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Timber structures Timber frame

“There has been a gradual shift from traditional wood preservation to wood protection, which is based not only on the inherent characteristics of the wood itself but also on design, maintenance, exposure and moisture risk.”

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imber in construction has undergone something of a renaissance, led by the desire to use more environmentally friendly materials and to reduce construction costs. The development of modified wood and engineered timber, such as glulam and crosslaminated timber (CLT), provides new ways of achieving modern construction goals over a reduced construction time. Compared to aluminium, steel and concrete, most timber is produced using considerably less energy and acts as a carbon sink, reducing CO2 emissions.1 While timber is at risk to biological decay, a combination of appropriate design and material selection will mitigate this risk. National and European projects such as WoodBuild, PerformWood and DuraTB have increased our understanding of the performance of wood in service. This has led to modelling of products during their service life, as well as providing guidance for avoiding risks of decay often associated with prolonged exposure to high moisture levels. Another study2 shows that the use of mass timber construction, such as CLT, led to lower on-site labour costs, a lower environmental impact and the possibility of improved amenity and reduced running costs for owners and occupiers.

Service life The importance of service life is highlighted in the Construction Products Regulation, with its seven basic requirements that should be met by construction products during a ‘reasonable service life’. They are: • mechanical resistance and stability • safety in the case of fire • hygiene, health and the environment • safety and accessibility in use • protection against noise • energy economy and heat retention • sustainable use of natural resources. The performance or service life of wood products is based on a combination of end use and degrading parameters. The concept of ‘use classes’ is related to the susceptibility to >> www.trada.co.uk

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook

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Profile for BM TRADA

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Profile for trada
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