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Timber structures Roofs

The loader must check the loading sheet before the lorry can leave. Photo: Pasquill

Usual access is via the deck of a modified loader or aircraft steps. Under no circumstances should the loader ever be directly under the extended forks.

Ahead of the driver arriving, the contractor will have cleared the area to provide ample space, making sure there are no overhead cables and that the area is both level and dry.

Once safely on the lorry bed, the trusses can be secured. Each pack should be secured to the centre bar at a minimum of two points above the centre of gravity to avoid trusses falling during transit. The rope or banding used must have a minimum 450kg breaking strain.

Load information, in terms of quantities, weights and sizes, is always provided ahead of delivery so site staff can develop a safe unloading and handling plan. This includes an assessment of the mechanical handling equipment needed to remove the trusses from the vehicle. The contractor must have also considered how the trusses will be stored. As they are made from timber, they cannot be left in an area that is damp or in or near water.

With the roof trusses secured to the lorry, other ancillary items forming part of the order can be added. The driver is responsible for checking the load and will fit transportation straps to ensure that the structural integrity of the trusses is not compromised during transit. This should also take into account any heavy breaking or travelling over rough ground. The designated haulier must be trained in transporting roof trusses and be fully up to speed on the relevant health and safety requirements. Careful management of the loading process in the fabricator’s yard will mean nobody needs to access the lorry bed during unloading at site.

Once the area is clear of other personnel, the driver can release the transport straps. At no point should anyone stand between the unloading equipment and the trailer. It is the responsibility of the equipment operator to ensure no one is in the danger area before attempting to take the weight of the trusses. The driver will then cut the banding securing the pack of trusses to the vehicle. This must be done at a safe distance using a telescopic cutting staff. The forklift or telehandler can then lift the trusses and place them in the designated offloading area.

Once the haulier gets on site, safety is the contractor’s responsibility. However, the delivery driver is well within their rights to refuse to offload the trusses if they deem it unsafe.

TRA members can advise on other procedures, such as using a crane to offload trusses or unloading inverted trusses and turning them around. It is essential that the truss fabricator >>

www.trada.co.uk

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook

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Profile for BM TRADA

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Profile for trada
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