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SYNERGY

PT

Official Publication of the Texas Physical Therapy Association

Members Giving Back How Texas PTs are vounteering their services locally and in other countries to those who need it most


OFFICERS: Michael Connors, PT, DPT, OCS, President Michael Geelhoed, PT, DPT, MTC, OCS, Vice-President Lois Stickley, PT, PhD, Speaker of the Assembly Jennifer Frerich, PT, DPT, OCS, Secretary Robert Sandoval, PT, PhD, Treasurer

TPTA DISTRICT CHAIRS:

COMMITTEE CHAIRS:

Capitol Area: Central: Coastal Bend: East Texas: Greater El Paso: Heart of Texas: Midwest: Midwest: North Texas: Panhandle: Permian Basin: South Plains: Southeastern:

Nominating Committee: AC Committee: Bylaws Committee: Ethics Committee: Government Affairs Committee: Membership Co-Chairs: Practice Committee: Professional Dev. Co-Chairs: Public Relations Committee: Payment Policy Committee:

Mark Mililgan, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Robert Sandoval, PT, PhD Aaron Cantu, PT, DPT Polly Bowers-Maness, PTA Bryan Boyea, PT Kristi Trammell, PT, DPT Mary Lou Garrett, PT, DPT, C/NDT, PCS (Co-Chair) Regina Hartnett, PT (Co-Chair) Seth Watson, PT, DPT, Cert. DN, CSCS Spencer Church, PT, DPT (Co-Chair) Misty Miller, PT, DPT (Co-Chair) Vacant Brad Allen, PT, ScD, COMT Gail Zitterkopf, PT, DPT, CLT, CKTP



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Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PhD, PCS Kristi Trammell, PT, DPT Martha Sneary, PT, DPT, MSCPM Robert Sandoval, PT, PhD Cynthia Fisher, PT, DPT, MS, PCS Marcos Lopez, PT, DPT, OCS Janna McGaugh, PT, ScD, OCS Jon Anderson, PT Kristi Trammell, PT, DPT Michele Voight, PTA, MPA Katherine Reyes-Brooks, PT, DPT William "Bill" Lewis, PT, DPT


CONTENTS WINTER 2017

PT Synergy is published for Texas Physical Therapy Association 900 Congress Avenue, Suite 410 Austin, TX 78701 512.477.1818 www.tpta.org EDITOR IN CHIEF Craig Tounget, CAE Executive Director ctounget@tpta.org MANAGING EDITOR Stacey Mather, CAE Deputy Executive Director smather@tpta.org PT SYNERGY is published quarterly by the Texas Physical Therapy Association.

6 9 12 16

Evidence-Based Practice in Pediatrics House of Delegates Update

7

PTs as the Wellness Experts

TPTA Bylaws Changes

Tom Waugh Leadership Development Program

12

Members Giving Back

14

Annual Conference Recap

IN EVERY ISSUE 4 TPTA Member Updates 5 Executive Director's Report 7 PoP Quiz Questions page 3

Winter 2017


MEMBER UPDATES TPTA 2017 Leadership Winners Congratulations to the new TPTA officers & delegates

New TSPTA Officers President Cambria Carson

Vice President Michael Geelhoed, PT, DPT, MTC, OCS

Vice President Cord DeMoss

Chief Delegate Janet Bezner, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA

PT Delegate Joshua Hill

PTA Caucus Representative Deborah Nicole Volek, PTA

PTA Delegate Shelby Nail

Nominating Committee Member Lauren Szot, PT, DPT, NCS

Secretary Amanda Scampini

Delegates-at-Large Kimberly Broderick, PT, SCS, OCS, ATC, CFMT, MS Michael Geelhoed, PT, DPT, MTC, OCS Denise Gobert, PT, PhD, CEEAA, NCS Rupal Patel, PT, PhD Colette Pientok, PT, DPT, OCS Robert Sandoval, PT, PhD Winter 2017

Treasurer Meagan McCluskey Core Ambassador Daniel Millar

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THE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT CRAIG TOUNGET, CAE

I

t was great to get to meet many of you at the Annual Conference in Corpus Christi. We had a very successful conference and I would encourage all of you who did not attend this year to plan to be at next year’s. The most important item on the to-do list for TPTA in the coming months is to develop a new strategic plan for the association. At the next Board of Director’s meeting, January 19-20, 2018 in Austin, we will devote a great deal of our time to working on the strategic plan and developing the goals of TPTA for the next few years and to developing the strategies to ensure that we are successful in meeting those goals. As a member-driven organization it is imperative that we hear from you about what is important to you as a member. What is it that you need from TPTA? What is important to you in terms of legislative priorities? Regulatory issues? Annual Conference? Communications? Other items that we are not currently being addressed? You will be receiving surveys about legislative priorities and other issues, but please also feel free to reach out to your District Chair, your SIG Chair, any of the Officers of TPTA or to me or other staff members to let us know of your concerns. The staff and all of your volunteer Board Members

are dedicated to doing their best to promote the profession and to provide the best possible service to the membership. But we cannot fulfill that mission unless we know the needs of our members. While all of our Board Members are professionals working in a wide cross-section of the industry and from across the state, they do not necessarily know all the issues that are important to all of our members. If you have a concern that you feel needs to be addressed, please reach out to someone and let them know. Please also respond to surveys so that we can get as much input as possible as we determine the goals and future of the TPTA. There may be a brief period where we here in the state office may be a little difficult to contact around the same time you receive this issue of Synergy. We are scheduled to move our offices to a different floor within the same building (their decision – not ours) at the same time this newsletter is scheduled to arrive in your inbox. If you call and don’t get an answer right away, please bear with us for a couple of days while we get settled in and get all of our technology back up and running. We will have a little more space and brand new, updated walls, paint, carpet, etc., and we are looking forward to being in our new space shortly before the holidays.

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Winter 2017


Evidence-Based Practice in Pediatrics by VENITA LOVELACE-CHANDLER, PT, PhD, PEDIATRIC CERTIFIED SPECIALIST

W

hat is meant by Evidence-Based Practice Example of a Case with an Infant with Torticollis Using (EBP)? These Resources: You have a 4 month old infant patient with a diagnosis of torticollis. You could access the The concept of EBP used by the APTA has 3 parts: best CPG on the PT Now website (http://www.ptnow.org/ available research (evidence), the expertise of the PT, clinical-practice-guideline-detail/physical-therapyand the values and needs of the patient and family. management-of-congenital-muscular) for information EBP is central to decision making, high-quality care, and on examination, intervention, and discharge and followreducing unwarranted variation. More information about up for infants with torticollis. You could use that site to EBP can be found at the APTA’s website (http://www. “Check Your Practice.” For example, did you follow the apta.org/EvidenceResearch/) or at the Academy of recommendation to “Include 7 body structures, use a Pediatric Physical Therapy website (https://pediatricapta. standardized motor assessment, and include participation org/includes/fact-sheets/pdfs/Evidence-based%20 status in your examination?” You could go to “Tests” Practice%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf) (PTNow site) and determine if an age-appropriate, standardized tool for infant motor assessment was For many PTs, finding the evidence may be the difficult available and download it for use. You could go to part of the task. APTA’s PTNow portal (http://www. “Article Search” (PTNow site) and search for articles ptnow.org/Default.aspx) is the site to find clinically published since the publication of the CPG in 2013. relevant information of typically treated conditions. One article you would find describes how the Division Members can search for articles, use Clinical Summaries, of OT and PT at Cincinnati Children's Hospital used download tests and measures, and use Clinical Practice the Torticollis CPG in a quality improvement study.(1) Guidelines (CPGs), and many of those resources are The authors found that significant population outcome for members practicing in pediatrics. Members of the improvements were achieved. You might be able to use Academy can access resources related to EBP at the the methods used in that study to examine the outcomes in “Member Resources’ link. The Academy’s Knowledge your own practice environment, and you might eventually Translation Committee prepares and emails a quarterly participate in the Outcomes Registry to submit your own Spotlight that highlights recently published articles. practice data and compare yourself to national norms. Citations are provided along with links to either the full text article (if available publicly) or to the abstract. Many other pediatric resources exist for other patient The Academy and the APTA have recently partnered to populations to assist you in Demonstrating Excellence include a congenital muscular torticollis module on the in Practice! Outcomes Registry (https://pediatricapta.org/includes/ fact-sheets/pdfs/17%20Outcomes%20Registry%20 1.Strenk ML, Kiger M, Hawke JL, Mischnick A, QuatmanFAQ%20Resource.pdf) which will allow participating Yates C: Implementation of a Quality Improvement practices to help PTs make well-informed clinical decisions Initiative: Improved Congenital Muscular Torticollis and track and benchmark clinical outcomes against Outcomes in a Large Hospital Setting. Phys Ther, nationwide data. 97(6);2017: 649–658

Summer2017 2017 Winter

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TPTA 2017 Award Recipients Joy Davenport Award - Polly Bowers, Maness, PTA Jeanette Winfree Award - Lynne Hughes, PT, PhD, OCS Warren S. Smith Outstanding Service Award - Michael Furtado, PT, DPT, NCS William Gould Memorial Faculty Award - Dana Wild, PT, PhD, PCS Rex Nutt Award - Rebecca Russell, SPT President's Award - Denise Gobery, PT, PhD, NCS, CEEAA Outstanding Research Poster Presentation Award (from 2016) Denise Gobert, PT, PhD, NCS, CEEAA Debra McDowell, PT, PhD

1

Past District Chairs Ben Renfrow, PT, DPT, PCS, SCS, FAAOMPT (Southeastern District 2015-2017) Past Committee Chairs Myles Quiben, PT, PhD, DPT, GCS, NCS (Nominating Comm. 2016-2017) Brant Capps, PT, DPT, MS (Government Affairs Comm. 2011-2017) Past Officers Denise Gobert, PT, PhD, BCS, CEEAA (Vice President 2014-2017) Lynne Hughes, PT, PhD, OCS (Treasurer 2014-2017) Luke Markert, PTA (Executive Committee Rep. 20172018) Greg Perry, SPT (President, TSPTA 2016-2017)

PoP Quiz - Questions Is there a potential that I could lose my Medicare billing privileges if I do not report a change in enrollment information such as change in practice location or final adverse action?

Summer 2017

2

Are the new Medicare Supplemental Medical Review Contractor and the Office of Inspector General focusing on the number of units a therapist bills in a given day? *Answers are on page 16

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Winter 2017


PTs as the by ANN NEWSTEAD, PT, DPT, PhD

H

ealth and wellness are critical to the prevention of disease and a wide variety of health conditions. For nearly 100 years, physical therapists have provided movement analysis and guided our patients in the formation of an individual plan of care that leads to improved functional quality of life for those who have orthopedic and neurological disorders, cardiopulmonary and vascular diagnoses, and other complex health conditions. As such, physical therapists are in a prime position to provide health and wellness services and aspects of preventative care to our patients/clients. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) suggests physical therapists perform a comprehensive wellness check-up for our patient/ clients. The Annual Physical Therapy Check-up would include a Personal health profile, Disease risk profile, Physical examination, and Physical functional performance examination. Other special tests may be administered depending on the health profile of the individual. Specialized and individualized recommendations would be made to the individual to improve the areas of need. In addition, the APTA position statements (from 2006-present) encourage patient/client

Winter 2017 Summer 2017

health, wellness, and fitness and management of disease. Health management of patients with disease is also highly encouraged. Additionally, physical therapists’ own health and wellness and fitness are advocated as we are examples to the population-at-large. In 2017, the role of the physical therapist in diet and nutrition was included as a part of health and wellness, primary, secondary and tertiary care and within our scope of practice. Referral to other healthcare professionals is encouraged when special problems are identified. How can you improve the health and wellness of your patients/[clients]? Through your existing clinical practice, you can enhance the patients/clients quality of life by providing strength, endurance, flexibility, pain reduction, balance and functional training, especially to our aging and at-risk populations. Health and wellness programs should be comprehensive in nature with consideration for all body systems. By initiating a health and wellness program, we can prevent and defer many of the complications of disease. Kudos to the many physical therapists who have already begun health and wellness programs within their existing clinic, hospital, and community-based settings.

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House of Delgates Update by JANET BEZNER, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA The Texas Delegation has begun its preparations for the 2018 House of Delegates (HOD) meeting. Thanks to the TPTA members who attended the Texas Assembly meeting in October at the TPTA Annual Conference in Corpus Christi, we have several motion concepts we are vetting as possible motions. These concepts include: • A position clarifying that APTA does not support the use of interventions for which there is not sufficient evidence, even when they are still included on the licensing examination. The determination of what topics are on the licensing examination occurs based on a practice survey performed every 5 years by the Federation of Boards of Physical Therapy sent to recent graduates asking them to indicate what interventions they perform and the associated risk to the patient. • A request of APTA to define the role of physical therapists and physical therapist assistants in disaster management (during and after a disaster). • A position expressing support for the use of telehealth for prevention and health promotion services provided by a physical therapist and support for efforts to secure payment for such services. If you have an interest in any of these topics and would like to provide input or support, please contact your district delegate or any member of the Texas delegation. Another motion that we are aware will be considered in the 2018 HOD is a motion to give sections a

vote. Historically and currently, each section has one delegate in the HOD who can make motions and participate in debate on motions, but who can’t vote on motions. This proposal would give each section two voting delegates. As the profession of physical therapy has evolved, particularly over the last 30 to 40 years, our education, knowledge base, practitioner skill, patient population needs, practice operation settings and complexity, and societal responsibilities have increased exponentially. In response, the profession has developed many structures and processes to most efficiently ensure that we are consolidating and effectively growing our expertise and making new knowledge accessible to practitioners and patients alike. The formulation of sections has been very effective for addressing many of these needs. At this time over 50% of APTA members choose to belong to a section and survey data report that section and other members believe it is the sections that specifically deal with substantive issues relating to advancing the profession. Capturing and reliably integrating the knowledge and practice expertise that our sections represent in our governance process is essential to enhancing the accuracy and completeness of our information reservoir during policy creation. Stay tuned for more information on the motions that will be considered in the 2018 HOD – and please contact a delegate if you have information to share with us or questions.

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Winter 2017 Summer


MEMBERS GI

PT Service Hom

William Shakespeare once said, “the meaning of life is to find your gift – the purpose of life is to give it away.” Many physical therapists and physical therapist assistants would agree that their ability to serve others with their physical therapy expertise is a gift that is worth sharing. We spoke with three PTs who are using the gift of physical therapy to serve locally and abroad. Creating Pro Bono Access to Care in Local Communities The Physical Therapy Clinic at the East Communities YMCA in Austin was started earlier this year when Mark Milligan, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, OCS learned that there were no physical therapy clinics on the east side of Austin. He was led to the area by one of his patients, and quickly identified a gap in accessing healthcare. “There is an average 6-12 month wait time for [Medicaid/ pro bono] PT in Texas, and some patients cannot function without treatment,” Dr. Milligan said. He shared the story of one patient who could not sit, and was prescribed pain medication since he was not able to access a physical therapist. The clinic helps address this need by offering four 45-minute sessions, two evenings each month. In accordance with the Texas Physical Therapy Practice Act and Rules, he treats patients with referrals or provides evaluations. He often refers patients and provides patient education. “There is an opportunity to make much-needed improvements to the quality of life for communities and people who cannot access healthcare,” Dr. Milligan said. Since launching the clinic, he has received questions from other physical therapists throughout the country asking how to model the system. He hopes to eventually create a national network for pro bono physical therapy clinics. “There are great student-run programs, but there isn’t a network for clinicians to give back,” he explained. “Working together, we can have a great impact on improving healthcare.” When asked why he volunteers his time, Dr. Milligan shared, “serving makes me a better person, and allows me to utilize my knowledge and skills.” He hopes that others will consider getting involved or starting pro bono Winter 2017

clinics in their own communities. “A commitment of 1-2 times a month makes a huge impact,” he shared. He encourages those interested in starting a clinic to contact him for more information. Serving Children on the U.S./Mexico Border For more than 30 years, the Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic run by the FEMAP Foundation has provided orthopedic medical care and physical therapy to more than 7,500 children in the City of Juarez and Mexican States of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, and Sonora. Cynthia Fisher, PT, DPT, MS, PCS has served with the clinic since its inception, along with Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Jacob Heydemann. Other healthcare providers have since joined the clinic as volunteers, including an orthotist and other physical therapists, including members Nicole Alvillar, PT, DPT, and Fabiola Leyva, PT. Once a month, Dr. Fisher and the team travel from El Paso, across the U.S./Mexico Border Bridge, to the clinic. They spend an average of four hours treating up to 4050 patients with a wide variety of diagnoses, including conditions not typically seen in the U.S., like childhood polio. Some patients may travel more than 12 hours via ambulance to access physical therapy services, or may be post-surgical (the clinic also offers pro bono orthopedic surgery, with support provided pro bono by local physicians, surgical teams, and hospitals). Their goal is to improve the quality of life for their patients, who live in impoverished areas and do not otherwise have access to quality healthcare. At the clinic, there is a limited amount of resources – a ball, rolling stool, and mat serve as the only equipment available to screen, treat patients, and demonstrate exercises to be completed during that month. The clinic accepts donations for medical equipment, including braces, which they distribute as they become available. “You don’t have the same advantages with equipment and medical records,” she stated. “Serving in the clinic challenges and builds your clinical reasoning skills, since you have to find ways to treat your patients with limited equipment, supplies, and time.”

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IVING BACK

me and Abroad

Cynthia Fisher, PT, DPT, MS, PCS demonstrating a technique to medical professionals and assisting a pediatric patient with physical therapy across the Mexico border

Dr. Fisher said that she always to give back and, when presented with this opportunity, saw the ability to serve in an area she is passionate about – treating children. “All it requires is one afternoon away from family and the hospital [where she is employed],” she shared. “It is wonderful to see the kids grow up and be successful, and the parents are so committed to helping their children improve.” She recommends that others who wish to serve find an opportunity where they can use their skills and become a better person. “Think about how much time you wish to volunteer before you make a commitment,” she advises. “This ensures that you are able to do a good job and honor your commitment.” Fulfilling a Need Abroad in Haiti Sometimes a call to serve takes us away from our community in order to fulfill a need. Ben Keene, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, OCS volunteers with Phoenix Rising for Haiti, a nonprofit that completes two medical missions trips each year, with teams of more than 20 healthcare providers treating 600+ patients each week. Dr. Keene shared that treating patients in Haiti is challenging, and a full evaluation and treatment must be completed within 1-2 visits, given the limited time that providers are in the country. “We also have to account for limited supplies and equipment, which is often limited to a crude table and whatever you are able to travel with,” he said.

Ben Keene, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, OCS practicing on a patient in Haiti

They often see a variety of diagnoses, ranging from basic mechanical lower back pain to fractures and dislocations and even initial visits post-stroke. “This may be the first time they have ever spoken to any healthcare provider,” Dr. Keene explained. A lack of money often restricts access to any healthcare in Haiti, so a dislocated shoulder or broken leg can be left untreated for weeks or longer until pro bono services are available. “It can sometimes be heartbreaking, but we often make a tremendous difference,” he said. A love of experiencing new cultures and traveling led Dr. Keene to consider serving in Haiti. “Serving [here] challenges my clinical skills, and puts perspective on the advantages we have here in the U.S.,” he shared. He acknowledges that traveling to a foreign country is not an option for everyone. “Going to Haiti is rewarding but is also expensive and time-consuming,” Dr. Keene noted. Traveling to remote villages in Haiti often takes 18-20 hours from Texas, and you are only able to serve there for a limited time. As such, he has been branching out to identify ways he can serve locally in his Austin clinic. “Serving reminds me how awesome our profession is and what we can do,” Dr. Keene shared. He encourages others to start small, get involved now, and find an area to serve that you are passionate about. “It’s a really powerful feeling to give back and make a difference in the world.”

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Winter 2017


2017 Adopted Bylaws Changes

During the 23rd TPTA Assembly, the following Bylaws changes were adopted:

Therapist, Retired Physical Therapist, and Life Physical Therapist members in the chapter.

TA17.01 – Adjusts apportionment for PTAs, Retired PTAs, and Life PTAs from 30 to 15 members for each Assembly representative.

TA17.02 – Exempts the offices of President Elect, Past President, Treasurer Elect, and District Chair Representative from consecutive term limits.

The Bylaws Committee moves to add under Article IX. Assembly – Section 2. Composition – Subsection E, “and one additional representative for each fifteen Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant, and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members, or a majority portion thereof,” and remove under Article IX. Assembly – Section 2. Composition – Subsection F, “Each district shall be entitled to send one additional representative for each thirty Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members or a majority portion thereof,” and renumber subsequent sections. So it would read:

The Bylaws Committee moves to add to Article XII. Officers – Section 4. Term of Office – Subsection G: “President Elect, Past President, Treasurer Elect and District Chair Representative are exempt from consecutive term limits.” So it would read:

ARTICLE IX. ASSEMBLY Section 2. Composition E. In addition to the Chief District Representative, each District shall be entitled to send one additional representative for each fifteen Physical Therapist, Retired Physical Therapist, and Life Physical Therapist members, or a majority portion thereof, and one additional representative for each fifteen Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant, and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members, or a majority portion thereof. F. Each district shall be entitled to send one additional representative for each thirty Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members or a majority portion thereof. Supporting Statement: The APTA Bylaw amendment passed at the House of Delegates last month with the addition that is underlined as follows: D. Structure * * * (4) A chapter may create a representative body for the transaction of chapter business provided that the basis for establishing and apportioning the membership of the representative body shall be included in the chapter bylaws. A chapter's method of apportioning representatives of Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant, and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members of the representative body shall be proportional to one-half the number of Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant, and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members in the chapter, unless the chapter bylaws allow the apportioning of representatives of Physical Therapist Assistant, Retired Physical Therapist Assistant, and Life Physical Therapist Assistant members in the chapter to be the same as the apportioning of representatives of Physical

Winter 2017

ARTICLE XII. OFFICERS Section 4. Term of Office G. No member shall serve more than three consecutive terms as an elected officer or serve more than two consecutive terms in the same elected office. President Elect, Past President, Treasurer Elect and District Chair Representative are exempt from consecutive term limits. Supporting Statement: These offices have a one-year term and should not limit an individual from serving as an elected officer for less than three consecutive terms. The way this is currently written is interpreted to mean that the President-elect, President, and Past President would each be a term and would then have served three consecutive terms as an elected officer. A person would then not be eligible to hold these three offices immediately following a term as the Secretary or District Chair Representative. TA17.03 – Eliminates potential conflict of interest in members of the Nominating Committee running for office during their term. The Bylaws Committee moves to add to Subsection D, “and may not run for a Chapter office during their term.” So it would read: ARTICLE XIII. COMMITTEES Section 5. Standing Committees D. Nominating 7. A member of the Nominating Committee may not serve in another Chapter-elected position, except Delegate-at-large, and may not run for a Chapter office during their term. Supporting Statement: There has been an expressed concern related to two issues with Nominating Committee members running during their term. First, there is a potential conflict of interest related to slating candidates by members who are opponents for them during the election. Second, if several members of the Nominating Committee are running for office, it create a burden for the other members for those running to all recuse themselves from assisting during the election process.

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ASSEMBLY RECAP We had a lively Texas Assembly this year in Corpus Christi with lots of discussion and business. We had discussion and voted on four motions. Then we had time for substantive discussion with the Texas Delegation to the House of Delegates about matters that are of concern to members that may result in motions at next year’s House. Please see the article by Chief Delegate Dr. Janet Bezener for information about that discussion and its outcome. The following motions were presented, debated in a lively manner, and voted upon. TA17.01 – Adjusts apportionment for PTAs, Retired PTAs, and Life PTAs from 30 to 15 members for each Assembly representative. This motion was brought by the Bylaws Committee. It passed and now our Texas PTAs have equal representation at the Assembly and when voting for state positions. This ended a two year effort which required a change at the House of Delegates to allow the “full vote” in representative assemblies, such as the Texas Assembly. Thank you to our Chief Delegate, Janet Bezner, for leading this effort at the House. Congratulations to all our PTA members! TA17.02 – Exempts the offices of President Elect, Past President, Treasurer Elect, and District Chair Representative from consecutive term limits. This motion was brought by the Bylaws Committee. The motion passed with amendments to clarify the intent of the motion. The final wording was ____. TA17.03 – Eliminates potential conflict of interest in members of the Nominating Committee running for office during their term. This motion was

brought to the Assembly by the Bylaws Committee and was passed. The motion is intended to limit members of the Nominating Committee from serving in another Chapter-elected position, except Delegate-at-large, and would make NC members ineligible from running for a Chapter office, except Delegate-at-large during their term. TA17.04 – Eliminates the Ethics Committee as a Standing Committee. This motion was brought to the Assembly by the Ethics Committee based on recommendations from the APTA. After lively discussion on both sides of the issue, the motion failed with a voice count. A related motion to establish the Ethics Committee as an Ad Hoc Committee was found out of order after TA 17.04 failed. Congratulations to following individuals were elected by the membership. Thank you for your service to the Chapter! Vice-President: Michael Geelhoed, PT, DPT, MTC, OCS Chief Delegate: Janet Bezner, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA Nominating Committee: Lauren Szot, PT, DPT, NCS PTA Caucus Representative: Nicole Volek, PTA Delegates-at-Large: Michael Geelhoed, PT, DPT, MTC, OCS; Collette Pientok, PT, DPT, OCS; Denise Gobert, PT, PhD, CEEA, NCS; Robert Sandoval, PT, PhD; Rupal Patel, PT, PhD; and Kim Broderick, PT, SCS, OCS, ATC, CFMT, MS. Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your Speaker. Lois Stickley PT, PhD

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Winter 2017


2017

TPTA ANNUAL CORPUS CHRISTI OCTOBER 27-30

T

he TPTA Annual Conference Committee and TPTA staff want to thank you all for attending the 2017 Annual Conference. The conference was a great success, and we look forward to seeing you all at the next one in 2018.

TPTA President Michael Connors, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS

South Plains College PTA students

Outstanding Research Poster Presentation Award 2016 Winners Debra McDowell, PT, PhD & Denise Gobert, PT, PhD, NCS, CEEAA with TPTA President Michael Connors, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS

TPTA PAC President Jerre van den Bent, PT

Winter 2017 Summer 2017

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Andrea Borda, PTA

Austin Community College PTA students

Michele Voight, PTA, MPA & Michele Biernacki, PTA

TPTA President Michael Connors, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS

Luke Markert, PTA, BS, Nicole Volek, PTA, Polly Bowers-Maness, PTA & Amanda Aanstoos, PTA

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Winter 2017 Summer


Tom Waugh Leadership Development Program

O

n Thursday, October 26th, the Tom Waugh Leadership Development Program held its annual meeting during the 2017 TPTA Annual Conference in Corpus Christi, Texas. We are happy to report that the event was filled again with promise of a bright future for TPTA leaders. The event included nationally known leaders such as Dr. Ray Patterson who gave the keynote address on “How to be a Successful Mentoring Leader”. In addition, Dr. Sheila Nicholson, our APTA BOD liaison, shared information about our professional future directions, which will require strong leaders to meet the upcoming challenges. The highlight of the evening was the pinning of two new leadership fellows: Dr. Venita Lovelace-Chandler (mentored by Dr. Janna McGaugh) and Dr. Leah Alba (mentored by Dr. Mary Lou Garrett). Eight new mentees were matched with their mentors to begin their 18-month program during 2018. Finally, the evening ended with an excited discussion about Texas Chapter future needs and how the program might grow to encourage other new professionals towards the “leadership journey” in Texas. The TWLDP now has topped over 60 members in its ranks. Please go to the TWLDP website to learn more about the program or to donate in support of the program’s activities: TPTA website.

TWLDP Mentee Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PhD, PCS

TWLDP Mentee Leah Alba, PT, DPT

1

PoP Quiz - Answers Yes. Pub. 100-08 Transmittal: 304 Date: September 25, 2009 Change Request: 6642 Revocation 11 (42CFR 424.535(a)(9)): If the individual or organization reports a change in practice location more than 30 days after the effective date of the change, the contractor shall not revoke the supplier's billing priviliges on this basis. However, if the contractor independently determines - through an on-site inspection under 42 CFR 424.535(a) (5)(ii) or via another verification process - that the individual's or organization's address has changed and the supplier has not notified the contractor of this within the aforementioned 30-day timeframe, the contractor may revoke the supplier's billing provileges.

2

Yes. CMS has tasked Strategic Health Solutions as the Supplemental Medical Review Contractor (SMRC) with performing this medical review on a post payment basis. The SMRC will eb selecting claims for review based on: - Providers with a high percentage of patients receiving therapy beyond the threshold as compared to their peers during the first year of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA); - Therapy provided in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), therapists in private practice, and outpatient physical therapy or speechlanguage pathology providers (OPTs) or other rehabilitation providers; - Of particular interest in this medical review process will be the evaluation of the number of units/hours of therapy provided in a day.

Winter 2017

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Profile for TPTA Admin

TPTA Synergy Winter 2017  

TPTA Synergy Quarterly Newsletter - Winter 2017 Issue

TPTA Synergy Winter 2017  

TPTA Synergy Quarterly Newsletter - Winter 2017 Issue

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