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Engineered timber CLT/Glulam

At East India Dock, as part of the Republic masterplan, 650,000 sq ft of high-quality, low-cost workspace will be created, along with a wide range of amenities and extensive public space. The masterplan will be realised in three phases. The Import Building was completed in 2018, formerly referred to as Anchorage House.

Phase 2 includes the Public Realm elements of the project and is also now complete. The works include partially infilling and re-routing the existing waterway and providing a series of tall CLT pavilions that appear to float above the space. Phase 3 is the Export Building, formerly Capstan House, and it is currently on site. For this phase a two-storey extension to the building is being installed with a glulam and timber frame, designed for a future additional three storeys. The use of such a lightweight construction technique has meant that the existing basement construction and its foundations beneath have been justified for the additional five floors of extension, only four of which were possible in steel and metal deck slab. CLT pavilions in the public realm space at Republic, East India Dock. Photo: Heyne Tillett Steel

At Anchorage House, the architect developed an exciting scheme to infill in part the existing atriums with glued laminated timber (glulam) and CLT, creating a dramatic and tactile space while gaining additional floor space and interaction between the floors. It was possible to justify the additional load on the existing reinforced concrete frame due to the availability of extensive archive information, backed up by intrusive investigation, as well as the lightweight nature of the material.

The Export Building at Republic, East India Dock. Photo: Heyne Tillett Steel

The Export Building at Republic, East India Dock. Photo: Heyne Tillett Steel

The timber atrium at Anchorage House aka the Import Building. Photo: Galliford Try

www.trada.co.uk

Benefits The benefits of timber in the commercial refurbishment sector, such as lightweight construction, speed on site, wellness credentials for workers and users, and aesthetic appearance, is ten-fold. Existing reinforced concrete frames, from 20 to 30 years ago, tend to have excessive capacity, and there is a growing trend to update office space to allow flexible and co-working spaces. >> Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook

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Profile for BM TRADA

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Timber 2019 Industry Yearbook  

The annual publication of the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA) includes topical and technical features on all aspects of...

Profile for trada
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