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Joinery Stairs

“The staircase was made from an engineered timber sheet material, CNC-cut directly from the architectural drawings as a means to budget efficiency while retaining control of design.�

T

he prefabricated timber staircase at Askham Road formed part of a one-off new-build contemporary house, situated on a modest end-of-garden plot in west London. With issues of privacy and overlooking influencing available fenestration, it was important to design sensitively and introduce light through clerestory glazing, roof lights, a stepped terrace down to the basement and the open stair core at ground-floor level. With such varied fenestration came the decision to treat the interior spaces of the house with a plain, pared-back look and finish, letting the different angles of light provide the interest. With this simple approach to interior space, the staircase became an opportunity to create a striking architectural feature within a plain space, materially distinct from its surroundings and able to permeate light through to different levels and angles.

Aspirations and procurement opportunities The staircase was made from an engineered timber sheet material, CNC-cut directly from the architectural drawings as a means to budget efficiency while retaining control of design. As a result, an entire layer of surveying, drawing and administration was omitted from the construction process. This subtle change in procurement added a new dimension to the design and detailing process, including consideration of the sequencing of installation and physical access, which required the fitting of certain stair elements once others had been installed. Naturally, a great deal of care in establishing survey data and design tolerances was required, all of which would become the responsibility of the architect; a challenge rarely accepted by the profession. The installation is made entirely of 42mm-thick TinTab multiply sheets1, with the exception of screws and handrail brackets. All vertical support is provided by 100mm-wide uprights at 110mm centres, and the same 42mm section is installed as a batten inbetween the open treads, to comply with building regulations. Given the direct procurement approach there was no opportunity to work or finesse the material or joints as might be expected in a joinery workshop, hence a conscious decision >> www.trada.co.uk

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook

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Profile for BM TRADA

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Profile for trada
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