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December 2010

The Connecticut Independent Agent


“The Connecticut Independent Agent is the official publication of the Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut 30 Jordan Lane Wethersfield, CT 06109 Phone: (860) 563-1950 Fax: (860) 257-9981 www.iiact.org

IIAC Staff Warren C. Ruppar President Tracy Hearn Office Manager / Event Planner Ed Meaney, CPCU Education Director

Independent Agents Services Staff

The Connecticut Independent Agent This Issue’s Features IIAC Mid-Year Convention Photos

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Monthly Bulletin Review

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Massachusetts Department of Industrial Accidents Issued New Out-of-State Form Connecticut Insurance Commissioner Issues Bulletin on the Use of Certificates New York Workers’ Compensation Board Issues Out-of-State Employers Policy Many Americans Are Not Fully Prepared for Natural Disasters

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Adding a Pet to the Family This Holiday Season?

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Certificates of Insurance

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Does Brand Matter?

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Laura Szatkowski E&O Program Administrator Rosemary Mullaly Lawyers’ Liability Program RLI This publication is intended to provide accurate and authoritative information on the subject matter covered. It is distributed with the understanding that neither IIAC, nor any contributing author, publisher or contributor is rendering legal, accounting or any other professional service and assume no liability whatsoever in connection with its use. Further, the electronic links to our associate membership found in this publication are provided as a courtesy to our readers and do not necessarily indicate an endorsement by IIAC. News items will be accepted / printed at the discretion of the IIAC. No paid advertisements are accepted in this publication. Please contact Tracy Hearn at thearn@iiac.org for further information.

In Every Issue January and February Continuing Education Courses

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Events

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About Us

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2010 - 2011 Officers

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Committees

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Big “I” Advantage Programs

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Associate Member Index Associate Members - Insurance Brokers & Services

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Associate Members - Insurance Companies

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IIAC MID-YEAR CONVENTION OCTOBER 21, 2010 Aqua Turf Club

Morning Business Meeting

Candidates Address Convention Attendees


Exhibit Hall


Exhibit Hall


Exhibit Hall


Convention Photos


Convention Photos


IIAC MONTHLY BULLETIN REVIEW The IIAC Monthly Review recaps important issues that were sent out to the IIAC Membership as Agent Alerts and Bulletins throughout the previous month.

AGENT ALERT - ISSUED NOVEMBER 4, 2010 MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS ISSUES NEW OUT-OF-STATE FORM The Massachusetts Department of Industrial Accidents last week issued an amended circular letter and a new version of Form 154, Verification of Massachusetts Workers' Compensation Coverage for Out-of-State Employers Operating in Massachusetts. Form 154 must be completed by the insurance carrier of any out-of-state employer conducting business in Massachusetts at the request of the DIA's Office of Investigations. The DIA may also require an out-of-state business to submit this form at any time. Clicking the links above will bring you directly to the circular letter and the amended form

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT BULLETIN ALERT - ISSUED NOVEMBER 11, 2010 Insurance Commissioner Issues Bulletin On The Use Of Certificates of Insurance Insurance Commissioner, Thomas Sullivan, issued Bulletin S-14 this week concerning the proper use of Certificates of Insurance. IIAC requested that the Commissioner review this issue as we have received numerous calls from the membership regarding the proper use of certificates. IIAC Chairman, Tom Wilson, praised the department for their work on this bulletin specifically because of the E&O concerns. IIAC President, Warren Ruppar, thanked the Commissioner on behalf of the membership for meeting with IIAC representatives and addressing this important issue. Please click here to view Bulletin S-14.

AGENT ALERT - ISSUED NOVEMBER 24, 2010 New York Workers’ Compensation Board Issues Out-of-State Employers Policy The New York Workers’ Compensation Board issued a bulletin yesterday announcing a new policy on out-ofstate employers. Both the bulletin and the policy clarify when an employer must carry a New York Workers’ Compensation policy. IIAC strongly urges our members to read both the bulletin and announcement.


MANY AMERICANS ARE NOT FULLY PREPARED FOR NATURAL DISASTERS National survey reveals urgent need for better disaster preparedness. Most Americans are not fully prepared in the event of a natural disaster, according to a national survey by Trusted Choice® and the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America. Of all survey respondents, less than 22% said they felt they are fully prepared in case of a disaster. More than half of respondents (51%) admitted they are only somewhat prepared, and more than a fifth of households (22.7%) reported that they were not prepared at all. “Hurricane season officially began on June 1 and other disasters can happen anytime, anywhere, as we saw with the devastating floods in Tennessee,” said Madelyn Flannagan, Big “I” vice president of agent development, education and research. “Lives and property are saved when people know what to do before, during and after a disaster. This national study further demonstrates that unfortunately most people are not ready in the event of a natural disaster.” The survey further revealed that many households have not even taken the most basic steps to protect against a disaster. For example, more than two-thirds of those surveyed (67.7%) said they had not created a photo or video home inventory of their belongings. More than 40% have not assembled a disaster and emergency supplies kit in their homes. Sixty-eight percent of homeowners have not made any structural improvements or reinforcements to better protect their property from a disaster. Of all survey participants, almost 36% said they don’t have or don’t know if they have adequate insurance coverage to help them through a disaster, and an alarming 62% say they have never discussed a complete disaster preparedness plan with an insurance agent. ”Independent insurance agents not only advise clients about insurance, but they’re disaster readiness experts,” says Robert Rusbuldt, Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America (IIABA or the Big “I”) president & CEO. “It is imperative to know what your risks are and what to do in the event of a disaster. We recommend meeting with a Trusted Choice® independent insurance agent who is an expert in assessing your risks and insuring that you, your family and your home are prepared in the event of a disaster.” Trusted Choice® and the Big “I” offer many disaster-specific readiness and recovery tips for consumers. To access them, click on the corresponding headline. • Hurricanes • Flooding • Tornadoes • Earthquakes • Wildfires • I want to start my disaster preparedness plan. Where do I start? • How do I prepare a home inventory? • How do I storm-proof my home?

The survey was conducted for Trusted Choice® via telephone by International Communications Research (ICR), an independent research company in Media, Pa. Interviews of a nationally representative sample of 1,006 households were conducted in May 2010. The survey has an overall margin of error of +/- 3.1%. For more information about ICR, go to www.icrsurvey.com.


GETTING STARTED A good way to begin your planning process is to gather as much information as you can. There are numerous resources available to guide you through the process of getting your household prepared to deal with a disaster. Trusted Choice® and the Big “I” offer many disaster-specific readiness and recovery tips for consumers including the following suggestions to get started: • Make a list of each of your insurance policy numbers and the insurance company name, and keep the information in your wallet, purse, or on your mobile device. For example, nearly all states use some form of a wallet-size auto ID card, which is required to be kept on your person, or in the vehicle. It's a good idea to do have similar information with you on all your other insurance coverages. • Make a record of your insurance agent's web site address, and keep this information in your wallet, purse or mobile device. After a widespread catastrophe, more and more agencies post information about claims procedures on their web site. This is especially important in cases where the agency itself has been affected, and has set up temporary operations at another location. In addition, agency web sites will usually post emergency insurance claim phone numbers, etc. • Use social media to contact your insurance agent. Many agencies use some form of social media, such as Facebook, Twitter, etc., and these information outlets can provide vital, timely information about claims procedures and other necessary information for policyholders. • Find out how you and your neighbors would be informed about an imminent disaster. • Ask if evacuation routes have been established. • Contact your city's or town's planning and emergency assistance organizations. Ask them for information about disaster planning. • Contact your children's school(s) or day care center to learn about the emergency plans they have in place. • If a family member is in an elder care facility, check to see what emergency procedures they will follow. • Take a First Aid/CPR class from the American Red Cross. • If you have pets, have a contingency plan in place. Many emergency shelters won't accept them. PREPARE A HOME INVENTORY If you were the victim of a major natural disaster and suddenly found yourself with nothing left, would you remember everything you lost? When is the last time you counted the number of CDs you own or took stock of the current value of your TV and video equipment, not to mention your clothing, jewelry and other personal belongings? Too often, we forget about personal valuables that are stored in closets or drawers. An inventory will help you remember what you have so you can accurately document your losses to your insurance company. For example, your insurance company will be less likely to dispute the value of your antique teapot collection if you have photographs, sales receipts and other documentation to prove it. • Make a detailed written or videotaped inventory of your property and house-hold possessions. Take a video camera and go through every room, taping and describing what you see. For valuable items, note when and where you purchased them and how much you paid for them. Include the serial numbers of major appliances.


• Don't forget to inventory the garage, attic, basement and the exterior of your house, including landscaping and fencing. • Update the inventory yearly. • Keep your inventory, insurance policies and other important documents in a safe-deposit box and keep a duplicate set in a fire- and water-proof container at home. Include important documents such as wills, deeds, titles, stocks, bonds, certificates of deposit, passports, bank account numbers, credit card numbers, income tax returns, birth certificates and so on. STORM-PROOF YOUR HOME • Keep your home in tip-top shape to protect it against the damage of heavy winds, snow, ice or rain. Make sure your roof, windows and doors are not in need of major repair. • Position cribs/beds away from windows or tall furniture that could slide or topple. • If you live in a hurricane-prone area, purchase sheets of plywood to cover your home's windows and store them in your garage or shed. If you wait until a storm is imminent, your local hardware store may be sold out. • Bolt bookcases and other tall pieces of furniture to the wall. • Power generators are often used during power outages. If you own one, make sure it is well maintained and that all family members know how to operate it properly. • If you live in a mobile home, make sure it is securely anchored down. • If you own a boat, make sure it is securely moored. • If there is a fire hydrant near your home, make sure it is clear of debris and can easily be located by the fire department. • Remove low branches and dead trees from around your house. • Clear debris from the chimney, gutters and vents. EARTHQUAKES Before the earthquake • Assess your home's vulnerability to earthquakes, especially if you live near a fault line. You can obtain fault zone, maps from your city or county planning department or check with your independent insurance agent for further information. • Locate a safe place in every room where you can go when an earthquake occurs. Choose a place away from windows where nothing can fall on you, preferably under a sturdy table or desk, or under an interior doorway. • Help quake-proof your home by bolting tall furniture and the water heater to wall studs. Attach mirrors, pictures and other objects securely to the wall. Do not hang glass-framed pictures behind your bed.


Use flexible connectors for gas-fueled appliances to prevent them from snapping. Install strong latches on cupboards to prevent objects from falling out. • Make sure your house is bolted to the foundation. If you live in a mobile home, make sure it is securely anchored down. Check with your local building inspector to determine if walls need additional bracing. • If a severe earthquake does occur, you may be asked to evacuate. Have your disaster supplies kit packed and ready to go. During an earthquake • The shaking that occurs during an earthquake typically only lasts for a few seconds, although it may seem like an eternity. To protect yourself, remember these three words: duck, cover and hold. • Move away from windows and exterior doors. • Lie low and take cover, preferably under a table, desk or other safe spot. Protect yourself by curling up, if you can. Cover your head, spine and chest areas. Hold onto the furniture and be prepared to move with it. • If you're in a high-rise building, move against an interior wall: Again, try to find a desk or table to crawl under. Do not use the elevators. Expect the fire alarms and sprinklers to go off. • If you're in a car, pull over and stop. Avoid bridges and overpasses. Stay in the car until the shaking stops. • If you're outdoors, find a spot away from buildings, trees and power lines. Lie on the ground. • If you're on a sidewalk near buildings, try to duck into a doorway to protect yourself from falling glass or debris. After an earthquake • Be prepared for aftershocks. Although they may be smaller and less intense than the main quake, they could cause additional damage or cause tottering buildings or other structures to fall. Stay indoors until after the shaking stops and you're sure it's safe to exit. • If no one in your house is injured, place a sign saying "all OK" on the door so emergency teams can assist those who do need help. • Check your house carefully for chimneys or walls that might be damaged and ready to fall. • Reposition anything in your closets and cupboards that may be damaged or ready to fall. WILDFIRES • If there is threat of a wildfire, warnings will be issued. Listen to your local radio or TV news program for the latest information. • Evacuate immediately, if you are told to do so. Take your disaster supplies kit with you and begin to implement the disaster preparedness plan you have already developed.


• Back your car into the garage or park in an open space, facing the direction of the escape route. Shut the car doors and roll up the windows. • If possible, confine your pets to one room so they'll be easier to find in case you have to evacuate. • Secure the inside of your home. Close windows, vents, doors, blinds and drapes. Open fireplace dampers and close screens. • Move flammable furniture away from windows to the center of the room. • Turn a light on in each room to increase the visibility of your home in heavy smoke. • Secure the outside of the house: seal attic and ground vents with plywood; turn off propane tanks; put patio furniture inside; connect garden hoses to taps; set up a portable generator; water the shrubs close to the house. Tips for new home construction • Build your home away from ridge tops, canyons and areas between high points of a ridge. • Build your home at least 30 feet from your property line. • Use fire-resistant building materials. • Enclose the underside of balconies and above-ground decks with fire-resistant materials. • Limit the size and number of windows that face large areas of vegetation. • Install dual- or triple-paned windows. FLOODS Before a flood • Talk to your insurance agent about the need for flood insurance. Nearly all communities in the United States have access to flood insurance. In addition, even if your lender/mortgagee doesn't require flood insurance, this doesn't mean your property isn't in a "flood zone." Under federal guidelines, lenders are required to show evidence that a property backed by a federal loan guarantee has flood insurance, if the property is located in certain high-risk flood zones. However, more than 25% of flood damage occurs in areas that are in lower-risk flood zones. Also, even where the lender requires flood insurance, it is only required on the building, and not on the personal property. Be sure and purchase coverage on your personal property, which can be added as a separate item of coverage on your flood policy. • Under standard flood policies, there is still no coverage for the expense of temporarily relocating (often called "additional living expense"). In addition, standard flood insurance for businesses does not cover lost business income. Talk to your agent to see if either of these coverages might be available through a specialty policy. • When a flood watch is issued, move your furniture and valuables to higher floors in your home. If you live in a single story home, get valuables off the floor and as high as possible (for example, on top of a shelf).


• Fill your car with gas in case you have to evacuate. • Get your disaster supplies kit ready to take with you. You may be given very short notice to evacuate. • Bring outdoor furniture inside. • When a flood warning is issued, listen to your local radio and TV stations for information. • If told by authorities, turn off all utilities at the main switch and close the main gas valve. • If told to evacuate, do so immediately, especially if the warning is for flash flooding. It will be easier to leave before the flood waters become too deep. • If you live in a flood-prone area, stockpile emergency building materials, shovels and sandbags. • Protect your home by having check valves installed in sewer traps to prevent flood waters from backing up in sewer drains. • Have large corks or stoppers on hand to help plug showers, tubs and basins. • Fill tubs, sinks and jugs with fresh water in case the water supply becomes contaminated. During a flood • Don't attempt to drive through floodwaters. • Abandon your car if it stalls in an area where there are rapidly rising waters. • No matter where you are, move to higher ground. • Move away from rivers, streams, creeks, storm drains and other waterways. • Avoid walking through floodwaters. • Obey traffic instructions and detour information. They are being issued for your safety. After a flood • The danger caused by floods isn't over when the water recedes, so don't attempt to return home until authorities say it's safe to do so. • If your car has been submerged, let it dry out thoroughly before trying to start it. • Use battery-powered flashlights or lanterns to examine the premises. Do not attempt to turn the lights on until you are sure it is safe to do so. • Watch out for snakes that may have come into your home with flood waters. Use a stick to poke through debris. • Pump water gradually from flooded basements to avoid structural damage.


• Shovel out mud while it is still moist. • Raise wall-to-wall carpeting to allow air to circulate through it. • When plaster walls have dried, brush off loose dirt. Wash with a mild soap solution and rinse with clean water. • Clean out heating and plumbing systems. • To prevent metal objects from rusting, clean immediately, wipe with a kerosene-soaked cloth and apply a light coat of oil. • Allow clothing and household fabrics to dry before brushing off loose dirt. • Boil any water you use for drinking or food preparation until the water supply is declared safe. • Throw out any food or medicine that has come in contact with flood waters. • Take wooden furniture outside to dry, but keep it out of direct sun-light to prevent warping. • Before the house is aired out, scrub all woodwork and floors with a stiff brush. Saving Family Photos Often when people are interviewed after a major disaster, they express profound sorrow over the loss of family photos. Houses and everything inside them can usually be replaced but photos, which contain years of memories and family history, cannot. These tips may help you preserve your water-damaged photos. • Most prints, negatives and slides can be air-dried. Put the image or picture side face up and avoid touching the front surface. • Hang items on a clothesline, using wooden or other non-abrasive clothespins or use a fan to circulate the air. If using a fan, do not aim it directly at the photos. • For a framed photo, place the frame glass-side down and remove backing materials. Remove the photo and airdry it. If the photo is stuck to the glass, don't remove it. Keeping the glass side down, try to dry the frame with the photo inside. • If photos are covered with mud or dirt and are still wet, they may be gently rinsed in clean, cold water. • If negatives are stuck together or if your photos are badly damaged, consult with a photographic conservator at your local museum or historical society. • Consider keeping digital copies of all photos outside your home, perhaps in safety deposit box or at the home of a trusted family member or friend.


HURRICANES Before a hurricane • Install hurricane shutters or precut 3/4" pieces of marine plywood for each window of your home. • Make trees more wind resistant by removing diseased or damaged limbs, then strategically removing branches so that wind can blow through. • When a hurricane is approaching, a hurricane watch or a hurricane warning will be announced through your local news media. Be prepared to evacuate, especially if you live on the coastline, on an offshore island, in a mobile home, or near a river or floodplain. High winds and flooding are common even if the hurricane doesn't make landfall. Take your disaster supplies kit, sleeping bags and blankets. • Lock the windows and doors of your home before leaving and turn off all utilities. • Follow the recommended evacuation routes. • Store away lightweight objects that could become airborne. • Anchor outdoor objects that cannot be brought inside. • Call your emergency contact person to report your plans. • Fill your car's gas tank. • If you are not told to evacuate, settle in and stay put. Keep the roads free for those who need to use them. Don't be fooled! The first part of the storm is followed by a period of tranquility. It is only the eye of the hurricane passing over. The rest of the storm is yet to come. • Collect your disaster supplies kit, blankets and sleeping bags and keep them near you. • Keep children and pets indoors. • Make sure your battery-powered radio is nearby. • If you're along the immediate coast and in danger of a storm surge, go to a room on an upper floor, preferably one without windows. Stay there until the storm passes. • If you're in a location not susceptible to a coastal storm surge, then go to an interior room on the lowest floor to protect yourself from wind-related damage. After the hurricane • If you have evacuated, wait until authorities tell you it's safe before returning home. • Be alert for tornadoes. • Stay away from flood waters.


• Use a flashlight. Do not light matches or turn on electrical switches. • Sniff for gas leaks. If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open windows and evacuate. If you have any concerns, have the gas system checked by a professional. • Do not touch wires or outlets. • Check for frayed cords and for cracked or broken prongs and plugs. • Turn off the main electrical circuit switch. Be careful to stand on a dry surface and do not touch the metal handle of the switch box. Use a piece of heavy rubber, plastic or a piece of dry wood to open the metal door and throw the switch. Share your concerns with a licensed electrician. • Watch for holes in the floor, loose boards or hanging plaster. • If your home has been flooded, check for snakes and other animals that may have entered the property. • Before you start cleaning up debris, prepare an inventory of all damaged or destroyed personal property. If you can, videotape or photograph the damage. • Make temporary repairs to prevent further damage. • Clean up any flammable or poisonous materials that may have been spilled. • Dispose of all spoiled food immediately. If you have insurance coverage for spoiled food, document your losses. • Hold off on permanent repairs until you've received approval for reimbursement. • Save remnants of damaged or destroyed property for your insurance company adjuster, and do not sign agreements with contractors or anyone else until you have a chance to meet with your insurance adjuster. • Keep a written record of everyone you talk to about your insurance claim, including the date of the conversation and a summary of what was said. • Keep all receipts. • Your pre-disaster home inventory will be of great assistance to you at this point. After you've examined everything and determined the extent of damage, call your independent insurance agent as soon as possible to file a claim. THUNDERSTORMS Before a thunderstorm • Remove dead tree branches near your house which could ignite and cause a fire if struck by lightning. • Unplug all appliances before the storm hits to prevent power surges. • Close blinds and shades.


During a thunderstorm • Keep away from windows. • Avoid using the phone. Telephone lines can conduct electricity. • Stay away from faucets, sinks and bathtubs. • If you are in or near water, go to land immediately and find the best shelter you can—preferably inside a building rather than a car. • If you're in a car, keep the windows closed. Pull to the side of the road to wait until the heavy rain subsides. Keep away from trees that could fall on your car. • If you are outside, find a location that is not likely to flood. Avoid tall structures, such as towers, trees, fences, telephone lines or power lines. • Squat low to the ground and assume a tucked position. Place your hands on your knees with your head tucked between them. Try to touch as little of your body to the ground as possible. Do not lie flat on the ground, as your fully-extended body will provide a larger surface to conduct electricity. • If you feel your hair stand on end in a storm, drop into the tuck position immediately. This sensation means electrical charges are already running up your body from the ground toward an electrically charged cloud. If you can minimize your contact with the ground, you will minimize your injury. After a thunderstorm • Once lightning has struck a person or an object, the person or object does not carry a charge and cannot harm you. So don't be afraid to touch or assist a person who needs help. Administer first aid or CPR immediately. A lightning victim usually suffers burns in two places on the body—where the lightning entered and where it exited. TORNADOES Before the tornado • Become familiar with the type of alarm or notification system your local government will put into effect to let you know if a tornado watch or warning is being issued. Above all, don't wait until a tornado warning is issued to find out what to do. Make sure everyone in the family is fully prepared to take responsibility for his or her own safety. • The best preparation for a tornado is to be alert to changing weather patterns. Pay attention to weather reports and rely on your own instincts and experience. • Nature provides certain environmental clues that may precede a tornado. Look for a dark, greenish sky, a wall of clouds and pieces of hail sometimes as large as grapefruits. Eyewitnesses say a tornado produces aloud roar, similar to that of an approaching freight train.


During the tornado • The safest place to be during a tornado is underground. If there is no basement in your home, a small room in the middle of the house is best. Stay away from windows. • Get under a steady piece of furniture, such as a heavy table or desk. Hold on to it and use your arms to protect your head and neck. • If you live in a mobile home, even if it has tie-downs, you should leave and seek shelter somewhere else. • If there is no safe place inside, go outside and lie flat on the ground with your hands over your head and neck. • If you're in a car, get out and seek a safe shelter or lie down in a low area, again with your hands over your head and neck. • If you're in a high-rise building, make your way to an interior room on the lowest floor. Avoid windows. After a tornado • Check for injured or trapped persons. Do not move them unless they are in immediate danger of further injury.


Adding a Pet to the Family This Holiday Season? ®

Trusted Choice insurance agencies urge families to consider risks and liabilities before giving or receiving pets as gifts. The holiday season often includes images of cute puppies under a Christmas tree or a kitten with a sparkly ribbon around its neck. But before you do your holiday shopping at the pet shop, Trusted Choice® independent insurance agents and brokers recommend considering the risks and liabilities you may also be bringing home. A new national survey by Trusted Choice® found that 29% of respondents, representing more than 65 million households in the United States, said they have either given or received a pet as a gift. Of those, 73% said they never considered liability or risk factors of pet ownership such as higher insurance rates or the need for specialty coverage. “Many people don’t understand or take into consideration the huge financial risk and expense they may be presenting along with that cute puppy,” says Madelyn Flannagan, Big “I” vice president of agent development, education and research. “Pet owners are responsible for their pet’s actions and could be held liable if, for example, their animal bites or injures someone or property.” Trusted Choice® independent insurance agents urge consumers to consider these points before giving someone a pet for the holidays: • Sick puppy? While the concept of health insurance for pets has received a lot of attention lately, it is important for pet owners to know that this coverage is NOT suitable for everyone. These policies are non-regulated insurance products, so purchasers have no recourse through state insurance regulators if there is a complaint or problem with their coverage. In addition, many pet insurance policies exclude routine examinations, vaccinations and pre-existing conditions. This coverage may have some merit for certain pet owners, but consumers should research any pet insurance product carefully before buying it. • Is Fido a biter or a chewer? As a dog owner, you can be held financially responsible if your animal attacks and injures a person or property. That bite can also have huge implications for your insurance. Most people are bitten by dogs they know, not strays. About 50% of all dog bites happen on the owner's property according to the Insurance Information Institute. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says children are the victims of about half of the 800,000 dog bites that are reported yearly in the United States, with the highest rate among children ages five to nine and many requiring medical attention. However, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 10% of children (7.5 million) in the United States do not have health insurance. Talk with your independent agent before you bring a new pet into your home to make sure you have adequate liability coverage and inquire about safety measures to take to protect your family and those who visit your property. • What kind of dog is that? Many insurers are now routinely asking in their policy applications if homeowners or renters have dogs and if those dogs have a history of aggressive behavior. Some companies may even deny coverage to those who own certain breeds of dogs, including wolf hybrids, pit bulls and Rottweilers. Insurance companies can deny claims or limit coverage for dog owners who do not take precautions to prevent their animals from attacking. Many agents recommend at least $500,000 in liability protection for owners of large dogs or for those who own certain breeds. • How much was that doggy in the window? Pet owners must understand that no matter what they paid for their pooch (or any pet), most homeowners insurance policies exclude any damage or injury to animals. So if your pet is injured or killed in a fire or other disaster, it is not likely you will be able to claim it as a loss with your insurance company. • Cruisin’ with canines. Some auto insurers are now including a pet clause which allows for a certain amount of coverage for expenses relating to your dog’s injuries in the event that you are involved in an accident when your dog is in the vehicle. Ask your independent agent about the availability of this special coverage. • Beyond cats and dogs. Does your little princess want a pony? Or maybe your future farmer wants a baby goat? These types of gifts are not uncommon, especially with the popularity of state fairs, livestock competitions and youth agriculture programs. Families who are considering the purchase of horses, goats, calves, pigs and other farm animals may want to consider livestock or animal mortality products that cover certain losses, including drowning and electrocution. These are considered specialty products, though, and are not available through all agents. ”Independent insurance agents not only advise clients about insurance, but they’re risk and liability experts,” says Robert Rusbuldt, Big “I” president & CEO. “We recommend meeting with a Trusted Choice® independent insurance agent who is an expert in assessing your risks and insuring that you and your family know what you’re getting into before adding a pet to your household.”


New September 2009 ACORD 25 Forms Reprint of article by Bill Wilson, Big “I” Virtual University

Some certificate holders are refusing to accept the September 2009 ACORD 25 form because it no longer includes a notice of cancellation, but rather refers them to the policy. They want you to use an earlier edition, modify the current form, or use a proprietary certificate. This article explains why you should not or cannot comply with this demand. Also included is a "one-pager" you can give to your customers or third parties that explains this. In September 2009, ACORD made significant changes to the ACORD 24 and ACORD 25. Big "I" members can review all 39 of those changes, including several in great detail, here: "New September 2009 ACORD 24 and 25 Forms" (access requires member username and password). However, the main change involved essentially removing notice of cancellation from these certificate forms. This same change was made to all of the other ACORD certificate and evidence forms (ACORD 20, 21, 22, 23, 27, and 28) in December 2009. Why was this change made? It began with ACORD being pressured by state regulators who had taken the position that notice of cancellation is a policy right, not a voluntary service, and should be governed by the policy. Only filed policy forms can grant policy rights, not certificates. Throughout this article, reference will be made to state laws, regulations, and insurance department directives. For detail on all of these state-specific legal issues that we are aware of, go to this public web page: "Certificate Laws and Regulations" We are just now starting to see some push-back from third parties on this change similar to that seen when the ACORD 27 and ACORD 28 were revised in 2006. The push-back from lenders on the ACORD 27 and 28 resulted in the following article in the public section of our Virtual University web site (scroll down the article to download a one-page explanatory form Big "I" members can give to lenders to explain why they cannot use the older forms): "Providing Proof of Insurance Coverage to Lenders" As a result, we anticipate that agents will begin receiving demands from certificate requestors to: (1) use older ACORD forms, (2) amend the newer forms (or add addenda) to include cancellation notice, (3) complete proprietary certificate forms, or (4) warrant coverages or rights via an "agent affidavit" or "compliance checklist." The purpose of this article is to explore the reasons for the removal of cancellation notice from the ACORD certificates and to suggest how agents can respond to requests as just outlined. Anticipated marketplace response "It's going to get worse before it gets better." — Dalton, in the movie Road House. In each of the following instances, compliance with these requests or demands can create both contractual and regulatory problems for agents, not to mention dramatically increasing the likelihood of litigation. 1. Requests to use older ACORD forms. Under ACORD’s licensing agreement, the prior editions of superseded forms can be used for one year from the time the new forms are introduced. For example, the latest ACORD 25 is dated September 2009. The prior edition was January 2009. Therefore, under ACORD's licensing agreement, the January 2009 edition can continue to be used until the September 2009 version has been in use for one year. That is, the January 2009 form could be used until at least September 2010. After this time, agents issuing earlier editions of the September 2009 ACORD 25 are in violation of ACORD's licensing agreement prohibiting the use of those copyrighted forms. To confirm this, check out this “Certificates FAQs” document from ACORD: http://www.acord.org/standards/forms/Documents/ACORDCertificatesFAQ_201004.pdf In addition, some states require all certificates (or non-ACORD or non-ISO certificates) to be filed and approved and would not permit the issuance of older editions.


2. Requests to amend the newer forms (or add addendums) to include cancellation notice. Many, if not most, agency/ company agreements prohibit the issuance of modified ACORD forms without the insurer's express consent. Therefore, contractually, the agency may be unable to issue such amended certificates and must refer them to insurers. In addition, ACORD's Forms Instruction Guide says, "The ACORD Certificate should be issued only in compliance with company instructions. ACORD recommends that the Certificate NOT be used in the following situations...To waive rights...To quote wording from a contract...To quote any wording which amends a policy unless the policy itself has been amended." 3. Requests to complete proprietary certificate forms. In addition to the agency/company agreement issues discussed in #2 above, proprietary certificate forms may not comply with insurance laws or regulations regarding filing or content. Some states require all certificates (or non-ACORD or non-ISO certificates) to be filed and approved and would not permit the issuance of unfiled proprietary certificates. Many states now require specific language be shown on certificates. At least nineteen states mandate the “does not amend, extend or alter” language on the certificate…pretty much all others implicitly prohibit it since the certificate would effectively become a policy form, and an illegal unfiled form at that. Also, proprietary forms often omit disclaimers and use vague or ambiguous language that can create the potential for claims of breach of contract, misrepresentation or fraud, or otherwise result in adverse litigation. On top of that, nonstandard forms may imply that the certificate grants policy rights that don't exist. As a result, the agent may be accused of executing a non-filed policy form, resulting in loss of license or other penalties. 4. Requests to warrant coverages or rights via an "agent affidavit" or "compliance checklist." Sometimes a certificate requestor may require some sort of warranty that the policy forms being provided comply with the contract the insured has signed. This "affidavit," "compliance checklist," “opinion letter,” or whatever name it is called is often an attempt to circumvent restrictions on what can or should be shown on a certificate and to establish a legally actionable document. Typically these contracts include an indemnity agreement for which no insurance program in the world can fully comply. Often the questions or required statements on these documents are so broad, vague, or ambiguous that the resulting completed document may end up being accused of being a misrepresentation or fraudulent insurance document. At least four states explicitly prohibit issuing an agent “opinion letter” that misrepresents policy coverages. While a state may not have certificate-specific laws or regulations, all states have laws against the issuance of fraudulent documents. For example, indicating that a certain notice of cancellation may be or will be provided to a certificate holder is more often than subject to being challenged as a misrepresentation or fraudulent statement. For more information on this issue, please read this article on the Virtual University: "Beware Indemnity Agreement Agent Affidavits" (access requires member username and password).

Why certificate notice of cancellation is illegal, impractical, and/or impossible For years, agents have included entries on the ACORD 25 such as “30” days notice of cancellation, even though such notice may not have been granted by the policy. None of the ISO CGL additional insured endorsements provide for cancellation notice. The only ISO cancellation notice endorsements we’re aware of are restricted to the state of Texas: CG 02 05 12 04 — Texas Changes - Amendment of Cancellation Provisions or Coverage Change CA 02 44 06 04 — Texas Cancellation Provision or Coverage Change Endorsement Some insurers will issue proprietary cancellation notices for certificate holders or additional insureds selectively, depending on the agent and/or the account. Aside from these apparently relatively rare occurrences, the reality is that, when agents indicate that a specific notice of cancellation will be provided by the insurer on a certificate of insurance, this means one of two things. First, there is no real expectation of the insurer providing notice. In such cases, the question of whether this makes the certificate a misrepresentation or fraudulent insurance document depends on state laws.


Second, the agency may very well intend to make a good faith effort to voluntarily provide notice to the certificate holder or additional insured. Many are diligent about this. However, the reality is that in many or most cases, notice simply cannot be provided as required by the contract the insured has signed. This is one reason prior editions of the ACORD forms use the language "endeavor to," because, try as they might, in many instances it's simply impossible to provide the notice the contract requires. For example, the most common provision is one similar to that in the AIA A201 contract: "[T]hese certificates and the insurance policies required by this Section 11.1 shall contain a provision that coverage afforded under the policy will not be cancelled or allowed to expire until at least 30 days prior written notice has been given to the owner." The problem is that it is virtually impossible to comply with this requirement. Even insurers who do issue notice endorsements rarely if ever fully comply with this. Here's why.... The AIA language applies to policies that are "cancelled or allowed to expire." It does not distinguish between cancellation by the insurer or insured and, presumably, "allowed to expire" refers to nonrenewal. In addition, consider that many contracts also require notice of "material change" (always undefined) or reductions in coverage (which might be interpreted as partial cancellations under contracts that simply refer to "cancellation." We've already established that the reality of the marketplace is that the insurer is probably not going to provide notice to a certificate holder, or an additional insured for that matter. In fact, for certificate holder, many insurers become ill-tempered if the agency copies them on certificates and most have advised agents not to copy them. At best, the agent has voluntarily assumed that notice in states where it is still legal to do so. So, what happens if the insured cancels immediately by written notice or surrendering the policy? How can the agent give 30 days notice unless either s/he or the certificate holder is willing to pay for an extra 30 days of coverage (which the insurer is unlikely to accept since they are not a party to the insurance contract)? What if the policy is cancelled by the insurer for nonpayment, fraud, misrepresentation, or criminal conviction? How can the agent possibly give 30 days notice to the certificate holder? The answer is simple: It can't be done. And, again, if the agent is aware of this, there is the very real risk of a claim that s/he issued a fraudulent or misleading document. As blanket additional insured endorsements are being increasingly used due to the proliferation of AI requests, additional notice problems are created. Over the course of a year, an insured may have dozens or hundreds of additional insured requests. The insured is signing contracts requiring notice of cancellation and the agency is not even aware of who these additional insureds are because of the automatic status granted by written contract. It’s impossible to provide the 30 days notice many of these contracts require when other party is unknown. Also consider that many of these nonpayment cancellations involve missing installment premiums and coverage is subsequently reinstated. So the agency issues a certificate, then sends a cancellation notice, then sends a new certificate following reinstatement. What one certificate requestor is now doing Some third parties have recognized the realities of the marketplace and discontinued requiring notice of cancellation. A good example is the City of Atlanta, Georgia, as outlined in this presentation by their legal department at a 2008 conference: http://www.aci-na.org/static/entransit/Caput--Legal Aspects of Airport Insurance.pdf Originally, the city required 30 days notice of cancellation for any reason other than nonpayment (10 days required) and material change in insurance. How this was usually effected, if at all, was by using an ACORD 25 and striking the "endeavor to" and "but failure to do so shall impose no obligation or liability of any kind upon the insurer, its agents or representatives" language. The city indicated that they routinely faced contractors, agents, and insurers that refused to provide certificates or endorsements complying with the city's notice of cancellation requirements.


The city discovered that these disagreements caused significant problems and delays in contract execution while the issues were being resolved or debated. For example, 5% of certificates had already expired, 20% had missing information, 50% were not backed up by additional insured endorsements, and 75% did not include the requested cancellation notice. These problems, on average, took several weeks to resolve. The City of Atlanta found that, in the last 15 years, there had been no known incidents linked to cancelled contractor insurance and that at least 16 hours every week in the legal department were dedicated just to resolving cancellation notice issues. As a result of this study, the City no longer requires direct notice of cancellation by the agent or insurer, but does require the contractor to fax a copy of the insurer's cancellation notice within 2 business days of receipt. So, what should agencies do? We suggest not providing ANY notice of cancellation not supported by the policy. We agree with the emerging stance being taken by regulators that notice of cancellation is a contractual policy right and should be governed by the policy and state law. In those states, agents would be required by law to comply with insurance department directives and other applicable state laws. Even where there is not a specific legal requirement in place, we believe that if you show that 30 days notice of cancellation will be provided, knowing that it is possible that the insured can cancel without advance notice and that the insurer is only required to give 10-20 days notice for nonpayment, you have issued a misleading document. This could quite possibly be a violation of fraud, unfair trade practices, or other state laws. Given that, the alternative is to provide for such notice via endorsement to the policy(ies). Many insurers have dumped the entire certificate mess in the laps of agents and left them twisting in the wind to fend for themselves. However, we believe that a policy right such as notice of cancellation is an insurer issue, not an agency issue. The parties to the insurance contract are insurers and insureds and only they can resolve this issue. This requires recognizing the realities and necessities of the marketplace. No doubt, some -- perhaps many -- carriers will continue to refuse to provide notice to anyone other than a First Named Insured, mortgagee, or loss payee. These carriers and their agents will lose business to those who are willing to do this. Finally, to assist you in educating your customers and those they do business with, the following is a "one-pager" that IIABA members can give to insureds or certificate requestors to explain why you are using the current edition of the ACORD 25: "Why We Are Using the Latest ACORD 25 Certificate of Insurance" (access requires member username and password). Closing with another quote from the legendary philosopher, Dalton, "Nobody ever wins a fight." It's time to end the conflict and reach an agreement that all parties can live with that is reasonable, fair, and cost effective.

Article Addendum: On November 9, 2010, Connecticut Insurance Commissioner, Thomas Sullivan, issued Bulletin S-14 concerning the proper use of Certificates of Insurance. To view Bulletin S-14, please click here.


Does Brand Matter? In the daily bustle of operations, it’s easy to forget about the most important asset you as an owner have to manage: your agency’s brand. Why is this? Perhaps because when considering your brand, there doesn’t appear to be an instant gratification. Many of you grew up selling. As sales people, you’ve been trained to think, “If I do this activity, I can make this many sales, which translates into this much revenue and this much profit.” To be sure, your firm’s brand is a big-picture concept. Your task is to break it down into pieces so you can take steps to manage it. For example, at your next staff meeting discuss the importance of your brand. Note that each employee’s daily behavior is largely responsible for helping, or hurting, your brand. You might see eyes glazing over. They might be wondering how this topic possibly can relate to what they do. But there are many good reasons for all to care about your brand. Here are nine ways in which brands can get stronger. At your staff meeting, put them up on a white board, a flip chart or a PowerPoint and encourage discussion: 1. Consumers have choices about where to buy insurance and financial services, and strong brands help consumers edit those choices. In figuring out where to shop and buy among often bewildering choices, consumers want to go to a source, or a few sources, they trust. Remember that people buy brand, not a product or service. 2. Your brand literally is what people say about you. Hence, referrals are critical to new business. Strong agency brands create and maintain top-of-mind awareness in their communities, helping current customers and opinion leaders direct business their way. 3. Strong brands get to choose their clients. They have more loyal customers. In turn, they have lower customer churn or dissatisfaction. That, in turn, means fewer E&O issues. 4. Strong brands have increased revenue per customer, especially those with a consistent plan to reach out to customers. Great brands never forget the importance of taking care of people already on the books. 5. You can more easily roll out new products if you have a strong brand. Research leading to the development of Trusted Choice® demonstrated the value of offering customers the opportunity to purchase other insurance and financial services products. This is what consumers say they want from an insurance provider, so offer them the opportunities to buy! 6. Strong brands guide employee behavior. Everyone is on the same page, and everyone is after the same vision. There are no freelancers doing their own workflows, and there are no arrogant producers pushing the staff around. The best brands attract—and keep—great staffers. 7. Similarly, strong brands attract and retain the best carriers and other business partners. Great brands offer best-of-breed products and services. (Perhaps it’s time to leave one of your carriers if it’s no longer truly supporting your brand?) 8. Who wants to battle it out in a price war? Who wants to be a commodity in the agent or broker business? A strong brand will keep you on a value, not price, platform. That means your customers care most about the overall value they’re getting. 9. Strong independent agent and broker brands consistently increase in value. After all, every agency someday will be acquired, merged, taken public or given to the kids, so you want it to be as valuable a business as it deserves to be.


Does Brand Matter? Continued from page 29

With these staff discussions around brand, you actually can define your business strategy and tactics. Ask, “If this is (or is going to be) our brand, what should we be doing?” It should help stop arguments in your agency. If your brand is about friendly service, and your receptionist has difficulty dealing with the public in a positive manner, it’s time to make a switch. If your brand is about choice, make sure you demonstrate clearly on your Web site that you offer multiple products from multiple companies. If your brand will be more about financial services and less about property-casualty products, are operations aligned to support that? A great guide to staying consistent with your brand message with your staff is the Trusted Choice ® Pledge of Performance. This Pledge articulates exactly what consumers say they want from their insurance provider. There are 10 subject areas addressed in the Pledge. For example, Trusted Choice® agents pledge to “Use our experience and multiple-company relationships to customize your coverage as needed.” Ask: What does that literally mean day-to-day in your firm? Are you customizing all coverages? Trusted Choice® adds value as an additional ingredient to strong independent agent and broker brands. To reiterate: Trusted Choice® provides consumers exactly what they say they want from their insurance provider. Go to www.TrustedChoice.com for more branding tips.


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A COMPLETE ANNUAL CALENDAR CAN BE OBTAINED ON THE “EDUCATION” PAGE OF OUR WEBSITE CONNECTICUT CONTINUING EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS All resident agents are subject to continuing education for every line of authority. The Connecticut Insurance Department has an extensive website (www.ct.gov/cid) offering information on licensing, forms, statutes, regulations (proposed and finalized) Please take advantage of this web site for valuable information. Individual transcript information can be obtained by accessing www.sircon.com. Once on the website, select “For Individual Agents” from the “Products and Services” menu. Under “Quick Start for Agents” (at the top of the page) select “Look Up Education Courses / Credits.” This will bring you to an “Inquiries” page. Select “Continuing Education Transcript Inquiry.” Select “Connecticut” from the drop-down menu. Enter your license number and last name and click “submit.” You will now be able to view and print your transcript. Please note that transcripts are only accessible using producer license numbers. Social Security numbers are no longer usable. Flood Insurance Course Requirement Newly licensed agents are required to complete a flood program course during their first compliance period.


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A COMPLETE ANNUAL CALENDAR CAN BE OBTAINED ON THE “EDUCATION” PAGE OF OUR WEBSITE CONNECTICUT CONTINUING EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS All resident agents are subject to continuing education for every line of authority. The Connecticut Insurance Department has an extensive website (www.ct.gov/cid) offering information on licensing, forms, statutes, regulations (proposed and finalized) Please take advantage of this web site for valuable information. Individual transcript information can be obtained by accessing www.sircon.com. Once on the website, select “For Individual Agents” from the “Products and Services” menu. Under “Quick Start for Agents” (at the top of the page) select “Look Up Education Courses / Credits.” This will bring you to an “Inquiries” page. Select “Continuing Education Transcript Inquiry.” Select “Connecticut” from the drop-down menu. Enter your license number and last name and click “submit.” You will now be able to view and print your transcript. Please note that transcripts are only accessible using producer license numbers. Social Security numbers are no longer usable. Flood Insurance Course Requirement Newly licensed agents are required to complete a flood program course during their first compliance period.


2011 IIAC EVENTS Spring Conference Sponsored by the IIAC Young Agents Committee May 2011 Exact Date and Venue TBA

Annual Dinner Meeting and Installation of Officers June 16, 2011 St. Clement’s Castle, Portland, CT

22nd Annual Golf Tournament Sponsored by the IIAC Young Agents Committee August 4, 2011 Blackledge Golf Course, Hebron, CT

Mid-Year Convention November 10, 2011 Aqua Turf Club, Plantsville, CT

Additional information and registration forms for the above events can be obtained on the “Events” page of our website or by contacting Tracy Hearn at 860-563-1950 or emailing to thearn@iiac.org.


WHO ARE THE INDEPENDENT INSURANCE AGENTS OF CONNECTICUT? The Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut was founded in 1899 as the Connecticut Association of Local Fire Insurance Agents. The organization’s name was changed in 1913 to the Connecticut Association of Insurance Agents. This name was considered more representative of the membership due to the expansion of the property-casualty business coverages and the increased presence of casualty and surety agents. In 1975 the organization became The Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut to emphasize its members abilities to work with a variety of insurance companies and industry representatives. The Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut has always been in the lead on important issues for agents. The list is long as IIAC has worked with regulators and the insurance industry on important issues such as agent licensing, anti-rebate laws, ownership of expirations, banking and insurance, and agent compensation to name a few. Today IIAC offers a wide variety of products and services to its members. The education calendar offers a full assortment of choices for licensing, continuing education and advanced degree programs. In addition, IIAC offers several insurance programs for our members that can be purchased to protect their agency business and insurance products that members can sell to their customers. IIAC also offers technical and regulatory assistant to our members. Technical advice is available at the staff level and through the Virtual University where you can “Ask The Expert.” In addition, IIAC meets regularly with the Insurance Commissioner and department staff to discuss current market conditions and consumers issues. IIAC is a strong advocate for independent agents at our state capital and in Washington D.C. Whatever the issue may be, IIAC is the voice for independent agents as we represent the interests of our membership. Our national association, IIABA is a predominant lobbying force in Washington and is constantly ranked among the top 10 of all the lobbying groups in the United States. The Big “I” mission succinctly captures our purpose: “to provide independent agents with a sustainable competitive advantage.” To accomplish that, IIAC is the unrelenting advocate on the issues that shape the environment in which our membership conducts business. IIAC is the voice in the halls of Congress, the state capital and in boardrooms across the nation.

INSURPAC InsurPac is the Political Action Committee (PAC) of the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America (IIABA). It represents the unified political voice of IIABA's 23,000 member agencies and 300,000 agents and brokers nationwide. It is the largest property-casualty insurance industry PAC in the country, and is one of the primary reasons the Big "I" is routinely rated among the most successful lobbying groups in Washington, DC. "Lobbying and a well-funded PAC go hand-in-hand," says Charles Symington, IIABA's Senior Vice President of Government Affairs. "InsurPac's voice resonates through the halls of Congress on behalf of the Big "I". Every elected official knows that a contribution from InsurPac is a contribution from 23,000 small business owners." InsurPac raises funds by asking for voluntary personal contributions from independent agents and brokers throughout the country. By pooling money together, InsurPac helps elect candidates and re-elect members of the U.S. Congress who share IIABA's business philosophy. This concept of pooling personal contributions together for the greater good is essential to understanding the importance of PACs. As an individual, you can make the average contribution of $200 to a Congressman, or you can invest that $200 in a PAC, which in turn combines that with 9 other donors and gives the same Congressman $2,000. At the end of the day, PACs are able to speak with a collective voice that is much louder than that of an individual. It is impossible to overvalue the power of a collective voice -- of a collective InsurPac speaking on behalf of the Independent Agency system.


2010 - 2011 Officers Chairman Tom Wilson The Wilson Agency, Shelton Chairman-Elect Michael Gergler, CIC Wilcox & Reynolds, Storrs Treasurer Jim Suzio, CIC Suzio Insurance Center, Inc., Meriden Secretary Kim McGillicuddy, CPCU Pierson & Smith, Inc., Norwalk Immediate Past Chairman Kurt Battey Scholes Agency, Inc., East Haddam

IIAC Committees The Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut has several committees which are dedicated to furthering both the benefits of membership and the professionalism of individuals within the insurance industry. Committee members are volunteers who are either an owner or an employee of a member agency. IIAC is always looking for new individuals to serve on its committees. If you are interested in becoming a committee member, please complete the information below and return this form to: IIAC, 30 Jordan Lane, Wethersfield, CT 06109 or email to the committee staff liaison Name: ___________________________________________________________________________________ Agency & Full Address: ______________________________________________________________________ Phone: (______)__________-__________

E-Mail: _____________________________________________

Indicate Committee: ________________________________________________________________________ Education Committee – members help create IIAC programs and locate teachers and resources. Staff Liaison, Ed Meaney, emeaney@iiac.org Executive Committee – members must be a principal in an IIAC member agency and are part of the governing body of the association. Membership on the committee is limited and must be voted upon by the Board of Directors. Staff Liaison, Warren C. Ruppar, wruppar@iiac.org Technical Committee – members analyze current industry topics and issues, make recommendations on how to handle, and funnel information to the Education Committee to create programs. Staff Liaison, Ed Meaney, emeaney@iiac.org Young Agents Committee – members create networking programs to promote young professionals in the insurance industry. Staff Liaison, Tracy Hearn, thearn@iiac.org


ARE YOU TAKING ADVANTAGE

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OF ALL YOUR MEMBERSHIP HAS TO OFFER??

Big “I” Advantage Programs

Big “I” Professional Liability As a member of your state association, you have access to the Big “I” Professional Liability program, the most respected and comprehensive program in the business offering a variety of insurance agent’s E&O products that are hand-selected for their superior reputation and exceptional performance. With comprehensive rates and a long-term market, the Big “I” Professional Liability program is properly positioned to meet your professional needs, protecting the future of your agency. www.iiact.org - Member Resources page / Or call Laura Szatkowski at 860-563-6510

Big “I” Markets Exclusively available to Big “I” members, IIABA’s online market access program features specialty/niche coverages, program business and hard-to-find markets. Unlike similar programs, there are no registration fees, no volume commitments and competitive commissions. www.bigimarkets.com

Big “I” Flood Big “I” Advantage operates as a managing general agency and agents participate as sub-producers for the Big “I” Flood Program. Selective Insurance Company is our provider for this NFIP Write-Your-Own program and they make writing flood insurance easy and profitable leaving the method of quoting up to the agent. www.independentagent.com/flood.

Big “I” Retirement/Benefits Having trouble deciding which retirement plan is right for you or your agency? Big "I" Retirement Services is here to help you choose which plan best meets your circumstances. They offer quality investments, state of the art administration and the support of your association as an advocate for your agency. Look to us also for Group Long Term Disability, Group Short Term Disability and Group Term Life Insurance. www.independentagent.com/retirement .

RLI RLI's Personal Umbrella Policy stands atop your client’s existing homeowner and auto insurance to provide an extra layer of personal liability protection. With RLI's PUP program, auto or home coverage can be maintained with any insurance company provided the mandatory minimum underlying coverage limits are met. RLI’s @Home Business policy, responds to the needs of over 100 eligible business classes on an ISO BOP form. Premiums starting at $150, competitive commissions, easy underwriting and a self-rating application should makes this product an easy sell. www.iiact.org - Member Resources page / or call Rose Mullaly at 860-563-6510.

Business Resources Enjoy group discounts for a variety of services to assist in managing your agency. Caliper (employee testing) ; DHL (express delivery); Mines Press (printing); Big “I” Store (logowear); Hertz (car rental); Artizan Internet Services (Service 911, CSR 24). www.independentagent.com.


ARE YOU TAKING ADVANTAGE

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OF ALL YOUR MEMBERSHIP HAS TO OFFER??

Big “I” Advantage Programs

InsurBanc InsurBanc is an independent community bank founded by agents exclusively for agents. You can rely on InsurBanc for custom products designed to underwrite your success, like acquisition and perpetuation financing and cash management services perfectly suited to the way you do business. www.insurbanc.com.

Virtual University www.independentagent.com/vu

Research Library For those who seek a smarter way to research, the VU provides access to hundreds of insurance, business and technology articles written by volunteer faculty and other contributors. Technical insurance articles and white papers on issues affecting today’s marketplace, often include links to full sample ISO forms. Resources in the VU are limitless.

Ask an Expert Service Sometimes you need answers to questions that can't be found in the research library. To help with these "just in time" issues, we have assembled a faculty of leading experts from around the country. Big "I" Members can submit questions to our "Ask an Expert" service and a response is usually sent within 3-5 business days, but often sooner.

Online Courses The VU offers a wide variety of online classes to enhance and expand insurance technical and business skills. Many designation programs are also available through the Virtual University.

Best Practices The Best Practices program provides member agents with meaningful performance benchmarks and business strategies that can be adapted to improve the performance of your agency, thus enhancing agency value.

Trusted Choice® In a world full of millions of media messages each day, differentiating the services of independent agents and brokers to consumers is critical. Trusted Choice®, the national consumer branding program sponsored by the Big “I”, uniting more than 10,000 independent agency locations and 53 insurance companies. Based on extensive consumer and industry research, Trusted Choice® highlights the value of the independent agent distribution channel: choice, customization and advocacy. www.trustedchoice.com

Governmental Affairs The Big “I” is your advocate on the issues that matter to your success, whether the issues occur in state legislatures, Washington D.C., your state insurance department, the NAIC, or the judicial system. Through common-sense, pragmatic legislative initiatives, we seek to protect your business while keeping the consumer in mind.


ASSOCIATE MEMBER - INSURANCE BROKERS AND SERVICES (Click on the Associate Members website for a direct link) ACE Private Risk Services 860-828-7931 www.aceprivateriskservices.com

Glass America 860-444-6344 www.glassusa.com

Agility Recovery 704-341-8700 www.agilityrecovery.com

HSB Associates, Inc. 860-722-5539 www.hsb.com

Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Services, Inc. 860-560-2766 www.ajg.com

Insurance Agency Accounting & Bookkeeping 860-614-7268 www.brendadicarlollc.com

Auto Glass of New England, LLC 203-375-4700 www.autoglassofnewengland.com

InsurBanc 866-467-2262 www.insurbanc.com

CATIC Exchange Solutions, Inc. 860-513-3131 www.caticexchange.com

Iroquois of Connecticut, Inc. 860-621-8412 www.iroquoisct.com

Connecticut Interlocal Risk Management Agency 203-498-3000 www.ccm-ct.org/insurance/

Kapura Cleaning & Restoration 860-747-2100 www.kapurarestoration.com

Connecticut Underwriters, Inc. 860-347-9600 www.ctunderwriters.com

Joseph Krar & Associates 860-628-3967 www.jkrar.com

Crystal Restoration Services 203-853-4179 www.crystal1.com

J.P. Maguire Assoc., Inc. 800-233-8220 www.jpmaguire.com

Paul Davis Restoration 860-539-0911 www.pdrestoration.com

Anthony Martini & Company, Inc. 203-445-6640 www.thatsmybroker.com

Demetriou General Agency, Inc. 212-897-6912 www.demetriougroup.com

McGrath Insurance Group, Inc. 508-347-6850 www.mcgrathinsurance.com

Gill and Roeser Holdings, Inc. 212-972-3306 www.grholdings.com

Mergers & Acquisition Services 212-750-0630 www.merger-acquisition.net (Continued on next page)

For information on how to become an Associate Member of the Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut and a complete list of benefits, please visit the “Join� page of our website or contact Rose Mullaly at 860-563-1950 or email rmullaly@iiac.org


ASSOCIATE MEMBER - INSURANCE BROKERS AND SERVICES (Click on the Associate Members website for a direct link) Money Concepts Financial Planning Center 888-229-0316 www,moneyconcepts.com/tjones

ServiceMaster by Wills 860-447-3265 www.servicemasterbymason.com

Oakbridge Insurance Services 860-906-0120 www.oakbridgeins.com

SERVPRO Cleaning and Restoration of New Haven, Waterbury & Naugatuck Valley 1-800-243-8812 www.servproofnewhaven.com

Premium Assignment Corp. 603-421-1953 www.premiumassignment.com

SERVPRO of Manchester-Bolton 860-649-0836 www.servproofwesthartford.com

JN Phillips Auto Glass 781-939-3400 www.877autoglass.com

Steamatic of CT 203-985-8000 www.steamaticct.com

Pro-Klean Cleaning & Restoration Services, Inc. 866-463-2313 www.pro-klean.com

Target Insurance Services 860-284-0088 www.target-capital.com

PuroClean Mitigation Services 860-516-8083 http:..ms-ct.puroclean.com

Thompson Agency, Inc. 860-693-4999 www.thompsonagency.net

Renaissance Group, Inc. 860-307-2957 www.renaissanceins.com

Travel Insured International, Inc. 860-528-7663 www.travelinsured.com

Robert Hensley & Associates 860-678-1090 www.hensleyasociates.com

United Cleaning & Restoration, LLC 800-835-0740 www.unitedcr.com

Servicemaster QRV Regional Group 203-386-1565 www.servicemastergb.com

XS Brokers Insurance Agency, Inc. 617-471-7171 www.xsbrokers.com (Continued on next page)

For information on how to become an Associate Member of the Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut and a complete list of benefits, please visit the “Join� page of our website or contact Rose Mullaly at 860-563-1950 or email rmullaly@iiac.org


ASSOCIATE MEMBER - INSURANCE COMPANIES (Click on the Associate Members website for a direct link) Acadia Insurance Company 860-331-2391 www.acadiainsurance.com

MetLife Auto & Home 860-668-2699 www.metlife.com

American Commerce Insurance Company A MAPFRE Company 800-922-8276 www.acilink.com

MiddleOak 860-638-5132 www.middleoak.com

The Andover Companies 860-257-7286 www.andoverco.com

NLC Insurance Company 860-887-3553 www.nlcinsurance.com

Chubb & Son Insurance 203-782-4115 www.chubb.com

Ohio Mutual Insurance 419-563-0959 www.omig.com

C N A Insurance 860-513-6460 www.cnacentral.com

Peerless Insurance 860-571-2201 www.peerless-ins.com

Connecticut Fair Plan 860-528-9546 www.ctfairplan.com

Pennsylvania Millers Ins. Co. 860-677-8488 www.pennmillers.com

FirstComp 888-500-3344 www.firstcomp.com

PMA Insurance 203-379-3825 www.pmagroup.com

General Casualty Insurance 860-570-0802 www.generalcasualty.com

Progressive Insurance Company 800-274-4055 www.progressiveagent.com

Harleysville Worcester Insurance Company 800-225-7387 www.harleysvillegroup.com

Safeco Insurance 603-358-4156 www.safeco.com

The Hartford 860-409-6150 www.thehartford.com

Seacoast Brokers, LLC 843-341-1600 www.seacoastbrokers.com

The Hingham Group 781-749-0841 www.hinghammutual.com

State Auto Insurance Companies 860-633-4678 www.stateauto.com

Kemper, A Unitrin Business 203-775-5846 www.ekemper.com

Utica National Insurance Group 800-695-1914 www.uticanational.com

For information on how to become an Associate Member of the Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut and a complete list of benefits, please visit the “Join� page of our website or contact Rose Mullaly at 860-563-1950 or email rmullaly@iiac.org


The Connecticut Independent Agent