Strand Hatters. Ceramic stool, $695, from Arida. Karel Palda Design Czech crystal shot glasses (part of decanter set), $1975, from Becker Minty. Havana Club rum, POA, from leading liquor stores. McGuire ‘Harlan’ armchair, $1540, from Cavit & Co. French skipping rope, $35, from Elements I Love. Panama hat, $600, from Strand Hatters. Faux bamboo dining chair, $3760/set of 8, from Imagine This. Designers Guild ‘Savine’ cushion, $125, from Radford Furnishings. Vintage timber table, POA, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. ON TABLE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Antep Yesil large pot, $155, from Garden Life. C1960 Japanese green-glazed ceramic vase, $950, from Jason Mowen. Vintage cast-iron candlestick, $60, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. Nanna Bayer porcelain vessel, $79, from Planet. Bakelite bowl, $29, and tray, $26, both from The Country Trader. Rattan-covered glasses, $12.50/each, and jug, $45, from Manyara Home. I Gattipardi floor tiles, POA, from Di Lorenzo.


SPY TRENDS

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CLOCKWISE FROM CENTRE &tradition ‘Mayor’ sofa, $10,750, from Great Dane Furniture. Tom Dixon ‘Screw’ table, $1628, from De De Ce. Timber and glass table lamp, $910, from Zuster. Artek ‘160’ clothes tree, $985, from Anibou. Vitra ‘Low’ nest tables, $2165, from Space. Small hammered copper bowl, $99, from Becker Minty. Michael Verheyden marble bowl with leather lid, $775, from Becker Minty. Vide Poche bronze tray, $225, from Henry Wilson. Waylande Gregory handmade ceramic cylindrical bin with gold band, $495, from Becker Minty. Artek ‘710’ daybed, $2285, from Anibou. Aqua Creations ‘Molecule’ table light, $1499, from ECC Lighting + Furniture. Swedese drum table, from $875, from Fred International. ‘Tricky’ American oak chair upholstered in felt, $1270, from Koskela. Röthlisberger ‘AT-AT’ desk, $6825, from Anibou. Tom Dixon ‘Bash’ vessel, $517/large, from De De Ce. Hay ‘Wood’ desk tray, POA, from Cult Designed. Coco Reynolds ‘Thread’ floor lamp, POA, from MCM House. James Dunlop Textiles ‘Cavalier’ fabric, POA, from Mokum.


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SUB LIM E UTI L I T Y

Clean lines and simple shapes keep things in perspective.

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1 Alexander Wang fall 2013. 2 James Long spring 2014. 3 Copper pendant light, from $320, from Lightly. 4 Hay ‘About a Lounge’ chair, from $1000, from Cult Designed. 5 Fluoro yellow Motex tape, $4, from The Woodsfolk. 6 ‘Stem’ floor lamp, POA, from Asaf Weinbroom. 7 Riva 1920 ‘Molletta’ bench, POA, from Fanuli. 8 Henry Wilson ‘A3-joint’ table, POA, from Cult Designed. 9 Discipline ‘Last’ stool in polished copper, $974, from Stylecraft. 10 Moroso ‘Lowland’ sofa, $9880, from Hub. 11 Paola Navone ‘Houston’ chair, $2963, from Baxtershop. 12 Areaware radio dock, $55, from De De Ce+ 13 Berto Pandolfo ‘CRM’ metal stool, $485, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. 14 Tom Dixon ‘Mass’ console, POA, from De De Ce. 15 Artek ‘Paimio’ chair, $4220, from Anibou. 16 Oiva ‘Pörkki’ serving pot, $89, from Marimekko. 17 E15 ‘Backenzahn’ stool in oak, $1165, from Living Edge. 18 ‘Agreggato’ suspension light, $560, from Artemide. 19 Areaware concrete tape dispenser, $50, from De De Ce+. 20 Matthew Hilton ‘Burnham Windsor’ chair, $1240, from Spence & Lyda. 21 Intensive hand cream, $27.95, from Grown Alchemist. 22 ‘Smed’ stool, $745, from Great Dane Furniture.

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BOHEMIAN CHIC Flower power returns with a boho edge.

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1 Christian Dior resort 2013. 2 Gucci spring 2014. 3 Artwork by Vicki Lee, POA, from MCM House. 4 Leona Edmiston ‘Mia’ crochet throw, $79.95, from Myer. 5 ‘Verandah’ chair, $795, from The Decorator Trader. 6 ‘Palladian’ dinner set, $230/5-piece setting, from Wedgwood. 7 ‘Butterfly Bloom’ lidded vase, $1395, from Wedgwood. 8 Moroccan pouf, $199, from Table Tonic. 9 Paola Lenti ‘Cosmo’ rug, POA, from De De Ce. 10 Saint-Louis ‘Magic Lanterns’, $2645/tall, $2995/round, from Christofle. 11 Bone inlay commode, $2200, from Fenton & Fenton. 12 John Robshaw Textiles quilt and cushion, POA, from Ascraft. 13 Patricia Urquiola ‘Mangas Caramelo’ ottoman, $1795, from Hub. 14 Cast-iron bistro table, $1450, from The Country Trader. 15 ‘Paradise’ lace-up espadrille, $81, from Soludos. 16 ‘Pico’ chair in kilim fabric, from $3500, from Coco Republic. 17 Natural patchwork overdyed kilim rug, $3745, from The Design Hunter. 18 ‘Joker’ embroidered wool cushion, $105, from Linen & Moore. 19 Oly ‘Hannah’ daybed, $6900, from Coco Republic. 20 Tom Ford ‘African Violet’ nail lacquer, $45, from David Jones. 21 ‘Kantha’ hand-stitched vintage sari lampshade, $135, from Hermon & Hermon. 22 Oly ‘Flowerfall’ chandelier, $3495, from Coco Republic.

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SPY TRENDS CLOCKWISE FROM CENTRE Oly ‘Taylor’ sofa, POA, from Coco Republic. 60s Liberty cushion, $425, from Napoleon Perdis Life.Style. Langdon cushion, from $85, from Bev’s Remnant House. 70s Liberty paisley cushion, $425, from Napoleon Perdis Life.Style. Antique Amish quilt, POA, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. ‘New York’ cushion, $339, from Coco Republic. Designers Guild ‘Octavia Blossom’ cushion, $250, from Radford Furnishings. Rubelli ‘Pardes’ fabric, POA, from South Pacific Fabrics. ‘Anemone’ linen, POA, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. Antique French doors, POA, from MCM House. French wrought-iron chandelier with ceramic floral decoration, $1750, from Elements I Love. ‘Kantha’ fabric rolls, $26.50/m from Bev’s Remnant House. Langdon cushion, from $85, from Bev’s Remnant House. Cushion, POA, from Elements I Love. Easel, POA, from Sydney Art Store. Aureolin artwork by Alesandro Ljubicic, POA, from Art2Muse Gallery. French-style upholstered armchair, $2350, from Elements I Love. Vintage ‘Wilhelms’ bowl, $355, from Napoleon Perdis Life.Style. Verona glasses, $10/each, from Zuster. ‘Gypsy’ fabric-wrapped stool, $220, from No Chintz. Vintage ‘Famille Rose’ bowl, $480, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. Swedish porcelain cache pots, POA, from Gamla Lan. Glass domes, from $300, from Ici et Là. Fabienne Jouvin hand-painted porcelain stool, $870, from Laura Kincade. Vintage timber paint box, $245, from The Country Trader. Brushes, POA, from Sydney Art Store. Vintage Anatolian rug, $3450, from Koskela. Fabienne Jouvin hand-painted and gilded porcelain candlesticks, $367/each, from Laura Kincade. C1960 Wedgwood bateau vase, $295, from Becker Minty. Flowers by Fjura. ‘Gypsy’ fabric-wrapped rocking chair, $595, from No Chintz.

WANT MORE?

To hear Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony discuss the season’s trends

download the free viewa app and scan the entire page.


SIT LESS. PLAY MORE. Getting caught up in routines and everyday life? Try something new. We offer a few ideas, and urge you to live more, try more & play more. And make your furniture a part of it. The new collection is out now - see it and find your own ways to sit less and live more. Visit us in store or online www.boconcept.com.au to pick up your free 164 page 2014 catalogue!

NEW

collection out now

Occa extendable table from $2695

Mariposa Deluxe Chair from $499

BoConcept Sydney 575 Pacific Hwy Crows Nest Tel. (02) 9437 0066 www.boconcept.com.au


EXCLUSIVE

KELLY WEARSTLER

US design maven Kelly Wearstler’s signature jewellery and homewares have arrived in Australia. We love her glamorous, classic style, served up with plenty of sheen and a little cheeky whimsy. Exclusive to Becker Minty. beckerminty.com.

Including NEWS WHO BAZAAR ARCHITECTURE ART BLOG WHERE ICON LUXE FILES FOCUS MAN + WOMAN CLOTH LIBRARY

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RIGHT NOW NEWS

3 1 4

2

5

[ 2 ] SUMMER DAZE Holidays might be around the corner, but, with these sleek Burleigh daybeds from Eco Outdoor, good style won’t be putting its feet up. ecooutdoor.com.au.

8

[ 8 ] TOTES IRRESISTIBLE! Bespoke’s all the buzz – that’s why we just had to get a handle on this fabulous tote in soft quilted calf leather, handmade by Geoffrey Parker. geoffrey@geoffreyparker.net.au.

[ 3 ] GLOBAL WARMING We really took a shine to this bright idea. With the ‘Booo’ pendant collection, bulb and shade are one and, amazingly, its LED bulbs can last up to 20 years. thesnapcollective.com. [ 4 ] TRAY CHIC ! Discovered by us on Instagram – Sydney designer Kenny Yong Soo Son, aka KYSS, is putting a much-neglected material, concrete, to good use with these handsome trays. We also love his copper containers and hexagonal mirror. cargocollective.com/kyss. [ 5 ] BACK TO THE FUTURE We – and Don Draper – would happily rest our weary bods in the sleek and retro ‘Uno’ occasional chair with adjustable back, in bold of-the-moment Citrine, from King Furniture. kingfurniture.com. [ 6 ] RUG ADDIC TION We shouldn’t fuel an obsession, but this latest ‘Azilal’ vintage wool rug, from Fossik, is just too good to ignore. A Moroccan tribal rug, 200x150cm, it loves to be walked all over. fossik.bigcartel.com. 46

[ 7 ] SET TO IMPRES S We can’t get enough concrete right now and these Kaza Concrete ‘Mystile’ tiles cement its reputation firmly in our minds. theselvedgegroup.com.au.

6

7 NEWS / OPENINGS

BRITANNIA RULES THE WARES!

ENGLISH MASTER OF REINVENTION, TIMOTHY OULTON, HAS OPENED HIS FIRST LOCAL OUTLET. AT COCO REPUBLIC MELBOURNE, CHURCH ST, RICHMOND, IT MELDS GENTLEMEN’S CLUB WITH A DELIGHTFUL QUIRKINESS THAT’S SO VERY BRITISH. BELLE’S VERDICT? “SPIFFING!” cocorepublic.com.au.

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVE WHEELER (KYSS AND BAG)

[ 1 ] BEDAZZLED Kelly Wearstler, how did we last this long without you? Now the LA style maven’s homewares and jewellery ranges, in all their glam gold sheen and striking motifs (above and previous page) are available in Australia through Becker Minty, instore from October. Can’t wait till then? Preorder at beckerminty.com.au.


Italian flair, the Natuzzi way

NEALE’S TREND PREDICTIONS. See Belle Editor-In-Chief Neale Whitaker’s trend projections from the Milan Furniture Fair featuring Natuzzi Italia. Download the free viewa app, scan this page to watch the video.

Over the last 54 years, Pasquale Natuzzi has built a brand synonymous with quality and design. He talks about the secret of this success and what to expect from interior design this year. Pasquale Natuzzi is the son of a

propelled his business from local to

cabinetmaker who began his career at

international. By democratising the

19, producing hand-crafted sofas and

leather sofa – a commodity that was

armchairs to sell at a local southern

once only available to the wealthy –

Italian market. He went on to become

Natuzzi conquered the North American

Chairman and Chief Designer of Italy’s

market, resulting in his company’s listing

leading furniture company, with around

on Wall Street on May 13th, 1993. In 1995

300 stores globally, 6 factories in Italy

the Group attained ISO 9001 System

and nearly 7,000 employees worldwide.

of Quality cerification and by 2001 was

Driven by a search for beauty, focus

ISO 14001 certified for Environmental

Pasquale Natuzzi predicts that this

control.

year’s interior design buzzwords will be durability and sensible technology.

on quality and comfort and a passion for maintaining production in Italy, it

Keeping costs down while still using

“Both of these are a clear reaction to

was a trip to America in the 1980s that

the best materials and processes is the

the recession and the way economies

result of being 92% vertically integrated

affect the way we live,” he says. “More

and having so much control over raw

than ever, people are looking for lasting

and semi-finished materials. Each model

products, in both durability and appeal.

is 100% made in Italy, from conception

Statement sofas are fun, but this year

in the Style Centre, Santeramo in

I’m confident that people will want

Colle, to Virtual Prototyping and hand-

elegance that is built to last, made

finishing by expert craftsmen. Sofas and

by genuine craftsmen using the best

armchairs are styled as “Total Living”

possible materials. Leather has a big

packages together with furnishings

part to play here, too; there’s nothing

and accessories, dining sets, lighting,

else that looks so beautiful for so long.”

storage and even room fragrance, by

See him tell the story on youtube:

Natuzzi’s interior designers, delivering

Natuzzi – a life becomes a brand.

Forma, an Italian Attraction model. 2 seater in fabric from $1,995, leather from $2,995. natuzzi.com.au

a complete Natuzzi Italia lifestyle.


RIGHT NOW NEWS 10 [ 9 ] FRENCH POLISH Christian Liaigre and his ranges of streamlined, classic furniture evoke subtle sophistication – little wonder many Belle readers have been inspired by his timeless style. Now he and Louis Vuitton have formed a formidable team. Just take a look at this foldaway Objets Nomade ‘Travel Desk’. Safari, anyone? louisvuitton.fr.

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11 [ 1 4 ] YONG AT HEART The work of renowned Singapore-based designer Nathan Yong has landed locally at Spence & Lyda. The Line Series of uber-cool cabinets, including this smart Credenza in American walnut, gets a big tick from us. spenceandlyda.com.au.

[ 1 0 ] SHINING EXAMPLE We’re all so chandeliered out, it’s little wonder everyone’s now switching to the pared-back pendant. Such as this slick ‘Ball’ light, from Hub. hubfurniture.com.au. [ 1 1 ] MELLOW YELLOW Discipline has come to Stylecraft – the Italian brand, that is – including its ‘Paffuta’ armchair in glorious sunshine yellow. Its simple construction features five cushions on a steel frame. stylecraft.com.au. [ 1 2 ] DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER We eagerly awaited Zuster’s new ‘Traverse’ range at Sydney Indesign. As you can see from this cabinet, we weren’t disappointed. zuster.com.au.

[ 1 5 ] STACKS OF POS SIBILITIES Spied by us on blog Yellowtrace, here’s dramatic proof that stacking chairs aren’t just for the church hall. By New York designer Victor Vetterlein, the ‘X-Federation’ chair, with its ultra-slim profile and brass trim, redefines a plain-Jane genre. victorvetterlein.com.

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[ 1 6 ] LOVE YOUR WRINKLES! We just couldn’t resist the colour and crinkly texture of the Baxter ‘Stromboli’ Cuoio Petrolio pouf, in very-now petroleum blue leather. Designed by Paola Navone. baxtershop.com.au.

[ 1 3 ] SOUND INVESTMENT The BoConcept ‘Cupertino’ desk is a real multi-tasker – it’s not just a work surface, but also incorporates speakers within its sleek black oak or white lacquer profile. You can mix work and pleasure! boconcept.com.au.

12

14 NEWS / OPENINGS

HOW SWEDE IT IS!

IKEA HAS LAUNCHED A NEW ‘STOCKHOLM’ RANGE, INCLUDING DINING CHAIRS, TABLES AND TABLEWARE. WE LOVE THEIR SIMPLE, SCANDI PROFILES. ikea.com.au. 48

13


THE NEXT GENERATION RANGE ROVER A bold evolution of an iconic design. The next generation Range Rover is the most reďŹ ned and capable Land Rover ever. landrover.com.au

2013 Australian International Design Award Best in Category: Automotive and Transport


RIGHT NOW WHO Words by TONY MAGNUSSON

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Lindy Wright and Richard Archer at their Sydney office with a large untitled artwork by US-based artist Dragan Mrdja. Entrance to The Hyde Penthouse, Sydney. The morning room for a private residence at Whale Beach. The kitchen at one of the Bathers Beach residences, Cronulla.

Secret service Sydney architects Archer+Wright maintain a low profile to shield their high-flying clients.

50

design practice you’ve never heard of. Flying under the publicity radar thanks to a bevy of high-profile clients for whom privacy is paramount, the Sydneybased firm’s directors, Richard Archer and Lindy Wright, accept that much of their residential work will only be seen by those for whom it was created. It’s a shame, because the made-to-measure nature of these projects lends itself to spectacular results. “One home was budgeted at $38,000 per square metre,” says Richard. “It wasn’t a massive house,” adds Lindy, “but it was an expensive build. Generally we work upwards of $10,000 per square metre for high-end clients.” That might mean a $35,000 feature wall for a shower, or bespoke back-lit panels to encase a ceiling full of Dale Chihuly glass sculptures. It’s no surprise that this category of client – from captains of industry to members of significant Australian dynasties – tends to be demanding. Cue phone calls at all hours, blizzards of emails and lots of general handholding. “You’re dealing with highly intelligent, driven people who have multiple residences around the world and are used to the very best,” says Richard. “When they walk into their own home it has to be better than anything they’ve seen. But they’re paying for a bespoke service and that’s what they get. I think we understand how people want to live – and want to be seen to be living.” The pair met in the mid-90s while running Cox Architecture’s interiors division. Richard (who is also a registered architect) left to start his own practice in 1998 and Lindy struck out on her own shortly thereafter. They joined forces in 2003. “Stylistically we’ve been on the same page since day one,” says Richard. Although they have different fortes – Richard does most of the architectural planning; Lindy focuses on materials, finishes and furnishings – they work collaboratively across each aspect of a project. “It helps to have that second opinion,” says Lindy, “and we’ve never disagreed on direction.” Not all of A+W’s toil is subject to non-disclosure clauses. Another mainstay is luxury multi-residential developments. A win at 2013’s International Property Awards for Asia-Pacific should boost their profile. Bathers Beach Residences in Cronulla won Best Interior Design Apartment Australia, with judges praising its strong sense of place. And in 2011 A+W was highly commended for its transformation of the penthouse atop Sydney’s The Hyde development. With nine projects active – including the most recent, the redevelopment of a hotel into 126 apartments in Rushcutters Bay – the pair have expanded their headcount to eight. “We’ve been very fortunate but we work bloody hard,” says Richard. Being lean and mean has its advantages. “We’ve never missed a deadline and we always come in on budget.” How do they define themselves within the design sector? “We’re a modern practice with classical overtones,” says Lindy. For Richard, it’s about achieving an elegant simplicity that balances beauty with function. Hand drawing is key. “All our documentation is computer-based, but the design process is about the mind to the hand to the page. You work things out as you draw them.” For more information, visit archerwright.com.au

PORTRAIT DAVID WHEELER

ARCHER+WRIGHT might be the most successful architectural and interior


ROAD TO RETRO

FURNITURE

JERSEY HAND-CRAFTED ARMCHAIR, $1699 EACH UPHOLSTERED IN WARWICK MYSTERE FABRIC. CRISS CROSS ROUND SIDE TABLE WHITE, $399. JARROD HAND-CRAFTED OTTOMAN, $1499 UPHOLSTERED IN WARWICK TWIZZLE FABRIC EXCLUSIVE TO DOMAYNE. THE JERSEY AND JARROD COLLECTIONS ARE HAND-CRAFTED MADE AND DESIGNED IN AUSTRALIA BY MOLMIC EXCLUSIVE TO DOMAYNE.

HOMEWARES

STUDIO FLOOR LAMP WHITE, $249. STUDIO MUG ORANGE, $6.95. ORLA KIELY MULTI CUSHION, $69.95. JAR PALE BLUE, $79.95. SQUIRREL COOKIE JAR, $39.95. ORLA KIELY LINEAR STEM CANISTER, $39.95.

CREATE THE HOME YOU LOVE IN STORE & ONLINE DOMAYNE.COM.AU

INTEREST FREE NOW AVAILABLE IN STORE AND ONLINE


Shop in store or shop online at www.domayne.com.au


LIVING ROOM RETRO

CREATE STYLISH LIVING AREAS WITH THE HEART-WARMING TONES OF ORANGE, OLIVE AND WOOD. A VINTAGE STYLE BOOKCASE, CIRCULAR LAMPSHADE AND BOLD COLOURED CUSHIONS BRING A DESIGNER EDGE INTO THE HOME.

FURNITURE

ORLA KIELY WALL UNIT, $4999. DALTON OTTOMAN UPHOLSTERED IN MOKUM ESPLANADE FABRIC, $1399.

DECORATOR

CARITA CABLE KNIT THROW, $189. ZONE CLOCK ORANGE SMALL, $59.95. STUDIO DIP DISH ORANGE, $2.95. NATURAL TIMBER DOME, $45. SUNBURST LANTERN YELLOW, $34.95. ALFRESCO TRAY WHITE, $24.95. STEPPE HAND-TUFTED WOOL BLEND RUG (160CM X 230CM), $799.

OPPOSITE PAGE FURNITURE

LILIA MARBLE TOP LAMP TABLE, $899. CODA ARMCHAIR UPHOLSTERED IN WARWICK ASPIRE FABRIC, $1999; GRANDE SOFA UPHOLSTERED IN WARWICK PRONTO FABRIC, $3499; OTTOMAN UPHOLSTERED IN WARWICK PRONTO FABRIC $1099.

DECORATOR

GLASS BOTTLE AMBER LARGE, $39.95. DOME FLOOR LAMP, $249. ORLA KIELY LINEAR STEM CUSHION ORANGE OR CHOCOLATE, $69.95 EACH. WEST CUSHION WHITE, $89.95. CARITA CABLE KNIT CUSHION, $49.95. COWHIDE RUG, $999.


FURNITURE

CITRO HIGH GLOSS TOP AND STAINLESS STEEL FRAME DINING TABLE, $699 EACH. ALLEGRA* TRANSPARENT DINING CHAIR BLACK OR WHITE, $299 EACH. MIO* DINING CHAIR ORANGE OR WHITE, $199 EACH. *THE ALLEGRA AND MIO DINING CHAIRS ARE MADE AND DESIGNED IN EUROPE.

DECORATOR

Shop in store or shop online at www.domayne.com.au

PASTEL LANTERNS PINK OR BLUE SMALL, $19.95 EACH; LARGE, $29.95 EACH. BOX SINGLE FRAME YELLOW LARGE, $49.95. ORLA KIELY SHADE MULTI STEM LARGE, $249 EACH. S&P HI-BALL TUMBLER WHITE SET OF 4, $24.95. RITZ TUMBLER GREEN SET OF 4, $45. JOLIE VASE LARGE, $79.95. PORTO PITCHER LILAC, $49.95; CAKE STAND LILAC, $69.95. DOILY 2-TIER CAKE STAND, $39.95. S&P EDGE 16-PIECE DINNERSET, $129.95. PORTO BOWL LILAC, $19.95. VERONA PITCHER AMBER, $39.95; TUMBLER AMBER, $9.95.


TOUCHES OF PASTEL

TRANSFORM YOUR DINING AREA WITH COLOUR-BLOCKED CHAIRS, FEATURE LAMPSHADES AND BOLD PATTERNED HOMEWARES. GARNISH WITH COOL PASTELS AND SPRING BLOOMS FOR A TRULY MODERN RETRO DELIGHT.

DECORATOR

ORLA KIELY LINEAR STEM SIDE PLATE GREEN $14.95. DOILY 2-TIER CAKE STAND, $39.95. PORTO FLAT PLATTER TURQUOISE, $39.95. ORLA KIELY GIANT PEARS PLATE MINT LARGE, $17.95; WALLFLOWER ROUND/SQUARE TRAY MINT, $59.95. ANNA GARE MEASURING CUPS SET OF 4, $26.95; PUNNET BLUE, $9.95.


FURNITURE

CARTER 6-DRAWER DRESSER, $999. PASH WHITE GALVANISED METAL STOOL, $99.

DECORATOR

Shop in store or shop online at www.domayne.com.au

BOX FRAME WHITE SMALL, $34.95. ERWIN TABLE LAMP, $99. ORLA KIELY LINEAR STEM THROW RED, $349; LINEAR STEM CUSHION RED, $69.95. LOCKER BOX WHITE, $19.95. STEPPE HAND TUFTED WOOL BLEND RUG (160CM X 230CM), $799.


WARM WOODEN HUES

BLEND THE RICH, GLOWING TONES OF NATURAL FINISHES, COWHIDE RUGS AND STATEMENT LIGHTING. ACCENT YOUR SPACE WITH RETRO INSPIRED PATTERNED WALLPAPER, CUSHIONS AND COSY THROWS.

FURNITURE

CALIBRA 6-DRAWER DRESSING TABLE, $1799; 1-DRAWER BEDSIDE TABLE, $599; 2-DRAWER BEDSIDE TABLE, $749; QUEEN BED FRAME, $1699. EUROPEAN MADE AND DESIGNED BOX IN OR OUTDOOR STACKING ARMCHAIR RED, $199.

DECORATOR

SAINT MAXIME FRAMED PRINT, $259. SWAY HANGING LIGHT ORANGE, $59.95 EACH. PARKER BROMELIAD, $120. SHIRLEY TABLE LAMP, $75. ORLA KIELY CAKE TINS SET OF 5, $89.95; GIANT ABACUS QUILT COVER SET* QUEEN, $249; ABACUS CUSHION, $69.95. CABLE CUSHION ORANGE, $59.95. ORLA KIELY ABACUS FLOWER THROW, $349. SHIRLEY TABLE LAMP, $75. CABLEKNIT HURRICANE VASE, $49.95. COWHIDE RUG, $999.


FURNITURE

SUNDAY QUEEN BED BLACK, $699. AVAILABLE IN 4 OTHER COLOURS. OPTICAL 3-DRAWER BEDSIDE TABLE BRONZE, $499 EACH. AVAILABLE IN 2 OTHER COLOURS.

DECORATOR

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RIGHT NOW BAZAAR Edited by HARRY ROBERTS

L A TI N L A U N CH Design juggernaut B&B Italia has touched down in Mexico City, where modernist icons such as Gaetano Pesce’s 1969 ‘Up Series’ chair mingle with work by contemporary maestros Patricia Urquiola (below) and Atelier Oï. The impressive showroom is a first for the Latin metropolis, part of a growing collection of single-brand stores globally. bebitalia.com

MANNING UP DuckEggBlue stores in Sydney’s Balmain have welcomed a handsome new neighbour, The Man Next Door (left). The menswear emporium’s interiors are dressed to kill amid plush chesterfields and luxe antique rugs, and stocks clothing labels like James Perse and Jac+Jack. duckeggblue.com.au

Thoroughbreds Design establishments with pedigree. NORTHERN N ES T Purveyors of refined eclecticism Sydney’s Orson & Blake now calls Crows Nest home. The store’s north shore outpost (right) brings together Jardan furniture with African and oriental objet d’art, graphic art and exquisite, plush textiles. orsonandblake.com.au

H I FI

Natuzzi lifestyle has landed in Adelaide (above), with the Italian brand unveiling its largest store yet in Keswick. The furniture collection integrates leading technology with superb craftsmanship and can be configured in a range of styles and textures thanks to the Your Natuzzi design service. natuzzi.com.au

PHOTOGRAPHS BY KELLY HAMMOND (THE MAN NEXT DOOR), PABLO MARTIN (DINOSAUR DESIGNS)

CHIC TEAMING Melbourne homewares hub Turner & Lane has called upon Studio Moore for the design of its third store in South Yarra (below), a chic emporium teeming with globally sourced goods. The expertly curated collection includes dinnerware by Pols Potten from Rotterdam, Welsh-designed baskets and porcelain from Germany. turnerlane.com.au

R EA SON TO CELE B RA T E Lee Broom has distilled the signatures of celebrity shoe label Christian Louboutin for his design of its stunning new boutique, set within landmark London department store Harrods. Walk the red carpet while perusing the fine footwear innovatively shown from custom Lee Broom displays. leebroom.com

PS... PORE OVER Dinosaur Designs has debuted an online store, where lovers of the brand can pore over its

exquisite resin wares and a newly revealed range of vivid, organically produced candles and towels (above). dinosaurdesigns.com.au 59


RIGHT NOW ARCHITECTURE Edited by ANNE-MAREE SARGEANT

Herzog & de Meuro M U S E U M IN S IG H T n a museum for visu have been appointed to design M+ al culture to house (b art, sculpture, desi elow and left), image, in the West gn and moving K ow lo on Cultu partner with arch itects TFP Farrells ral District, Hong Kong. They will on th set on a 14-hectare park on Victoria H e 62,000-square-metre building, arbour for completion at th e end of 2017. herz waterfront, scheduled ogdemeuron.com

VERTICAL VILLAGES

Talents combine forces to raise the roof. PATH WAYS

Philippe Starck has collaborated with Riko, a leading European maker of prefabricated housing, to launch P.A.T.H, featuring 34 designs that can be assembled – plumbing, tiling and electrics included – and fitted out ready to occupy in six months. Starck with Riko has released renderings of the available configurations, among them the RDCF (below) with a choice of finishes and materials that make the project highly flexible. starckwithriko.com

TAKE TWENTY David Melocco and Phil Moore established Melocco & Moore Architects in 1993, the award-winning Sydney-based partnership celebrating its 20-year milestone with a new website. Their portfolio spans contemporary residential projects, including a refresh of the Kirribilli house (right) originally built in 1906, along with community and commercial building projects. The firm handed over a community centre for Holroyd Council in May and is currently completing a multi-residential project in Randwick. meloccomoore.com.au

FIFTY PLUS

TEE TWO

Schoolfriends Tomek Archer (above left) and Toby Breakspear have combined as Sydney-based architectural practice Archer Breakspear. On graduation, Tomek joined Johnson Pilton Walker and set up his own brand Tomahawk Studios, and Toby joined Manly practice CHROFI. The duo shared several projects prior to their April launch and are now tackling a theatre restoration, the upgrade and furnishing of a public institution and prestige residences. archerbreakspear.com

BVN Donovan Hill, Cox Rayner Architects, Hassell, Neeson Murcutt Architects and Johnson Pilton Walker are among 34 Australian architectural firms and their 51 projects shortlisted in this year’s World Architecture Festival. Winners will be announced in early October. worldarchitectur efestival.com [ ANNE-MAREE SARGEANT FACEBOOK THE SNAP ASSEMBLY TWITTER @THESNAPASSEMBLY ]

PORTRAIT BY KASIA WERSTAK (ARCHER BREAKSPEAR)

Building blocs

Located in the financial heart of Sydney’s CBD, 8 Chifley Square (left) represents a premium high-rise tower. After winning a design excellence competition in 2007, architectural practices Lippmann Partnership and UK firm Rogers Stirk Harbour partnered on the project. Designed as a series of seven stacked ‘villages’, each oriented around an atrium of several storeys to harness natural light, the tower sports a 6-Star Green Star for sustainability. 8chifley.com.au


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RIGHT NOW ART Edited by ANNE-MAREE SARGEANT

SO SY D N E Y

Carriageworks will host the inaugural Sydney Contemporary art fair, showcasing 80 leading galleries and work by such artists as Shaun Gladwell (left). Created by Art HK founder Tim Etchells who says, “[This] is the first time this city has hosted a serious, high-end art fair. We expect it to play a significant role in focusing attention on the art scene.” September 19-22. sydneycontemporary.com.au

State of the art Cutting-edge or traditional, the scene is hot. FASHION FORWARD

RMIT Design Hub is hosting a major retrospective of renegade Belgian designer Walter Van Beirendonck’s work. Bursting onto the global fashion scene in London in 1987, Van Beirendonck was one of the ‘Antwerp Six’ that included Dries Van Noten and Ann Demeulemeester. With an oeuvre spanning three decades, on display are notable collaborations with photographers Ronald Stoops (right, far right and below), Nick Knight and Juergen Teller. Until October 5. designhub.rmit.edu.au

ART A

ACCA artistic dire P P O I N T M E N T ct is also artistic dire or Juliana Engberg (above) ct Sydney. She previo or of the 19th Biennale of us Festival Visual Art ly curated the Melbourne as well as the Aus s Program from 2000–2006, tr Biennale. The even alian showings at the Venice t runs from 2014. biennaleofsy March 21-June 9, dney.com.au

I N FOC U S South African artist William Kentridge’s work (right) spans a variety of media including film, drawing and tapestry. Artworks from his opera productions, Shostakovich’s The Nose and Mozart’s The Magic Flute are part of the exhibition Drawn From Africa at the National Gallery of Australia, September 27-November 3. nga.gov.au

MOVING ON 62

THE BIG PICTURE

The National Gallery of Victoria will unveil its most ambitious project Melbourne Now, celebrating architecture, art, fashion, design and dance. Showcasing 250 commissioned and procured works (such as the photograph by Christian Markel, above), the program also connects 130 artists with 30 curators across the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia and NGV International. From November 22-March 23, 2014. ngv.vic gov.au

Helen Gory Galerie is departing Prahran to co-locate with Dianne Tanzer Gallery + Projects in its existing Gertrude Street, Fitzroy, space. [ ANNE-MAREE SARGEANT FACEBOOK THE SNAP ASSEMBLY TWITTER @THESNAPASSEMBLY ]


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RIGHT NOW BLOG Edited by ANNE-MAREE SARGEANT

CRYSTAL LINE Melbourne lighting designer Christopher Boots joined design collective NEST13 at DesignEX 2013 in Sydney to show his bespoke illuminated quartz-ringed light sculptures, among them ‘Prometheus’ (centre left) and ‘Diamond Ring’ (far left). Boots established his atelier in 2011, with the lights handmade in Melbourne by a team of glassblowers, coppersmiths, sculptors and bronze casters. His latest offering is the crystal-clad ‘Sugar Stick’ pendant light (left). Visit christopherboots.com

V E SSE L S A FL O A T

Sydney surface supremos Axolotl extends their product offering with the launch of design brand Anomaly, a joint venture with Evostyle. Unveiled at DesignEX, the first collection comprises glass-on-oak vessels (above) from interiors and furniture designer Matthew Sheargold, one of a number of Australian designers who will contribute to the product line launching in September. anomaly.com.au

Mining boom

Excavating things of beauty from the raw.

GOMA GOES RETRO On show at GOMA, California Design 1930-65: Living in a Modern Way offers a retrospective of mid-20th century designs – some 250 objects including furniture, fashion, architecture and design from LA County Museum of Art. On show will be the original Barbie doll and Levi 501 jeans, Arline Fisch’s ‘Peacock Tail’ necklace (far left) and pieces by Charles and Ray Eames including the ‘ESU’ storage unit (left) and ‘Elephant’ chair (below left). November 2 to February 9, 2014. qagoma.qld.gov.au

POPPY IN BLOOM Melbourne-based designer Anara Mailybayeva studied industrial design at RMIT prior to releasing her first product, Tall Poppy (right), a clothes valet that was a finalist in Workshopped and Launch Pad in 2012, with Anara capping a successful debut year by winning the IDEA Awards Design Pitch. Anara exhibited her new work, ‘Pieces of Cake’ (above) at DesignEX 2013. The mirrored wall-mounted storage units can be used as a hook, book, magazine holder or mirror. anara.com.au

POE

Walking out of design T I C P E R FO R M E R Furniture in 2003, LA school armed with a Bachelor of Fine Ar ts ar edition and one-off pi tist David Wiseman embarked on creating in eces, including the ‘R ock’ and ‘Facet’ bronze limited (above). His poetic, na vases tu re -in sp ired installatio flagship stores in New York, Shanghai and To ns grace Christian Dior kyo. by R 20th Century De sign in New York. Mor His work is represented e at r20thcentury.com

IN TUNE Customise items like jewellery with eBay ‘Exact’, a 3D printing app – select a piece and modify pattern, material, shape and colour. iTunes.com 64

[ ANNE-MAREE SARGEANT FACEBOOK THE SNAP ASSEMBLY TWITTER @THESNAPASSEMBLY ]


RIGHT NOW WHO Words by STEPHEN TODD

Cafe culture Sydney bar icon Toby Osmond finds fresh fields up-country hosting an indigenous arts diner.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Moree, in the heart of cotton country, is where Toby Osmond grew up. Jakayu Biljabu’s Untitled. Bugai Whyoulter’s Kunawarritji (foreground) and Nora Nungabar’s Untitled featured in the recent Great Sandy Desert group show held at Yaamu Ganu Centre. Toby helms the centre’s Cafe Gali.

Osmond sure gets around. As one half of the legendary Will & Toby’s team that brought high style to Sydney nightlife, Toby is now plying his trade in north country New South Wales. While Moree, population 12,000, may seem a bit off the map, Toby is to the manner born. “I was raised on a property, Balarang, about 100 kilometres north of town,” he says. “I started out in hospitality as a second job, as a lot of people do. Eventually I realised that I not only kind of enjoyed it, but was actually rather good at it.” So good that with brother Will he became Sydney nightlife royalty for the best part of a decade. The original Will & Toby’s in Darlinghurst’s Victoria Street quickly became a cult club, but it was the Taylor Square operation that secured their reputation as big-picture taste-makers. All pale quail-egg blue, club chaired and frescoed, it was on a par with the most chichi of hotel bars. A surprise, then, to find Toby at the helm of an arts centre cafe in the heart of cotton country? Not so. A: He comes from there. “And when I got back it was, like, Moree, where have you been all my life? I rediscovered healthy living!” B: He’d burned out. “The Sydney nightlife scene is lots of fun, but after a while it’s like you’re living with permanent jetlag.” C: It was time for a little gravitas. “Cafe Gali is part of the Yaama Ganu Centre, which exists thanks to the Aboriginal Employment Service set up after the Royal Commission on Aboriginal deaths in custody. Yaama Ganu aims to give meaningful jobs – and invaluable training – to the Aboriginal community.” Cafe Gali is a polished wood and stark white-walled affair, with bright painted metal stools punctuating the airy, open-plan space. Its interior vocabulary is recognisably urban with accordion doors opening directly onto the street and a generous communal table. “I was asked to create a contemporary dining experience, but basically I delivered a modern Sydney cafe,” Toby laughs. “But the really great thing about being anchored in an arts centre is that there is this constantly changing visual environment. We curate the painting line-up on a monthly basis.” Nearly three years since its founding, the Yaama Ganu Centre has shown works by some 350 indigenous artists, from the local Kamilaroi nation as well as across the country. All profits go to the artists. All staff – besides Toby and co-founder and fellow Moreean Sascha Estens – are Aboriginal. “The centre and the cafe are all about Aboriginal excellence – in the sense that it allows the population at large to appreciate indigenous culture, at the same time as helping members of the indigenous population to acquire new skills, in the process bolstering confidence and self-esteem.” For more go to yaamaganu.com.au. 66

PHOTOGRAPHS BY KATE BLACK

SYDNEY, NEW YORK, London, Moree ... former bar proprietor Toby


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RIGHT NOW ICON Words by MITCHELL OAKLEY SMITH

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The glittering semi-transparent Louis Vuitton store in Hong Kong. Peter conceived 56 shades of grey for Dior's flagship Avenue Montaigne store. Peter packaged up Chanel's Robertson Boulevard store in Los Angeles in the brand's signature glossy black and white. Peter Marino.

Ultra Marino New York architect Peter Marino has applied his artful brilliance to dazzling effect in luxury stores the world over.

PORTRAIT BY MICHAEL MUNDY

THAT THE CLOSE relationship between art and fashion is increasingly reflected in the built environment is no surprise, given that luxury fashion brands regularly collaborate with award-winning architects to create unique retail spaces to display their goods. New York-based architect and designer Peter Marino has been so complicit in the convergence of innovative high-end design and the retail industry that his extensive body of work, which includes multiple projects for Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Chanel, represents a great shift in architectural hierarchy. It’s a big call to make for someone who essentially designs shops, but in the past few decades luxury retail stores have become secular temples to good design and consumerism, places of worship for fashion’s followers and must-see sites for tourists. This is partly thanks to fashion companies’ deep pockets that allow them the fiscal freedom to make controversial design statements that will become important creative capital for their brands. Retail forms less than half of Peter’s architectural business, which employs well over 150 people, but it’s certainly what he has become known for since redesigning department store Barneys in 1985. That and his Village People leather get-up and Mohican hairdo. Peter has said before that his rise to the top of his game was not easy. He received a scholarship to study architecture at Cornell University, New York, and later worked for more than a decade at prestigious architecture firms, where he met his wife, costume designer Jane Trapnell. But he said he felt different to his classmates. “I entered architecture after years of painting, sculpture and art history,

so I didn’t come at it from an engineering point of view,” he told London newspaper The Telegraph. “I was very lucky to make it through and become a licensed architect because the educational system is skewed to eliminate people like me.” And, unlike his classmates, he was happy to take jobs such as fashion boutiques – not seen as the top rung of the design ladder. What he did at Barneys, his first major contract, was revolutionary – creating individual boutiques for the brands it carried. Peter’s design played into the global branding expansion underway in the fashion business and made him a name with individual brands for later work. The stand-alone boutiques of Louis Vuitton are what Peter is best known for, due in part to the brand’s sheer prestige and visibility in the global market. His brilliance in designing for the luxury label is his incorporation of its innovative multimedia branding operations that can include in-store video displays and animation, temporary art installations and semi-permanent exhibitions. For his recent redesign of the Chanel boutique on Sydney’s Castlereagh Street, he opted almost exclusively for black, white and glass, evoking the brand’s famed perfume bottles, while furniture is covered in luxurious tweed, like its iconic bouclé jackets. Peter has become known for his ability to hone in on a brand’s history and identity – important when designing for heritage houses – and communicate this in a unique way. Or, as he described it in The Telegraph: “Quality, functionality, a gorgeous sense of light and what I call a mixed rich cultural baggage.” For more visit petermarinoarchitect.com. 69


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What artists are an enduring influence? Impressionists Monet [1] and Matisse for their use of colour and the way they moved between realism and abstraction. What contemporary artists do you admire? Chuck Close. The scale of his largerthan-life portraits is extraordinary yet still intimate. I love David Hockney and the playfulness of Damien Hirst. I admire many Australian artists such as Garry Shead, Tim Maguire [2], Guy Maestri, Robert Malherbe and Paul Davies [3], to name a few. Do you collect anything? As much photography and art as my purse will allow! I can never leave Michael Hoppen Gallery in London without the challenge of how to transport a picture. My dream is to fill a room with Peter Beards. Fashion must-haves? A great handbag. Of course, we would all love an Hermès! Gucci sandals; Chanel, Pierre Hardy and Lanvin [4] all do a well-shaped ballet flat. Fragrance of choice? The three I wear are all very fresh scents, Eugénie-les-Bains (from a spa in the south of France), Barneys Route du Thé [5] and Balenciaga. Books you are reading? Never enough time! I am trying to open Grace by Grace Coddington. I’ve been working on my own book and can’t wait to see it in print. What music do you have on rotation? I can’t get Tom Odell [6] out of my head; old favourites Fleetwood Mac, The Killers, Pretenders, Coldplay and Gipsy Kings; and a bit of country like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Neil Young and Bob Dylan. Favourite flowers? Hydrangeas, peonies [7], delphiniums and wild roses. What is a must-have when you entertain at home? I am so particular with food that it’s good to know what we are eating and where it is from, but I also love seeing my friends relaxed when we all have a good laugh and banter. Your restaurant of choice? I am a creature of habit and tend to frequent Billy Kwong, Sean’s Panaroma, Fratelli Paradiso, and Rockpool Bar & Grill. Your preferred tipple? I’m a wine fanatic. Champagnes I love are Dom Pérignon 2010, Ruinart, Egly-Ouriet and Pol Roger. I only drink pinot noir or French burgundy. Mount Mary [8] for Australian pinot; New Zealand’s Felton Road and Ata Rangi. What films have most inspired you? The Talented Mister Ripley [9] takes me to Italy; The Piano for its beautiful beach scene; The Sheltering Sky; Capote; and Argo. Favourite stores? Online: Austin Press for stationery; Net-a-Porter for shoes. Shops: markets everywhere; Petersham Nurseries, London, for garden and home; Merci Paris for everyday bed linen; Paper2 for stationery and Parterre for outdoor items, both Surry Hills, Sydney; Capri and Positano for loafers and sandals. What magazines do you read? World of Interiors, Vogue everywhere and Belle. Travel – favourite haunts and your must-see list I love Italy, so anywhere there. Puglia and Sicily are on my next trip. Rajasthan [10], India, is a must-go place for all. Objects of desire you’d buy? Murano water glasses, all colours and patterns; Le Creuset, they’re the best to cook with; anything from Astier de Villatte [11], Paris. Visit collettedinnigan.com.au

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RIGHT NOW ICON Words by MITCHELL OAKLEY SMITH

IF WE CAN LEARN anything from the recent passing of David Collins, it’s that nothing is certain. The Irish-born, London-based interior designer died on July 17 – peacefully, and surrounded by close family – merely three weeks after being diagnosed with skin cancer. This column typically looks at the late greats of the design world, but at just 58 and at the height of his career, there was no doubt there was so much we were yet to see from David, despite his already extensive portfolio. He was, and remains, an icon of our time. I had the pleasure of interviewing David twice in the past few years. The first time, for Belle in 2009, we spoke about his London home, the subject of the subsequent feature and, a year later, by then acquainted, he spoke more candidly about his views on design and reflected on his career to date for a profile that appeared in The Australian’s Wish magazine. Both times I found him to be friendly, forthcoming and, most notably, very honest. In my experience, creative types tend to put on a front for the press – they’ll tell you what they think you want to hear, and generally describe their aesthetic or style so descriptively that it backs them into a corner. They stereotype themselves, in a way. David never did that. He liked to think of himself as a design chameleon, responding emotionally to a brief rather than creatively, and he chose to live in the moment, allowing himself to indulge in a trend if he so desired, or to take a risk with a project. “Looking back always makes me feel a bit nostalgic, which is another word for sadness, and looking forward is all a bit daunting,” he said. “As I’ve gotten older I try to live in the present and engage with what I’m doing now.” Naturally, a thread connects David’s various projects, and in much the same way as he’s partly responsible for giving British hospitality design a strong identity, those spaces will become even greater landmarks in his wake, for there’s no way a successor or imitator could replicate them. “There’s a romanticism evoked by a Versailles-like opulence in decoration but a nod to modernism in colour palettes,” I wrote of his signature. “Each room of every project is a study in detail; the stunning result of a complex thought-process that observes the emotional connection between people and a space.” For those who knew him – Madonna, for one, helped make his name by employing him to design a number of her homes – David will live on in their minds as the embodiment of the spaces he designed: inviting, thoughtful, exciting. But such is the power of his signature that we can all remember and still appreciate him, and there’s no doubt we will continue to do so for a long time yet.

TRIBUTE 1955-2013

DAVID COLLINS

The design chameleon has left a legacy of brilliant work that is unlikely to be replicated.

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RIGHT NOW ICON

A creative collaboration between celebrated artist JEFF KOONS and Dom Pérignon was always going to be exciting.

M

PHOTOGRAPH BY RAPHAEL GIANELLI MERIANO

y dad was an interior decorator so I learned about aesthetics and caring about the execution of something. He would always start with a plan and you knew what it was going to be like once things were all pulled together. He taught me that textures and colours affect the way you feel, that you can be in control of these emotions through using aesthetics.” ‘Surreal’ is one of those words used all too easily to describe any experience outside our personal norm, but surreal is exactly how it feels to be sitting in a private room at New York’s Gagosian Gallery, in conversation with one of the world’s most celebrated contemporary artists. My companion from Vogue Mexico and I have Jeff Koons to ourselves. The artist’s response to my question about interior design speaks volumes about Koons’s well-documented meticulous approach to his own work. Just a short while earlier, he had escorted us – with several other journalists in New York as guests of Dom Pérignon – around New Paintings and Sculpture, his first major exhibition at Gagosian Gallery. The personal tour culminated in the reveal of a startlingly beautiful limited-edition (just 650 will be produced) Balloon Venus for Champagne Dom Pérignon (right), a perfectly-scaled adaptation of Koons’s mirrored, stainless-steel colossus, sensuously enveloping a bottle of Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 2003. Whatever your views on Koons – and the 58-year-old American artist divides critical

Words by NEALE WHITAKER 77


IT IS IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO BE AWED BY THE CONFIDENCE AND AUDACITY OF HIS WORK.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Colouring Book at the Royal Academy of Art, London 2011. The artist with Balloon Venus for Dom Pérignon; Antiquity 3 hangs behind. Sacred Heart and Balloon Dog at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 2008. Cracked Egg and Play-Doh artwork at the Beyeler Foundation, Basel. Menu from the dinner. Lobster. Balloon Venus and Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 2003. On display at Liebieghaus, Frankfurt. Gazing Ball at David Zwirner Gallery.

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opinion like no other – it is impossible not to be awed by the confidence and audacity of his work, and the price it commands. The Antiquity sculptures (Balloon Venus is a pneumatic reinterpretation of the paleolithic Venus of Willendorf) are remarkable in their scale and visual impact. The previous evening, the delicious amber-copper Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 2003 had been sampled at an intimate and atmospheric dinner in New York’s Chelsea. Paired with Provençal flavours such as bouillabaisse and figues fraîches avec parfums du Sud it was close to sensory nirvana. “Bold, provocative, full-bodied, intense.” Dom Pérignon’s chef de cave Richard Geoffroy could as easily be describing Jeff Koons’s oft-polarising work, but he is referring to the characteristics of the Rosé Vintage 2003, a vintage born from extreme weather conditions a decade ago. A fiercely hot summer following a severe winter prompted an unusually early harvest. But the resulting vintage, says Geoffroy, “is one of the most memorable ever. Pushing the boundaries of vin rosé.” So why the collaboration that Dom Pérignon describes as a “creative collision”? Geoffroy is unequivocal. “It’s about freedom, Jeff Koons’s unconstrained way of reinterpreting history and the history of art. The creative process with Jeff took two years from our first encounter,” he continues. “It was a process of getting to know each other. I was very respectful, never rushing. Nothing was forced.” Previous collaborators include Andy Warhol, Karl Lagerfeld and Australia’s Marc Newson. Jeff Koons is a natural fit. ‘When Dom Pérignon asked me to participate with the brand I was aware that other artists such as Andy Warhol had done projects with them in the past,” explains Koons. “The image of Balloon Venus came to me very quickly. It was more or less instantaneous. The issue was how we could place the bottle within it.” In conversations with Koons and Geoffroy, time is a recurring theme. “Nature and time are important to Dom Pérignon,” says Geoffroy. In creating a vintage, “time is the raw material, it’s as important as grapes”. To Koons, “one of the amazing things about art is that you’re able to experience aspects of time. To feel a connection to the past and the present, and a foot in the future.” Time is also precious to us writers. Our audience with Koons is brief. My companion from Vogue quizzes Koons about business (“I never had any thought of commercial success, I just wanted to make something the best I could”), while I’m curious to know where this creative dynamo may head next. The scale of these latest works suggests architecture, surely? Koons smiles. “I have enough on my plate just making my work. Sometimes I feel my public sculpture does try to compete with architecture. I would like to make a building, yes, I would like to do that.” Before leaving New York I visit Gazing Ball, an alternative Koons exhibition at the David Zwirner Gallery. Again, I’m intrigued by a creativity that veers from heroic to mundane to kitsch. But I am also aware that I like this work and the fact that it challenges and divides. There can be no fence-sitting with Jeff Koons. Dom Pérignon’s collaboration with him is audacious but entirely logical. It’s a meeting of icons and hints at continuity, fertility and sensuality. And, like this all-too-brief visit to New York, it’s just slightly surreal. Neale Whitaker travelled to New York courtesy of Dom Pérignon.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY NEALE WHITAKER, GETTY IMAGES

RIGHT NOW ICON


GROUND

SWELL MEET EIGHT OF A GROWING BAND OF TALENTED AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPE

ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNERS

WHOSE FERTILE VISIONS ARE

GREENING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE OUTDOOR SPACES, BOTH HERE AND OVERSEAS.

MYLES BALDWIN Was landscaping something you always knew you wanted to do? As long as I can

Myles Baldwin wears striped jacket, bow tie and chinos from MJ Bale. Hat from Strand Hatters. Boots from Gucci.

remember I‘ve been gardening. As a child I’d help Mum plant annuals along our drive in Sydney’s south, as a teen I got a holiday job at a local nursery and then I studied landscape design while doing a horticulture apprenticeship at the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney. How has your style evolved? My gardens have remained fairly driven by the need to suit the environment, the brief and the architecture, which makes each one unique. Who inspires you? Russell Page’s beautifully proportioned gardens with a wonderful array of plant material. He was the best of his era and his works range from a sculpture garden in Connecticut, to royal landscapes in the UK and a rill through a garden on an Italian island. Today, Jacques Wirtz, Piet Oudolf and Tom Stuart-Smith. What styles appeal? I design to suit the architecture, so I tinker with many styles, but contemporary design with bold and romantic plantings is my passion. Lately, I’ve been doing a few ‘Beverly Hills meets Palm Springs’ styles – it’s where architecture is now. Most rewarding project? Working with John Schaefer at his Bellevue Hill property to produce a garden of horticultural specimens like no other. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? My garden is a postage stamp-sized eclectic mix of favourite plants and design ideas that with my work schedule is copping some tough love. Elements of an ideal garden? Every landscape and garden is diferent but they all need great plants, uncomplicated materials and comfortable furniture. Does your passion for the exterior flow into interiors? On smaller jobs, I work a lot as a stylist with a green thumb. I tend to be fairly eclectic with my own tastes, and am a big fan of Sibella Court and Andrew Parr. I like the super-sleek look of Piet Boon and Christian Liaigre. Artists from Clement Meadmore to Dion Horstmans and Jef Koons. What are you working on now? I’m down in Hobart a fair bit finishing a heritage garden. In Sydney, I’m working on a house at Tamarama that will really turn heads. Visit mylesbaldwin.com.


designer focus

PhotograPhs

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DESIGNER FOCUS

RICHARD UNSWORTH Was landscaping something you always knew you wanted to do? Gardening was always in my blood. As a child, part of earning my pocket money was helping to maintain the garden, clipping hedges and mowing lawns. One of my earliest memories is of my father and me planting radish seeds. My first job was at the local garden centre, but after repotting frozen bulbs in winter I decided I couldn’t do landscape work in the UK. Luckily, I made the move to our warmer climate 23 years ago. What inspires your landscaping style? I walk everywhere with my eyes wide open and find so many inspiring things. Good design needs to be driven first and foremost by a client’s needs and the specifics of the site, architecture and environment. Recently, I wrote a story on Nicole de Vésian for Belle and fell in love with her garden and now I’m planning to visit it in Provence. Also, Hugh Main of Spirit Level has a good eye and uses plants well. What period or styles do you gravitate towards? Contemporary style is what we do best, although this also can mean soft, layered and textural planting with clean structural lines. It’s not about stark and spiky. We are driven primarily by our client’s brief and requirements because, after all, it’s their garden we are helping to create not ours. Tell us about your most rewarding project. I love transforming harsh urban spaces. Recently, we worked on a rooftop garden for the National Film School that was a huge, exposed tiled space that was unusable. We craned in massive planters to make an impact and created greenery so it’s now a lush oasis for staf and students to enjoy. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? We moved in last year and one of the first jobs in the front garden was to rip up the concrete for a herb and vegetable garden, which is thriving and gives me great pleasure. The rear garden is a work in progress! What are the elements of the ideal garden? Providing a sense of withdrawal, comfort, intimacy and peace, as well as a space for connecting with others – or with yourself. Good seating, lighting and structure and great planting are paramount. Does your passion for the exterior flow into the interior? These days I like to think our gardens flow inside rather than the other way round. Visit gardenlife.com.au.


PAUL BANGAY

Paul Bangay wears Dior Homme suit. Tie from Assin. Shoes from Gucci.

Richard Unsworth wears double-breasted jacket from MJ Bale. Farrell scarf from David Jones. Lanvin hat from a selection at Assin. Vintage boots from The Country Trader.

What inspires your landscaping style? Travel is the main thing. l travel regularly and always visit as many houses and gardens as l can. l am also inspired by architecture, often seeking much inspiration from the building l am designing the garden around. Has your style evolved? It’s always evolving. l started my career obsessed with formal European gardens, in particular, 17th-century French gardens. Now I’m obsessed with a tension between organic green shapes and the softness of flowering perennials. Is there another designer who inspires you? The great English designer David Hicks, who l often shadowed in Europe as he worked. Also, Piet Oudolf and Luciano Giubbilei. Most rewarding and challenging projects? Designing gardens overseas is challenging as you have to design for unknown climatic conditions and foreign local planning laws. A rooftop garden in New York was particularly dificult, with snow and harsh winds. And a garden l redesigned in the Hamptons on Long Island was most rewarding as it had been designed originally by Russell Page, who l admire greatly. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? My garden in Central Victoria sits on 40 hectares of undulating breathtaking mountain terrain and is the subject of my book, The Garden at Stonefields, which comes out in October. l have been creating the garden for the past nine years and spend every weekend in it, both maintaining it and creating new areas. How would you describe your aesthetic? Timeless and current. It incorporates both the formal and the informal by using precise layouts and soft planting schemes. What current projects are you working on? A campus for an Australian university in Italy, a soft country garden in the south of France, many Australian country gardens, and a rooftop garden for Chanel in Melbourne. Visit paulbangay.com. 83


BRENDAN MOAR Was landscaping something you always knew you wanted to do? I was not a very dedicated student during my HSC and once daytime TV was over I found rummaging around in the garden another excellent way to avoid study. And there in the undergrowth, I got hooked. I worked in photography for a few years and then found my way back to landscape when I wanted to blend design and environment – landscape architecture! Has your style evolved? Most definitely. I had the great opportunity to design gardens in the context of the TV shows I’ve done where I pushed myself from garden to garden, ensuring I was breaking new ground (for myself, that is) each time. Is there another designer who inspires you? I love the way Fiona Brockhof’s gardens celebrate their context. She has a beautiful Australian aesthetic all her own. Tell us about your most rewarding and challenging projects to date. All the gardens I created on Dry Spell Gardening were particularly rewarding. They were all challenging in their own way and each set of clients were great people. Creating a garden that is a perfect match to the people it’s for never loses its appeal. What are the elements of the ideal garden? A northern aspect, a big beautiful shade tree, a great connection from in to out and, for me, minimal views beyond the garden. I like to make the garden the view, undistracted by views beyond. It takes more work to create that, but I reckon it’s the thing that separates the men from the boys in a design sense.

Does your passion for the exterior flow inside? If so, which designers are you influenced by? In and out should be at the same level of fantasticness! I’m partial to the work of Jonathan Adler and Marc Newson.

Describe your aesthetic? I like clarity of space. I get pretty sculptural on the whole. Visit brendanmoar.com.l

Brendan Moar wears Dries Van Noten jacket from a selection at Robby Ingham. Bow tie and pants from Gucci.

Will Dangar wears suit from Ermenegildo Zegna. Pocket square from MJ Bale. Hat from Strand Hatters. Tricker’s brogues from The Standard Store.


DESIGNER FOCUS

WILLIAM DANGAR Was landscaping something you always knew you wanted to do? I met my wife, who was a city girl, when I was working on a cattle station in the Northern Territory. She said she had absolutely no intention of moving to the country and, if I wanted to keep her, I had to relocate to the city (the things we do!). So I got a job as a labourer at an eastern suburbs landscape company in 1991. When the recession hit, I got retrenched and started a lawn mowing and landscape contracting business. The rest is history. What has informed your landscaping style? Marcia Hosking is an amazing plants woman I worked for in the 90s. When I was working as garden editor of Belle in the early 2000s, I learned a lot from Eric Matthews who exposed me to a lot of talented people. Is there another designer in this field who has inspired you? I love Fiona Brockhof, Hugh Main from Spirit Level and Myles Baldwin for the way they let the plants form the strength of what they do. Internationally, I am a huge fan of Roberto Burle Marx and have visited many of his gardens in South America. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? We have just sold our house and are moving down the road to a site that’s a knock-down. Stay tuned as the new garden will be very exciting. I am going all native for this one. Elements of the ideal garden? A large site with a small house. Relatively unheard of in Sydney as everyone is so greedy with the size and proportion of their dwellings in relation to the land size. It’s a direct result of the ridiculous property prices in this city. Does your passion for the exterior flow into the interior and, if so, which artists or designers are you influenced by? My favourites are interior designers Briony Fitzgerald and Romaine Alwill as well as Tracey Deep, the floral artist. Visit williamdangar.com.au.

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DESIGNER FOCUS

FIONA BROCKHOFF Tell us about your most rewarding projects? A rewarding project is where you see the client using, loving and talking about their garden with pride. The most depressing is where you visit some months later and find the garden unloved and vegies unpicked. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? We have land on Bass Strait that we cultivated with a large orchard, vegie garden, small vineyard and areas around the house where I experimented with many of the local indigenous plants. It is low maintenance to a large degree, with no lawns, little irrigation and plants that thrive in the conditions. We used many recycled and local materials, such as limestone, old pier timbers and local gravel. The house and the garden were conceived together and belong together. It is a family garden and enjoyed in diferent ways by us and our friends. Elements of the ideal garden? A strong sense of place is most important and spaces that work and fulfil the client’s brief. Plants that thrive and are carefully chosen for what they contribute in terms of form or habit and texture. Flower colour is a secondary thing and fleeting so would rarely inform my choices. Ideally, I love to be able to include an area where the client can grow herbs or vegies or fruit, even if just a lemon tree and a few herbs. It is fulfilling for people to be able to pick something they had a hand in growing. Does your passion for the exterior flow into the interior? Definitely. The most successful house and garden combinations are those that are conceived together or where the architect and garden designer understand and respect each other. In the garden in which I’m pictured, my client who is an architect and interior designer at Spaces in Armadale, chose the red rabbit around which the entire garden was designed. Describe your aesthetic? Strong, simple and stylish but never trendy. I use many native plants and only Australian or Victorian materials. I won’t use imported paving stones or rocks. My gardens are not resource-hungry in their construction or maintenance. Beautiful and successful spaces do not need to be expensive. Visit fionabrockhofdesign.com.

Fiona Brockhof wears coat, dress and shoes from Bottega Veneta.


WANT MORE?

To view the behind the scenes download the free viewa app and scan the entire page.

ANTHONY WYER What has informed your landscaping style? I am a serial traveller. Being exposed to a diverse range of cultures and landscapes has provided me with an abundance of ideas and styles that I can express in my designs. This year I visited both north-western New South Wales and the Amalfi Coast in Italy – diverse places but both equally inspiring. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? With young children our happiest times are spent in the garden, but I drive my wife insane as I’m always tweaking it. I move plants around, try ideas for designs and swap the outdoor furniture and fabrics to keep things fresh. What are the elements of the ideal garden? A successful garden design is achieved through creating layers of interest with a harmonious palette of hard and soft elements, and a mix of decorative elements like pots, furnishings and lighting. I like to have at least one amazing tree to complete the garden and if there isn’t one already we bring one in.

Does your passion for the exterior flow into the interior and, if so, which artists or designers are you influenced by? Layout, cohesion and functionality plague me no matter what I am doing and this includes interiors. I enjoy beautiful pieces of furniture and Australian art is always inspirational. I have pieces by John Olsen and David Bromley and photography by Murray Fredericks and Max Dupain. What are you working on? A rural property in New Zealand for over 18 months. The client is really open-minded, a little crazy and happy to take things way outside the box. To give you an idea of the scale and outrageousness of the project, the property now has a stone outdoor entertainment area for 100 guests, a tennis court, pool, spa and bar area, an olive grove, a bocci court, an underground bunker that doubles as a car workshop, a grassy mound for dirt biking, a go-cart track, an archery range and a giant chess set! Visit anthonywyer.com.

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Anthony Wyer wears jacket and pants from Giorgio Armani. Shoes from Bally.

Peter Fudge wears navy tuxedo and bow tie from MJ Bale. Shoes from Gucci.

Creative direction Jack Milenkovic

Production Tanya Buchanan

Styling Harry Roberts

Grooming David Novak-Piper and Sylvia Ura


designer focus

peteR fUdge What has inspired your landscaping style? This landscape of bush land and open space has taught me that for a garden to look real and efective you need to eliminate fuss and pare back your elements. It’s taught me about plant communities and what works well together, and how to arrange these without looking contrived. I strive to make my gardens holistic, where no one feature steals the limelight. Is there another designer in this field or others who has inspired you? I really admire Andrea Cochran from San Francisco. Her style is simple, bold and uncluttered. What period do you gravitate towards? I love the current period of contemporary design, but I also love the retro period of the 1950s and 60s and am drawn to this. Tell us about your most rewarding and challenging projects to date. I’m working on a house site near Sydney’s North Head, which is nestled in bush land. The challenge is to mimic nature so it looks like the house has always been part of the landscape. Do you ‘do’ your own garden? We move house regularly, so I get to do a new garden every three years or so. How lucky am I? My team and I install the gardens and it’s my hobby and passion to spend time nurturing it. It’s easy for me to find moments to clip or rake gravel or water in among my full schedule. I just find myself in it. Elements of your dream garden? So I can be in my garden all year, my ideal space would have lots of seating to capture the winter sun and summer shade. It would have an outdoor fire pit to gain warmth and where I could toast marshmallows from autumn to spring, and a natural pool I could dive in and drink chemical-free fresh water. The design would have organic overtones but be visually sharp with natural materials like timber, stone and metal, so it’s timeless and current at the same time. Visit peterfudgegardens.com.au.


RIGHT NOW WHO

Modern traditions The Dane behind &tradition reveals the bold design philosophy that drives his finest ideas.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Founder and brand director of &tradition, Martin Kornbek Hansen. The ‘Fly’ collection by Space Copenhagen. Jaime Hayón’s ‘Catch’ chair. ‘Shuffle’ side table by Mia Hamborg. ‘Trash Me’ lamp by Victor Vetterlein. Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Mayor’ sofa, originally designed in 1939.

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AN AMPERSAND is an unusual but beautifully graphic way to start a brand name. What and tradition? What does it mean? On a recent trip to Australia, founder and brand director of &tradition, Martin Kornbek Hansen provided the answers. Like many Danes, Martin has a thorough understanding of design. But it’s his belief in the importance of a brand staying true to its philosophy that makes &tradition such a strong new label. The founding principle that set the tone for this young company was “tradition tied to innovation”. From the outset, Martin championed the merits of bringing together the work of past masters of Danish design – Verner Panton and Arne Jacobsen – and the best of contemporary design. When the brand launched in 2010, it had acquired the rights to Panton’s ‘Flowerpot’ and ‘Topan’ lights – two classics from the 1960s – and was ready to release its first contemporary designs by Benjamin Hubert and Norm Architects. In keeping with this philosphy, Martin took a holistic approach to brand development, where everything from products to branding and photography was highly considered and driven by a desire to create unique designs in quality materials. Three years on, the brand is going from strength to strength, releasing new products by Samuel Wilkinson and Victor Vetterlein, while also reissuing several early Arne Jacobsen classics from the 1930s. “We operate within a framework where innovation is tied to tradition or vice versa,” he says. “If a design is avant-garde, we see if the materials or method would benefit from a traditional element. Equally, products made using innovative materials often require a measured design approach.” This is possibly why &tradition’s products integrate so well with each other. Radical contemporary designs such as Vetterlein’s ‘Trash Me’ lamp and Mia Hamborg’s ‘Shuffle’ side table work well with Jacobsen’s ‘Mayor’ sofa from the 1930s. A more recent example is Space Copenhagen’s ‘Fly’ sofa launched at the Milan Furniture Fair in April, where the traditional Nordic spindle-back chair is reinvented as a lounge collection with a wing-like base providing an integrated side table. Jaime Hayón is another well-known designer who has collaborated with &tradition recently. His ‘Catch’ chair, released earlier this year, was the fruit of years of discussions with Martin. “&tradition is rooted in the heritage of Scandinavian and Nordic design, so mixing that with Jaime Hayón’s more cartoonish, exaggerated style creates something very new,” says Martin. Hot on the heels of these pieces, a number of lighting products are slated for release over the next six months, including a crystal-glass lamp by Samuel Wilkinson and a collection of lights by Jaime Hayón. “We are also releasing some beautiful new lights in marble by Studio Vit, a group of talented young Swedish designers based in London,” says Martin. With so many new products imminently joining the brand’s range, a big ‘&’ at the front of ‘tradition’ seems especially appropriate. For more go to andtradition.com; greatdanefurniture.com.

PORTRAIT BY DAVID WHEELER

Words by DAVID HARRISON


BELLE READER EVENT CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Hugo, Del Kathryn Barton’s 2013 Archibald Prize-winning portrait of Australian actor Hugo Weaving. The artist in her studio in front of an unfinished work for her upcoming exhibition Pressure to the need. Roslyn Oxley9. Satellite fade-out exhibition, Roslyn Oxley9, 2011. One of Del’s new works, Pressure to the need.

Dinner with Del

A special event with Del Kathryn Barton at Roslyn Oxley9. JOIN THE BELLE TEAM at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery in Sydney for an exclusive art dinner, sponsored by Belle Property, featuring two-time Archibald Prize winner Del Kathryn Barton, pictured above right with work from her upcoming exhibition, Pressure to the need. The event will coincide with the new exhibition. Neale Whitaker, Belle editor-in-chief, will be your host and Del will discuss her art, influences, inspiration and day-to-day work practice with a renowned contemporary art curator. A sumptuous menu will be prepared by stellar caterer Kate White of Katering and will be matched with premium Wolf Blass wines. This is a rare opportunity to get an insight into the thought processes and physical techniques that produce such amazingly detailed, fantastical work. Don’t miss this very special evening of art, fine food and wine and conversation. PORTRAIT BY NICHOLAS WATT, DAVE WHEELER (GALLERY EXTERIOR)

ROSLYN OXLEY9 GALLERY –

BOOK NOW

OCTOBER 23

W E D N E S D AY, O C T O B E R 2 3 , 6 . 3 0 p m Join the Belle team and artist Del Kathryn Barton for an exclusive evening at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery in Paddington, Sydney. Four-course dinner with premium Wolf Blass wines, $175 per head. Phone (02) 9282 8634 or email bellebookings@bauer-media.com.au.

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PROMOTION

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is one such course developed for those wishing to gain employment as an assistant designer within the interior design industry. The flexible, part-time qualification provides an opportunity for students to complete an accredited course while maintaining other commitments such as full-time work or study. The cost of tuition at Whitehouse is subject to annual review and fees can be structured to assist a student’s payment plans. FEE-HELP is a government approved loan scheme set up at The Whitehouse Institute of Design that helps eligible fee-paying students to pay all or part of their tuition fees, which are then paid directly to Whitehouse. Let your creative spirit soar and enrol now in a design course at Whitehouse. There’s never been a better time to learn.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, call 1300 123 123 or visit www.whitehouse-design.edu.au

BACHELOR OF DESIGN SECOND YEAR STUDENT’S WORK – RENATA GUIMARAES

Design to Inspire

INTERIOR DESIGN ACADEMIC C A R E E R PAT H W AY


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Private eye

Investigate these slick accessories to create a sharp profile. 1 French Navy personalised stationery, from $40/10 notecards and envelopes, from frenchnavy.com.au. 2 Theo metal frames, $820, from The Eye Scene. 3 White twill shirt, POA, from P.Johnson Tailors. 4 Paisley tie, POA, from P.Johnson Tailors. 5 Windowpane check two-piece suit, POA, from P.Johnson Tailors. 6 Farrell fringed silk scarf, $70, from David Jones. 7 Bronze sitting dog (one of a pair), $375, from Becker Minty. 8 Farrell wool blend trench, $650, from David Jones. 9 ‘Middlesbrough’ silk tie, $79.95, from MJ Bale. 10 Prada Uomo ‘Zip’ shoe, $1400, from Prada. 11 Gucci ‘Made to Measure’ EDT, 90ml, $94, from major department stores. 12 Shu Uemura ‘Art of Hair’ clay definer, $46, from leading salons. 13 ‘Radiomir’ hand-wound mechanical watch with alligator strap, POA, from Panerai. 14 Bottega Veneta ‘Pour Homme’ EDT, 90ml, $145, from David Jones. 15 Prada Uomo leather envelope bag, $1060, from Prada. Illustration by Megan Hess, POA, from meganhess.com. For stockists see Address Book.

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Glamour puss Spice up a turquoise trend with a little animal magnetism. 1 Yves Saint Laurent limited-edition ‘City Drive’ eyeshadow palette in Classy, $90, from major department stores. 2 Elsa Peretti diamond and 18k rose gold necklace, $5050, from Tiffany & Co. 3 Lanvin leopard top, $2295, from Belinda. 4 Giorgio Armani ‘Sì’ EDP, 50ml, $100, from major department stores. 5 Lickoeur ‘Spinning Top’ vase, $129, from Becker Minty. 6 Sisley ‘Phyto-Khol Perfect’ pencil in Khaki, $62, from David Jones. 7 ‘New Masera’ viscose pant, $599, and jacket [16], $1199, from Carl Kapp. 8 Balmain ‘Ivoire’ EDP, 50ml, $110, from Myer. 9 Lancôme ‘Blush Subtil’ all-in-one contour, blush and highlighter palette, $79, from major department stores. 10 Roberto Cavalli sunglasses, $565, from The Eye Scene. 11 Prada heels, $1090, from Prada. 12 Lanvin leopard leather clutch, $1175, from Belinda. 13 Paloma Picasso ‘Olive Leaf’ cuff in 18k yellow gold, $15,000, from Tiffany & Co. 14 Sisley ‘Supremya Eyes’ anti-aging eye serum, $290, from David Jones. 15 Céline leather handbag, $2799, from David Jones. Illustration by Megan Hess, POA, from meganhess.com. For stockists see Address Book.

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CloCkwise from bottom Dedar ‘Nonchalante’ silk in Potimarron from south Pacific fabrics. ‘Aspire’ polyester jacquard in flame from warwick fabrics. ‘Vanuatu’ cotton in Campari from the textile Company. ‘Paradise’ polyester/ acrylic/viscose in Hibiscus from Zepel fabrics. Designers Guild ‘Savine’ linen in Pimento from radford furnishings. Hermès la maison ‘Fil d’Argent’ cotton in terracotta from south Pacific fabrics. Chair from fanuli covered in Jonathan Adler for kravet ‘Acid Palm’ rayon/polyester in watermelon from elliott Clarke. De le Cuona ‘Liquid’ viscose/cotton cushion in russet from boyac. Baskets, $575, from the Country trader. for stockists see Address book.


RIGHT NOW CLOTH Edited by DAVID NOVAK-PIPER

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spirit

Whether draped, swathed or upholstered, these fabrics epitomise the vibrancy of our alfresco lifestyle. PH O T O G R A P HS P R U E R U S C O E

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Right Now cloth

CloCkwise from bottom left ‘Kato’ cotton blend in fuchsia from warwick fabrics. James Dunlop textiles ‘Abstract’ viscose/linen in multi from mokum. Designers Guild ‘Zeno’ linen blend in moss from radford furnishings. Colefax and fowler ‘Kerala’ cotton/polyacrylic in Prairie from Geraldine Cooper. ‘Palms’ cotton in Peninsula from the textile Company. sixhands ‘Bonfire’ canvas in rainforest from radford furnishings. Christopher farr Cloth ‘curica’ linen in lime from Ascraft. missPrint ‘Dandelion Mobile’ cotton/linen in sunflower Yellow from Ascraft. Jonathan Adler for kravet ‘Distorted’ linen in Prism from elliott Clarke. Christian lacroix for Designers Guild ‘Alcazar’ linen in safran from radford furnishings. sixhands ‘Zulu efuru’ canvas in spice from radford furnishings. sixhands ‘chevy chase’ canvas in Candy store from radford furnishings. ‘Tartan’ linen/cotton in scarlet from Cloth fabric.

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NEO – DESIGN VERSATILITY WITH STYLE.

NEO

Adelaide: Transforma 21 Kensington Road Norwood SA 5067 Tel. 08 8332 4044

www.hulsta.com.au

Melbourne: Image Interiors 610 Church Street Richmond VIC 3121 Tel. 03 9421 6655

Perth: Ultimo Interiors No.4 Hutton Street Osborne Park WA 6017 Tel. 08 9201 2479

Sydney: Covemore Designs 43 Prime Drive Seven Hills NSW 2147 Tel. 02 9624 1011

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RIGHT NOW CLOTH CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT Sahco ‘Melissa’ viscose/polyamide in col.04 from South Pacific Fabrics. ‘Atoll’ acrylic in Basalt from Mokum. ‘Pendula’ linen in Snowdrift from Unique Fabrics. Catherine Martin ‘Antique Lace’ linen/viscose in Linen 812 from Mokum. Zimmer + Rohde ‘Caleido’ silk/cotton/viscose from Unique Fabrics. ‘Oasis’ acrylic in Basalt from Mokum. ‘Bolt’ viscose/linen in Gold from Warwick Fabrics. Lizzo ‘Zen’ polyester/cotton/viscose in col.01 and col.03 from Westbury Textiles. Soleil Bleu ‘Ikat’ linen in col.050 from Seneca. Large basket, $575, and oval cane basket, $19, both from The Country Trader.

STYLING ASSISTANT KELLY STEELE

E A RT H WAT C H : N E U T R A L S with shots of gold and ochre keep schemes grounded.

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RIGHT NOW WHO

Silver ware Interior and furniture designer Phillip Silver is one of AustraliaÕs unsung design maestros.

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Phillip Silver in the master bedroom he designed for the 2013 San Francisco Decorator Showcase. The marble and lucite side table will be included in his upcoming furniture collection. Zebrawood cabinet is a standout piece in the bedroom. An elegantly designed country house.

WITH A 40-YEAR career spread across three continents, Sydney-born Phillip Silver has mastered every genre in the design game from high-end hospitality, residential and corporate projects to private jets and luxury boats. Today he works in his San Francisco practice, Bigelow + Silver, and is in as much demand as ever for his understated, elegant interiors that exude refinement and harmony. Working like a ‘design conductor’, he layers discreet tones and textures with thoughtfully edited furnishings, lighting, objects and art to produce the kind of rooms one doesn’t want to leave. And it’s all achieved with the laid-back ease of a man who works quickly and without fuss – down-to-earth Australian traits that define him. Phillip’s career started as a plucky 18 year old, when he convinced design legend, the late Leslie Walford, to hire him as a junior and so learned the ropes in the traditional manner. Push the fast-forward button to his twenties, when Phillip was running his own Sydney design practice, working on some of the biggest hospitality and corporate projects in the country. With such clients as Bond Corporation, Phillip opened a second office in Perth while establishing a furniture-making business in Sydney. He says he started making furniture because he didn’t have the choices he wanted for his clients. His furniture was so covetable that David Jones and [the former] Georges asked to stock it in their stores. The next chapter in Phillip’s high-flying career came when he won a worldwide competition to redesign Hayman Island Resort. With no prior hospitality experience, he was suddenly in charge of a three-year, $400 million project, which later was named Best Resort by Condé Nast Traveller. When the stockmarket crash hit at the end of the 80s, Phillip relocated his office and staff to Hong Kong, and Asia became his home for the next 20 years. Working harder than ever, he designed everything from hotels and casinos to shopping centres throughout the region and major hotels for Hyatt Hotels and Resorts. According to Phillip, this was a time of huge professional growth. He realised there was no going back to Australia – he needed to continue to live abroad to achieve his dreams. His recent move to the US – to which he was always attracted because of its “design it and do it attitude” – “feels like the third act” in the play of his life. “My focus now is to do fun projects with fun people,” he says. “I have so much to do – residential projects, boutique hotels.” He has also returned to his first love – designing furniture – to challenge himself a little more. The Phillip Silver Studio collection of furniture and lighting will be released in the US in February. And, with orders already taken for his acrylic cocktail tables, debuted at the recent San Francisco Decorator Showcase, the wheel seems to be turning full circle. And, like most high achievers, Phillip Silver is as fearless and optimistic as ever. For more go to bigelowsilver.com.

PORTRAIT BY ANGIE SILVY. ARTWORK IN PICTURE (TOP LEFT) BY ERIN CONE.

Words by SUE-ANNE WILKINSON


PROMOTION

PA R K L I F E P E R F EC T I O N

The Mirvac Belle Life Series of modern apartments injects new verve into living at Harold Park on the edge of Sydney’s CBD.

THIS PAGE Pendant lights from Dunlin Home, floor lamp and side table from Cavit & Co. Blue cushions from Domestic Textiles upholstered in Zoffany fabric. Green cushion and coffee table from PAD. Sofa from Jardan. Rug from Cadrys.

DESIGN COLLABORATION


STYLE NOTES

Use the free viewa app to scan page and watch Steve take you through his styling inspiration.

WHEN EXPERTS IN STYLE and design unite, beautiful things happen. So it is at Harold Park, where Mirvac and Belle have teamed up to create a trio of pop-up display apartments, each of which represents a different stage of life. To launch the series, Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony created a home that would seduce the young and urbane, in touch with the city, in tune with good design. Steve applied his deft touch to create a look that is vibrant and textural, with shots of navy and emerald offset by earthy tones and lively dashes of bronze, copper and gold. Raw and polished finishes lend a dynamic synergy to the instantly welcoming space, furnished with pieces from Coco Republic, Cavit & Co, Cadrys, Great Dane Furniture, Becker Minty, MCM House, Garden Life, Max Sparrow, PAD, Laura Kincade, Dunlin Home and Worlds Away. Harold Park by Mirvac is one of Sydney’s most significant urban renewal projects in which a former paceway, 2.5km from the CBD, is being sensitively transformed into a sustainable new residential community of 1250 terraces and apartments set within 3.8 hectares of parkland leading to the harbour foreshore. “Maestro” is the third release at Harold Park, offering a range of homes that pay homage to the art of living beautifully. An easy art to acquire. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony. Copper bowl from Cavit & Co, armchair from Coco Republic, plants from Garden Life. Leather bedhead and photograph from Coco Republic. Floor lamp from Great Dane Furniture, side table from Max Sparrow.


PROMOTION

THIS PAGE, ANTI CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Gold stool from Becker Minty and towel from Bemboka. Blue and white china vase from MCM House. Gold console from Becker Minty, ceramic horse and chevron cushions from PAD. Black lamp from Cavit & Co and bedlinen from Bemboka.

DESIGN COLLABORATION


PROMOTION THIS PAGE Dining table from Great Dane Furniture, dining chairs from Coco Republic. Étagère from Worlds Away, Natural Curiosities artworks from Cavit & Co. Terrace design and plants from Garden Life. Timber side table from PAD.

DESIGN PARTNERS

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RIGHT NOW LIBRARY Edited by NIGEL BARTLETT

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Innovative minds

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These inspiring volumes break new ground. 1 THOMAS PHEASANT: SIMPLY SERENE Washington-based designer Thomas Pheasant believes in creating interiors that are havens of peace. He blends classical elements with contemporary details to come up with a style that has seen him named Andrew Martin International Designer of the Year (1997) and chosen to redecorate the US President’s guesthouse. Thomas Pheasant, Rizzoli, $90. 2 RURAL MODERN Here’s a selection of properties by American architects showcasing the best of contemporary country-house design. Blending ideas from modern Bauhaus and the US shingle style, these homes combine sustainability, livability and good looks. Russell Abraham, Images Publishing, $60. 3 AUSTRALIAN COASTAL GARDENS One of the country’s leading landscape designers guides the reader around Australia’s best coastal

gardens, created by professionals and homeowners alike. Author Myles Baldwin worked with photographer Sue Stubbs to produce a book that shows the beautiful results that can be achieved despite often adverse conditions. As well as the gardens themselves, he includes an illustrated guide to plants that are well suited to coastal locations. Myles Baldwin, Murdoch Books, $90. 4 REAL HOMES: INSPIRATION BEYOND STYLE Originality can sometimes seem lacking in many contemporary homes, as owners and interior designers understandably follow trends and style fads. Here, however, are more than 650 images that show how imagination and creativity can trump the vogue for being in vogue. It’s ideal for those who feel like breaking the fashion mould. Phyllis Richardson and Solvi dos Santos, Thames & Hudson, $60.

5 RAFIQ AZAM: ARCHITECTURE FOR GREEN LIVING This is not a book on eco-architecture, as its title hints, but a study of the work of Bangladeshborn Rafiq Azam. The visionary architect won Residential Building of the Year at 2012’s London Design Festival. The “Green” in the title comes from his use of internal and external gardens that bring rural and urban together, and an abundant use of water as ponds, pools and water courts. Rosa Maria Falvo, Skira, $120. 6 BEHIND CLOSED DOORS Fans of the quirky will enjoy the premise of this book: it comprises photographs of 25 homes owned by well-known creative types, with all the snaps taken by the owners themselves on disposable cameras. A condition for inclusion was to shoot the insides of their fridges. Take a look at the living conditions – and eating habits – of the likes of Martha Stewart, Courtney

Love, fashion designer Jeremy Scott and British artists Gilbert and George. Rob Meyers, Hardie Grant, $40. 7 A LIFE LESS ORDINARY The British homewares store I Gigi is renowned for timeless pieces and a low-key, muted palette. In this book the store’s founders say why they love the look they’ve put together (and has proved so popular), and how to recreate it combining earthy hues and restored and reclaimed items. Zoe Ellison and Alex Legendre, CICO Books, $50. 8 THE ART OF THE INTERIOR An insight into the history of interior design from the 17th century to today. It’s not as dry as it sounds, thanks to abundant photography that illustrates this chronological guide to 34 of the most significant designers of the past 400 years, among them Billy Baldwin and Andrée Putman. Barbara and René Stoeltie, Flammarion, $80. 109


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SPACE

SARAH DAVISON

Vintage and contemporary pieces add lustre to the interior designer’s airy Sydney sanctuary. Photographs by FELIX FOREST

“There’s no paperwork or computers at home for me, not even a TV. Here, it’s all about unwinding ...”

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HAT HAS INSPIRED AND INFORMED YOUR INTERIORS STYLE? Travel is a great source of inspiration for me. For example, the design and furnishing of my own apartment was influenced by my travels to the west coast of America, with all its gorgeous Spanish Mission-style architecture. Also, by an incredible trip I took to Marrakech just before beginning the renovation. IS YOUR HOME A SANCTUARY OR DOES IT DOUBLE AS A WORK SPACE? Definitely a sanctuary! There’s no paperwork or computers at home for me, not even a TV. Here, it's all about unwinding with music and candles. HAS YOUR STYLE EVOLVED OVER TIME? Yes, I think my style is less structured and more fluid and eclectic as I become more experienced and more brave. TELL US ABOUT SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE ITEMS Some of the more exotic pieces from my overseas sourcing missions are favourites. The 1970s hammered brass leaf light by Tommaso Barbi I found in Saint Germain, the framed antique calligraphy from Istanbul and the 1920s painted silver-leaf screen from Los Angeles all have a beautiful, knocked-back lustre. IS THERE A PARTICULAR PERIOD OR STYLE THAT APPEALS TO YOU? I like many periods. I find it easy to combine great examples of design pieces from the 1920s to the 1970s, as I’ve done here. WHAT HOUSEHOLD ITEMS COULDN’T YOU LIVE WITHOUT? Flowers and candles. IF YOU DIDN’T LIVE IN SYDNEY, WHERE ELSE WOULD YOU CALL HOME? Oh, that's hard. I really feel Sydney is home. Perhaps Melbourne, San Francisco or the south of France, if I had to move! WHICH DESIGNERS, ARCHITECTS OR INTERIOR DESIGNERS (LIVING OR DEAD) DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY? Currently I'm liking Rick Owens for fashion and furniture, and the architect who designed his London store, Joseph Dirand, who’s based in Paris. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR OWN STYLE? Atmospheric and timeless, with a focus on functional space planning and beautiful materials. W H AT A R E YOU C U R R E N T LY WO R K I N G O N ? We have our first international commission, for a cuttingedge penthouse in Kuala Lumpur. Also, some lovely projects in Australia, such as a family house on the beach in Tamarama and a sophisticated apartment in Darling Point. It all makes for a fun and inspiring mix! For more go to sarahdavison.com.au.


CREATIVE HOME

WANT MORE?

To see an interview with Sarah

download the free viewa app and scan the entire page.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Contemporary and vintage elements mix in the living room, among them the low-slung coffee table, designed by Sarah, and the circular vintage mirror. Leather campaign stools by Christian Liaigre. Antique Japanese kiri wood drawers serve as a dressing table. Vintage faux bamboo chair in the sunroom off the bedroom purchased in LA. OPPOSITE PAGE Sarah Davison in the sunroom.


HOM E S A pared-back, graphic entrance in a monochrome palette welcomes guests to this revamped Melbourne home. See Quality Control, p146.

AUSTRALIAN ISSUE

PHOTOGRAPH BY SHARYN CAIRNS

Simplicity, individuality and laid-back charm are the hallmarks of these Australian homes. From city pads to beachside retreats, this is a chic and creative collection.

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c o m p l e x

Gold accents and ornate finishes have brought a movie-star quality to this glamorous Sydney home designed by Greg Natale. PhotograPhs anson smart words chris pearson


SYDNEY HOME THIS PAGE Marble floor tiles in the entrance have been ground back so the grouting all but disappears for a seamless effect. The study has a Regency ‘Drum’ table from Pecare Trading Company. ‘Utopia’ sunburst plaques and C. Jeré ‘Urchin’ wall art from Jonathan Adler. OPPOSITE PAGE The orange-sorbet-hued front door pops against the expanses of white.

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n the 1957 romantic comedy Designing Women, Lauren Bacall’s beau-to-be, Gregory Peck, describes the fashion designer’s living room as “very chic”. When viewing the film recently, interior designer and movie buff Greg Natale thought so too. He couldn’t resist using that glamorous space as inspiration for the living room in this home on Sydney’s lower North Shore. The movie Frost/Nixon inspired another room. The moody media space, which contrasts with the light and airy living areas, references a 1970s hotel room featured in the film, in which UK talk-show host David Frost grills former US president Richard Nixon. “It had this wallpaper. I loved it,” says Greg. But the house is no movie set – it has the drama, but it’s also a comfortable home to Angela and Daniel Perikic and children, James, nine, and Charlotte, seven. Throughout, Greg has created a fresh and breezy take on Hollywood Regency. Popular in the 50s and 60s, the style evokes mid-century Bel Air and Beverly Hills, generously peppered with Palm Springs and Palm Beach. Celebrated in movies of the era, the look layers clean, organic forms and ornate, classic pieces in often surprising combinations. It also has a gilt complex – sprinklings of gold lend sparkle and glamour. While the likes of Peck, Bacall and the Rat Pack may have inhabited those original rooms, the aesthetic sits easily in Australia for homeowners wanting relaxed elegance, says Greg. “It’s a mixture of classic and clean, with lots of gold and a mix of styles. It was so cool then, and it’s still very current.” On this project, Greg found a keen and amenable client in Angela, who owns a vintage clothing store and shares his passion for retro. A humble brick bungalow stood on the site when she and Daniel bought it nearly three years ago, but the couple had more ambitious plans. After trawling the net for a suitable designer, they knew Greg could give them exactly what they wanted. “I love how he does decorative kitchens as furniture and the way details, such as rugs, just pop out at you,” she says. “His style is unique.” As well as designing the interiors, Greg tweaked the exterior by architects Playoust Churcher. While the interiors in the new build are more LA, Greg fashioned the exterior into 1950s Florida. With its classic sash windows, wide eaves, Besser-block


THIS PAGE Hickory Chair sofa, Alexa Hampton for Visual Comfort table lamp and Christopher Guy ‘Sunburst’ mirror, all from Laura Kincade. Vintage coffee table from Drawing Room Theory at Mitchell Road Antique and Design Centre, re-gilded by Brigitte Eggert Art Gilding. Armchairs from Pecare Trading Company in Kelly Wearstler Groundworks ‘Confetti’ and cushions in ‘Agate’ and ‘Oblique’ from Elliott Clarke. Custom-made ottoman in Kelly Wearstler Groundworks ‘Channels’. Oly San Francisco ‘Diego’ side table from Coco Republic with ‘Turbines’ brass sculpture from Plantation LA, and ‘Carnaby Flame’ vase from Jonathan Adler. Life Insurance artworks by Helen Shelley. Greg Natale ‘Manhattan’ rug from Designer Rugs. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Vistosi ‘Giogali’ chandelier from Mondo Luce. Coffered ceiling by AllPlasta. In the hallway is a ‘Carnaby Waves’ vase from Jonathan Adler. Artwork by Scott Petrie. On coffee table, ‘Spiky’ ball and male figure both from Plantation, and ‘Sven’ vase and Santorini ‘Pandora’ box from Jonathan Adler.

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THIS PAGE The open-plan living area flows to the kitchen. Christopher Guy wing chair from Laura Kincade sits at the head of the table. ‘Kora’ dining chairs from Casa Mia. OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP Kitchen has black granite benchtops, with the splashback and island benchtop in River White marble from Saba Bros Tiling. ‘Olde English’ kitchen mixer from Astra Walker. Thomas O’Brien for Visual Comfort ‘Bryant’ pendant light over the island bench, and Barbara Barry for Visual Comfort ‘Bowmont’ chandelier over the table, both from Laura Kincade. Coffered ceiling by AllPlasta. BOTTOM ‘Ella’ upholstered chairs and ‘Dorothy’ chairs all from Casa Mia. Regency ‘Drum’ table from Pecare Trading Company. Accessories on shelves from Plantation, Meïzai and Jonathan Adler. Ceiling in Designers Guild ‘Rheinsberg’ wallpaper from Radford Furnishings.

“I designed the room and really the whole house around the incredible coffee table. I love it.”

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dividing walls, orange-sorbet-hued front door, palm trees and pool cabana, the house conjures up this romantic and elegant era. The salt air wafting from the beach nearby completes the allusion. With its cinematic references, this home had to have a theatrical entry. The double door is faux – only one side opens – but the illusion gives a sense of arrival and lends gravitas to the marble hallway, separated from the open-plan area by a floor-to-ceiling screen with a bamboo motif. Luminescent and sparkling thanks to the crisp white walls and gold accessories, the living room is the star of the house. “I designed the room and really the whole house around the incredible coffee table. I love it,” says Greg of the retro ornate gilded table with Lucite legs. “The faux marble wallpaper, too, was inspired by the Gregory Peck movie. For this room, you need that richness in the wallpaper.” Also in the open plan are a dining area and kitchen with an island bench that resembles a piece of furniture floating off the floor. Beside the living area is the study-cum-library, which is especially family friendly. “I love doing beautiful studies,” says Greg. “You can turn them into libraries, and books work so well to help create a warm interior.” Angela adds, “We spend a lot of time in here, the kids drawing and studying.” Another distinctive feature of the house are the coffered ceilings in the family areas – Daniel owns a plasterboard company, so it’s not surprising the ceilings are a focus. “We kept everything for the ceilings and walls. They create a grand gesture,” says Greg. The bedrooms have ceilings papered in graphic geometrics for a cocooning effect. Angela is entranced by the results. “It’s like a resort. The home feels fresh and glamorous.” And her favourite space? “Right now, it’s the living room. It’s like a piece of art, it’s not like any normal living room.” She has Greg and Designing Women to thank for that. For more go to gregnatale.com.


SYDNEY HOME

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Oly San Francisco ‘Ingrid’ bed from Coco Republic. ‘Manhattan’ bedside table from Casa Mia. Visual Comfort ‘Helena’ table lamp from Laura Kincade. Kravet wallpaper from Elliott Clarke. The media room has Cole & Son ‘Palm Leaves’ wallpaper from Radford Furnishings. Alexa Hampton for Visual Comfort ‘John’ table lamp from Laura Kincade. In the ensuite, ‘Theoretical’ mosaic tiles from Trend Australasia. Vistosi ‘Diadema’ wall light from Mondo Luce. Christopher Guy ‘Ovum’ mirrors from Laura Kincade. Bedhead in Warwick Fabrics ‘Alderney’. Cushions in Hingham Plaid fabric from Duralee. ‘Richard Nixon’ throw from Jonathan Adler. Piero Fornasetti for Cole & Son ‘Frutto Proibito’ wallpaper from Radford Furnishings. On ceiling, Romo ‘Fougere Octa’ wallpaper in Whitewash from Marco Fabrics. Suzanne Kasler for Visual Comfort ‘Soleil’ pendant light from Laura Kincade. OPPOSITE PAGE Talenti ‘Bend’ sofa from Insitu. Cushions in Schumacher ‘Trellis’ and ‘Peacock Print’ from Orient House. Emu ‘Heaven’ vases from Ke-Zu.

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speed r e a d Having bought a site on sydney’s lower north shore which was occupied by a humble brick bungalow, a couple with two young children engaged interior designer Greg natale of Greg natale design to create a home that embraced their love of all things retro. + With its wide eaves, classic sash windows, palm trees, pool cabana, and orange-sorbet-hued front door, the solid new build references breezy 1950s Palm Beach, Florida. + Greg took his cue for the sparkling and luminous living area from the 1957 movie designing Women, which celebrates Hollywood Regency style. Its white and gold palette contrasts strikingly with the rich and moody media room, which was in turn inspired by a hotel room in the ďŹ lm, Frost/nixon. + Throughout, clean, uncluttered forms are cleverly layered with the ornate and classic.


C o l l e C t o r s’ piece Having assembled a vast array of antiquities and artworks during six years in London, this couple has found a home for them all in their inner-city terrace. PhotograPhs michael wee words david harrison


SYDNEY HOME THIS PAGE Alfie, the family Schnoodle, guards the entrance, which has built-in bookshelves and contemporary artworks by the likes of Aida Tomescu, Sarah Robson, Elwyn Lynn and Caroline Duffy. The circular table is in mahogany and dates from 1820. The Louis XV-style armchair is covered in chocolate suede. OPPOSITE PAGE Margaret’s grandmother’s bureau is a Chippendale design in mahogany and holds a pair of Greek Tanagra figurines. Portrait above dates from 1770.

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he year was 1989, and for Ronan Sulich and Margaret Nolan, landing in London with no jobs and very few belongings was an exciting but daunting way to start married life. It was also the beginning of a lifetime of collecting that ultimately led to the unique mix of ancient and modern art and artefacts that furnishes their sensitively renovated Sydney terrace house. Ronan, now the Australian representative for Christie’s, and Margaret, one of the founder directors of graphic design company The Collective, are happy that everything in their house has provenance, a history or sparks an interesting anecdote. “Margaret and I left Sydney for London the day after we were married. We had sent on one tea chest packed with clothes, a mirror and a cassette player. We came back six years later with a container full of furniture and art!” In London Ronan was taken on by a small auction house in Chelsea called Lots Road. “We had an auction every Monday and I catalogued all the antiques. I later worked out that I had catalogued 80,000 or 90,000 items in my six years there. It was a brilliant way to learn and of course I was able to buy things here and there when I could afford it.” While Ronan rapidly became something of a bowerbird, picking up a wide variety of interesting and low-cost antiques, Margaret was far more realistic about how much they could fit into their tiny Holland Park bedsit. “She managed to curb some of my more ridiculous purchases but it was hard to resist the temptation. We slowly filled our little bedsit to overflowing with battered antiquities and old artworks.” With Ronan’s keen eye for a bargain, he was able to buy and sell to create a slush fund to indulge his passion. The most expensive purchase was £800 for a French armoire that now sits in their upstairs lounge. Several moves later, the couple decided that if they were to have children they would need to relocate back to Sydney. Ronan took a job with Christie’s Australia, and in early 1995 they returned and began the search for a house. A year later they came across a mid-Victorian terrace hidden away in a dead-end street in Darlinghurst. “It was pretty squalid, with bird cages and bird


SYDNEY HOME THIS PAGE The dining room has a pleasant aspect opening onto the courtyard. On the original marble ďŹ replace is a reproduction bust from Anthony Redmile in London. Table came from the former Manning & Manning. The chairs are George III Chippendale bought in London. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Ronan Sulich sits in front of a series of 18th-century Roman views by Piranesi. The upstairs lounge features an oak armoire bought in London. The bust of Zeus is a resin copy of an ancient work. Sofa was bought in London and recently reupholstered in Belgian linen with silk cushions. Portrait is by William Hoare, anked by 17th-century engravings by Anthony van Dyck.

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“We let the house provide a neutral backdrop to all our belongings.”

seed everywhere.” Despite its condition Margaret and Ronan fell in love with both the house and its location overlooking the Domain and CBD. It was, they decided, the perfect place to put down roots and unload the container. “Before we moved in, friends helped us paint over the mishmash of colours and we stripped out the horrible lightfittings. We replaced the knotty pine panelling in the kitchen with a simple plaster ceiling and let the house provide a neutral backdrop to our belongings.” It wasn’t until 2000 that the couple renovated the 70s bathroom and removed the strange spiral staircase that wound its way up inside the back section of the house. This allowed for a third bedroom just in time for the birth of their second child, Elisabeth. Other modest renovations have followed to provide a guest bathroom and remodel the courtyard, but the greatest single improvement, according to Ronan, was to redo the flooring. Limewashed reclaimed blackbutt was laid over the various tiled and badly patched timber floors. “It made the space feel a lot lighter and brighter, and gave the sense of a more continuous and spacious house.” A soft white, Dulux ‘Sandman’, has been used on door frames, walls and windows in most of the house, while the master bedroom is painted in Farrow & Ball ‘French Gray’. Painting some of the woodwork has reduced the ‘sea of cedar’ that many owners of Victorian homes feel compelled to reveal. “We couldn’t live in a Victorian house that had been restored back to its original state. We love the beauty, history and craftsmanship of old things but we don’t want to live in a museum.” 126


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THIS PAGE The upstairs lounge is a more formal entertaining area used by Ronan and Margaret for pre-dinner drinks. The pair of chairs are copies by David Money of ones seen in an issue of The World of Interiors. The portrait (far left) is by Michael Dahl, circa 1690. The hanging brass lantern is in Arts and Crafts style. OPPOSITE PAGE The kitchen is in a simple French bistro style with Thonet chairs and a wall-mounted table. Cooking pots hanging from rails are reminiscent of a commercial kitchen.


THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Contemporary artworks, such as those by Scott Redford (top) and Caroline Duffy (below) in the dining room provide a contrast with all the antiquities. The main bedroom sits in the pitch of the roof and windows to the front and rear (below) provide plenty of morning light. The bed is Empire style in French brass and mahogany. A plaster plaque of Nero from Anthony Redmile in London sits above a teak bench in the courtyard. Framed 19th-century bookplates line the walls in the stairway. OPPOSITE PAGE The library at the front of the house features an original ďŹ replace with a neoclassical plaster plaque from Anthony Redmile. Bronze sculpture is Stormy Weather by Clement Meadmore. The plaster foot is from Peter Walker Fine Art in Adelaide. Small artworks are by the couple’s son Oscar.

WANT MORE?

To view an interview with Ronan Sulich download the free viewa app and scan the entire page.


SYDNEY HOME S P E E D R E A D Ronan Sulich and Margaret Nolan are indefatigable collectors who honed their eye for antiquities and old artworks during a six-year stint in London. + Returning to Sydney in the mid-1990s and working as Australian representative for Christie’s, Ronan has been able to ďŹ nd a spot for all his treasured possessions in the inner-city terrace house he and Margaret bought and sensitively renovated. + Far from being a paean to the Victorian era, the house happily mixes antique and vintage pieces with modern accoutrements, including a collection of contemporary art, for which Margaret, a graphic designer, has a penchant.

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S PE AKS VOLUM ES Expansive size is just one of the many attributes of this sophisticated apartment that is also remarkable for its quiet luxury and restrained design. PHOTOGRAPHS EARL CARTER WORDS CARLI PHILIPS

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THIS PAGE A glass-encased north-facing terrace links the entertainment zone with the casual dining area. KnollStudio table, MDF Italia ‘Flow’ chairs, and Lindsey Adelman pendant light. OPPOSITE PAGE Tundra Grey Limestone tiles create a streamlined feel throughout the apartment. The oculus skylight bathes the space in natural light, while the full-length windows offer panoramic views across Carlton Gardens, the Royal Exhibition Building and Melbourne Museum.


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hat do you get when you cross a global design firm, Australia’s leading multidisciplinary practice, and a sophisticated local architecture studio with an award-winning, seven-star energy-rated development? The result is timeless, resort-style sophistication in one of Melbourne’s most coveted locales. Destined for greatness, this garden apartment was conceived by the dream team triumvirate of Woods Bagot, Hecker Guthrie and Dominic Piccolo of Piccolo Architects who spearheaded the interior architecture. The only penthouse in a boutique block of just 49 in the heart of Carlton, it’s a stone’s throw from the CBD, major landmarks, and the neighbourhood’s Little Italy. Fitting then, that this contemporary residence would look equally at home in Milan or Paris as in the historic streetscape of humble, terracelined Rathdowne Street in Melbourne’s north. Flooded in light from the oculus skylight, the open-plan living area boasts full-height windows with views out to the Melbourne Museum, the Royal Exhibition Building and Carlton Gardens through the oak treetops. This breathtaking view is rivalled only by the home itself, which is accessed via a private lift that opens directly into the penthouse. Oriented to the north, it is gently divided into two distinct zones: private quarters to the west; living areas to the east. At the junction is the first of two internal landscaped areas that Dominic says make the interior feel like an extension of the outdoors. “The internal

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THIS PAGE, ABOVE Minotti lacquered oak table and Maxalto ‘Febo’ chairs furnish the dining area. Chandelier by Barovier & Toso and ‘Taccia’ table lamp, both from Euroluce. Ciatti side table is in satin aluminium. BELOW The design of the apartment has a contemporary European style. “This classic approach ensures an effortless way of living and entertaining,” says Dominic. OPPOSITE PAGE The glass-enclosed fireplace topped by a granite pillar forms the entry to the apartment and acts as a partition.


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“FLOATING CEILINGS, SKYLIGHTS AND THE GLASS-WALLED INTERNAL COURTYARD MAKE THE SPACE FEEL MORE INTIMATE,” SAYS DOMINIC.

THIS PAGE A Mies van der Rohe ‘Barcelona’ chaise longue and Maxalt0 table in the study overlook the internal garden with its Barry Thompson sculpture and landscaping by Trevor James. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT In the kitchen a thick limestone bench in Tundra Grey echoes the flooring throughout. The internal courtyards and floating ceilings make the rooms feel more intimate. Velvet-lined domed ‘Versailles’ chair punctuates the space. The living area features a Maxalto sofa and side table, and a gold Bonaldo coffee table. Teal Ligne Roset ‘Harry’ armchairs from De De Ce add a flash of colour to the neutral scheme.


forms are carefully articulated to give the residents the impression that they are in the garden looking back towards their home,” he says. The internal atrium is enclosed by a glass-walled study, powder room, master bedroom and dedicated steam room. Accessible and visible from all four rooms, this peaceful central sanctuary has been landscaped by Trevor James and showcases a Barry Thompson sculpture and lean cactus alongside disc-shaped stepping stones. Moving from a traditional, suburban family house, the client brief was simple and open ended: neutral stone, natural light, and two large bedrooms, with a clean, minimalist aesthetic that could be layered with new furniture. In the lounge, a Maxalto sofa with oyster-hued cushions is teamed with chrome console tables, punctured by a velvet-lined ‘Versailles’ domed burlap chair and teal Ligne Roset ‘Harry’ armchairs. This carefully considered furniture layout stays true to the apartment’s “opulent yet restrained aesthetic”, says Paul Hecker. Channelling the mood of a luxury hotel suite, an oversized European oak pivot door leads to the spacious private quarters which are textured in a range of rich materials from brushed oak to granite, nickel and leather in tints of kohl, metallic and bordeaux. Functional yet elegant, the master bedroom features a Maxalto ‘Febo’ bed framed by Minotti bedside tables and overseen by a cluster of ‘Stand By’ pendant lights by Aqua Creations. Throughout the apartment, rooms have been created through volume rather than the harsh division of walls. “Floating ceilings, skylights and the glass-walled internal courtyard make the space feel more intimate,” says Dominic. “The idea of the central passage was to create clearly visible pods to formalise entry to the rooms.” Dominic extended this seamless interior design right down to the built-in joinery. “You walk in and you’re uninhibited by light switches, exhausts and plugs,” says the architect, who meticulously conceived everything from recessed hinges to concealed power-points and in-built kitchen appliances. “You appreciate the space more when utilities are hidden.” The result? “A luxurious and streamlined home with premium, hand-picked finishes and customised elements carefully designed according to the client’s needs.”

SPEED R E AD A stellar team of design professionals – Woods Bagot, Hecker Guthrie, and Dominic Piccolo – collaborated on this penthouse on the edge of Melbourne’s CBD. + City views are not the only drawcard – the home has two internal landscaped areas that add to its sense of expansiveness and connection with the outdoors. + Relocating from a suburban family home, the owners specified a neutral palette and a minimalist aesthetic, the perfect canvas for a standout collection of new furniture. + An assortment of tactile and luxury materials from brushed oak to granite, leather and nickel in muted tones lend a sophisticated air.


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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Agape ‘Pear’ basin and Lauren Alessi floorstanding lavatory in the bathroom. Access to the terrace is through automatic sliding glass doors. The brief was to create a resort-style main bedroom. A marble partition separates the bed from the ensuite. Aqua Creations ‘Stand By’ pendant lights hang over the Maxalto bed. Baker ‘Cristobal’ chest is in varnished silver leaf. OPPOSITE PAGE Apaiser ‘Haven’ bath and Zucchetti ‘Bellagio’ freestanding tap set. KnollStudio ‘Platner’ side table. Aqua Creations ‘Sikus’ wall light.

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With a frenetic lifestyle split between Sydney and Aspen, this busy family PHOTOGRAPHS NICHOLAS WATT WORDS TANYA BUCHANAN STYLING STEVE CORDONY

THESE PAGES Wire sculptures from Tracey Deep Floral Sculptures make a statement above a sideboard that the owner bought in London. Leather chairs from Pure and General. Reindeer skin from Les Interieurs. Thomas Eyck knitted blue ottoman. Tom Dixon lamp from De De Ce. Side table from Arida with a pot from Garden Life. Jute rug from International Floorcoverings.


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enjoys coming home to their serene retreat on the northern beaches.

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complete overhaul by interior designer Justine Hugh-Jones has transformed this Palm Beach house from bland box to the perfect chic retreat for the busy Bellotti family who split their time between the US and Australia. Aspen, Colorado, and Palm Beach, New South Wales, may seem worlds apart but the uber-busy Carrie Bellotti happily manages her family’s time between the two – enjoying the active lifestyles both places offer, and seamlessly melding business and pleasure. In Aspen, Carrie owns a yoga, Pilates and spa operation and two retail stores, O2 Aspen. She and financier husband Steve and their two children commute to and from Sydney regularly. Her healthy lifestyle business ventures mirror the family’s life with skiing, paddle-boarding, hiking, surfing and swimming top of their agenda. The family purchased the Iluka Road home in 2011 because of its enviable location – spilling out onto a level waterfront lawn – but the interior needed reworking to make the most of the position and the family’s penchant for watersports and regular entertaining. “The finished product is vastly different from what we started with. It was dark and dated!” Carrie exclaims. “Now it’s open, light, cheerful, beachy and chic.” Carrie’s busy transcontinental existence meant it was imperative that she found an interior designer who shared her style and that she could trust to run the project when she was abroad. “I instantly related to Justine’s sophisticated yet warm style and we worked together beautifully. I trust her without hesitation – she always sources unique pieces and different suppliers from what you typically see in Australia. My goal was to create a comfortable family beach shack for entertaining – with a sophisticated twist.” Justine says, “The most challenging thing for me was the tight turnaround of six months and working without an architect. The work was all internal and didn’t require a DA, but it was a major transformation. Fortunately Carrie makes speedy decisions and she allowed me to hire the builders of my choice – Lovett Building Company – so the project ran very smoothly.”

THESE PAGES, FROM TOP LEFT The study nook in the main bedroom has a bamboo desk from The Country Trader and a chair from Manyara Home. African baskets from Les Interieurs adorn the walls. The living room opens out to the water and is furnished with a Jardan sofa and an Indian daybed from Les Interieurs, with cushions made from vintage saris. Lucite coffee tables from MCM House. Enoki light. Outdoor table from Robert Plumb with lanterns from Dunlin Home.


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“The finished product is vastly different from what we started with. It was dark and dated. Now it’s open, light, cheerful, beachy and chic.”

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THIS PAGE, ABOVE Moroccan stools in the kitchen are covered in a fabric from Tigger Hall and surround a Calacatta marble bench designed by Justine. Moooi light from Space. BELOW The main bedroom has a Jardan ‘Leila’ bed flanked by George Nelson wall lights from De De Ce. John Robshaw Textiles cushions from Ascraft. Bedside tables from Maison et Jardin. OPPOSITE PAGE Alboo chairs from Robert Plumb with cushions in a Christopher Farr Cloth fabric from Ascraft surround a table from The Country Trader in the dining room. Bird photographs by Leila Jeffreys. Baskets from Les Interieurs.


SYDNEY HOME “The house had been built about 15 years ago but lacked any defining characteristics – it was basically a rendered box with metal windows,” says Justine. “We gutted the entire house and reconfigured the interior to get the easy flow it has today. The house also had two kitchens, two laundries and eight bathrooms so we consolidated a lot of space.” The flooring was also redone using Belgique tiles throughout that mimic floorboards. “I prefer using real floorboards but Carrie had used these tiles in her spas in Aspen and convinced me. We installed underfloor heating and it looks fabulous and is easy to maintain. It’s great to have a guaranteed finish as limewashing is such a tricky thing to get right for any floor sander,” says Justine. Elegant yet practical finishes were chosen for easy maintenance and resistance to the wear and tear of waterfront living and regular entertaining. The family are so passionate about their watersports that one of the few things that was retained from the house’s previous incarnation was a hydraulic trapdoor in the living room (covered by a jute rug) that allows all sorts of watercraft to be launched straight from the house to the beach. With such a frenetic lifestyle this serene abode offers a welcome respite from the demands of work and play. “By early evening our son is quick to light the fire pit and it’s pure bliss to fall into the bean bags, drink a glass of wine and watch the sun go down,” says Carrie. For more go to justinehughjones.com.

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speed rea d The owners of this waterside property on sydney’s northern beaches, who divide their time between Aspen and sydney, engaged interior designer Justine Hugh-Jones to radically reinvent the uninspiring home that occupied the site. + The starting point for the design was the location and the view coupled with the family’s busy lifestyle as inveterate entertainers and watersports aficionados. + The proximity to the water’s edge dictated an open, breezy design that maximises the available space and connection with the outdoors. + Justine chose easily maintained finishes combined with casual yet stylish furnishings that help to promote the feel of a serene retreat.

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Pots from La Croix on the terrace. The powder room has a Pozzi Ginori basin from Reece, and marine lights sourced from the US. In the bunk room the tongue and groove ceiling is painted in stripes. Libeco bed linen. Sibella Court handles from Anthropologie. In the sand room, an old railway sleeper serves as a bench seat. Tiles from Onsite Supply & Design. Leather handles by Turnstyle Designs. OPPOSITE PAGE Apaiser bath in the main ensuite with a wall sculpture by Tracey Deep Floral Sculptures.


Q U A L I T Y C O N T R O L The owners of this 1930s home left all the design decisions to the architects – from the furnishings and art to the china and glassware.


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THIS PAGE In the casual living room is a Paulistano leather armchair, ‘Spar’ floor light by Jamie McLellan, and black steel and marble coffee table designed and made by Robson Rak. OPPOSITE PAGE The entry was designed to be luxurious and functional. Geometric rug, credenza and pendant light all designed by Robson Rak. Photograph by Emmanuel T. Santos.

PHOTOGRAPHS SHARYN CAIRNS WORDS CARLI PHILIPS STYLING FIONA RICHARDSON 147


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oogle Robson Rak Architects and you will find endless websites linking to the critically acclaimed four-and-a-half hectare Merricks Farm House that Kathryn Robson and Chris Rak recently designed for clients as a weekender just under an hour from Melbourne. But that is not the husband-and-wife team’s only claim to fame. This project is situated in the elegant inner-city enclave of Toorak rather than the rural terrain of Victoria’s countryside, but the commitment to timeless architecture, quality craftsmanship and materials remains unchanged. Kathryn says the firm tries to avoid creating works that are “too trendy”. “We’re committed to longevity and work that will still be relevant in 10 years’ time. We find that natural, earthy colours enable this. They’re not now, they’re not yesterday. They’re forever.” It’s an approach Robson Rak wholeheartedly employed in the modernisation of this large 1930s home during a 10-month renovation period. Breathing new life into the tired and dated structure, they transformed it into a “fresh, clean, classic yet contemporary home for a busy family of four”. The existing residence had a lot of character, so original cornices, architraves, external window shutters, doors and skirtings were retained. “We designed the interior to create a more sleek look to contrast with these details,” says Kathryn. The home’s layout and room proportions were generous, so aside from a new laundry and butler’s kitchen, no major structural changes were necessary. Initially engaged to redesign the bones of the building, Kathryn says, “This quickly evolved to include the interior design, decoration, and also the landscaping. The clients loved our vision for the hard interior design and wanted us to follow that through to the decoration – all the soft furnishings and art collection, the china and glassware. It was a full redesign of everything.” While there’s no shortage of design classics, with pieces by MAP, Hans J. Wegner, and copper lights by Tom Dixon, the clients championed bespoke pieces. “They

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THIS PAGE In the formal living room, ‘Obi’ coffee table is by Linteloo. The mirror, pendant light and wool/silk rug were all designed by Robson Rak. Brass and steel ‘Base’ lamp by Tom Dixon. Curtains in Chivasso ‘Hot Madison’ and Unique Fabrics ‘Sabi’ in Zinc. OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP The landscaping around the 1930s home was designed by Robson Rak. BOTTOM The casual living area is the heart of the home and has a custom-made sofa in Marco Fabrics ‘Livorno’. Bluestone fireplace surround, shelf and dado. Photograph by Emmanuel T. Santos.


THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT MAP dining table and Hans J. Wegner ‘Wishbone’ chairs in the casual dining area. Painted stainless-steel sculpture by Chris Rak. Bifold windows open up the kitchen to the outdoors to extend the sense of casual living. Banquette cushions in Marco Fabrics ‘Torino’ velvet in Slate. OPPOSITE PAGE An antique walnut table and upholstered chairs that the owners had previously suit the formal dining room. ‘Produzione Privata’ vases by Michele de Lucchi. Custom designed lightfitting by Robson Rak. Artwork Mountain Devil Lizard Dreaming by Kathleen Petyarre.

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“If we could design a lightfitting that worked with this house instead of buying one off the shelf, then we did it.”


“We’re committed to longevity and work that will still be relevant in 10 years’ time,” says Kathryn.

really encouraged the idea of building furniture especially for the house,” says Chris. “If we could design a lightfitting that worked with this house instead of buying one off the shelf, then we did it. That was the approach we took.” A part-time sculptor, Chris fashioned furniture and fittings sympathetic to the original period details of the house, including steel pendant lanterns and tables, fireplaces, sofas, credenzas, mirrors, geometric rugs and even art. “It was amazing – dream clients that were incredibly trusting of our vision,” says Chris. The casual dining and living spaces were united by a new bluestone fireplace and dado with floating shelf. This helped to modernise the room as well as effectively link the two areas. “It was really important to the clients to have a large space where they could entertain informally. There is a separate, more formal room but that’s used infrequently compared to the area which links directly to the terrace.” This spirit of relaxed living continues with bifold shutters above the kitchen sink opening directly out to the pergola. “People can sit outside and relax and still connect with the person cooking inside,” says Chris. The large kitchen counter with Lapalma bar stools invites casual gatherings as well. With two teenage boys, the home was designed to be robust and low maintenance without sacrificing style. Materials such as American oak for the floorboards, stone benchtops, marble vanities and concrete pavers outside were selected for their aesthetic appeal as well as their durability and functionality. The ‘perfect’ clients now have a perfect home to match. For more go to robsonrak.com.au.


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THIS PAGE An antique Chinese stool provides a contrast to the sleek lines of a Kaldewei ‘Classic’ bath, and vanity in Elba marble. OPPOSITE PAGE In the main bedroom, Poliform ‘Angie’ bed and side tables. Ism Objects ‘Kapelo’ lamp by Chris Connell.

SPEED R E AD

The owners of this 1930s home in Melbourne engaged architects Robson Rak to modernise the interior. + So happy were they with the architects’ vision for the interior design that they extended the brief to include all the decoration, right down to the china and glassware, and the landscaping. + The transformation has resulted in a “fresh, clean, classic yet contemporary home”. + The only structural additions to the house were a laundry and butler’s kitchen, and the existing generous proportions were reworked. + The clients championed bespoke, so much of the furniture and fittings were custom designed, resulting in a unique but very livable family home.

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Eclectic d re a m

A neoclassical sensibility and a love of contemporary and indigenous art gives this Melbourne townhouse an inimitable style. PHOTOGRAPHS DEREK SWALWELL WORDS CARLI PHILIPS


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THIS PAGE An eclectic combination of Australian and European art and decor deďŹ nes the living room. A Rosella Namok painting shares a wall with sunburst mirrors from The Country Trader. The 18th-century French chair is upholstered in a Colefax and Fowler fabric. OPPOSITE PAGE The main hallway is decorated predominantly in a neoclassical style with a Louis XVI commode and early 19th-century Italian salon chair, both from Mark Koronowicz Antiques.

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT An abstract artwork by Grahame King (below) sets the tone in the second staircase. Landscapes by C. F. Mudie. Through the doorway is a French gilt gesso mirror dating from the early 18th century. A French Aubusson tapestry from Mark Koronowicz Antiques dominates the main hallway. OPPOSITE PAGE Contemporary paintings by Richard Crichton (top) and Leonard Brown (bottom) enliven a staircase. Two 18th-century French torches from Thomas & Alexander Interiors sit on a French carved wood and gilt console from John D. Dunn Antiques.

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t just works,” the resident of this Melbourne home says simply, referring to his living room’s indefinable melange of eras, origins and styles. Indeed, a 2001 black cherry-hued painting by Rosella Namok presides over a 17th-century Portuguese walnut table, a Regency clock from Ireland, a pair of French chairs and two Spanish mirrors. A house of many contradictions, its incongruity emanates right from the austere, blink-and-you’ll-miss-it exterior, which belies the luxurious, decorative eclecticism within. The street facade was intended to be deliberately confusing,” says the owner, a Melbourne-based architect. “It doesn’t attract too much attention and most people can’t work out if it’s a new office building or just had a makeover. But in actual fact, it’s an entirely new construction.” Formerly the site of a diminutive weatherboard cottage that was, curiously enough, an architect’s office in a previous life, the spacious townhouse took two years to build. This gave the owner ample time to downsize from his sevenbedroom suburban Victorian family home and prepare for the move to a hip, inner-city neighbourhood. “His [the owner’s] former house was very English, very traditional,” says interior designer Christopher Thomas of Thomas & Alexander Interiors, who worked on both properties. “We brought some pieces across and had some furniture reupholstered, but I wanted to instil a fresher approach here.” While the three-bedroom property spans four levels with a basement garage and billiard room, two staircases, elevator, rooftop pool and Parisian garden with a 19th-century French marble bath, it actually sits on a relatively small block. To heighten the sense of space, it was built boundary to boundary with internal courtyards to turn the focus inwards. “As soon as you open the front door, it’s just mind-blowing,” says Christopher. “You’re instantly transported to this amazing place that could be anywhere in the world.” Inspired by a residential Italianate terrace, the biggest of the home’s three courtyards bisects the core of the property and is clad in limestone with emerald


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S P E E D R E A D This newly built townhouse in inner-city Melbourne boasts a split personality with its blend of styles, eras and origins. + Reflecting the owner’s love of the neoclassical period, it is furnished with many antique and classic pieces which are offset by a stunning collection of contemporary and indigenous art. + The owner downsized from a large seven-bedroom home to the three -bedroom property. + A European sensibility pervades the decoration and the three courtyards, although the formality is infused with a lightness that is distinctly Australian. THIS PAGE An early 19th-century Swedish chandelier helps to create a particularly European aesthetic in the formal dining room. Chairs upholstered in a Boyac horsehair. Brunschwig & Fils ‘Loyang’ wallpaper. Landscape by George Grosvenor Thomas. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Classical elements, such as the archway, columns and urns, create an Italianate feel in the limestone-clad courtyard. Street lanterns in the central courtyard. The view from the family room out to the Parisian-inspired garden.

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shutters and street lanterns. An avid traveller, the owner sought to create a vignette akin to that “found down a little street in Florence where families may string their washing across a courtyard or call to one another from opposite sides,” he says. “It extends my imagination to another space.” It is here, in the sun-drenched central courtyard, that the home’s traditional backdrop merges most profoundly with its antipodean sensibility in the form of a large reclining aluminium sheep sculpture by acclaimed Melbourne artist Les Kossatz. True to the spirit of the home, this unpredictable addition firmly and intentionally ties it to Australia, says the owner who was raised on a farm. An existing 15-year working relationship and established rapport with his client ultimately led Brisbane-based Christopher to be given carte blanche over the interior scheme, with freedom to select everything from furniture to wallpaper, fabrics, cabinetry and carpets. Confident of Christopher’s aesthetic flair, the client hadn’t seen anything until the day the trucks arrived and installation began. The only brief: to create a different feel for each room while retaining an overall sense of unity. “I wanted the dining-room Chippendale chairs to look just as good in the living area, or to be able to pick up the hall armchair and happily plonk it elsewhere,” says the owner. While appealing to an overall neoclassical sensibility, Christopher’s ode to Europe is interpretive, as Continental pieces contrast with indigenous and mid-20th-century contemporary art. It’s an ongoing project that sees both client and decorator in constant contact, together with local antiques dealer Mark Koronowicz, who sourced many of the home’s unique pieces, such as the 17th-century French Aubusson mythological tapestry in the hallway. “It’s bursting at the seams with beautiful things,” says Christopher, who successfully created a gentle web of unexpected finishes, furniture, textiles and colours. “There’s formality to a degree but there’s also lightness,” he says. “Everything flows effortlessly, nothing jars or screams at you. It’s charming and gracious but also comfortable. I think it’s very Australian.” For more go to thomasandalexander.com.


A new steel framework fitted with floor-to-ceiling glass shows off the home’s amazing sea views. Vintage leather sofa from The Country Trader. Coffee table custom-made by Brian Hoy and pewter Moroccan tray from Brian’s store, Drawing Room Theory. Knoll ‘Platner’ lounge chairs bought in New York but also available from Dedece. Ponyskin rug from US leather company Spinneybeck. Floors in oak from Precision Flooring.

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O C E A N S A PA R T A London-based family’s Sydney retreat is opened up to scene-stealing views and reworked in slick, dark materials that bring a new mood to its bleached beachside surrounds. PHOTOGRAPHS MICHAEL WEE WORDS CHRIS PEARSON


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wo worlds tantalisingly merge in this beach house with a difference on Sydney’s northern beaches. It’s owned by a globetrotting Australian businessman, recently based in New York, but now posted to London. For him, his partner and his five-year-old daughter, the four-bedroom home, set among gum trees and soaking up spectacular Pacific views, is a grounding sanctuary, oceans away from his professional life. Being here is like returning to his childhood, an experience he wishes to share with his daughter. “I want her to have some of the amazing memories I have of growing up on the northern beaches.” And to create new memories in this special home, which he likens to being on an ocean liner. “The first time I walked onto the property, I had the sensation of being on a boat,” he says. “There was just ocean before me, uninterrupted by roofs.” The house was a plain Jane, however, with structural columns on the facade elbowing out jaw-dropping vistas. “They completely obstructed the view,” says designer Brian Hoy of Brian Hoy Design, hired to steer a major renovation. Not only miserly with its greatest asset, the Hamptons-style house was unremarkable, with cladding on the top two levels and rendered brick on the lower two. The owner wanted to sidestep a conventional beach retreat, instead applying an urban style for some serious coastal cool – opting for chic, moody charcoals and blacks. “I wanted something clean, modern, sophisticated and unique – different from the softer beach-house-style homes in the area,” he says. As well as maximising the view and the indoor-outdoor spaces, he asked Brian to make the top floor “special and just mine”, with an office and a living room, and to create a pool area “where people never feel guilty about spilling a drink. We love entertaining and having kids around, so the house needs to cater to both.” The original house was gutted, with a new steel framework removing the need for columns on the facade, which now boasts sheer walls of floor-to-ceiling glazing. Brian extended the top level to create a vast parent retreat, with a main bedroom, ensuite, sitting area and study, revamped the living areas below and added a second bathroom to the two bedrooms on the next level. 162


THIS PAGE The facade is clad in zinc on the two upper levels, which soar above the deck, with banks of sliding doors opening the rooms to the seaside setting. Black ottoman on deck from Interstudio. OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP LEFT The pool room, with its boiler table from The Country Trader includes stools custom-made by Brian; ‘W1’ mixer tap from Boffi Studio. The slate kitchen island bench in the open-plan living area echoes the dark natural stone used elsewhere, such as on the stairs, landings and the pool, from Bisanna Tiles. The house tightly hugs its dramatically steep site.


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palm beach home In the breakfast room, which abuts the pool, are a modular sofa and cushions all custom-made by Brian. Throw rug from Angelucci. ‘Acquatinta’ pendant lights above the table are from Format Furniture. Wall lights from Light Project. The external walls are in rough-sawn timber and plaster.


Meanwhile the lowest level, now the breakfast room, with its wall of stackable glass panels connects seamlessly with the pool. And, on a newly created landing between the third and fourth levels is a cosy library, a halfway point between the public and the private sectors of the house. The look is “fluid and organic, moulding itself to the client,” says Brian. The classic, slick aesthetic – he avoids dubbing it masculine – features a black and charcoal palette, steel, slate, leather and animal skins, with the pièce de résistance a massive studded steel table adapted from an industrial boiler in the pool room. It’s typical of the element of surprise throughout. “It’s clean and simple but with flourishes of rich details, such as the four-poster bed, the Louis chairs, the large leather chesterfield in the living room and the 1970s French dining table,” says Brian. Horn motifs and rich leather seating reference a club aesthetic, while a porthole in the study is a cheeky reference to the nautical. Renowned French designer Christian Liaigre, with his layering of textures and tone on tone, inspires Brian and it’s a style well suited to this home. “Here, it’s all about the view, so I kept a tight palette,” he says. “Grey pulls it back to slick. The owner likes dark stone, so we used black slate in the pool, and on the staircase and landings.” It’s complemented by a dramatic black stripe running across the living-room ceiling. “I often use coffers in ceilings to accentuate the length of a room and for a three-dimensional effect,” says Brian. So what lures the owner halfway across the world to his seaside retreat? “It can be a quiet sanctuary one minute and a place for entertaining the next,” he explains. “It’s like a tailored suit. It just fits perfectly. That, and the view is never the same two days in a row.” For more go to brianhoydesign.com.


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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT A solo French leather chair from The Country Trader keeps it quiet in the library. Serge Mouille ‘Lampadaire’ lamp from Corporate Culture. The steel sculpture, a prototype for student project, was bought from Mitchell Road Emporium. A photograph of Versailles by Felix Forest adds its impressive proportions to a corner of the main bedroom. Lamp by Filip Sawczuk, from Mitchell Road Antique & Design Centre. ‘Caspian’ stool by Brian Hoy. Silk rug from Whitecliffe Imports. A striking retro ‘ibex’ table bought at auction and Thonet ‘Cafe Daum’ chairs repainted black delineate the dining room. Photograph by Bill Henson in the living room. OPPOSITE PAGE The study abutting the main bedroom sports a ‘Platner’ chair from De De Ce, a desk light by Filip Sawczuk, from Mitchell Road Antique & Design Centre, and a photograph of the Guggenheim bought by Brian in New York.

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SPEE D R E A D

+ A globetrotting businessman hired Brian Hoy of Brian Hoy Design to transform a humble Hamptons-style beach house into a stylish, sophisticated retreat. Unlike the original house, it had to make the most of a jaw-dropping view. + The entire shell was gutted and structural steel inserted, removing the need for columns along the ocean side of the house, which had interrupted the spectacular vista. Floor-to-ceiling glazing was installed on the ocean side. + The top oor was extended to create a sweeping personal retreat for the owner that includes a bedroom with a massive four-poster, a spacious ensuite, sitting room and study. + Brian has furnished the home in a slick, dark aesthetic using materials such as metal, slate and leather on a neutral palette.

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PALM BEACH HOME THIS PAGE To avoid the heaviness of a conventional barbecue on the balcony beside the living area, Brian integrated an AEG-Electrolux Teppan Yaki hob within a customised table. Cappellini ‘Felt’ chair from Vampt. OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP The main bedroom with ensuite separated from the sleeping area by glass is a luxe space, taking in vast views of the Pacific. Reproduction Henry II bed, Louis XVI-style chairs, coffee table and side table are all from Drawing Room Theory. BOTTOM The ‘Terra’ bathtub, ‘PHC’ freestanding washbasins, ‘Pianura’ wall cabinet and ‘Disko’ taps are all from Boffi Studio.


DIGGI NG d eep Featured in this extract from Myles Baldwin’s Australian Coastal Gardens, Simon Houghton has carved out an exciting garden on his Tasmanian property, daisychaining it with ponds to reflect the glory of the plantings. PHOTOGRAPHS SUE STUBBS WORDS MYLES BALDWIN


TASMANIA GARDEN THESE PAGES From here, you can see how the design mimics the natural progression of an intercoastal lake system meeting the sea.

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every garden has a story... our team of designers, architects and horticulturists are reshaping outdoor living. ďŹ nd your story with us.

+61 2 9362 3333. anthonywyer.com

design. construct. maintain.


TASMANIA GARDEN THIS PAGE, TOP Agave americana and Aloe plicatilis. BELOW The chapel for all creatures great and small flanked by an echium in full flight.

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rriving at Hawley Beach at low tide you stand on the shore and look across at the long stretch of sand to Bass Strait. Stones and rocks, mounded on the beach to form fish traps, create pools and weirs with the escaping tide to catch dinner. Due east is the Narawntapu National Park and beyond that the mouth of the Tamar, running down to Launceston. ItÕs a peaceful place not far from Devonport and an ideal setting for one of the great gardens of Tasmania. To tell the truth, I was very excited about getting to the north coast of Tasmania; IÕd never been to a north coast before. We have plenty of coasts here, but no-one really goes to the northern coastline of Australia, do they? Apart from Darwin, I donÕt know of any other towns on that coast, and I do know you sure as hell canÕt swim there! Standing on the beach, admiring the view and weird sense of northern oceanness, you can be excused for not noticing one of AustraliaÕs largest oceanfront gardens, hidden behind a roughly mounded earth bank, a thicket of trees and a boulder retaining wall. But thatÕs the way Simon Houghton, the creator of this wonderful garden at Hawley House, likes it. SimonÕs an interesting eccentric who has moved mountains to create a garden in the family home his parents purchased in 1948. Originally a Victorian cottage dating back to 1878, the house has a rambling history (much like its architecture), first as a family home for a retired army officer, Major Dumbleton, then as an occasionally rented cottage. Following that, a retired soldier bought it as part of the World War One Soldier Settlement Scheme, and used it as a farm and guesthouse until 1942, when it was sold to the Douglas family. Simon describes his parentsÕ purchase of the property from the Douglases as more for the scenery than the house, and that they caused great controversy when they embarked on a Ômodernisation schemeÕ to install power and indoor plumbing, and expand the staff quarters. But despite their efforts to turn the old Victorian pile into a home, they didnÕt do much to the garden; from what I can gather, it just wasnÕt their kettle of fish. SimonÕs parents, Colonel and Mrs Houghton, tried to pretty the landscape with bulbs, which, as Simon puts it, gave it a look of Ôwild abandonmentÕ. SimonÕs passion developed from seeing the world, travelling throughout Europe, the Americas, and Asia. Working as a broker and a geologist, taking 173


TASMANIA GARDEN

THIS PAGE, TOP Looking back to the house over the saline pond. BELOW Water iris, salix and Ulmus parvifolia aren’t the typical coastal plants.

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in what the world has to offer, he developed an idea to create a garden – a great garden – at Hawley House. The house was there, it was in a wonderful location, the stage was set. Simon’s vision for Hawley is nothing short of a Brownian landscape. The advantage of having grown up on the property, understanding the effects of the wind and the poor condition of the soil, Simon bolstered pine and eucalypt screening trees to protect the garden from what can be brutal northwesterly winds, and embarked on a soil improvement scheme that would make a quarry look like a sandpit. Knowing that he had limited topsoil depth, Simon excavated a series of pools and lakes, removing the topsoil from the new pond locations to create higher ground and, more importantly, a deeper soil profile. The newly excavated areas were filled with water sheeting off the surrounding land and from nearby springs. Not only designed for visual pleasure, the lakes became an important element in keeping consistent moisture content in the soil and to fulfil Simon’s dream of having his own trout. From the front of the house, you look across two lakes terracing down to the ocean. Looking out to sea, the lakes draw the water closer to the house, extending the view and drawing the eye to the horizon. The carefully positioned banks look a little odd in plan but greatly extend the planting area and are an interesting intrusion in the middle ground. Looking towards the sea, the final bank in the pond complex is also designed to screen the road, and is home to a grey garden featuring mainly agave, teucrium and echium, underplanted with flowering gum, grevillea and buddleja. The end result is a subtle garden that finishes the view, without creating too big a distraction to ruin it. Behind the stable and dairy at the back of the house is a wonderful water garden of lilies and iris surrounding a pond fed from a rockery rivulet. Fruit trees, perennials and a low-hanging salix provide even more interest and romance, and a relaxed path leading around the pond makes you want to hop and skip over fallen plants and past spiders’ webs. Like bunches of cabbage, one of my favourite groundcovers, bergenia, billows under a camellia. From the water garden, a path leads through to a fabulous caged-in orchard of figs and stone fruit, a must for any rural person looking to grow edible plants that are also loved by parrots and other birds. Escorted by the family dog, and strolling past peacocks, the garden tour opens onto an expanse of lawn flanked by specimen trees, a small pond


TASMANIA GARDEN THIS PAGE TOP A little overgrown yet horticulturally exciting, this combination of plants is where Gertrude Jekyll meets Ganna Walska’s Lotusland. BELOW Simon’s unique planting style sees Cordyline stricta towering over echium, Aloe maculata and lavender.

and stunning shrubbery borders of echium, aloe, cordyline, wormwood and lavender. The trees include birch, elms, oaks, zelkova and liriodendron through to a mass of Californian redwoods and mixed conifers. Simon’s idea was to have a garden that would display a full range of autumn colour, be shady in summer and let in winter sun. I visited during late summer, when shafts of light streamed through the canopy of now very mature trees in full leaf, and your attention’s drawn to the long drifts of lawn, which become the main feature as they snake past the shrubbery borders. A supposedly blank space – in this case, the lawn – can be the most beautiful element in a composition. Walking through the garden with Simon, listening to how and why he created the landscape, you can also see a man whose thinking has evolved. As we moved further away from the house, the idea that a garden is something beautiful to be viewed, or to be a part of, has fallen by the way and the idea that a garden is a home for wildlife, a centre of biodiversity and wellbeing has taken over. This may have culminated in the purchase and transporting of an old timber chapel Simon installed on the northern flank of the garden, backed by a forest of eucalypts and facing a wildlife pond massed with alders, birch and hawthorn. The All Creatures Church, as Simon refers to it, features a ground-hugging floor so that ‘all walks of life can enter, whether they walk, crawl, hop or slither’. Fortunately nothing slithered when we were there. Past the chapel, the northwestern corner of the garden is enclosed by a melaleuca forest and wetland. A new garden, it is inspired by the natural vegetation in the Narawntapu National Park, a vegetation zone not uncommon in coastal dune systems, but I’d say not too commonly cultivated on the north coast of Tasmania. Through this Simon has carved a very rustic dirt path that takes you on a tour past pocket vistas and the forest’s best trees. Through the trees the view opens to a beautiful still lake, and should you not watch your step, you’ll find that you could be standing in the lake, as small pools form around many of the paperbarks. Looking through at the water lapping up around the base of the trees, and watching swamp hens, ducks and waders go by, picking and pecking at aquatic bits and pieces, you can’t believe you’re looking at a man-made setting. Simon quietly refers to this part of the garden as his greatest achievement. It’s close to what he set out to accomplish, a Brownian landscape, taking an existing landform and transforming it into a picturesque rendition of a natural setting. This is an edited preview of Australian Coastal Gardens by Myles Baldwin, photographer Sue Stubbs, published by Murdoch Books, October 1, 2013, rrp $89.99. To read our book review, see Library, p109. 177


PHOTOGRAPH BY MARK ROPER

Celebrating arts and flowers in Adelaide and Daylesford, we trip around our island continent to sample a sublime selection of ultra-luxe accommodation. Then it’s time to fly: Beverly Hills, Hong Kong and New York here we come.

POETIC INTERPRETATIONS of the landscape in a mesmerising work by artist Colin Pennock and the artistry of Adelaide Flower House take a bow at a Belle art dinner in Adelaide at Vincenzo’s Cucina Vera. For more see Menu, p183.

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TRAVEL HONG KONG Words by JACK MILENKOVIC

Mood indigo

Hong Kong’s newest boutique hotel reflects its colourful setting. AS A HONG KONG FIRST-TIMER , I definitely felt a sense of the high life in this designer-label-obsessed city when I entered the boutique Hotel Indigo in Hong Kong Island’s Wan Chai. In contrast to the dramatic marble foyers of Central’s global hotel chains, the Hotel Indigo is 100-per-cent old-school Hong Kong. The 138-room property is located on Queens Road East, right next to the Tai Yuen Street market, and shoulder to shoulder with the other narrow towers that make up the historic and culturally rich Wan Chai district. From the goldfish bathmats, which are a symbol of prosperity, to the wall murals of 1950s street scenes, the hotel’s design flair takes its cue from the intriguing and dynamic neighbourhood. The building is ‘wrapped’ in a striking gold dragon that functions as an eco-screen to counteract hot spots and harness solar power. The rooftop Skybar is a sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of the streets below, and is surrounded by a glorious infinity glass-bottomed pool, with a thrilling overhang, and outlook to the green hills and skyscrapers, including Opus Hong Kong, the 12-storey twisting residential tower designed by Frank Gehry. The real dragon pearl of my trip is the location: there’s so much to see and do on foot in every direction once out the front door (the strip of Queens Road East and the adjacent side streets really showcase the quirky design district). A five-minute walk from the hotel is the MTR train station which, in one or two stops, will take you to the major tourist areas. During my travels through the neighbourhood I find myself inspired by the colour blue. The nearby Blue House underlines the indigo theme. The 20s icon was born when a public housing project was painted blue, utilising surplus paint from the government’s water supplies department. The Indigo hotel chain’s position nearby was pure serendipity. The hotel equips guests with maps and directories of top things to eat, drink, see and do. It also offers a smartphone (for about $8 a day) to make local calls (yes!), and use free data connection to access the internet (yes!), aiding me in all my exploring efforts (yes!). I asked Bryan Gabriel, the hotel’s general manager, what sets Hotel Indigo apart in this area that’s brimming with potential. “Hotel Indigo is bringing something special to the neighbourhood of Wan Chai and to Hong Kong,” said Bryan. “What is the real standout is the grassroots engagement we have with the intriguing and culturally rich neighbourhood, where you can visit many of the city’s newest art galleries, restaurants and shops.” It’s chaotic and invigorating on the streets, yet there is a superb juxtaposition with the composure of the hotel. There is no way of feeling blue here! Jack Milenkovic was a guest of Cathay Pacific, travelling in its new premium economy service (cathaypacific.com), and Hotel Indigo (hotelindigo.com).

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Infinity glass-bottomed pool juts out from the building. Spectacular lighting in the atrium. Guestrooms are sleek and well appointed, with such quirky blue-themed touches as figurines. The building is ‘wrapped’ in a gold dragon ‘screen’, part of its environmentally friendly design.

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King Island, Tasmania

The perfect rainfall for the perfect milk for the perfect cheese. King Island locals will tell you that it’s much more likely to rain here after dark. With brilliant sunshine by day it means incredibly lush grass for our cows. The sweet milk they produce creates the perfect ingredient for some of the ďŹ nest cheeses on earth.


MENU FOOD VINCENZO’S CUCINA VERA RECIPE EDITOR CHRISSY FREER

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Art lovers gathered in Adelaide at a dinner to celebrate artist Colin Pennock and his lyrical impasto paintings inspired by nature. PHOTOGRAPHS MARK ROPER WORDS TANYA BUCHANAN

Simple elegant arrangements of orchids and freesias by Adelaide Flower House graced the table, picking up on the palette of Colin’s poetic works.

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WOOD-ROASTED PLUM PUDDING SUCKLING PIG WITH ROMANESCO BROCCOLI ALIO OLIO PEPERONCINO SERVES 8

2.5-3kg pork shoulder, bone in, rind scored 25g sea salt ½ lemon 2 heads Romanesco broccoli, trimmed, cut into small florets 60ml (¼ cup) olive oil 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 1 long red chilli, deseeded, thinly sliced

1 Preheat oven to 220°C or 200°C fan forced. Place pork into a large roasting tray. Rub salt and lemon into pork rind. Roast in oven for 20 minutes, or until rind crackles. Reduce oven to 180°C or 160°C fan forced. Continue to roast for 1 hour, or until pork is cooked to your liking. 2 Place broccoli in a large roasting dish, drizzle with the olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and scatter with the garlic and chilli. Cover with foil and roast for 20 minutes or until tender crisp. Serve with the roasted pork. Note: This recipe has been adapted as a whole suckling pig was used for the photo shoot. To cook suckling pig, allow 1 hour per 2.5kg meat, either in oven or over coals on a spit.

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t was destination Adelaide for the most recent Belle reader art dinner sponsored by Belle Property, featuring a decadent feast at acclaimed local restaurant Vincenzo’s Cucina Vera, on Unley Road in stylish Parkside, accompanied by an engaging conversation with abstract painter Colin Pennock. Scott Livesey, Colin’s Melbourne-based gallerist, grew up in Adelaide and has a strong connection to the food and artloving city so he was delighted to be involved in bringing Colin and his paintings home for a different audience to enjoy. Colin’s stunning impasto works were hung throughout the lovely little villa that is home to Vincenzo’s. Painted with considerable gusto using a wet-on-wet technique of thickly layered oils, the finished works still manage to exude a delicate quality and convey a sense of serenity and calm. Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony kept the rest of the restaurant interior simple, working with local florists Adelaide Flower House to choose elegant blooms, including cymbidium orchids and freesias, that would complement the art. Vincenzo’s Cucina Vera is owned by chef Vincenzo LaMontagna and run by him and partner Lara Marro. A meal at Vincenzo’s is a fabulous gastronomic experience but requires a fair bit of trust as Vince creates the menu from what is available and refines it until the last minute. On the night we dined, he presented a sumptuous menu featuring an entree of red deer consommé, venison marrow agnolotti, braised venison cheek and moss salt, accompanied by Logan Chardonnay 2011 and Pinot Noir 2012. Main was a delicious wood-roasted plum pudding suckling pig with romanesco broccoli, accompanied by the Logan Ridge of Tears Shiraz 2011, and the delicious finale was a tartufo of vanilla gelato, winter truffle crumb and spiced potato zeppole with Logan Moscato 2012.


MENU RED DEER CONSOMMÉ, VENISON MARROW AGNOLOTTI, BRAISED VENISON CHEEK & MOSS SALT SERVES 8

BONE MARROW CREAM 1kg venison osso bucco 1 tablespoon finely grated Parmesan 75ml sour cream

VENISON CONSOMMÉ 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small carrot, peeled, diced 1 small onion, chopped ½ clove garlic 60ml (¼ cup) Madeira 2 juniper berries, lightly crushed 1 bay leaf 1 clove

BRAISED VENISON CHEEK 1 kg venison cheeks 2 tablespoons olive oil 750ml (3 cups) venison stock 20g dried porcini mushrooms

PASTA 250g ‘00’ flour 2 large eggs, plus 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature Moss salt, to serve

1 For the bone marrow cream, use the end of a wooden spoon to gently push the bone marrow out of the meat. Place marrow in a bowl of salted iced water to soak for 20 minutes, or until marrow is pearl white. 2 Strain marrow, place in a small saucepan with 250ml (1 cup) water over a medium-low heat. Cook until marrow has rendered and water has evaporated. Set aside to cool to room temperature. 3 Place rendered marrow, the Parmesan and sour cream in a food processor. Process until smooth, season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Transfer to a small bowl, cover and refrigerate for 20 minutes. Place mixture in a piping bag, set aside in fridge until ready to use. 4 For the venison consommé, preheat oven to 200°C or or 180°C fan forced. Place venison osso bucco in a large roasting tray. Roast in preheated oven for 30-35 minutes, or until golden brown.

5 Meanwhile, heat olive oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Cook carrot, onion and garlic, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until golden. Add roasted venison, then add Madeira to deglaze the pan. Add the juniper berries, bay leaf, clove and enough cold water to cover the venison. Simmer gently for 2 hours, skimming any impurities off the top of the consommé. Strain, season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside. 6 For the braised venison cheek. Preheat oven to 160°C or 140°C fan forced. Remove silver membrane from upper side of cheek with sharp knife and season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a medium-sized flameproof casserole dish with a lid over a medium heat. Cook cheeks until golden brown. Add the venison stock and porcini. Bring to a simmer, then cover and place in oven for 2 hours, or until meat is very tender. 7 For the pasta, place the flour in a large mixing bowl and make a well in the centre. Break the eggs and yolk into the centre, begin mixing them with a fork, incorporating the flour into the eggs. When the mixture starts to come together, transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead until smooth (about 10 minutes). 8 Cover dough with a clean, dry cloth and set aside at room temperature to rest for 1 hour. Roll dough out through a pasta machine, starting dough on the thickest setting and continue to feed dough through each setting to the thinnest one. The pasta should look smooth and have elasticity. 9 Using a 3cm-diameter cutter, cut rounds from the pasta sheet. Take the bone marrow cream and pipe the size of a 10-cent piece in the centre of each round. Dip your finger in water and run it around the bottom edge of the pasta circle, fold pasta over to form a half-moon shape and press to seal. Place pasta on trays lightly dusted with flour. Place in freezer until ready to use. 10 To serve, bring a large saucepan of lightly salted water to the boil. Cook the agnolotti, in batches, for 2-3 minutes or until pasta is al dente. Divide pasta between serving bowls, pour over some hot consommé, top with some braised vension cheek and sprinkle with moss salt.

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Red deer consommé and venison marrow agnolotti. Guests lapped up the ambience. Logan wines flowed, including the pinot noir. Belle’s Neale Whitaker hosted the evening. Chef Vincenzo LaMontagna and Lara Marro. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Wood-roasted plum pudding suckling pig. Tartufo of vanilla gelato. The dining room. Colin Pennock in front of Back along the Ridge.

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MENU TARTUFO OF VANILLA GELATO, WINTER TRUFFLE CRUMB AND SPICED POTATO ZEPPOLE SERVES 8

VANILLA GELATO 500ml (2 cups) milk 250ml (1 cup) thickened cream 1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped 6 egg yolks 155g caster sugar

CHOCOLATE SPONGE 90g (¼ cup) unsalted butter, melted 1 egg 110g (½ cup) caster sugar 150g (1 cup) plain flour 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted 1 teaspoon baking powder A few drops of vanilla essence 180ml (¾ cup) milk

WINTER TRUFFLE CRUMB 200g winter truffle, grated 1 chocolate sponge

SPICED POTATO ZEPPOLE 2 large potatoes, scrubbed, skin on 150g (1 cup) plain flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1½ teaspoons caster sugar 2 eggs ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract Vegetable oil, for shallow frying 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 30g (¼ cup) icing sugar, sifted

1 For gelato, put milk, cream and vanilla in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Bring to scalding point. Set aside to cool for 5 minutes. 2 Meanwhile beat egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl until thick and pale. Gradually whisk in the cream

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mixture. Return mixture to a clean saucepan and cook, stirring, over a low heat until the custard thickens and coats the back of a spoon. 3 Pass mixture through a fine strainer, place in a bowl over an ice bath and chill completely. Churn the ice-cream in an ice-cream machine to the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer ice-cream to an airtight container; freeze until ready to use. 4 For the sponge, heat oven to 180°C or 160°C fan forced. Grease and line a 9 x 19cm (base) cake tin. 5 Put melted butter, egg and sugar in a large bowl and beat with electric beaters until well combined. Sift flour and cocoa powder, add to butter mixture with vanilla and milk. Beat for 1-2 minutes until smooth and thick. Spoon into prepared tin. Bake for 25 minutes or until a skewer inserted in centre comes out cleanly. Set aside to cool on wire rack. 6 For crumb, place chocolate cake and truffle in a food processor. Pulse until a crumb consistency. Set aside. 7 For zeppole, steam potatoes until tender. While hot, peel and discard skins. Place hot potatoes in a large bowl. Beat with electric beaters until fluffy. Sift in flour and baking powder, add sugar and pinch of salt. Stir in eggs and vanilla, gently mixing until a sticky batter forms. 8 Heat oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Drop 4-5 tablespoons of batter into oil at a time. Fry for 3-4 minutes, turning halfway through, until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon. Drain on kitchen paper. Mix cinnamon and icing sugar. Dust warm zeppole with spiced sugar. 9 To serve, roll scoops of gelato in the truffle crumb mixture to coat. Serve with the warm zeppole.

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Artist Colin Pennock and wife Katrina. The simple, elegantly styled dining room offered the perfect backdrop to the artist’s exuberant nature-inspired abstract paintings. Fresh flowers by Adelaide Flower House.

During dinner, Belle’s favourite art expert and super conversationalist, Michael Reid, instigated a casual discourse with Colin about his life, work and journey to Australia. Colin discussed his early years in Northern Ireland and his first job as a policeman during a time of constant turmoil. His work from this period was mainly focused on drawings. At 21, Colin left the police force and Ireland, and headed for London, where he was given a four-year scholarship to Saint Martin’s School of Art from the mid to late 80s. A relatively itinerant existence was punctuated by a stint in New York, which he left after 9/11 – the whole experience had a profound effect on him and led to his abandoning drawing in favour of abstracts. “I found that I was no longer comfortable drawing figures and responded better to telling the story with brushstrokes,” recalls Colin. His nomadic instinct brought him to Australia where he ultimately found a place to call home in the tropical hinterlands near Noosa. There, he paints from a studio on a friend’s property with the lush landscape and wildlife providing plenty of inspiration. “Colin Pennock’s landscapes paint an emotion of a place and time fondly remembered. There is a sense of urgency to his colour energy paintings. There is a physical need for the landscape; a desire for the ravishing,” says Michael Reid. And a ravishing evening it was – with fine art, delicious food and wine, and very creative company.


For those who ďŹ nd joy in the detail.


FOOD LOUNGE Edited by HARRY ROBERTS

HAVANA BALL!

A garden of earthly delights awaits in an unlikely CBD location, in Sydney’s Clarence Street. Soaked in Cuban style, The Lobo Plantation (left) serves up Caribbean cocktails in a decadent salon-like setting, with tasty eats from The Food Society, Darlinghurst, to match. thelobo.com.au

CHINA SETTING Shanghai design practice Neri&Hu has concocted a sublime scheme for the Jean Georges-helmed eatery, Mercato (above). Located within Three On The Bund, the space couples bistro elements with rugged concrete and salvaged timber. threeonthebund.com

In Monaco, design duo Humbert & Poyet has staged a stylish setting at Mozza (above), an Italian bar and restaurant inspired by Martin Scorsese’s mise-en-scène. Exposed brick, leather banquettes and industrial accents lend a gritty vibe. mozza.mc

LIG H T & FR O TH Y Chandon is toasting the Australian summer with a limited-edition bottle design (above left). The sparkling wine is ideal for a sun-drenched soiree. chandon.com.au Coffee king Pablo & Rusty’s has arrived in Sydney’s CBD (above), hot on the success of its four existing caffeine hits. Chic, Brooklyn-inspired interiors are the brainchild of Giant Design. pabloandrustys.com.au

IT’S ALL GREEK Worshippers of great style and fabulous Greek fare will be in god-like company at Alpha Restaurant, an impressive new venue spearheaded by celebrated chef Peter Conistis. Set within the historic former Hellenic Club in central Sydney, this food emporium, cantina, meze bar, cafe and restaurant exudes Grecian modernism, with its whitewashed interior and elegant appointments. alpharestaurant.com

T E R R A CO TTA A U STR A L I S

Gazi in Melbourne is the latest offering from restaurateur George Calombaris. Its edgy, stripped-down spin on classic Greek dishes is reflected by an interior (above) with ink-splattered walls and a whimsical ceiling of upturned terracotta pots. gazirestaurant.com.au

QUICK BITE WITH KATE WHITE DIRECTOR OF CATERING COMPANY KATERING

Best food experience? My husband and I took our family to Thailand. In Bangkok, we went to Moon Bar for cocktails and ‘mocktails’ with our children, aged 16 through to seven. Then we dined at David Thompson’s Nahm. It was a pleasure to watch my children extend their palates. Tipple of choice? Billecart-Salmon Rosé, but most nights I settle for a vodka! Culinary influences? Christine Manfield for her desserts and Maggie Beer for things old and romantic – little birds, poached quince and verjuice! Katering philosophy? Attention to detail and a passion for great food. No two events are the same. Favourite creative collaborations? Working with a product or design house lets us be creative, from intimate French-inspired dinners with Damien Pignolet to cocktail events for 1000. What’s exciting right now? Delicate presentation, pretty edible flowers and sleek natural materials to present food on. katering.com.au

PHOTOGRAPHS BY GEORGINA EGAN (THE LOBO PLANTATION), AGENCE VERONIQUE LOPEZ ( MOZZA), PEGENAUTE (MERCATO), DAVID WHEELER (PABLO & RUSTY’S)

Best bites Delicious design titbits to savour.

BENCH PRESS

PS... HIGH LIFE Chairs are shifting on the Sydney dining scene, with Claude’s closing after 37 years. Owner and chef Chui Lee Luk has a more casual vision for her next venture, on a site vacated by The Bentley Bar, while Bentley’s former owners will focus on their other venue, Monopole. 188


LIO0049_BE2

From a big impression to the most subtle of details, Lucy Feagins – founder of acclaimed design blog The Design Files – has a wonderful eye for the special and unique. Like Lucy, our winemakers at Petaluma take pride in sharing something truly exceptional in every bottle they craft. Fine wine and fine design have never looked so perfect together. For a taste of what makes a meticulous wine and to view the entire 2013 Meticulous Design Collection as selected by Lucy Feagins, scan the code or visit PetalumaMeticulous.com.au


Night owls Aficionados of Joshua Yeldham’s art were out in force in Daylesford.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The Tongue Has No Bone. Spirit of Motherwood. Fiona Biondi, Anne Walker, Katrina Walker. Neale Whitaker, Barbara Hermon, Steve Cordony. Flowers by Prunella. Joshua Yeldham, Judy Doughty and Cat-Owl Cotton Tree Bay.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANTHONY SCIBELLI

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ne of Australia’s most admired landscape painters, Joshua Yeldham, was the guest artist at a recent Belle Reader Art Dinner at The Argus Dining Room at Peppers Mineral Springs Retreat, Daylesford. It was a chilly winter’s evening but that didn’t stop a horde of Yeldham fans making the trek from around Australia to hear Joshua speak about his life and the inspiration behind his beautifully detailed and mystical works. Guests enjoyed a sumptuous menu created by The Argus Dining Room executive chef David Willcocks, featuring a main course of Birch Estate lamb loin with heirloom carrots, garlic, salted lemon and coriander, matched perfectly with the Logan Ridge of Tears Altitude 870m Shiraz 2010 and the Logan Pinot Noir 2012. The elegant dining room, designed by interiors guru Stuart Rattle, a friend of hotel owners Chris Malden and Wayne Cross, was dressed by Belle interior design editor Steve Cordony, and featured fabulous floral arrangements by botanical stylists Prunella using locally grown blooms. Belle art expert Michael Reid led Joshua in conversation as he recalled the journeys he has undertaken to achieve what he has in art and life. The audience was captivated by tales of life-changing events that took him from an unacademic boy lacking in confidence, who was bullied at boarding school, to his position today as one of Australia’s foremost landscape painters. The lively chat was accompanied by inspiring photographs and imagery. Joshua’s very personal memoirs cover every detail, including the origin of his obsession with painting owls when he and his wife Jo were trying to conceive. Thinking the mystical owls which surround his Hawkesbury River studio were somehow responsible for stealing their fertility, he started painting them. Now the proud parents of two children, the owls have become fertility symbols in his work. As owners of a Yeldham artwork will attest, up close the work is multi-dimensional, magical and intense, with a quintessential Australian flavour. “Josh Yeldham’s art meanders across the land. His paintings, drawings and watercolours are in search of insight and tranquillity. His is not a passive journey, for Josh physically grapples with his artworks. He gouges into and sculpts his landscapes, working his surfaces as a farmer ploughs the land.” says Michael Reid.


READER DINNER MENU

Words by TANYA BUCHANAN

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The elegant Argus Dining Room. Jo and Joshua Yeldham. Guests enjoy the menu. Blue Blessing – Yeoman’s Bay. Susie Livesey, Barbara Hermon. Solitude and Water – Mud Island. Mark Elmowy, Peter Hanscomb. Wayne Cross, Greg Mallyon, Josh and Jo Yeldham. Midnight Owl – Mud Island.

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A dazzling lineup of new and improved LUXURY ACCOMMODATION in the cities, on the coast and in the outback of Australia is putting the lust back into domestic wandering.

Escape TRAVEL SPECIAL

WORDS KENDALL HILL

THIS PAGE Amid burntorange trails etched into the grounds of its wild and remote site, Berkeley River Lodge delivers unsurpassed luxury to the steamy North Kimberley landscape.

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BERKELEY RIVER LODGE, WA

WHERE IS IT? A speck on the remote north Kimberley coast, 150 kilometres from the nearest town and only accessible by floatplane from Kununurra. WHEN DID IT OPEN? The resort, comprising 20 luxury villas, opened its doors in the 2012 dry season. WHAT’S THE VIBE? Indulgent isolation. The resort’s villas have been built atop a 65-metre sand dune that straddles the Berkeley River and Timor Sea. Each has a sun-drenched deck and private, open-air bathroom. Red-earth paths connect the accommodation to the main lodge, with its 20-metre lap pool parked above the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf. There is no phone signal, so the only distractions are dolphins, turtles and the occasional dugong. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? For the serenity. Or the activities. Or both. The ocean meets the outback here, so there is no shortage of options for exploring the great outdoors. The lodge’s guides are on hand to lead hikes along the ferrous-red Berkeley River gorge to Casuarina Falls and identify (croc-free) waterholes for a cooling dip. The deck of the main lodge doubles as a moonlight cinema. WHILE I’M HERE … Have the kitchen pack a picnic lunch. Then hitch a ride on the helicopter to a secluded escarpment above the Berkeley River. Kimberley Coast, Western Australia; berkeleyriver.com.au.

1 CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The deck at Berkeley River Lodge doubles as a moonlight cinema. Each villa sports an open-air bathroom. Casuarina Falls. The Lodge overlooks the Timor Sea. Lord Howe Island offers ample opportunities for visitors to get back to nature.

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ARAJILLA, LORD HOWE ISLAND, NSW

WHERE IS IT? Tucked behind Old Settlement Beach on World Heritage-listed Lord Howe Island, about 700 kilometres due east off the mid-NSW coast. WHEN DID IT OPEN? Arajilla Retreat’s six Banyan Suites debuted in September, the last stage of a full renovation of the 25-year-old resort that includes four new Kentia suites and a pair of two-bedroom Arajilla suites. WHAT’S THE VIBE? Rainforest chic. Shaded by kentia palms and banyans, the resort offers intimate accommodation for a handful of guests among the treetops. Facilities include the newly renovated restaurant (all meals included) and day spa, and mountain bikes for DIY excursions around the island. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? The north-facing Banyan Suites all have mezzanine lounges where guests can commune with the birds beneath the forest canopy. The richly timbered interiors are light and airy; louvred windows capture breezes in Lord Howe’s eternal spring climate. Botanical themed cushions, bedspreads and rugs by Julie Paterson of Cloth Fabric channel the island vibe. WHILE I’M HERE … Kick off the shoes and relax. Lord Howe is a sleepy paradise of rainforest and beach walks, surfing, watersports and the submarine delights of the planet’s southernmost coral reef. Lagoon Road, Lord Howe Island; lordhowe.com.au


WHERE AUSTRALIA [3]

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“A HUON PINE BATH TUB ON THE DECK ENCOURAGES INDOLENCE BENEATH THE STARS.”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Avalon City Retreat’s ‘Omnipod’ cube hovers above Hobart atop a tower block. Bedrooms are kitted out with king beds and cashmere blankets – as well as stunning cityscapes from the deck. A shady mezzanine lounge at Arajilla. Leafy views from the ensuite. Lord Howe Island.

AVALON CITY RETREAT, TAS

WHERE IS IT? In downtown Hobart, perched on the seventh storey of a 1963 Dirk Bolt-designed office tower, with penthouse views over St David’s Park to the Derwent River and beyond. WHEN DID IT OPEN? April 2012 (it was christened with a small wedding). WHAT ’S THE VIBE? The latest addition to developer Brett Torossi’s portfolio of exceptional holiday inns (Avalon Coastal Retreat, Rocky Hills Retreat) is a sleek, modular cube dubbed the Omnipod. This 17 metre-long jewel box of Tasmanian oak and steel hovers above the city, its glass walls capturing panoramas in every direction. A Huon pine bath tub on the north-facing deck encourages indolence beneath the stars. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? It’s quite possibly the ultimate short-stay apartment. Mesmerising views aside, the retreat has two identical ensuite bedrooms (king beds, cashmere blankets) and a raft of thoughtful extras. Entertaining is encouraged – either an outdoor BBQ or an indoor feast combining the kitchen’s well-stocked pantry, Scholtès oven and custom-made 3.3 metre Huon pine dining table. WHILE I’M HERE … Stroll down to the Brooke Street Pier Wharf and catch the ferry to MONA, David Walsh’s remarkable riverside museum, and grab a table at Garagistes, Hobart’s restaurant du jour, before it changes hands in 2014. Macquarie Street, Hobart; avalonretreats.com.au/city.

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“RETREAT DECKS OVERLOOK THE CHAMBERLAIN RIVER, SPOTLIT AT NIGHT FOR EASY VIEWING.”

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Corrugated iron roofs stamp El Questro’s three Cliffside Retreats with a strong sense of place. Laser-cut steel screens offer complete seclusion. Silky oak and spotted gum line the interiors.

CLIFFSIDE RETREATS, EL QUESTRO, WA

WHERE IS IT? El Questro is a 400,000-hectare wilderness park in the eastern Kimberley. WHEN DID IT OPEN? The three Cliffside Retreats, designed by 2010 Global Sustainable Architecture Award winners Troppo Architects, opened in 2012. WHAT’S THE VIBE? El Questro Homestead has long been the best address in the rugged Kimberley area, but these three guest pavilions above the Chamberlain Gorge add a new level of privacy. Landscaped grounds connect the retreats to the homestead proper, with its swimming pool, tennis court and gourmet dining. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? The retreats are nestled behind walls of Kimberley sandstone and laser-cut steel screens for complete seclusion. Indigenous artworks, silky oak and spotted gum finishes, and corrugated iron roofs convey a strong sense of place; daybeds, outdoor baths and feather-top bedding satisfy higher needs. Retreat decks overlook the Chamberlain River, spotlit at night for easy viewing of frolicking crocodiles and catfish. WHILE I’M HERE … The best way to get a sense of the Kimberley’s vastness and diverse beauty is from the air. Hail a helicopter to visit the 15 cascades of Amaroo Falls, or take the station’s plane to see the UNESCO-listed Bungle Bungle Range in Purnululu National Park. Gibb River Road, The Kimberley; elquestro.com.au.

SKYCITY LAGOON WING, DARWIN, NT

WHERE IS IT? On the Darwin beachfront, just a few minutes’ drive from the CBD. WHEN DID IT OPEN? The city’s first five-star beach resort debuted midway through 2012. WHAT’S THE VIBE? Urban resort. Suite interiors are cool and shady (a blessing in the Top End’s torrid heat) with contemporary interiors styled like city apartments – all neutral earthy tones, polished stone and timber finishes. Ground floor suites open to individual sundecks on the mint-green lagoon. Several so-called super villas are out of bounds for mere mortals – they’re reserved for the casino’s high rollers. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? Aside from having the Top End’s only swim-up pool bar, and a 30-metre manmade beach for croc-safe sunbathing and swimming, the lagoon wing is the closest place to a city oasis in this steamy capital. The neighbouring casino is an eyesore but flourishing tropical garden surrounds add a soothing note. Pampering awaits at the adjoining Endota spa. WHILE I’M HERE … Walk along the shore to Mindil Markets for a colourful insight into Top End nightlife. Gilruth Avenue, Mindil Beach, Darwin; skycitydarwin.com.au.

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WHERE AUSTRALIA [6]

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KINGSFORD HOMESTEAD, SA

WHERE IS IT? On the fringe of the Barossa, less than an hour’s drive from Adelaide. High-flyers are welcome to use the helipad. WHEN DID IT OPEN? Once the set for the Nine Network’s rural soap McLeod’s Daughters, the homestead was bought by the Ahrens family in 2009, thoroughly renovated and opened as a small luxury hotel last year. WHAT’S THE VIBE? Landed gentry. Completed in 1856, this stately Georgian pile has been prized by a succession of noted Australians, among them media magnate Kerry Packer and the Angus family (of beef fame). The honeyed sandstone mansion sits on 90-hectares of rolling hills and eucalypts beside the North Para River. Six suites inside the house and a seventh in the separate Stonemasons Cottage have interiors that mix glossy antiques and period touches with modern comforts like spacious ensuites. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? Kingsford offers a taste of pioneer history without the privations. The atmospheric cellar once held captured bushrangers but now hosts degustation dinners, complete with fine regional wines. Pricing covers evening meals and country breakfasts in the heritage dining room. Walking trails over the hills, picnics and sheepdog demonstrations occupy the days. Drinks and canapés are de rigueur at sunset. WHILE I’M HERE … Landmark Australian wineries including Penfolds and Yalumba are just down the road. Don’t miss them. Kingsford Road, Kingsford; kingsfordhomestead.com.au.

CRYSTAL VILLAS AT CROWN TOWERS, VIC

WHERE IS IT? The 16 Crystal Villas occupy the uppermost floors of the riverfront Crown Towers in central Melbourne. WHEN DID IT OPEN? The villas were unveiled last year, fresh from a $20 million makeover. WHAT’S THE VIBE? Corporate mogul at play. Crown’s go-to design guru Blainey North has lavished the 220/sqm spaces with countless luxuries including suede wallpapers, Eames desk chairs, hand-carved Axminster carpets and Brunschwig & Fils crocodile-print leathers. Villas are themed according to world cities – Milan, New York, Miami and London – but panoramic Port Phillip Bay views anchor them firmly in marvellous Melbourne. WHY WILL I LIKE IT? Villa indulgences extend to private gym, spa and sauna, full bar, butler kitchen and customised remote controls that put guests in charge of every convenience, from window shading to karaoke selections. Butlers are on call 24 hours for everything else. WHILE I’M HERE … Explore riverside bars and eateries, frock up for a performance at Hamer Hall or wander the gorgeous King’s Domain parklands. 8 Whiteman Street, Southbank, Melbourne; crownmelbourne.com.au.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A winding trail leads up to the Kingsford Homestead. Suites mix contemporary objects with antiques. Each Crystal Villa is themed to evoke a world city. Suede wallpaper and mirrored cabinets add their texture and gloss to a Crystal Villas suite. Bathing new and old: at Crystal Villas and Kingsford Homestead.

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PACKED WITH PANACHE

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1 Molami leather headphones, $360, from matchesfashion.com. 2 Orlebar Brown ‘Terry Towelling’ polo, $195, from Harrolds. 3 Chloé resort 2014. 4 Orlebar Brown ‘Setter’ swim shorts, $240, from Harrolds. 5 ‘Tiroupointe’ pétanque set, $1265, from Hermès. 6 ‘Avalon’ travel blanket, $1615, from Hermès. 7 Exception Ultime ‘Ultimate Time Solution’ eye and lip cream, 15ml, $127, from Thalgo. 8 ‘Lillypilly, Eucalyptus & Tea Tree’ handwash, $29.95, from Leif. 9 Foundwell ‘Asprey’ travel bar set, $2880, from Mr Porter. 10 ‘X LaLesso’ print espadrilles, $48, from Soludos. 11 ‘Rio’ sunglasses, $405, from Prism. 12 La Prairie ‘Skin Caviar’ luxe sleep mask, 50ml, $355, from David Jones. 13 Nicole Lobegeiger ‘Voyage’ eye mask, $85, from Becker Minty. 14 Bric’s ‘Pininfarina’ 55cm suitcase, $435, from Hunt Leather. 15 Natalia Brilli toiletry case, $495, from Becker Minty. 16 Thom Browne Gold Round sunglasses, $850 from Harrolds. 17 ‘Caviar’ Rose Damascena Mist, 100ml, $107, from Kerstin Florian. 18 ‘Haut à Courroies’ bag, $13,795,from Hermès. 19 Hermès spring 2013. 20 ‘Jet Set’ travel kit, $41, from Aesop. For stockists see Address Book.

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PRODUCED BY HARRY ROBERTS. PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID WHEELER

LEAVE THESE BEHIND AND YOU WILL BE GROUNDED, STYLEWISE.


TRAVEL PASSPORT Edited by HARRY ROBERTS

MA STER STR O K E R EV I SI TED Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Chicago swansong is now home to a dazzling new Langham Hotel (left). With sweeping views of the windy city, the former IBM Tower hosts a deluxe spa retreat, 316 generously proportioned suites and an opulent lobby conceived by the modernist master’s own grandson, interior designer Dirk Lohan. langhamhotels.com

ROCK STAR Baccarat has crystallised its creative vision on a supreme scale with the unveiling of its glittering New York hotel and residences (right). Conceived in collaboration with Starwood Hotels and design luminary Tony Ingrao, the hotel boasts sumptuous interiors and a blue-chip address that behoves the iconic French design house. baccaratresidencesny.com

Ticket to ride Jet off to one of these heady destinations. PINK P LUS Courtesy of designer extraordinaire Adam Tihany, the private cabanas and pool terrace at the Beverly Hills Hotel (below) have undergone a facelift befitting a Hollywood legend. Shaded by towering palms, the beloved ‘Pink Palace’ flaunts a new Cafe Cabana with Califocused fare delivered to your striped sun lounger. beverlyhillshotel.com

I N U N I O N With its haute bohemian styling, Hyatt Union Square (above) touts a youthful vibe in sync with its East Village locale. Interior designer Paul Vega took cues from the creative environs, as each suite is decked out with its own eclectic panache, while reeling in vibrant urban vistas. hyatt.com

A SH ORT STAY W IT H NI CK TO BI AS

MOUNTAIN HIGH A dreamlike escape in South African wine region Stellenbosch, Clouds Estate (below) has been reimagined by Suzy Vissers, wife of Moooi CEO Casper Vissers. A dramatic backdrop is only half the story for the villas that dot a mountainside, now dressed in Moooi magic. cloudsestate.com

PRINCIPAL , TOBIAS PARTNE

MA R K TWO

Ian Schrager has revealed the sequel to his Edition hotel concept, first seen in Istanbul, with a glamorous London Edition (above). The hotelier has instilled the establishment with the noirish decadence of an English gentlemen’s club, suavely updated for the modern-day hedonist. editionhotels.com

RS

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PS... CITY CITES Louis Vuitton city guides (left) have welcomed a stylish facelift. Fifteen luxe locations have been stamped with the LV treatment,

including a new Sydney survey, introduced by actress Miranda Otto, with a rollicking 24-hour round-up of the city’s sights. louisvuitton.com


“A Perfect Day Out…” Belle Magazine

SYDNEY CENTENNIAL PARK, SAT 16 NOV 2013 BRISBANE DORRINGTON PARK, SAT 24 NOV 2013 MELBOURNE ALBERT PARK, SAT 30 NOV 2013 PERTH LANGLEY PARK, SAT 7 DEC 2013 ADELAIDE VICTORIA PARK, FRI 13 DEC 2013

Hospitality packages and tickets can be purchased on www.polointhecity.com


ON THE TOWN

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– a model line-up wears Hardy Bros jewels and the latest Bianca Spender. 6 Kate Waterhouse 7 Deborah Hutton 8 Marie Bashir 9 Robbie and Gai Waterhouse 10 Timothy Oulton launch at Coco Republic Melbourne 11 Anthony Spon-Smith 12 Guests at the Timothy Oulton launch at Coco Republic 13 Peter Schaad, Morgan Parki 14 Beth Finckh, Simone Haag 15 Frank Spikker 16 Louise Olsen, Stephen Ormandy 17 James and Hayley Baillie 18 Adam Worling, Kelly Hume 19 Danika Windrim, Guy de Rivoire 20 Tanya Buchanan 21 Neale Whitaker, David Novak-Piper 22 Andrew and Mark Moffitt 23 Blooming marvellous: Bollinger Rosé makes a dazzling entrance.

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Luxe motors, hidden jewels and Champagne rule. HARDY BROTHERS hosted a decadent dinner in its Sydney vault, complete with an après-dinner parade of gorgeous girls wearing Hardy Bros jewels and pieces from Bianca Spender’s new collection. Bollinger unleashed its delicious Rosé on an appreciative crowd at a secret underground bar in Sydney’s George Street. Coco Republic Melbourne launched its Timothy Oulton store with a very stylish Brit-themed soirée. Dom Pérignon chef de cave Richard Geoffroy hosted a sparkling dinner at Est to unveil Dom Pérignon 2004 – a Champagne the esteemed house considers one of its finest vintages ever. Fabulous fashion photographer Nick Leary showcased his latest venture, Nick Leary Collections, to a capacity crowd at a party at MCM House. Range Rover lifted the lid on the new Range Rover Sport at a star-studded Sydney party. Nespresso splashed out with a megawatt dinner to celebrate the arrival of the U milk frother. 23

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY BELINDA ROLLAND (DOM PERIGNON & RANGE ROVER), DARREN LEIGH ROBERTS/DLRPHOTO (NESPRESSO)

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“ I can remember opening it in 1982 in Melbourne and hoping that one day I would be influential enough to be on those pages. I love the fact that it’s Australian and more than world class, the world’s best.

Neil Perry on Gourmet Traveller

Inspiring chefs for more than 45 years


Buyers’ market Make a statement with these fine things for your home. From a timeless clock to furniture that exudes comfort, you’re sure to find something that suits.

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1 Schots’ Italian full grain buffalo leather is the most soft and supple leather in its range. The lack of heavy processing and colouring results in the leather possessing a timeless quality and character. www.schots.com.au 2 BoConcept The new range of butterfly extension tables from BoConcept features an edgy design and a refined mechanism which allows each table to be opened and closed easily with one hand. www.boconcept.com.au 3 Sheridan Adding a layer of tactile sophistication to Sheridan’s luxurious linen collection, the 100% linen embroidered Francoise cushion takes inspiration from an heirloom piece of cross-stitch needlework. www.sheridan.com.au 4 Domayne Introduce an element of vintage glamour to your living space with the Verdi antique clock. Beautifully finished in distressed turquoise shades, this fashionable piece works wonderfully in any surroundings, whether attached to the wall or positioned casually on a chest or mantelpiece. www.domayne.com.au 5 Sixhands Australian textile brand Sixhands embodies the fusion of handcrafted design and contemporary technologies. Its latest Essentials wallpaper collection is Australian designed and printed on eco-friendly, non-woven paper (10m x 70cm). www.sixhands.com.au 6 Napoleon’s new Auto Pilot BBB Cream SPF30 is a happy hybrid of HD foundation, an anti-aging moisturiser and sunscreen. The beauty-boosting balm is light enough for a fresh-faced look, yet it boasts enough coverage to perfect and correct an uneven skin tone. Free of parabens, mineral oil and fragrance. www.napoleonperdis.com 7 King Furniture has designed and manufactured contemporary, award-winning furniture since 1977. The new King Cloud three-seat leather sofa offers unsurpassed comfort and contemporary style. Engineered TouchGlide® controls allow each headrest and recliner to be independently adjusted for personal comfort. www.kingfurniture.com 8 Hermon & Hermon’s Baila spheroid chandelier featured on The Block. The white ash timber and worn black iron framed pendant is available in three sizes. www.hermonhermon.com.au 9 Camerich Furniture A multi-use coffee table, storage unit and seat, the Drum is perfect for the space- and style-savvy punter. Covered in microfibre or leather and topped with a walnut or lacquer lid. Visit www.camerich.com.au


PROMOTION

Kitchen & Bathroom From state-of-the-art kitchens and quality tiles to striking stemware and all you need in home appliances, feast your eyes on this month’s eclectic collection.

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1 WONDERFUL KITCHENS From the classic French provincial look to modern, open-plan kitchen designs, Wonderful Kitchens custom designs the hub of the home to suit your style, budget and lifestyle. www.wonderfulkitchens.com.au 2 DILORENZO For quality, choice and inspiration, visit DiLorenzo where the possibilities are endless. DiLorenzo’s Taiga range of porcelain tiles is inspired by the type of wood found in the Boreal Forest across North America. It is available in four colours, two sizes and an external finish. www.dilorenzo.net.au 3 CAESARSTONE Displaying a unique blend of earthy tones and delicate infused veins, Caesarstone’s supernatural designs are inspired by some of the world’s most beautiful natural marble. www.caesarstone.com.au 4 KALDEWEI sets the standard in modern bathrooms. Created by Sottsass Associati, Milan, Kaldewei’s Classic Duo Oval 3.5mm steel enamel bath with moulded panel is designed for the ultimate in luxury bathing. www.kaldewei.com 5 NORITAKE Since 1904, Noritake has brought beauty and quality to dining tables around the world. Handmade in Italy, Noritake’s Fantasy range features a set of six stemmed goblets in a mixed collection of colours. Tumblers and bowls are also available within the range. www.noritake.com.au 6 WINNINGS offers an extensive range of products from more than 50 leading brands. Create your own professional quality cooktop combinations in the Wolf Integrated Modules range. Available at Winning Appliances stores. www.winningappliances.com.au/category/cooktops/ 7 REECE Australia’s leading name in bathrooms presents the latest in retractable mixers with the Zoom range from Teknobili. This Italian designed and manufactured tapware merges precise angles with advanced mechanics to create an alluring and technically innovative design. www.reece.com.au 8 FREEDOM KITCHENS believes in making your kitchen the best on the block. Freedom’s personalised design consultation service provides a dedicated and experienced Freedom Kitchens’ designer who is available to meet you in your own home and discuss your style needs and requirements. www.freedomkitchens.com.au 9 RIEDEL In 2013, Riedel celebrates the 40th anniversary of the iconic Sommeliers collection, which revolutionised wine glasses through its varietal-specific design. www.riedelglass.com.au


Stone Italiana Benchtops Distinctively... Different


KITCHENS pages of

Exclusive interiors

PHOTOGRAPH BY NICHOLAS WATT

FROM AUSTRALIA’S LEADING ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNERS.

JUSTINE HUGH-JONES ALEXANDER & CO DAVID HICKS ENOKI SARAH DAVISON SCOTT WESTON NEXUS DESIGNS HECKER GUTHRIE MICHAEL BECHARA STACEY KOUROS ALEXANDRA KIDD Change of mood: the kitchen in this Palm Beach, Sydney, home (see p138) lightens up with a crisp Calacatta marble bench, custom-designed by Justine Hugh-Jones, surrounded by Moroccan stools covered in a citrus-toned fabric from Tigger Hall. Moooi light from Space. 211


KITCHEN STYLE

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Trend INDIGO AND WHITE This page: 1 ‘Hybrid Piatto Piano’ plate. seletti.com. 2 Porcelain charger plate. cooteandco.com.au. 3 Glazed plate. thecountrytrader.com.au. 4 ’Elegance Stripe’ wallpaper. eurowalls.com.au. 5 Ceramic ginger jar. mcmhouse.com. 6 eb&ive ‘Lagoon’ bowl. ebandive.com.au. 7 Malcolm Greenwood porcelain cups. koskela.com.au. 8 Nespresso ‘Maestria’ cofee machine. delonghi.com.au. 9 Falcon Enamelware tumbler. koskela.com.au. 10 eb&ive ‘Lagoon’ bowl. ebandive. com.au. 11 Grey cup. thecountrytrader.com.au. 12,13 Ceramic mortar and pestle in Dune, bottle in Cobalt Blue. lecreuset.com.au. 14 Ceramic pot. koskela.com. au. 15 Ming-style ginger jar. thecountrytrader.com.au. 16 Antique mortar and pestle. thecountrytrader.com.au. 17 Ceramic vase. macleayonmanning.com. 18 Tom Dixon Eclectic ‘Stone’ candleholder. dedeceplus.com. 19 Silver bowl. beckerminty.com. 20 Asian After Work book by Adam Liaw. hachette.com.au. 21 Casserole in Cobalt Blue. lecreuset.com.au. 22 Pierre Frey ‘Macao’ cotton in Bleu de Chine. milgate.com.au. 23 Popham Design ‘Zigzag’ tiles in Midnight and Milk. onsitesd.com.au. 24 Ceramic ginger jar. macleayonmanning.com. 25 English dropside mahogany table c1810. thecountrytrader.com.au.

STYLING BIANCA ISGRO. CREATIVE DIRECTION JACK MILENKOVIC.

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great-tasting “For BRITA filtered water. ” ®

Gary Mehigan, celebrity chef

90 Degrees Neck WD 3020 Swan Neck WD 3030

STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

An icon in many families' kitchens for years, BRITA® taps into a refreshing new way of drinking filtered water. THERE’S NOW AN EVEN EASIER way to get filtered water, thanks to BRITA®‘s new 3-Way Water Filter Dispenser. The new 3-Way Water Filter Dispenser is ideal for new kitchens or renovations – you can have your kitchen looking great and look after yourself at the same time. Your kitchen tap is used throughout the day for drinks and meals. The filter sits below the sink and delivers great-tasting water for six months.

It’s available in hardware and electrical outlets and is easy to change. You don’t have to drill your benchtop as BRITA®’s 3-Way Water Filter Dispenser replaces your existing tap. Gary Mehigan, restaurateur, leading chef and MasterChef judge, knows the importance of using the best ingredients to make the best meals, and filtered water is an important one. It also improves the flavour and aroma of your coffee, tea and drinks.

Square Neck WD 3040

45 Degrees Neck WD 3010

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or unfiltered water Filter change reminder Easy to change the filter yourself Kit includes water filter, all components and a dispenser


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PASTEL PASTICHE

1 Porro ‘Gentle’ leather and timber chair. porro.com. 2 ’Aquarella’ glazed ceramic tiles in ‘Antique Green’, ‘Celery’ and ‘Petal Blue’. bettertiles.com.au. 3 ’Meltdown Grape of 8’ pendant lights. cappellini.it. 4 ’Neo’ round board. cittadesign.com. 5 knIndustrie ABCT casserole with mahogany lid. timberandtonic.com.au. 6 ’Wing’ flooring tiles. bolon.com. 7 Blå Station ‘Dent’ moulded ashwood chair. chairbiz.com.au. 8 S&B ‘Gradient’ tea towels. hay.dk. 9 ’Maya Votive’ bowl and ‘Alfie’ candleholders. countryroad.com.au. 10 Gufram ‘Novecento’ table, in timber or Corian. architonic. com. 11 knIndustrie WhitePot cookware. timberandtonic.com. au. 12 Marimekko ‘Loistava’ candleholder. marimekko.com. 13 ’Jumbled’ cup and saucer. t2tea.com. 14 ’Niagara’ glassware. noritake.com.au. 15 ’Linear’ SFPA140 oven. smeg. com.au. 16 ’Barbry’ oak tray. georgjensen.com.au. 17 ’Jackman’ American oak stool. temperaturedesign.com.au. 18 Zimmer artwork, by Kirra Jamison. kirrajamison.com. 19 ‘Happy Bar’ FAB10H fridge. smeg.com.au. 20 ’Press Pendant’ PET plastic light. greatdanefurniture.com. 21 Large ‘Beetle’ resin bowl. dinosaurdesigns.com.au. 22 ’Kaleido’ metal trays. hay.dk. 23 ‘Soulmates’ jars, in Petrol Blue and Kiwi. villeroy-boch.com/ en/au. 24 Paint, in colour ‘Rock Salt’. porterspaints.com.au.

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KITCHEN STYLE

PAINTERLY PASTELS Brushstrokes of delicious colour lend a decorative touch.

Photographs by HEIDI LERKENFELDT 217


“THE TALL ATRIUM CEILING AND LARGE SLIDING WINDOWS PROVIDED A BLANK CANVAS.”

FACT FILE

Interior design JUSTINE HUGH-JONES DESIGN Joinery Custom-designed polyurethane with scoop-style cutouts by Justine Hugh-Jones Design. Storage solutions Lots of drawers, a pantry cupboard and an appliance shelf. Low-level joinery was extended along the length of the kitchen. Benchtop Honed Aren Gris from Onsite. Splashback Popham tiles in Warm Grey and Milk in a fretwork pattern from Onsite. Sink Franke Planar PPX 151 undermount sink from Winning Appliances. Tapware Icon+ mixer A67.08. LH in Brown Bronze from Astral Walker. Oven Ilve Siena P90 oven from Winning Appliances. Rangehood Quasair 900HL-1 rangehood from Winning Appliances. Lighting Artemide Nur Suspension pendants from Artemide. Davey wall lights in Bronze, all from Dunlin Home. Dining table and chairs Zuster. Stools BCN Wood from Fanuli. Flooring Existing kauri pine floorboards stained in a warm grey. For stockists see Address Book.

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KITCHEN JUSTINE HUGH-JONES

COOL MOROCCAN

Natural finishes complement serene hues and strong lines. DE SIGNER Justine Hugh-Jones: “This was a total renovation of an existing kitchen and dining space in a federation family home in Sydney. The tall atrium ceiling and large sliding windows provided a blank canvas. The brief was to design a contemporarystyle kitchen with a dining space and island that flowed to the living area and garden.” W h a t l u x u r y i t e m d i d y o u c h o o s e fo r t h i s k i t c h e n re ga rd l e s s o f b u d ge t? “The Artemide Suspension Nur pendants were an obvious design choice as they’re contemporary but their aged coppery finish adds an element of warmth and character to the large space and they provide huge impact.”

Photograph by WILL HORNER


KITCHEN ALEXANDER & CO

INNER-CITY BRILLIANCE

Natural light and raw textures create a bold new look.

Photographs by MURRAY FREDERICKS D E S I G N E R Jeremy Bull: “The kitchen within this Sydney terrace was a central anchoring element that connected the traditional sections of the house with the new alterations. The backdrop is a wall created from harvested and reused bricks, salvaged during demolition, as well as a five-metre long skylight that mirrors the benchtop. The ground-level bathroom and laundry are concealed behind a wall of full-height joinery cabinets that contain the pantry and ovens.” What luxur y item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “The basaltina stone and the Barazza cooktop.”


FACT FILE

Interior design ALEXANDER & CO Joinery Custom-made two-pack finish in Dulux White on White by Captive Cabinetmaking. Benchtop/splashback Basaltina stone from Quality Marble & Granite. Bianco Matt Spanish handmade tiles from Bisanna Tiles. Recycled beam from Ironwood Australia. Sink Oliveri Sonetto 1050U sink from Cass Brothers. Tapware Brodware Neu England mixer from Cass Brothers. Oven Miele H4212B from Winning Appliances. Cooktop Abey Barazza LABH900-3 cooktop from Winning Appliances. Lighting Brass halogen swivel spotlights from Magins Classical Lighting. Mr Cooper pendant light from Coco Flip. Flooring Tongue n Groove European Oak in Sienna from Precision Flooring. For stockists see Address Book.

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KITCHEN DAVID HICKS

VICTORIAN SPLENDOUR Subtle embellishments enliven a streamlined design. FACT FILE

Interior design DAVID HICKS Joinery Two-pack finish in Dulux Vivid White, underbench drawers clad in stainless steel, silver-backed mirrors on overhead cupboards, all by E & C Joinery. Storage solutions Inside the full-height cupboards are wire shelving and baskets for improved access. Benchtop Polished Nero Marquina marble from Corsi & Nicholai Australia. Rear bench in stainless steel. Splashback Corian in Glacier White from Dupont. Sink Abey undermount sink from Elite Appliances. Taps Vola KV1, Vola T1 and Vola 2500T1, all from De De Ce. Cooktop Miele KM417 cooktop from Elite Appliances. Lighting Vintage Murano chandelier. Flooring Antique oak floorboards stained in Black with satin polyurethane finish by The Salvage Company. For stockists see Address Book.

Photograph by SHANNON M C GRATH D E S I G N E R David Hicks: “This kitchen was designed for a young family of four. The brief was for the kitchen to be streamlined, modern and practical, with lots of storage. Subtle, embellished detail was incorporated, such as the mouldings on the vast wall of built-in cupboards and the turned-timber legs on the island bench. These elements add to the architecture of the original Victorian house that has been renovated and extended.” What luxur y item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “The curved legs on the island bench were custom-spun and provide a bespoke element to the kitchen. We could have used any legs or none at all, but these were a luxury addition to the design.” 223


KITCHEN SCOTT WESTON FACT FILE

Interior design SCOTT WESTON ARCHITECTURE DESIGN Joinery Marblo cladding in Chalk M110A and Opal NOL3/WP1875-1 by Marblo and Norford Industries. Abet embossed laminate in Silver 2705 from Abet. Joinery conceals a Liebherr fridge, Gaggenau oven, Miele rangehood and Bosch dishwasher, all from Winning Appliances. Storage solutions Häfele and Blum. Lighting Turbostrip on C-Bus in the circular bulkhead, and ECO13 recessed LED downlights with dimmable driver, all from Superlight. Flooring European oak parquetry in a chevron pattern by European Timber Floors. For stockists see Address Book.

NAUTICAL ALLUSIONS Art Deco ocean-liner design inspires innovative ideas. Photograph by NICHOLAS WATT

D E S I G N E R Scott Weston: “The kitchen is a cool, white, resin and silver wall of integrated appliances with a counterpoint of a triangular translucent resin object echoing the curved forms of Art Deco ocean-liner design and the bluegreen hues of the harbour beyond. The mirrored wall and splashback reflects the harbour and gives the illusion of a larger living space, while linear uplights and concealed lighting wash the ceilings in light, giving the effect of a more generously proportioned space.” What luxur y item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “We invested in Marblo cladding panels that were custom coloured and thermo formed for the concealed walk-in pantry and laundry (left), with electronic touch-sensitive drawers and concealed lighting.” 224


A SUB-ZERO IS JUST A REFRIGERATOR, LIKE A DIAMOND IS JUST A STONE


Photograph by WILL HORNER

“THE END RESULT HAS A CLASSIC YET LIGHTHEARTED MODERN SHAKER FEEL.”

FACT FILE

Interior design SARAH DAVISON INTERIOR DESIGN Joinery White polyurethane cabinetry. Island bench and china cabinet in ebonised American oak. China cabinet and tea cabinet on back bench have panels of bronze mesh. All by Gary Galego Joinery. Storage solutions Walk-in butler’s pantry and an appliance benchtop. The full-height china cabinet provides functional storage for tableware. Benchtops Custom-made stainless-steel benchtop by Gary Galego Joinery. Honed Nero Marquina marble on island bench from SnB Stone. Sink Custom-made stainless-steel sink integrated into benchtop, with custom-made solid-timber draining board, all by Gary Galego Joinery. Tapware Dornbracht Tara Classic single mixer, soap dispenser and hot/cold drink tap from Candana. Oven Existing. Cooktop Existing. Rangehood Qasair UV 1200F2T rangehood from Winning Appliances. Fridge/freezer two Fisher & Paykel CoolDrawers from Winning Appliances. Dishwasher Existing. Lighting Floss Romeo Moon suspension light from Euroluce. Disk Adjustable downlights from Inlite. Flooring Existing timber floorboards were re-finished in a matte water-based polyurethane by Sunset Constructions. Suspended fish bowl from De Vera. For stockists see Address Book.

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KITCHEN SARAH DAVISON

EBONY & IVORY

Chic ebonised oak sets the tone in a busy family kitchen. DE SI GNE R Sarah Davison: “Our brief was to design a chic, welcoming kitchen for a family with three teenage daughters. The result has a classic yet lighthearted modern Shaker feel. The space is divided into three zones – the L-shaped, stainless-steel benches for cooking, the marble island for serving and the dining area with its glass-fronted cabinets that encourage people to help themselves to tableware or another wine glass.” What luxur y item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “The bespoke ebonised oak and marble island bench. It’s a beautifully detailed, handmade piece of furniture and has a wonderful inviting quality that is a centrepiece to this bustling home.”


KITCHEN ENOKI FACT FILE

Interior design ENOKI Joinery Two-pack finish in Solver Paints Kitty Grey by T & C Joinery. Castella Architectural Cabinetware Pewter Porcelain handles from Handles Plus. Benchtop Carrara marble and solid American white oak. Splashback White glazed brick tiles with Mapei grout in Jade Green from Eco Tile Factory. Sink Villery & Boch porcelain double-bowl sink from The Source. Tapware Bastow Georgian basin mixer from Reece. Oven Falcon oven, existing. Rangehood Ilve rangehood, exisiting, housed in Laminex in Black. Lighting Torus 100 FX spotlights from Sylvania Lighting. Ceiling-mounted lamps, existing. Flooring Parmate Vintage European oak by EFP. For stockists see Address Book.

OUT ON THE TILES

A black-and-white palette calls for a clever use of colour. DE SIGNER Alexandra Moeck/Susanna Bilardo: “This kitchen is full of contemporary quirks intertwined with traditional detailing. The wall and ceiling panelling were given a slathering of Solver Paints Kitty Grey, brightening the space and highlighting existing features, such as the timber window frames and beams. The blackand-white palette is complemented by a spark of mint green, subtly interjected using Mapei tile grout in Jade Green, power-point backing plates in Dulux Brush, and Agostino & Brown’s Olive stools. Warmth and texture is provided through solid American white-oak joinery features.” What luxury item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “This kitchen has luxurious details, such as the porcelain sink, Bastow Georgian mixer and Carrara marble, but we like to think of the finer details as the luxury. These are specifically designed for the client. Perhaps ‘luxury’ could be used to describe a unique space that no one else has.” 228

Photograph by BRI HAMMOND


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KITCHEN NEXUS DESIGNS

SECRETS OF SUCCESS Clean lines, dark hues and ... a second kitchen.

Photographs by ISAMU SAWA


FACT FILE

Interior design NEXUS DESIGNS Joinery American oak timber veneer with a custom stain, and two-pack finish in Dulux Natural White. Quad cabinet handles, code 5112, powder-coated in Dulux Bronze Pearl, from Designer Doorware. Benchtop/splashback Honed Ecru reconstituted stone from Stone Italiana. Emery White handmade tiles from Stonetile Ind. Storage solutions Blum Intivo Inner Boxcap openfronted drawers in the butler’s kitchen provide visibility of contents and easy accessibility, from Blum. Sinks Franke SQX120C/D Steel Queens from Harvey Norman. Tapware Franke Azimut pull-out spray tap from Harvey Norman. Billi Eco 90 1000 water system from Billi. Ovens Miele H5681BP oven and Miele H5080BM microwave combination oven, both from Harvey Norman. Dishwasher Miele G5500SCU-BRW dishwasher (butler’s kitchen), from Harvey Norman. Coffee machine Miele CVA3660 built-in coffee machine (butler’s kitchen), from Harvey Norman. Lighting Dome lights in Matte Milk (main kitchen), by Mud Australia, Bestlite wall lamp in Matt Ivory (butler’s kitchen), from Corporate Culture. Stools ICS in Spessart Oak by Poliform. Flooring Tasmanian oak stained with an Estapol clear finish from Bowens. For stockists see Address Book.

“THE EXTRA ROOM FOR STORAGE ALLOWED US TO MAKE THE ISLAND BENCH MORE SCULPTURAL.”

DESIGNER Lucy Marczyk: “The back of this house consists of a large rectangular space. Previously, the kitchen was at the north-east end with the informal living area to the north west and meals in the middle. By swapping these spaces over, we were able to create a kitchen with a direct connection to an elegant terrace and beautiful gardens. We enclosed part of the colonnaded west-facing verandah and created a butler’s kitchen with two stunning arched windows. The large island bench with handcrafted timber legs has a solid benchtop to function as a buffet for entertaining. Ceramic pendant lights hang gently above with a backdrop of a tiled splashback. The feeling is undoubtedly handcrafted.” What luxury item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “Space planning and scale was the key to this kitchen’s success. Incorporating a butler’s pantry provided a hidden workspace and preparation zone for a very social family. The extra room for storage allowed us to make the island bench more sculptural and ‘table like’ where we would usually be maximising storage.” 231


FACT FILE

Interior design HECKER GUTHRIE Joinery Two-pack finish in Dulux Natural White by Grater Construction. Benchtop Bedonia stone from Artedomus. Splashback Casamood ceramic tiles in White from Stonetile Ind. Sink Franke Kubus KBX110-55 sink and Franke Kubus KBX11034 sink, both client’s own. Tapware Vola mixer with double swivel spout and Vola mixer with hand shower, both from Mary Noall. Oven Gaggenau BO280 oven, Gaggenau BO281 oven and Gaggenau BM221 built-in microwave oven, all from Gaggenau. Cooktop Vario VG421 gas cooktop, Vario VI421110 induction cooktop and Vario VP421111 teppanyaki grill, all from Gaggenau. Rangehood Qasair UV1500-F3 rangehood from Winning Appliances. Fridge/freezer Sub Zero BI-42SD, client’s own. Fisher & Paykel Izona CoolDrawer from Winning Appliances. Lighting Flos Pure downlights from Euroluce. Flooring American oak floorboards from Precision Flooring. For stockists see Address Book.

D E S I G N E R Hamish Guthrie: “This Sydney home is located on a steep block and boasts views beyond the tree canopy to the harbour. Hecker Guthrie redesigned and reconfigured the kitchen, and by sacrificing some windows were able to install a long bank of joinery connecting the kitchen to the view. This created a dining area that hadn’t previously existed, in the most covetable space within the home.” What luxur y item did you choose for this kitchen regardless of budget? “The client selected high-end appliances from Gaggenau and a white hand-glazed ceramic tile from Italy – and we thought one of those items may have been her luxury item – yet when we quizzed her on it, surprisingly, her answer was the underbench drawer fridge.”


KITCHEN HECKER GUTHRIE

INSTANT CONNECTION Clever joinery unifies a functional space with harbour views.

“BY SACRIFICING SOME WINDOWS WE WERE ABLE TO INSTALL A LONG BANK OF JOINERY.”

Photographs by DAVID WHEELER 233


BATHROOMS HOT TRENDS

bright ideas style gurus

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID WHEELER

FROM THE TO PUT TO WORK IN YOUR OWN HOME.

MICHAEL BECHARA HECKER GUTHRIE STACEY KOUROS ALEXANDER & CO ALEXANDRA KIDD Moon shadow: Designer Simone Haag of Hecker Guthrie injected a shot of drama into this powder room’s rich grey tones with the whimsical ‘Francis’ mirror (see p246). 235


It’s often the unexpected moments that bring the most joy to our day. To ďŹ nd out what Simon and his family really love about their new bathroom, visit reece.com.au/moments


BATHROOM STYLE 3 1

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NATURAL SELECTION Soothe the senses with raw textures and neutral hues. Photographs by DAVID WHEELER

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STYLING BIANCA ISGRO. CREATIVE DIRECTION JACK MILENKOVIC.

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Trend EARTHY FINISHES This page: 1 Phillip Jefries ‘Rivets’ wallpaper. textilecompany.com.au. 2 ’Lustre Light Square’ light by Tom Dixon. dedece.com. 3 Gold mirror. cocorepublic.com.au. 4 Vola KV10 swivel tap in brass. dedece.com.au. 5 Antique Chinese altar table. thecountrytrader.com.au. 6 Wooden bowl. thecountrytrader.com.au. 7 Soap dish. beckerminty.com. 8 Nesti Dante ‘Philosophia’ soap. saison.com.au. 9 K Hall ‘Washed Cotton’ hand and body wash. saison.com.au. 10 Gold box. beckerminty.com. 11 Low gold plate. beckerminty.com. 12 Fornasetti Profumi ‘Cammei’ scented candle. beckerminty.com. 13 ’Beat Vessels’ brass pots by Tom Dixon. dedece.com.

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beckerminty.com. 2 Voluspa ‘Arcadia’ two-wick candle. saison.com.au. 3 Soap dish. beckerminty.com. 4 Nesti Dante ‘Romantica’ soap. saison.com.au. 5 Perrin & Rowe porcelain handshower on hose. englishtapware.com.au. 6 ’Beat Vessels’ brass pot by Tom Dixon. dedece.com. 7 K Hall ‘Washed Cotton’ hand and body wash. saison.com.au. 8 K Hall reed scent difuser. saison. com.au. 9 ’Murano’ wallpaper. eurowalls. com.au. 10 ’Aren Bianco’ raw sawn limestone slab. onsitesd.com.au. 11 Perrin & Rowe ‘Rohl’ tap in bronze. englishtapware.com.au. 12 ’Hammam’ towel. kulchi.com. 13 ’Bash Vessel’ brass bowl by Tom Dixon. dedece. com. 14 Gold toilet brush. beckerminty.com.

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1 ‘Bamboo’ towel ring in bronze. motherofpearl.com. 2 ‘Kahoy’ side tables with petrified timber top and gold base. exhibit.net.au. 3 Handloomed bouclé towel. ottomanhamam.com.au. 4 Hand-peened bronze tile. motherofpearl.com. 5 ’Pantop’ copper pendant by Verner Panton. frandsengroup.dk. 6 Bevel-edge bronze tile. motherofpearl.com. 7 ’Elementaire’ tissue box. christofle.com. 8 HD3 wall light. ismobjects.com.au. 9 ‘Pendant 45’ light in grey. englishtapware.com.au. 10 ‘Turn’ beech and porcelain ladder. seletti.it 11 ‘Ficus’ stool. jamieduriedesign.com. 12 ‘Nettle’ paint. porterspaints.com.au. 13 Bronze basin. motherofpearl.com. 14 Kludi ‘Zenta’ mixer in black. kludi.com. 15 ‘Lumina Glass Smoke Brick’ and ‘Heavy Metal Square Mosaic’ tiles. byzantinedesign. com.au. 16 ‘57 Series’ Bocci lights. bocci.ca. 17 ‘Vessel’ bathtub. splinterworks.co.uk. 18 Hay ‘Strap’ mirror in grey. corporateculture.com.au. 19 ’Plankton’ wood and gold leaf side table. worlds-away.com. 20 ‘Jacquard’ cotton bath towel and ‘Azalea’ velour bath sheet. cittadesign.com. 21 ‘Acquarello’ vases by Federico Angi. cappellini.it. 22 ’Pietra Grey’ honed tile. byzantine design.com.au. 23 Vola ‘060 Round’ showerhead. dedece.com.

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DARK & HANDSOME Glowing gold accents warm a dramatic black-and-white palette. Photograph by VINCENT LEROUX 243


BATHROOM MICHAEL BECHARA

SEAMLESS SOLUTIONS Orchestrating the balance between colour and form. Photographs by JUSTIN ALEXANDER

D E S I G N E R Michael Bechara: “I set out to design a bathroom that had no definitive change between the floor and the walls. I chose a 50mm hexagon in four shades of grey to highlight the shift and play between both colour and form. Although random in spirit, the colour palette and tile articulation were carefully considered to create rhythm and harmony. The cabinetry was designed to almost disappear into the tiling, which is imperative to the balance and tempo of the bathroom, allowing the tiles to quietly sing.” What luxury item did you choose for this bathroom regardless of budget? “I custom-designed the sliding mirror and shelving unit to play on the eccentricity of the room. Detailed in aged brass for a classic and timeless appeal, the mirror serves its purpose and offers privacy when drawn in front of the window. Although both mirror and screening are considered necessities, the detailing in this case was a complete luxury item and fun to design. Adding that custom touch to my client’s home was very rewarding.”

FACT FILE

Interior design MICHAEL BECHARA DESIGN Joinery Custom-designed oak unit stained in Black, brass mirror and shelving unit by Michael Bechara Design. Wall finish and flooring Winckelman hexagonal ceramic tiles from English Tile Company. Basin Alape Circa above-counter basin in White from Reece. Tapware Scala basin mixer from Reece. Showerhead Scala Rail Shower from Reece. Toilet Axa Uno back-to-wall toilet from Reece. Lighting Hunza Bollards from Urban Lighting. For stockists see Address Book.

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BATHROOM HECKER GUTHRIE FACT FILE

Interior design HECKER GUTHRIE Joinery Custom-designed basin unit by Hecker Guthrie and installed by Herb’s Joinery. Wall finish Murano Smalto mosaic tiles in Titanium from Sicis. Vanity Bedonia stone slab from Artedomus. Basin Parisi Twinset 430 from Mary Noall. Tapware Vola hand mixer in Dark Grey 09 from Mary Noall. Mirror Francis Mural wall mirror from Petite Friture. Flooring Honed Bedonia stone tiles from Artedomus. For stockists see Address Book.

COMMAND PERFORMANCE Layers of grey and shimmering mosaics steal the show. Photograph by DAVID WHEELER D E S I G N E R Simone Haag: “A touch of glamour and theatre was given to this powder room by way of layering rich grey tones within the space. The dark-grey Bedonia stone slabs, which were also used in the kitchen, continue into this powder room with contrasting shades of grey in the mosaic tiles and powder-coated Vola tapware.” What luxur y item did you choose for this bathroom regardless of budget? “The Francis mirror, with its subtle colour, adds some whimsy to what is an ultra-muted and sophisticated space.” 246


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BATHROOM STACEY KOUROS

Photograph by JASON BUSCH

CHAIN REACTION An arresting tile pattern governs this dazzling design. DE SIGNER Stacey Kouros: “This Sydney house was a new build on the water. The client brief was to design a contemporary home with elements of retro glamour while remaining fresh and light. The first element chosen was the Bisazza mosaic feature. The highly decorative print in rich colours meant that other finishes and design elements needed to be simple and restrained, contrasting with the graphic feature.” What luxury item did you choose for this bathroom regardless of budget? “The marble used throughout the space creates a feeling of luxury and glamour. Mitred edges are seamless and enhance the monolithic block forms of the basin plinth and bath surround. Chains by Bisazza was used as the main feature. The graphic pattern generates a strong presence in the space, while the gold adds a feeling of luxury and glamour.” 248

FACT FILE

Interior design STACEY KOUROS DESIGN Splashback/wall finish Bisazza Chains and Bisazza mosaic tiles in White, all from Di Lorenzo Tiles. Basin plinth and bath surround Honed green marble from Nefiko Marble. Basin Catino basin from Parisi. Tapware Dial tapware from Parisi. Bath Kaldewei bath from Just Bathroomware. Flooring Green marble tiles from Nefiko Marble. For stockists see Address Book.


I want to Hettich my kitchen. “After seeing your gorgeous new kitchen we’re going to Hettich our entire renovation: kitchen, bathroom, living room and bedroom!” “Hettich has thought of everything: soft close drawers and doors, designer handles and fabulous lighting.” “I’m off to our local Hettich Endorsed Showroom to get our plans started!” Find your local Hettich Endorsed Showroom at hettich.com.au


BATHROOM ALEXANDRA KIDD

RED EMPEROR

Vibrant red textured tiles magnify a sense of space. DESIGNER Alexandra Kidd: “This powder room was converted from a laundry to create a guest bathroom with increased amenities and storage. The client’s favourite colour is red, which provided inspiration for the Fan tiles. The Fan tile is textured, creating a feeling of depth in what is a small area.” What luxury item did you choose for this bathroom regardless of budget? “The Fan tile was the ultimate luxury item. The client fell in love with it and it has become the defining feature of the room.”

Photograph by SIMON WHITBREAD

FACT FILE

Interior design ALEXANDRA KIDD DESIGN Joinery Custom-designed mirrored cupboard by Alexandra Kidd Design. Wall finish Glass Fan tiles in Red from Academy Tiles. Basin Studio Bagno Clever 70 basin from Cass Brothers. Tapware Dorf Jovian basin mixer from Cass Brothers. Toilet Roca Nexo 3-4963 toilet from Cass Brothers. Lighting Tilee light from Euroluce. For stockists see Address Book.

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BATHROOM ALEXANDER & CO Photograph by MURRAY FREDERICKS

BACK TO BLACK A dark canvas invites bold statements in white.

FACT FILE

Interior design ALEXANDER & CO D E S I G N E R Jeremy Bull: “This bathroom is small and it belongs to the more traditional part of a terrace. To expand the footprint we applied a dark bluestone tile to all surfaces. Traditional fixtures are tightly fitted along one wall, adjacent to the bathroom window, and a flush-set curtain-track provides screening for the shower.” What luxur y item did you choose for this bathroom regardless of budget? “The claw-foot bath and the basin with the metal console.”

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Joinery White melamine mirrored cabinet by Captive Cabinetmaking. Wall finish and flooring Bluestone tiles. Basin Duravit Happy D 1050 basin with metal console from Candana. Tapware Brodware Nue England B80.00T3.P from Cass Brothers. Bath Custom claw-foot bath from Antique Baths Sydney. Showerhead Brodware Nue England B80.40 from Cass Brothers. Toilet Duravit Happy D toilet from Candana. Lighting AL-2354A-16WH trimless matt white from Ambience Lighting. For stockists see Address Book.


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The distinctive range of Brigitte Singh home furnishings is complemented by hand crafted lamps, tribal pieces, wooden carvings and a variety of Indian offerings. Open 7 days 10am to 5pm Shop 2 37-39 Old Barrenjoey Road Avalon NSW 2107 P. 02 9973 1299 www.soshus.com.au Follow us on facebook


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When you ďŹ nd you have outgrown your home, The Plan Shop can help. We can expand your living spaces, creating the perfect home for your family. We specialise in solving problems with space. Our focus is on shaping visually appealing spaces that are cohesive and in harmony with your lifestyle. Our focus is on shaping visually appealing spaces that are cohesive and in harmony with your lifestyle.

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choose a design or image from our range or use your own


Stockists A-Z

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MY CITY

M A N DY D 'A B O

My Hong Kong

WANT MORE?

To tour Mandy d'Abo's Hong Kong via Gooogle Maps

download the free viewa app and scan the entire page.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Mandy d'Abo in The Cat Street Gallery. Painting by Desmond Leung. Hong Kong skyscrapers. The China Club's Long March Bar. Entrance to Kee Club. Nendo for Lasvit pieces at Lane Crawford. The Cat Street Gallery. Duddell's.

258

What brought you to Hong Kong? Love! I met John, my (now) husband, in London at his ‘leaving party’ when he was heading to Hong Kong to live. I followed him out and fell in love with Hong Kong. That was 12 years ago and it is definitely now home. What do you like most about living there? The incredible energy and breathtaking pace. Hong Kong is one of the most vibrant, exciting places on earth, with the contrast of layer upon layer of skyscrapers, the majestic mountains, hiking trails, jungle, beaches, fishing boats and sea. Where is your gallery? On Hong Kong Island. The Cat Street Gallery and The Space are on Hollywood Road, Sheung Wan. What makes Hong Kong tick? Feverish energy, and ‘can do’ attitude. The people are masters of hard work, persistence and entrepreneurialism. What is the quintessential Hong Kong experience? Cocktails in the glamorous Long March Bar in the China Club and then into the dining room to feast on Peking duck. After dinner, have a nightcap on the terrace and gaze out to one of the best views of HK, all lit up beneath the stars. Your favourite haunts? 22 Ships. Kee Club for dim sum. JaaBar is a great hideaway. Chicha for Peruvian food. Honi Honi Bar for cocktails. 208 Duecento Otto for pizza. Duddell’s – the newest hotspot. Quinary for Earl Grey martinis. Happy Valley races. Yardbird, a yakatori restaurant. Ronin and Zuma – both for great Japanese. Ten Feet Tall for the best foot massage. Sevva for sundowners on the terrace. Alfie’s for fish and chips. If you only had one day in Hong Kong, how would you spend it? A hike out to sublime Tai Long Wan (Big Wave Bay), swim out to a fabulous junk and enjoy a delicious lunch of crispy chilli crab and ice cold rosé. Sail back into Aberdeen Harbour at sunset. Favourite HK design or furnishings store? Lane Crawford home and lfestyle store at Pacific Place. DeeM·for furniture. G.O.D. is a fun lifestyle shop incorporating HK imagery into chopsticks, slippers, T-shirts etc. Favourite restaurant? 22 Ships, Jason Atherton's hot new tapas bar in Wan Chai – can't resist the char-grilled Ibérico pork and foie gras burgers. Favourite bar? The bar in The Upper House Hotel. Jaw-dropping views and sublime lychee martinis. They look after you impeccably. Hong Kong artists to watch? Nadim Abbas, Angela Su, Wilson Shieh, Desmond Leung, Adrian Wong, Bosco Law, Yuk King Tan. Describe Hong Kong in one word? Indefatigable! For more go to thecatstreetgallery.com.

PORTRAIT BY CHRIS SORENSEN, GETTY IMAGES

The expat gallery owner has her finger on the pulse of this vibrant city.


DESIGN PORTRAIT.

For Viola every story always begins with Tufty-Time. Tufty-Time is designed by Patricia Urquiola. www.bebitalia.com

Belle 2013 10-11  
Belle 2013 10-11  
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