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JCA Destinations 2019 programs and funding needs


Welcome to our vibrant network Together we have created something remarkable – a vibrant Jewish community that supports and enriches every one of us. Our goal at JCA is to ensure that it remains vibrant, secure and sustainable for generations to come. And, as the world changes, so must we. This guide provides insight into the significant changes we’re introducing in 2019 – why we’re changing and what we hope to achieve. It shines a light on our community – on the breadth of services and support we provide for each other. And it provides transparency, up front, of actual funding needs for each of the programs outlined in this directory. Our hope is that 2019 will be a year of insight and illumination. Thank you for being a part of it.


Contents JCA’s New Fundraising & Allocations Approach........................................2 Program Sectors Aged & Community Care.............................................................................4 Community Continuity.............................................................................. 22 Culture, Engagement & Outreach............................................................26 Holocaust, History & Heritage..................................................................46 Jewish Education........................................................................................54 Security & Advocacy..................................................................................70 Index of Programs, Providers & Funding Targets....................................76

donations.jca.org.au

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JCA Destinations 2019


JCA’s New Fundraising & Allocations Approach JCA is introducing an exciting new approach to its Fundraising and Allocations this year. Worldwide, donor trends have shifted towards requiring greater clarity on where their money goes. Younger donors particularly seek greater insight into the impact of their giving. The new JCA approach responds to these trends and at the same time preserves the essence of the collective JCA model – with JCA Allocations ensuring monies are well applied and key community needs are met, and that the cooperation and cohesion within our community continues. The new JCA approach will: • provide greater insight into the breadth and depth of the individual programs that our community delivers and the impact these programs have • provide transparency of actual funding needs – setting funding targets for each program – and answering the question: “Where does my money go?” • give donors more choice with the ability to make both communal donations as well as program-specific donations to community causes that are most meaningful to them The JCA Allocations Committee continues to ensure that the core needs of the community are balanced and met – by setting the funding targets for each program in consultation with member organisations, by redistributing any excess funds received and by dealing with any shortfalls.

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As a JCA donor, the new Fundraising and Allocations approach gives you a choice of paths for donating in 2019: • Simple path – make your communal donation to JCA and our Allocations Committee will direct it where most needed • Uplift path – make your communal donation to JCA and increase your giving by supporting specific programs • Custom path – make donations to specific programs with the choice to also make a community-wide contribution We certainly encourage continued support for JCA communal donations to help meet the wider needs of the community, and we are urging donors to increase their giving by supporting individual programs closest to their hearts. What happens if the new approach leads to a program being overfunded or underfunded? • Overfunded – if the fundraising target for a program is exceeded, any excess will flow into the community-wide pool and will be distributed by the JCA Allocations Committee to meet the $15 million target needed to fully fund all community programs in 2019. • Underfunded – if a program does not meet its target, the JCA Allocations Committee will, as it has always done, consider relative core needs and determine if and how any shortfall should be covered, including out of JCA reserves. The new approach will also allow us to better understand donors’ preferences and to personalise our communications so they are more aligned with individual donor needs. We encourage all our supporters and members of the Jewish community to get behind the JCA 2019 Fundraising Campaign to help ensure that all vital community services that our network provides will be fully funded in the year ahead.

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Retirement living rent subsidy for elderly ineligible for Government funding

Support for aged residents in need of affordable rental housing, who are not supported by any government funding, who do not have the means for family financial assistance and who are, in many cases, ineligible for the aged care pension.

Funding Target

$50,000

Key Impact Stats • 26 community members assisted in 2018 • 8 years average stay per resident • 80 years median age of assisted residents

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This program is offered to those BBRV residents, whose circumstances change and who require a helping hand with rent.

Program Beneficiaries 26 residents benefitted from this program in 2018

There is no Government funding received for this program and a substantial amount of residents are not eligible for the aged care pension. The average stay of a resident is currently 8 years, with a median age of 80. The provider is governed by the Retirement Living Act which caps the cost of retirement living fees.

Program Provider B’nai B’rith Retirement Village

BBRV already subsidises approximately $140,000 per annum from its operating costs, however the needs in this area are growing. Your donations will go directly towards the resident fees of those most in need.

Founding Year 1963 Joined JCA 2012 Website bbrv.org.au Chairman Henry Wirth General Manager Leon Fredkin

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Kosher meals on wheels

Sydney's only Kosher Meals on Wheels service delivers fresh nutritious meals to members of our community who cannot make a meal on their own due to extreme age, frailty, injury, illness, disability, or recent hospitalisation.

Funding Target

$100,000

Key Impact Stats • Over 1,000,000 meals delivered • 20,000 meals a year • Over 250 monthly recipients • 94% of meals recipients qualify for subsidies • Cost of meal subsidies for one person: $120/week, $520/month, or $6200/ year

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The Kosher Meals on Wheels service is available to members of the Jewish Community who need ready-to-eat meals as a short-term stopgap or for an extended period of time. Recipients are assessed on a needs basis and include the frail and aged as well as younger people with a disability, those experiencing injury, or illness, or needing help on compassionate grounds such as bereavement or a change in personal circumstances.

Program Beneficiaries Clients include vulnerable members of our community who would otherwise struggle to obtain regular, nutritious meals.

Fresh meals are delivered in Sydney's eastern suburbs three times per week and frozen once a week to the northern suburbs, to cover main meals for the whole week.

Founding Year 1982

In past years, COA has foregone an allocation from JCA so that programs in greater need could be funded. This year they need community support – your donations will allow them to continue to provide the critical services that many of our aged community depend on.

Program Provider COA Sydney Incorporated

Joined JCA 2009 Website coasydney.org President Justice Francis Marks Zelda Feigen OAM (Hon. Life President) CEO Rachel Tanny Program Partnerships • The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany. • Partnership with OzHarvest. • Hannah Meyer Project supported by Jewish House and JEMS. • Membership with FoodBank NSW. • Activities and special events programs partner with a variety of organisations across the Jewish community, including JNF, WIZO, JewishCare, Kesser Torah, and many others.

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Support services for individuals and families in crisis

Relief programs for community members in crisis, including domestic violence, suicide prevention, chronic illness, grief counselling, aid to children and youth, care packages for Jewish inmates in the prison system and people experiencing mental health issues.

Funding Target

$850,000 Key Impact Stats

• 600 community members and their families helped in 2018 • 125 children and young adults linked with mentors or counselling services • 500+ community volunteers (across all programs) • 1,200 attendees at education and information sessions • 2,000 helpline calls in past 12 months

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This program provides services to some of the most vulnerable and at-risk members of our community. Their Jewish Suicide Prevention Strategy is a response to increasing suicide rates across all ages. Among other related initiatives, it provides mental health ‘first aid’ training to hundreds of community members – including youth leaders and Rabbis – to promote early intervention and increase prevention. The Big Brother Big Sister program helps younger members of our community who are struggling through difficult situations in their personal and family lives, matching them up with volunteers who form supportive, mentoring relationships. Recognising that domestic violence occurs in all society sectors, the White Ribbon Breakfast Program educates men about speaking up and/or taking personal responsibility in domestic violence situations. The Love Bites in school and sexual assault prevention program educating high school students about domestic and family violence. Addressing the needs of a sometimes ‘hidden’ sector of our community, the Jewish Inmate Support program delivers care packages and assists family members who often may not disclose their predicament publicly. For individuals and families who are grieving, the Chessed Program provides counsellors to work side-by-side with community members at this time of great need. It also provides assistance to our schools in cases where staff members are impacted by loss.

Program Beneficiaries Jewish families and individuals in our community – from the youngest to the oldest – are the direct beneficiaries of this program. Without JCA funding, the services of this program would not be available to our community. Program Provider JewishCare Founding Year 1936 Joined JCA 1967 Website jewishcare.com.au President Jason Sandler CEO Claire Vernon

Families in crisis receive financial and other support services. In the past year they assisted about one in four members of our local Jewish community. Wherever possible, they leverage government assistance packages and financial support to deliver their services. As Claire Vernon, CEO, noted: “We only use community funds to supplement the mainstream, so we’re not replicating what is already out there.”

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Social support and advisory services for the aged living at home

Breaking the barriers of social isolation, this program provides a social fabric that allows our elderly and frail community members to continue to live at home. It also provides vital advice on restitution funding for Holocaust Survivors and access to government-funded support packages.

Funding Target

$550,000 Key Impact Stats

• 1,000 aged community members supported • 65 volunteers reaching isolated individuals • 500+ community volunteers (across all programs)

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Over 300 elderly people receive support which helps them to remain in their own homes for as long as they are safe. The services offered include Community Club Network which offers social activities for seniors across a network of Friendship Clubs in many locations. In addition, restitution information and advice is provided to Holocaust Survivors on their eligibility for payments and funded support to remain in their home for as long as possible. The service looks to cultural diversity and inclusion and a drop in centre has been provided for the Russian community which promotes activities and bus trips for Russian speaking community members. The service also provides volunteers who are linked with isolated seniors for regular visits with over 60 volunteers running across the northern and eastern suburbs. Further there is a team of professional social workers who assist seniors and their families negotiate the aged care system and receive support and information on issues such as living with Dementia and guardianship. Occupational therapy is also provided to identify appropriate supports and equipment to keep people safe and comfortable at home.

Program Beneficiaries A total of 1,600 individuals and their families are supported through this service. Program Provider JewishCare Founding Year 1936 Joined JCA 1967 Website jewishcare.com.au President Jason Sandler CEO Claire Vernon

This service also offers a strong community connection for the visually impaired, through the Herta Muller Club, which allows beneficiaries to receive weekly recording of news items such as the AJN. Without this funding Community Aged Services would be severely cut back. $7.3m total spend in this area with the majority funded through current operations.

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Disability support services for children, adults and their families

Providing a framework for inclusion of community members with disabilities, this program offers residential youth camps, skills development, employment opportunities, family respite, and a number of safe housing placements for vulnerable members of the community.

Funding Target

$460,000 Key Impact Stats

• 130 community members and their families supported • 52 Camp Sababa 3-day youth camp attendees annually • 47 attendees at Our Kitchen Hand and lifeskills programs • 20+ employees with a disability at Print 35 • 500+ community volunteers (across all programs)

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The disability support service encapsulates Jewish ethos regarding inclusion. As an example, Camp Sababa provides a three day residential camp for children and young adults with disabilities in Sydney. This brings together a unique cohort of our community and allows some family respite. The camp is predominantly staffed by volunteers.

Program Beneficiaries Over 200 individuals plus their families are supported through this service.

The service also encompasses Print 35 which is a community printing service which employs more than 20 people with an intellectual disability to help develop their skills and provide meaningful employment, whist still delivering a cost and quality competitive product to the community.

Founding Year 1936

Our Kitchen Hand is a domestic skills project that teaches people with an intellectual disability to shop, cook and provide meals for themselves. Whilst teaching household skills this service also offers a financial skills program which aims to provide community members with intellectual disabilities with an understanding of budgeting, money management and everyday banking. Supported accommodation ensures the safe housing of vulnerable residents in the community. This program operates 24/7. Without this funding the Disability Services support would be severely cut back. $5.5m spend in this area in 2018 with JewishCare funding the majority from their current operational revenue.

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Program Provider JewishCare

Joined JCA 1967 Website jewishcare.com.au President Jason Sandler CEO Claire Vernon Program Partnerships • Camp Sababa – Wolper Jewish Hospital • Our Kitchen Hand – Jewish Folk Centre • Supported accommodation – Enabled Housing

JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Financial support for pensioners to be provided quality residential aged care

This program aims to provide all older members of the Jewish community, who have limited financial means, with the choice to live with dignity and wellbeing in a residential care setting that supports their cultural and religious identity, while providing the highest standards of accommodation, clinical and allied health care.

Funding Target

$500,000 Key Impact Stats

• 175 fully subsidised and 65 partially subsidised residents supported to live in residential care • 87,600 subsidised residential days provided per year • Funding shortfall: $20,000 per fully subsidised resident per annum

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Montefiore currently subsidises approximately 240 Jewish residents at its Hunters Hill Campus, to ensure they receive quality accommodation, high standards of clinical and allied health care, and Jewish cultural inclusion that would otherwise be beyond their financial means. Around 175 residents are full pensioners and pay no more than a percentage of their government pension; while a further 65 residents are part pensioners and also require financial support. The total cost of providing financial support to these residents is in the order of $4 million each year. This is the shortfall between the Government subsidy and fees paid on behalf of these residents, and the actual cost of providing care and support.

Program Beneficiaries Your support for this program will ensure that some 240 elderly members of the Jewish community are able to live with choice, dignity, and wellbeing in a residential setting that celebrates their Jewish culture and identity.

Montefiore uses revenue from all its operations to help fund this shortfall. However, in recent years, federal government funding for aged care has declined in real terms, while the care needs of people entering aged care are becoming more acute, including the rising number of people living with dementia. These factors have resulted in an increasing financial burden on the organisation and need for community support to enable Montefiore to continue to provide financial assistance to these residents.

Founding Year 1886

This year, JCA supports the critical need to ensure this subsidy program remains available for the most vulnerable community members.

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Program Provider Montefiore

Joined JCA 1967 Website montefiore.org.au President David Freeman AM CEO Robert Orie

JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Wellness programs for seniors living outside of aged care facilities

Offering a range of physical activity programs designed and facilitated by professionals especially for aged members of the community. Programs include HydroCise, Tai Chi, Dance for Parkinson’s, run in conjunction with Dance for Parkinson’s Australia, and podiatry services run by Central Queensland University Students.

Funding Target

$95,000

Key Impact Stats • 230 aged community members served • 312 classes provided annually

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These programs are specifically offered to members of the community who reside outside of Jewish communal aged care facilities with a focus on maintaining or improving health and wellbeing to support independent living. Core strength, balance and coordination are elements of each of the programs along with a strong emphasis on social connection and active participation. A key element of the program is financial accessibility to quality and tailored programs for seniors to maintain their independence. Tai Chi is run twice a week by a Tai Chi Master. HydroCise is run three times a week by aqua fitness instructors. Dance for Parkinson’s classes are run once per week and lead by qualified dance teachers experienced with Parkinsons Disease. Without this funding the programs would be cost prohibitive to seniors and would not be viable.

Program Beneficiaries A total of 230 individuals are supported through this service. Program Provider The Burger Centre Founding Year 1991 Joined JCA 1991 Website burgercentre.com.au Joint Venture CEOs Claire Vernon Robert Orie Senior Manager Bronwyn Elbourne Program Partnerships • Montefiore • JewishCare

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Respite for carers program

Both the Social Support and Respite for Carers programs focus on social connection, active participation, lifelong learning and enjoyable leisure activity. The programs run five days per week and offer opportunities for new experiences, reigniting past passions, interests, skills and forming meaningful friendships. The Respite for Carers Program aims to further support families who are living with or caring for a loved one with Dementia and other significant conditions that require extensive care.

Funding Target

$190,000

Key Impact Stats • 230 families supported • 16,000 bus transport rides provided annually

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The Burger Centre offers an equal access Social Support Program presenting varied activities for those wishing to remain connected with others with similar interests. The range of activities on offer is expansive and includes programs specific to men including both a snooker and chess club, art, guest speakers, discussions as well as a vast range of opportunities to visit places of interest including, museums, galleries, landmarks, movies and musical performances. The Respite Program is run for carers, and offers those living with dementia and other cognitive conditions a supportive and engaging environment to participate in meaningful and purposeful leisure activities, suited to their individual needs and interests, creating opportunities for carers to work, rest or pursue their own leisure on their own. This program runs five days a week.The Burger Centre continues to offer Russian specific programs to meet the growing need of this community to reduce social and community isolation based on their age related health needs and language barriers. Burger Centre has bilingual staff to support a range of languages including Russian, Hungarian, Hebrew, French and Polish. A fleet of buses to support independence is available to those accessing the programs. Without this funding these services would be severely cut back.

Program Beneficiaries A total of 230 individuals are supported through this service. Program Provider The Burger Centre Founding Year 1991 Joined JCA 1991 Website burgercentre.com.au Joint Venture CEOs Claire Vernon Robert Orie Senior Manager Bronwyn Elbourne Program Partnerships • Jewish Care • Montefiore • Commonwealth Home Support Program • Randwick Waverly Community Transport Group

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JCA Destinations 2019


AGED & COMMUNITY CARE

Private hospital specialising in rehabilitation, medical and palliative care

Providing rehabilitation services, medical and palliative care to the local community – with consideration for Jewish culture, religious and dietary requirements – and staying true to their founders’ principles of dignity, compassion and outstanding quality care for all. Wolper Jewish Hospital (WJH) is an extremely proud JCA member organisation. Whilst it accepts bequests and donations, the Hospital Board of Directors is dedicated to ensuring the Hospital’s financial sustainability so that it ideally neither requests nor accepts a financial allocation, preferring to leave JCA funds available for other community organisations.

This program is self-funded Key Impact Stats

• Over 1,600 inpatient admissions in 2018 • Over 1,000 people attended Day Rehabilitation in 2018 • Over 400 people attended MoveWell exercise classes in 2018 • 665 people attended a Wellbeing seminar in 2018

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As Australia’s only Jewish hospital, Wolper specialises in rehabilitation, medical and palliative care. Its rehabilitation service for older people provides restorative care for patients with complex medical needs. As the majority of the Hospital’s patients are not Jewish, Wolper takes the opportunity to highlight various aspects of Judaism through its palliative care practices, kosher food service, observance of chagim, special Shabbat dinners and more. Services extend outside of the Hospital with Day Rehabilitation, MoveWell exercise classes, private physiotherapy as well as Physio At Home. Wolper also leads the way in the screening and genetic testing for nine genetic disorders including Cystic Fibrosis, Tay Sachs, Canavan Disease, Familial Dysautonomia and Fanconi Anaemia. Additionally, Wolper has been pivotal in the continuing success of Gift of Life Australia – raising awareness for and recruiting much-needed donors for stem cell, bone marrow and cord blood transplants. Wolper supports the health and wellbeing of the general community through its ‘Wellbeing’ series of health-related educational seminars, and through its support of other likeminded organisations. For example in March 2019 the Hospital donated a new emergency response vehicle to Hatzolah (increasing their fleet to three). The Wolper Jewish Hospital Health Foundation was established in 2014 with the aim of funding health and wellbeing initiatives that deliver clear benefits to the Jewish and general community. Over $750,000 has been granted to good causes since the Foundation was established with 19 organisations receiving grants. These include the Hereditary Cancer Clinic for its online BRCA screening, Camp Sababa, COA, Holdsworth Community, Jewish House, Parkinson’s NSW, Shalom Gamarada, Multiple Sclerosis NSW, Sydney Children’s Hospital Foundation and JewishCare (as a contribution to the Jewish Suicide Prevention Strategy).

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Program Beneficiaries Those directed for rehabilitation, medical or palliative care from the Jewish and broader community.. Program Provider Wolper Jewish Hospital Founding Year 1961 Joined JCA 1967 Website https://wolper.com.au/ President Daniel Goulburn OAM CEO John Tucker Program Partnerships • Support for programs of other JCA member organisations, including: • Burger Centre • COA • JewishCare: Jewish Suicide Prevention Strategy, Camp Sababa • Maccabi NSW • Shalom Gamarada

JCA Destinations 2019


COMMUNITY CONTINUITY

Community planning and enrichment

For the community to adapt and thrive well into the future, there is a need to anticipate future requirements and be able to respond, collaborate and innovate. This program provides this capability by supporting the most effective distribution of funds to the community, by undertaking original community-wide research projects and analysis of census data, and by continuing to deliver a range of new services to the community over the years.

Funding Target

$550,000 Key Impact Stats

• $115 million distributed most effectively over past ten years through support of JCA Allocations Committee • 8,671 participants in Gen17 Report (highest response rate ever to Jewish survey) • 137 future leaders placed on NFP Boards through Observership Program

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In order to secure our community’s future, it is important to have a strong and vibrant network of community organisations. JCA has a unique and powerful model whereby analysis and planning for the future can be undertaken at a holistic community level. This means that trends can be identified, new needs and causes acknowledged, and projects and collaborations across organisations undertaken to ensure the community thrives, and continues to strengthen. Examples of community planning include undertaking the Gen17 study to appreciate community expectations and attitudes, analysis of the Census data to ensure we understand and monitor the changing shape of our community, and coordinating working groups of our network organisations and skilled volunteers, to tackle topics like Jewish day school affordability, how to manage enrolment peaks and troughs, and responding to crisis situations like support funding for struggling organisations within our community. Examples of new innovative projects initiated to benefit the community include JBridge, an interest-free deferred payment plan for parents in need of some assistance with school fees, Y2i subsidising trips to Israel for Jewish teenagers, and the Observership Program providing young professionals with opportunities to undertake training, observe boards and grow their skills.

Program Beneficiaries The cost of running this function consists of a small team and some seed funding for the various analyses and projects that are explored and undertaken. If the future of our community is important to you, please support this program! Program Provider JCA Founding Year 1967 Website jca.org.au President Stephen Chipkin CEO Bruce Goldsmith

Strong holistic planning enables our community to have the best chance of remaining vibrant and adapting to the specific evolving needs of our community. It provides the scaffolding for dealing with crises and the infrastructure for tapping into the talent in our community through the committee structure.

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JCA Destinations 2019


COMMUNITY CONTINUITY

Community relationship management system

Investing in critical infrastructure to ensure we know the people in the community and can reach them – in a relevant, timely and personalised manner.

Funding Target

$300,000 Key Impact Stats

• more than 30,721 active individual contacts across NSW and ACT in our community databank • more than 4,772 donations managed by JCA in 2018 • 399,624 individual communications in 2018

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JCA relies on its underlying information systems and community database to drive fundraising on behalf of the 23 member organisations in the network and to engage with the donor community. Changes in technology platforms, coupled with increased community expectations around personalisation and relevance of messages, have resulted in JCA outgrowing the capabilities of the current 12-year-old system. Examples of new innovative projects initiated to benefit the community include JBridge, an interest-free deferred payment plan for parents in need of some assistance with school fees, Y2i subsidising trips to Israel for Jewish teenagers, and the Observership Program providing young professionals with opportunities to undertake training, participate as observers on not-for-profit (NFP) Boards and grow their skills. With more targeted and meaningful communication, JCA can engage and fundraise more effectively with our current donor community and aim to increase our reach, growing our total number of donors.

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Program Beneficiaries The entire community served by our database • including member organisations and donors • allowing us to more efficiently communicate with all those in the NSW and ACT community. Program Provider JCA Founding Year 1967 Website jca.org.au President Stephen Chipkin CEO Bruce Goldsmith

JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Creating Jewish engagement within the regional Canberra community

Providing vital services to the Canberra Jewish community to build Jewish identity in the nation’s capital. Delivering education and cultural services for adults, teenagers and young children; social welfare for people in need; and political and diplomatic engagement on behalf of the national Jewish community. Housing the National Jewish War Memorial, a Jewish museum and library, as a resource for the broader community to understand the contribution of Jews to Australia.

Funding Target

$200,000 Key Impact Stats

• 120 people attended first night Seder in 2018 • 112 guests attended Rosh Hashanah young family’s dinner in 2018 • 38 children attending classes weekly • 20 teens and youth attending classes weekly • 5 Bar Mitzvahs celebrated in 2018 • 15 hours of social support services delivered weekly

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Educators are provided in ACT to holistically promote Jewish learning and culture, and support services for vulnerable members of the community. The ACT community is a diverse cohort who may not otherwise have any touchpoint with Judaism. A role model of an inclusive Jewish community operating under one roof, the support programs span the spectrum of Orthodox, Progressive and secular Judaism identity. The educators have been instrumental in ensuring that young adults are actively engaged and empowered in running programs for their demographics. Youth education and mentoring has seen participants become leaders and this program has maintained a steady cohort of active members. Adult education classes are run through the year with guest speakers and regular events. Children’s education has been cemented, through continued consultation with the community, parents, board, and staff, as a fully functioning program. There has been a dramatic increase in engagement and higher rates of participation, with learning goals being reached or exceeded. As well as teaching, educators run events, festival meals and celebrations as part of the service offering. Support is also offered for the vulnerable and grieving in the community. Without this funding this regional community would not have the touchpoints to Judaism, holistic overview and the communal gatherings which are the cornerstone of the vibrancy in the ACT. Support services also reach out to the broader Australian community – providing the National Jewish War Memorial, museum and library as resource for school visits, interfaith engagement and political and diplomatic engagement to showcase the contribution of Australia’s Jews to the whole community.

Program Beneficiaries Our core beneficiaries are 1,000 residents in and around the ACT. Our outreach activities to the broader Australian community directly support an additional 1,000 people each year and have an enduring impact through building partnerships and awareness. Program Provider ACT Jewish Community Founding Year 1951 Joined JCA 1970 Website actjc.org.au Chairman Veronica Leydman Program Partnerships • JewishCare NSW • National Council for Jewish Women – ACT Chapter • Australian Jewish Historical Society • ACT Zionist Council / Australian Zionist Youth Council • Moishe House Without Walls

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Social, cultural, advocacy and anti-discrimination programs

A community service organisation with programs that support human rights, antidiscrimination, multiculturalism, social justice and run social and cultural activities that add vibrancy to the community.

This program is self-funded Key Impact Stats • 350 members • 170 needy families assisted • 600+ community members attended 2018 exhibition “Goldene Medina Celebrating 175 Years of Jewish Life in South Africa” • 500+ visits to exhibition “Letters of Loss and Refuge” in March/April 2019 • 72 social and cultural events held each year

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B'nai B'rith is the umbrella body of the B'nai B'rith family of organisations in New South Wales which includes, the B’nai B’rith Retirement Villages, B'nai B'rith Centre, Bargain Bazaar and Courage to Care (NSW). The units facilitate a myriad of social activities in the eastern suburbs and the north shore including walks, book clubs and lectures. There is a focus on producing immersive exhibitions such as the successful ‘Goldene Medina, Celebrating 175 years of Jewish Life in South Africa’ exhibition in 2018 and ‘Letters of Loss and Refuge’ in March 2019. Two more big exhibitions are planned for 2019. The ABC Jewish Community Art Exhibition in partnership with COA, and Jewish Life in Norway from the Oslo Jewish Museum. The BBYO Kids Club is aimed at school-aged students and takes the children on a journey through photography clubs and holiday camps. Those children then get involved in delivering 170 care parcels before Pesach and Rosh Hashanah. BBYO also runs a Battle of Bands competition for teenagers. The B’nai B’rith Womanpower Unit, formerly Womanpower is spearheading the unique Safe Conversations Project in Australia. This interactive workshop enhances connection in relationships, preventing relationship breakdowns at home and in the workplace.

Program Beneficiaries Jewish community across the ages and the broader community through the B’nai B’rith Bargain Bazaar. Program Provider B’nai B’rith NSW Founding Year 1944 Joined JCA 1967 – one of the founding members of JCA Website bnaibrith.org.au/newsouth-wales President Anna Marks OAM

The Bargain Bazaar, based in Surrey Hills, sells second hand clothing and items to the broader community. The shop has raised in excess of $500,000 supporting a broad spectrum of charities – including, humanitarian, medical and educational. B’nai B’rith does not rely on any funding from JCA, however President Anna Marks OAM feels “We don’t want to be outside. We are an integral part of NSW Jewry and feel it’s very important that we are shown to be part of that community and we want to stay that way.”

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Jumpstart – engaging 20 and 30 year olds in our community

A new way to engage younger people in our community, using innovative initiatives to create a connection in our next generation.

Funding Target

$50,000

Key Impact Stats • 758 people attending Jumpstart events in 2018 • 51% increase in dollars donated to JCA from people under 40 • Doubled the number of engaged young people from less than 10% of the community in this agegroup to 20%

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In 2015 JCA noticed that the average age of a donor to JCA was 64 years old. Less than 10% of adults in the community under the age of 40 engaged with or donated to the JCA community network. Without an intervention, the situation was undesirable and unsustainable. Jumpstart was established – a fresh approach to engage with young people and change their perceptions about JCA, the community and the role every young person has in ensuring continued vibrancy of the Jewish community. Funding to date has been provided by The Giving Forum and individuals in the community, but with great results, great growth is possible. Jumpstart introduced a range of initiatives to appeal to this segment of the community, including: Jumpstart Innovation Hub – a co-working space for Jewish entrepreneurs and social entrepreneurs to work and exchange ideas and obtain advice and mentoring. Jumpstart annual ‘Shark Tank’ pitch event – where new social ideas benefiting the community can pitch and win grants. Jumpstart Volunteer – matching organisations in the community network looking for skilled volunteers with those in the community willing to donate their time.

Program Beneficiaries The younger generation through vibrant, active engagement in the Jewish community and the community as a whole through the cultivation of future leaders and nextgeneration donors. Program Provider JCA with a great team of volunteer committees Founding Year 2015 Website jca.org.au/jumpstart President Stephen Chipkin, JCA President Co-Chairs Jonathan Barouch Ben Levi

Millennials – events and engagement with the younger end of the Jumpstart demographic. Young Major Donors – fostering relationships and growing the numbers of Young Major Donors and securing their attendance at the annual Campaign. Jumpstart Junior – a soon-to-launch program to engage with young families to create a social conscience for children. Jumpstart focuses on innovative initiatives that build social, entrepreneurial and philanthropic connections between individuals and across community.

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Yiddish and Hebrew cultural immersion

Programs and events to promote and preserve Yiddish and Hebrew language and culture. A social centre for Israelis to connect and celebrate Israeli culture and traditions.

This program is self-funded Key Impact Stats

• 140 financial members • 30 attendees at Yiddish speaking programs each month

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The Jewish Folk Centre predominantly serves the Israeli migrant community, providing a social hub where Israelis can come together, feel connected to Israel and speak Hebrew, while also feeling part of the Sydney Jewish community. They gather for chagim and celebrate Israeli holidays like Yom Ha’atzmaut and commemorate Yom HaZikaron. The second night communal Pesach seder is a highlight of the annual calendar as well as second night Rosh Hashana. For many Israelis, it has become a home away from home. The Centre facilitates an array of activities that celebrate Israeli life including Hebrew literature and writing groups, Israeli dancing, a range of lectures in Hebrew and English, as well as outings to movies or cultural events. The Jewish Folk Centre is an active contributor to the local community. Through funding from JCA, the Centre has collaborated with JewishCare to provide a purpose-built kitchen space for their Our Kitchen Hand program which teaches domestic skills to people with varying disability. The Centre also offers its space to other Jewish community organisations including CSG, for training and seminars. True to their origins, the Centre still maintains a Yiddish language program each month where around 30 non-Israelis gather for a “Schmooze and Bagel”, speak Yiddish, listen to some music or even have someone perform in Yiddish. Co-President Miri Orden states, “The community might like to know that there is a place where Yiddish is thriving and continuing to exist, because if nobody would do it – it gives me goose pimples to think about it – it would just disappear into nothing. We keep it going. It’s important.”

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Program Beneficiaries Those in the community who are Yiddish or Hebrew speakers, seeking a cultural immersion, and Israeli migrants to Sydney looking for a home away from home. Program Provider Jewish Folk Centre Founding Year 1951 Joined JCA 1996 Newsletter Yedion – by registration on the mailing list Co-Chairs Miri Orden and David Nathan Program Partnerships • JewishCare with Our Kitchen Hand

JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Adult sport – supporting a healthy lifestyle

This program provides the infrastructure necessary to support a vibrant Jewish community sports program, promoting an active and healthy lifestyle for adults across our community.

Funding Target

With sports clubs being volunteer-driven, this program provides support to all clubs to offer much needed assistance with administration and operations.

• 2,000 members – 1,200 juniors and 800 adults

$70,000

Key Impact Stats • 18 individual sports clubs serviced

• 250+ volunteers and 100+ specialty coaches • up to 1,500 athletes participating in any given week – bringing Jewish people together and creating community connections

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There is extensive research linking an active lifestyle to general health and wellness; sport and exercise is one of the best medicines available and its health benefits are indisputable. Maccabi cares about the community’s health and wellbeing. They have played a role in promoting a healthy outlook through sport for over 90 years and are taking on the challenge of maximising the health of the community by providing opportunities for sports and recreation for people of all ages and abilities to get active. To do this, Maccabi needs a well-resourced state office to support all of the sports clubs. The Maccabi NSW state office has only a small team of staff servicing the diverse clubs, overseeing a raft of key operational tasks such as: marketing and member communications community engagement and events sports facilities – bookings and management leadership development courses safety and first-aid provisions national initiatives and events (e.g. Junior Carnival) insurance and liability coverage operational and financial assistance Without a well-resourced team of staff to manage these key support functions, Maccabi would not be able to operate and provide as many services as it does to so many people across the community.

Program Beneficiaries 2,000 members across diverse age groups (from age six through seniors) Program Provider Maccabi NSW Founding Year 1980 (Maccabi Australia) (1946 previously JASA – NSW sporting association) Joined JCA 2007 Website maccabi.com.au/nsw President Lauren Ehrlich General Manager Daniel Kresner Program Partnerships • Existing partnerships with Jewish Care • Wolper Jewish Hospital • BJE • Jewish Day Schools • Friendship Circle • JEMS • Hakoah Club • Magen David Adom

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

All abilities and youth sport program

Sport is universally recognised as an incredibly effective environment for youth to develop important values and to grow their personal identity. The All Abilities program promotes inclusion and provides sports and recreational opportunities for people living with a disability.

Funding Target

$130,000

Key Impact Stats • 1,200 Jewish youths playing sport with Maccabi • 40 participants (plus families) in the All Abilities Program • Bringing Jewish youth together under the banner of sports and creating stronger community connections

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The All Abilities program is one of the more recent successes in Maccabi’s long history. The program enables those living with a disability to share in their love of sport by offering more opportunities for involvement. The program seeks to foster a caring and inclusive community, building important connections that carry on beyond the sports field. This program facilitates the inclusion of all Jewish people in sporting activities and provides the opportunity to develop close relationships. Maccabi’s Youth Sport Program coordinates youth sporting activities (ages 6-18) and supports the Junior Maccabi Clubs. Sport involvement is a core aspect of youth development. It is widely recognised as a key environment for development of values such as teamwork, fairness, dedication, resilience, communication and inclusion and is an arena for young people to help shape their personal identity. Maccabi clubs such as Netball, Soccer, Basketball, Swimming, Tennis and Triathlon play a huge role in offering these opportunities to Jewish youth – to take part in sport and to experience all it has to offer. All of these clubs receive support from the Maccabi Youth program. Without Maccabi NSW, the ethos of community sport would be lost, as Maccabi plays an integral role in allowing all members of the community to participate together. Without JCA, the support to foster the love of sport and all that it offers will not have the means to grow. It’s imperative that we make sure that all youth can participate and come together through their love of sport and have ways in which to connect back to the Jewish Community.

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Program Beneficiaries 1,200 youth members participating in sport 40 All Abilities participants (and families) Program Provider Maccabi NSW Founding Year 1980 (Maccabi Australia) (1946 previously JASA – NSW sporting association) Joined JCA 2007 Website maccabi.com.au/nsw President Lauren Ehrlich General Manager Daniel Kresner Program Partnerships • All Abilities Program – partners with Jewish Care & Friendship Circle • Youth Program – partners with BJE, JEMS, the various Jewish schools • First Aid Training – partners with Wolper Jewish Hospital

JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Young mothers in crisis outreach program

Helping new Jewish mothers in crisis with a trained volunteer mentor, providing support through their first year of parenting.

Funding Target

$40,000

Key Impact Stats • 15 Jewish mothers mentored in 2018 • 96% of volunteers are Jewish mothers • 55 nationalities supported since inception

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It may take a village to raise a child, but for some women in our community, the key to navigating new motherhood in a positive way has been their Mum for Mum mentor.

Program Beneficiaries Mothers in crisis in their first year of parenting.

Established in 2008, the Mum for Mum team provides oneon-one emotional support in a safe, confidential space empowering the mother to be the best mother she can be.

Program Provider Mum for Mum (as part of NCJWA)

Many feel alone and overwhelmed when first becoming a parent. It’s very hard to prepare for the monumental changes a new-born brings. If there are no family members or friends nearby who understand the negative side of the experience, it can be isolating. Even having family or friends nearby doesn’t always help if the new mother feels uncomfortable sharing the negative aspects of being a new parent.

Founding Year 1923 NCJWA 2008 Mum for Mum

New mothers are paired with more experienced and trained mothers who volunteer their time to build a support system, enabling them to find other professional supports as needed. Referrals are made via hospitals, doctors or social workers and word of mouth. Weekly support continues until their baby’s first birthday. Whilst this service is open to the broader community, JCA funding only goes to support Jewish mothers.

Joined JCA 1967 Website ncjwa.org.au mumformum.org.au Chairman Diane Schaffer General Manager Nadene Alhadeff

Mum for Mum NCJWA promotes fundamental Jewish principles of tikkun olam. They are a voice for Judaism in the community and a counter-balance to antisemitism.

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Australasian Union of Jewish Students (AUJS)

Focusing on developing and strengthening Jewish Identity on tertiary campuses, through its engagement with the National Union of Australian Students. A voice for community advocacy, uniting the broader student body in condemning and combatting antisemitism. Running important programs for Jewish continuity, collecting the testimonies of ‘thirdgeneration’ children of Holocaust survivors.

Funding Target

$200,000 Key Impact Stats

• 164 events run in 2018 • 2,000+ attendees in “O” Week • 59 attendees at the Political Training Seminar • 62 Winter Conference attendees • 84 Summer Conference attendees • 120 attendees at the Millie Phillips Leadership Training Seminar

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AUJS is the representative body for Jewish university students and provides a sense of belonging for those students on campus. It facilitates programs to engage, enrich and develop their Jewish identity. Time spent at university is incredibly formative. As young adults and future leaders of the community, AUJS offers social, political and leadership initiatives to develop their personal and professional networks and skills.

Program Beneficiaries Hundreds of Jewish university students and alumni across NSW and the ACT. Program Provider Australasian Union of Jewish Students (AUJS)

Your support for AUJS has a direct impact, helping the organisation

Founding Year 1948

hold events, to source inspirational guest speakers and to coordinate educational and cultural programming that makes Jewish identity a vibrant and meaningful part of student life. It also ensures that subsidies are available to participants who may otherwise not be able to attend.

Joined JCA AUJS is not a member organisation of JCA. It receives funding support for cultural and educational activities developed in collaboration with Shalom, a member of JCA since 1967. Website aujs.com.au Chairperson Josef Wilkinson Program Provider Shalom Founding Year 1954 (Hillel Foundation of NSW) Joined JCA 1967 Website shalom.edu.au President Jonathan Lieb CEO Tamara Samuel

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Inclusive young adult and adult cultural programming

A large proportion of our community are cultural Jews. Shalom programs offer inclusive and pioneering cultural, educational and social opportunities that incubate Jewish community at a grassroots level. This is particularly important for young Jewish adults who are searching for meaningful Jewish identity. Young adult programs include Moishe House, AEPi, Professional Women’s Forum, LaunchPad, Thinktrepenuer, Shalom Shabbat activities, HaJam.

Funding Target

$485,000 Key Impact Stats

• 23,000 participants across 285 events in 2018 • 8,500 millennial participants in 2018 • 1,400 podcast downloads through digital pilots in 2018

Intergenerational programs include Limmud, Sydney Jewish Writers Festival, Sydney Jewish Comedy Showcase, Live Stories, Zikaron B’Salon and Theatre productions.

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Shalom programs increase the vibrancy and engagement of our Jewish community by fostering Jewish life and learning in an inclusive way. Moishe House is a global program that is based in Surry Hills in Sydney. Four young adults in their 20s support a community of millennial Jewish locals and expatriates through themed Shabbat dinners, social and social-justice activities that leverage the Jewish and Sydney calendar. 1,250 young adults participated in 2018. AEPi is a worldwide Jewish university brotherhood which is based at Shalom College in Sydney. 1,830 people visited the AEPi House in 2018. Shalom College offers accommodation, well-being and academic support to “at risk” Jewish university students in consultation with Jewish Care. Thinktrepeneur, Professional Women’s Forum and Launchpad all engage young adult Jewish professionals to be involved in Jewish community while developing their professional capabilities and networks. These attracted 700 participants in 2018. Young adult social activities in 2018 included Shabbat Tent, Vivid Cruise, Doughnut Selfies, film and comedy activities. These attracted 3,390 participants in 2018. LimmudOz, The Sydney Writers Festival, Sydney Jewish Comedy Showcase, Live Stories and our theatre productions allow Jewish adults across age groups to explore their Jewish identity in innovative, interactive and inclusive ways. These programs attracted 6,500 participants in 2018. In addition to the above programs, in 2019 Shalom are running a series of pioneering programs including Succah by the Sea with Sculptures by the Sea, Zikaron B’salon, Limmud in Your Lounge.

Program Beneficiaries University students, young adults in their 20s and 30s, and mature adults who want to engage in their Jewish identity in inclusive and engaging ways. Program Provider Shalom Founding Year 1954 Joined JCA 1967 Website shalom.edu.au President Jonathan Leib CEO Tamara Samuel Program Partnerships • Moishe House International • Sydney Writers Festivals • Sculptures by the Sea • i-Society • Jewish Care • BJE • Jewish Day Schools

The range of programming enables Jewish Sydneysiders to enrich their lives, culture, education and professional endeavours while building a sense of Jewish connection and community. JCA funding helps make these diverse and pioneering Jewish community programs possible.

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JCA Destinations 2019


CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACH

Shalom Baby and PJ Library

For many new families, this is an essential springboard to a lifelong engagement with Jewish identity. This program brings new parents and their little ones together through regular social events and celebrations of festivals, creating community connections that last a lifetime. PJ Library provides a welcome introduction to Jewish culture and learning with free Jewish-themed books delivered 12 times a year to families who might otherwise have little connection to community and identity.

Funding Target

$335,000

Key Impact Stats • 1,250 families receive PJ Library books every month in NSW • 100,000 books distributed to date

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For many young families, these are among the most meaningful activities that connect them to community and build a lifelong sense of Jewish identity and belonging, especially for families that are not actively involved in Jewish day school or synagogue life. Shalom Baby is a Jewish parents’ group, bringing together young parents and children – from newborns to 18 months – to meet, socialise, and share experiences and stories in play groups. It creates an enduring sense of Jewish community through regular social events and celebrations of festivals. PJ Library (PJ is short for Pyjama) gifts high-quality Jewishthemed children’s books to young families across NSW and the ACT. PJ Library books celebrate important aspects of Jewish culture, values and tradition, and quickly become cherished bedtime stories. In addition to receiving the monthly gift of books, families are also invited to participate in a range of special PJ Library community events throughout the year. This program provides essential building blocks of our Jewish community, particularly for families who would otherwise have little connection to community. It is about families beginning a journey together, enabling children from a young age to gain knowledge of their heritage so in time they become connected with all the wonders of Judaism and Jewish community. Your donations to this program will help ensure the vibrancy and sustainability of our future Jewish community.

Program Beneficiaries Young families across NSW and the ACT – parents and their children, from newborns through primary school age – who benefit from a real and meaningful connection to their Jewish identity and community. Program Provider Shalom Founding Year 1954 Joined JCA 1967 Website shalom.edu.au President Jonathan Leib CEO Tamara Samuel Program Partnerships • Byron Bay Jewish community • Hills District Jewish community • BJE • Jewish Day Schools • Synagogues

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JCA Destinations 2019


HOLOCAUST, HISTORY & HERITAGE

Community-wide archiving and digitisation of local Jewish history

This three-year project aims to preserve local Jewish historical information in all its forms, across all communal organisations, providing a rich legacy of Jewish continuity for future generations. The archive will provide everyone in the community with access to records including, among others, Jewish Australian service men and women, Jewish burials Australia-wide and 79 years of digitised Australian Jewish Historical Society (AJHS) journals.

Funding Target

$75,000

Key Impact Stats • 250 boxes from NSW Jewish Board of Deputies organised and catalogued • 31,600 pages of AJHS Journals digitised • 6,500 searchable records of service men and women linked to National Archive • 80,000 records of Jewish burials (due online July 2019) • 45,000 community members able to access digitised archives

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This project will collate Jewish historical information, in all its forms, and make it accessible online. AJHS is collaborating with communal organisations to achieve this community wide project. All communal organisations in Sydney have been invited to deposit their archives for arrangement and safekeeping.

Program Beneficiaries All communal organisations, historians, school children, all residents of NSW and the broader community

The project is estimated to run for three years, with the funding used to employ a communal archivist and associated technology and running costs.

Program Provider Australian Jewish Historical Society

The total budgeted over the three years is $450,000. A donor is supporting this project, providing 50% of the required budget.

Founding Year 1938 Joined JCA 1978 Website ajhs.com.au President Peter Philippsohn OAM

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JCA Destinations 2019


HOLOCAUST, HISTORY & HERITAGE

Holocaust and heritage online archive

The NSW Jewish community has a rich and vibrant history, with a vast collection of objects and resources. For these to be able to inspire, educate and inform people locally and worldwide, our community’s archives and collections need to be brought online so our history is readily accessible.

Funding Target

$75,000

Key Impact Stats • Local, national and international researchers will have the ability to search and view tens of thousands of personal papers, letters photographs, military records, newspapers and objects of significance to the Holocaust and Jewish life in Australia, dating back to the first fleet in 1788

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Currently, the vast reservoir of Australian Jewish history and experiences are not accessible to the general public. The only way this can be made broadly available is by bringing it all online in a coherent and cohesive manner. Two organisations hold the lion’s share of historical objects and information. The Sydney Jewish Museum (SJM) and Australian Jewish Historical Society (AJHS) are partnering to make their full collection and archives available online for the first time in a fully searchable format via a combined technology platform. The SJM collection started in the late 1980s when the Australian Association of Holocaust Survivors approached their members for memorabilia to form the basis of a permanent museum. Since the opening of the SJM in 1992, the collection has grown from a small number of treasured Holocaust related items to over 10,000 artefacts of the Holocaust, as well as Judaica and Australian Jewish history and identity, only a fraction of which are on public display. AJHS, founded in 1938, has built its collection over many years. In the past the collection process focussed on personal histories, but recently AJHS has been working with Jewish communal organisations to collate, preserve, store and make accessible their organisational archives for the benefit of the entire community. Bringing the collection and archives online will provide global access to these items of significant Jewish history. It will also encourage many of the remaining Holocaust survivors to donate their precious items to SJM as they will be available for all to see and engage with. Your donations will ensure that this program has the funds necessary to make this important legacy accessible to our community now and for future generations.

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Program Beneficiaries NSW, Australia and a wider global community interested in the Holocaust and Australian Jewish history. Program Provider Sydney Jewish Museum Founding Year 1992 Joined JCA 1998 Website sydneyjewishmuseum. com.au President Professor Gus Lehrer AM FAA CEO Norman Seligman Program Provider Australian Jewish Historical Society Founding Year 1938 Joined JCA 1978 Website ajhs.com.au President Peter Philippsohn OAM

JCA Destinations 2019


HOLOCAUST, HISTORY & HERITAGE

Holocaust commemoration and social justice outreach events

Multi-faith communal events to honour the memory of Holocaust victims and survivors, promote awareness of where racial hatred can lead and promote social justice for all.

Funding Target

$205,000 Key Impact Stats

• 5 major events held annually, attracting 2,200 guests • 200 to 300 VIPs, from federal and state MPs and diplomats, to leaders of community groups and faiths, local government and leaders of civil society • advocacy events promoting tolerance and respect across all cultural and religious boundaries

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The NSW Jewish Board of Deputies (JBD) runs three important commemorative events to honour Holocaust victims and survivors and raise awareness among current generations of the rising tide of racism, antisemitism and bigotry. On Yom Hashoah the JBD brings the entire community together to focus on the stories of survivors, the lessons from those who had the courage to save Jews from the Nazis, and understanding of where race hatred can lead. A recent innovation is Youth HEAR (Holocaust Education and Remembrance), which draws 400 young adults to a powerful Holocaust commemoration event, thereby ensuring that the next generations are taking on the responsibility. A high proportion of our community have a personal connection to the Holocaust, while the genocide is an indelible facet of our collective memory. Education and awareness are vital and beneficial for all NSW citizens. The Kristallnacht communal event marks the onset of the Holocaust and is a key component of understanding the genocide, while promoting the importance of human rights. Bringing leaders of various faiths together with politicians and diplomats and the Jewish community provides a forum in which to advance the knowledge, values and attitudes necessary to help prevent future violence.

Program Beneficiaries NSW, Australia and a wider global community interested in the Holocaust and Australian Jewish history. Program Provider NSW Jewish Board of Deputies Founding Year 1945 Joined JCA 1967 Website nswjbd.org President Lesli Berger CEO Vic Alhadeff

The event imparts universal values relating to oppression and bigotry.

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JCA Destinations 2019


HOLOCAUST, HISTORY & HERITAGE

Holocaust and Judaism education programs for NSW school students

Educating primary and secondary school students from all around NSW about Judaism, the history of the Holocaust, and how the lessons of the Holocaust have shaped our understanding of human rights and responsibilities.

Funding Target

$855,000 Key Impact Stats In 2018 the SJM: • educated 27,500 students and 1,000 teachers • had a total of 55,000 visitors to the Museum • facilitated students to listen to 792 hours of survivor testimony In the last 26 years the SJM: • educated over 300,000 students • has had over 750,000 visitors • collected over 10,000 artefacts

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The education of future generations is critical in developing a tolerant, inclusive and respectful society, and ensuring the atrocities in Jewish history do not repeat themselves. To achieve this, the Sydney Jewish Museum has been growing its school education programs. These programs embrace all primary and secondary school students in an age-appropriate way, and put the Holocaust firmly on their educational map. Reaching 27,500 students last year, the SJM provides professional educators as well as highly trained volunteer guides to support the students’ learnings, with direct links to the NSW school curriculum. In order to ensure these education programs are accessible to the widest range of school students, the Museum subsidises the program cost, and relies on the generosity of the community to fund the excess beyond what the Museum is able to cover on its own.

Program Beneficiaries 27,500+ NSW school students each year, the vast majority non-Jewish, and their families and friends with whom they, in turn, share their first-hand experience of a visit to the Museum. Program Provider Sydney Jewish Museum (SJM) Founding Year 1992 Joined JCA 1998 Website sydneyjewishmuseum. com.au President Professor Gus Lehrer AM FAA CEO Norman Seligman

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Program Partnerships The Sydney Jewish Museum works closely with many communal organisations on a range of programs to educate students and adults, to preserve historical artefacts and to commemorate the Holocaust. Partnerships include: NSW Jewish Board of Deputies, Montefiore, Australian Jewish Historical Society, Board of Jewish Education as well as Emanuel School, Masada College, Moriah College and Mount Sinai College . JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Jewish education in public schools

For nearly 2,000 Jewish children in our community, this program provides the only educational exposure they have to Jewish studies and culture. Engaging and relevant classes bring Judaism to life, covering everything from festivals and celebrations to values and beliefs within the NSW public school system.

Funding Target

$775,000

Key Impact Stats • 62 non-Jewish schools • 1,983 students across primary and high schools • 35 teachers provided with Jewish education packs • 367 Jewish education classes held in 2018 • 23 children prepared for bar and bat mitzvahs

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This program provides Jewish and Hebrew related curriculum in 62 government schools across NSW. Classes are creatively designed to cover everything from festivals and celebrations to values and beliefs in a very limited window of time within the school timetable. Australian law stipulates that no fee can be charged for these Special Religious Education (SRE) classes and so without JCA funding this program could not exist.

Program Beneficiaries Your donation covers salaries for teachers and education packs for the 1,983 students involved in the program. Program Provider NSW Board of Jewish Education (BJE) Founding Year 1909 (1844) Joined JCA 1967 Website bje.org.au President Tahlia Gordon CEO Hilit Man Program Partnerships • The Great Synagogue (Bar and Bat Mitzvah classes)

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JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Immersive Jewish experiences for high school students

These social and educational programs are a critical way to spark a sense of Jewish identity in high school students who do not attend a Jewish day school. The two flagship programs are the annual Weekend Escape Camps and Leadership Seminar.

Funding Target

$150,000

Key Impact Stats • 462 high school students • 143 camp and seminar attendees • 6 schools serviced

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This program offers high school students in Government and independent non-denominational schools an immersive Jewish experience of socialising and learning. The Weekend Escape Camp is an annual four-day camp designed to create an exciting and fun informal learning environment in which students develop themselves as individuals and engage with their Jewish culture, heritage and community. Students meet and develop friendships with other students from across a broad range of the Jewish community, setting up remarkable social and educational connections in the process. The Senior Leadership Seminar, also undertaken annually, is an opportunity for Year 11 high school students to acquire valuable leadership skills. By creating leaders and thoughtful human beings, it’s believed students are in the best position to ‘pay it forward’. The Seminar is designed to encourage and empower senior students to be confident and active members of the Jewish community. The annual Weekend Escape Camps and Leadership Seminar both rely on your JCA donation to operate.

Program Beneficiaries A total of 462 high school students and 143 camp and seminar attendees benefit from these enrichment programs. Program Provider NSW Board of Jewish Education (BJE) Founding Year 1909 (1844) Joined JCA 1967 Website bje.org.au President Tahlia Gordon CEO Hilit Man Program Partnerships • Y2i (Youth to Israel)

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JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Progressive Jewish education and cultural programming

Weekly progressive Jewish education classes are provided for children aged 5 to 17, embracing and empowering those young progressive members of the community across NSW and the ACT.

Funding Target

$155,000

Key Impact Stats • 213 students reached • 3 learning centres • 900 hours of instructional programming per year

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Progressive Jewish Education offers weekly classes outside of school hours. Programs include Sunday schools across NSW and ACT campuses, and 'KEF Kids', run on Thursday afternoons focusing on the Shabbat experience. These programs are an alternative experience to the Orthodox programs which exist in the community. The custom-designed, off-campus curriculum teaches Jewish values, festival celebrations and prayers, helping to strengthen a sense of Jewish identity in a stimulating learning environment. BPJE offer the program to over 200 students for whom this may be their only touchpoint with Judaism. JCA is the primary funder of the programs offered.

Program Beneficiaries A total of 213 students will benefit from progressive Jewish education classes. Program Provider Board of Progressive Jewish Education (BPJE) Founding Year 1996 Joined JCA 1996; 1968 as NSW Board of Liberal (Progressive) Jewish Education Website bpje.org.au President David Speiser Head of Education Dudu Gotlib

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JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Jewish Day School fee assistance for families in need

This program helps ensure that attending a Jewish Day School can be a reality for every Jewish child in Sydney, irrespective of means. Your donation goes directly towards fee assistance for applicants most in need (who otherwise could not afford these schools). All Jewish Day Schools across the communal religious spectrum are supported through this JCA funding stream and funds do not go towards any other element of these schools’ budgetary need.

Funding Target

$2,600,000 Key Impact Stats

Approximately 400 students qualify for fee assistance each year: • 5% of students at Emanuel School • 38% of students at Masada College • 7% of students at Moriah College • 29% students at Mount Sinai College

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This program offers support to those students whose families would otherwise be unable to send their children to a Jewish Day School. Ensuring these students have a place at our Jewish Day Schools is paramount for all Jewish education providers. Those with the most need in our community are the beneficiaries of this program. The total cost of providing this program amongst the four schools outlined is approximately $5.4 million of which the providers fund $2.75 million, leaving a shortfall of the requested funding.

Program Provider Emanuel School Founding Year 1983 Website emanuelschool.nsw.edu.au President Adam Blackman Principal Andrew Watt Masada College Founding Year 1966 Website masada.nsw.edu.au President Darryl Dorfan College Principal Martin Tait Moriah College Founding Year 1942 Website moriah.nsw.edu.au President Stephen Jankelowitz Co-acting College Principals Roberta Goot OAM Donna Delbaere Mount Sinai College Founding Year 1981 Website mountsinai.nsw.edu.au President Tim Greenstein

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Principal Phil Roberts JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Ensuring inclusion for students with special needs

These programs ensure that over 100 Jewish children with special needs are embraced by our day schools through funding the extra support they or their families need. Your donation supplements the amounts already committed by these day schools.t

Funding Target

$500,000 Key Impact Stats

Special needs children are supported at four Jewish Day Schools in Sydney: • 25 at Emanuel School • 10 at Masada College • 55 at Moriah College • 12 at Mount Sinai College

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Some of our most vulnerable community members are of school age and the Government does not provide sufficient funding to ensure their inclusion. Your funding supports children with anxiety, dyspraxia, ADHD, ADD, hearing limitations, sight limitations, mobility limitations, behavioural complexities, speech and language delays, Autism Spectrum Disorder, occupational therapy, Asperger’s and sensory processing disorder. The programs assist these children from an educational, social and physical perspective by providing appropriate teaching support and physical aids for each student’s requirements. A total of $1.34 million is required to support the special needs programs in our Day Schools and while approximately $800,000 is provided directly by the schools, JCA funds the $500,000 balance.

Program Provider Emanuel School Founding Year 1983 Website emanuelschool.nsw.edu.au President Adam Blackman Principal Andrew Watt Masada College Founding Year 1966 Website masada.nsw.edu.au President Darryl Dorfan College Principal Martin Tait Moriah College Founding Year 1942 Website moriah.nsw.edu.au President Stephen Jankelowitz Co-acting College Principals Roberta Goot OAM Donna Delbaere Mount Sinai College Founding Year 1981 Website mountsinai.nsw.edu.au President Tim Greenstein

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Principal Phil Roberts JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

University Jewish education and development of future Jewish educators

This program provides accredited undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, Jewish history, the Holocaust and Israel, and modern and classical Hebrew at the University of Sydney. This work promotes advocacy and helps combat antisemitism on campus and beyond.

Funding Target

$100,000

Key Impact Stats • 164 Jewish and nonJewish students have benefitted from the Jewish civilisation, history, Holocaust and Israel courses in 2018 • 23 students completed the Hebrew Language courses in 2018 • 15 graduates have gone on to senior education leadership positions in our community over the last 10 years

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These courses are a critical feeder of graduates back into the Jewish community. They also empower Jewish and non-Jewish students going into fields such as international relations, media, law, business, the arts and philanthropy by giving them specialised knowledge about Jewish history and thought, the Hebrew language and Israel. Your support thus develops a knowledge of Jewish culture, thought and tradition in Australia’s future leaders across a broad range of areas and industries as well as producing our communities’ future educators.Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, Jewish history, the Holocaust and Israel These courses are offered at both undergraduate and postgraduate level at the University of Sydney through the Department of Hebrew Biblical and Jewish Studies, and offer a pathway for students wishing to teach in Jewish Day Schools, as well as providing deep knowledge of Jewish thought and life for Jewish and non-Jewish students who go on to follow other careers. The Department also provides a strong Jewish presence on campus, which is critical for advocacy and in addressing the growing instances of antisemitism.

Program Beneficiaries University students who have a passion for Jewish learning, education and culture influence others through a lifetime of knowledge sharing. Program Provider Fund for Jewish Higher Education (FJHE) Founding Year 1981 Joined JCA 1997 Chairman Peter Wertheim AM

Classical and Modern Hebrew Language Providing the only university program in Australia to offer both classical and modern Hebrew language courses. The courses span four years and an Honours option is available for advanced students. Aside from the education benefits which are reaped by students, the courses also offers a positive presence of both ancient and modern Israeli culture and society at the University which helps fight antisemitism and increases advocacy. Without funds from JCA, the programs offered would be limited and the intangible benefits to the community of advocacy and countering antisemitism on campus and beyond, would be unachievable.

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JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Supporting religious day school diversity

This program supports the viability of the Orthodox Jewish Day School that would otherwise not be able to provide its services to families in need in its local area.

Funding Target

$350,000 Key Impact Stats

• 290 out of 336 students supported with fee assistance in 2018 • 13 out of 14 HSC students who graduated in 2018 did so with the support of fee assistance from the community

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Kesser Torah College services the Orthodox sector of the community in its local area and is currently seeking JCA membership. Although not as yet a member, KTC’s financial need is partially supported by a funding allocation from JCA to ensure the school’s viability. Assistance from JCA has remained at the same level and continued for the past 12 years, ensuring the school’s viability and an Orthodox Jewish education for hundreds of local students. KTC is seeking this funding for another year in order to assist families in need who would otherwise not be able to afford this school for their children. By supporting KTC’s viability you help ensure that community members of all religious streams have a day school to attend.

Program Beneficiaries JCA funding goes directly to support families in need who would otherwise not be able to afford an Orthodox Jewish education for their children. Program Provider Kesser Torah College (KTC) Founding Year 2004 Joined JCA While not yet a member organisation of JCA, Kesser Torah College is supported by funding made available by the JCA Board of Governors. Website kessertorah.nsw.edu.au President Meir Moss Principal Roy Steinman

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JCA Destinations 2019


JEWISH EDUCATION

Year 10 trips to Israel for Jewish students at public and private schools

Providing $5,000 vouchers to every Jewish Year 10 student participating in an approved fiveweek Israel education program. Programs are designed for students at Jewish schools as well as those who attend public and private high schools. Students explore and consolidate their Jewish identity and their sense of belonging and understanding of Israel and their Jewish background.

Funding Target

$250,000 Key Impact Stats

• 1,000+ students granted Y2i vouchers to participate in five-week Israel programs • 115% increase in students participating in BJE Israel program (who do not attend a Jewish school) • 92% of students at Jewish schools participate in their school’s program • 320+ students will participate in Israel programs in 2019

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Studies have demonstrated that by far the most powerful way to engage young people is through experiences, particularly meaningful experiences, in their formative years. This is particularly true in the context of Jewish continuity, and it has been demonstrated that trips to Israel are one of the strongest ways to engage Jewish youth in the community and forge a connection that lasts a lifetime. In 2015, Y2i was launched to provide every Jewish Year 10 student in NSW, ACT and QLD with access to a $5,000 voucher to be used towards an approved education trip to Israel. The voucher can be put towards programs operated by BJE, Emanuel School, Kesser Torah College, Moriah College, and Masada College. Y2i supports youth in the community regardless of whether they attend a Jewish day school, private school, or a public school.

Program Beneficiaries Your donation will contribute to the Y2i annual operating cost, making participation in Year 10 Israel programs affordable and sustainable. Program Provider Youth 2 Israel Team Founding Year 2015 Joined JCA Y2i is a JCA Endowment fund and not a JCA member organisation. Y2i is supported through funding from communal donors and the endowment fund is managed by JCA. Website youth2israel.org.au President Jeremy Dunkel Program Manager Rachel Swartz

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JCA Destinations 2019


SECURITY & ADVOCACY

Security for the NSW Jewish community

This program is vital for the physical safety and protection of our community. Charged with the 24/7 oversight and operations that safeguard personal security and strengthen communal physical facilities. Working closely with State and Federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies in analysing threats to the community and providing essential advice necessary for threat management and response.

Funding Target

$2,000,000 Key Impact Stats

• in excess of 25,000 hours of protection through the course of 2018 • an average of 5 hours of training per week for most CSG personnel attending mandatory weekly training sessions • approximately 270 operational and support staff, managed by a team of 10 full time and 5 part time staff. • ‘on-call’ 24/7, 365 days per year – CSG never closes

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The professional community organisation, CSG NSW is responsible for the critical systems and services that safeguard our community. To enable the depth of service provision, CSG has essential security infrastructure including a CCTV network with a staffed Control and Crisis Centre, in direct communication with security personnel. They offer extensive training programs providing security personnel, community ushers and hundreds of well trained volunteers where required. Training increases awareness and security skills that promote individual empowerment and confidence. Other infrastructure includes technical reporting systems (1300 number, CSG Alert app, website, Facebook page and group) facilitating community engagement and immediate incident reporting. 24-hour safety and security hotline provides security advice, assistance, and emergency response. CSG is responsible for developing and implementing crisis and emergency management plans to ensure community preparedness, readiness and post-crisis resilience. There is close and continuous liaison with local, State and Federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies in relation to the Jewish community’s specific security needs. CSG records and follows up on antisemitic incidents as part of their ongoing production and dissemination of Threat Assessments, Security Bulletins, Briefing Papers and Annual Review of reported incidents. CSG also provides independent security services and advice to Jewish institutions and community assets across NSW – consulting to Jewish schools, synagogues and institutions in relation to threats, effective procedures, physical and technical security and emergency/crisis planning. This includes auditing and testing of communal facilities’ security procedures, security personnel and physical security assets. CSG also works closely with the NSW Jewish Board of Deputies (NSWJBD) and the NSW Council for Jewish Community Security (CJCS NSW) to secure Government funding for capital works for communal installations. CSG NSW receives the majority of its recurrent annual funding from JCA through the auspices of the NSW Council for Jewish Community Security. Simply put, without this recurrent funding, CSG would not be able to provide these vital services.

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Program Beneficiaries The entire NSW Jewish Community benefits from these services, which are provided without political or financial bias, and are based solely on threat and security resources required and available. In addition to benefitting JCA member organisations and other communal institutions, CSG NSW provides advice and assistance (where resources allow) to the ACT Jewish Community. Program Provider NSW Community Security Group (CSG), under the auspices of CJCS NSW Founding Year Circa 1978 Joined JCA 2008 under the auspices of CJCS NSW. In its early years, CSG was funded in association with the NSWJBD. Website csgnsw.org.au Chairman Peter Wise Head of Security Matthew Meyerson Program Partnerships • NSWJBD • NSW Council for Jewish Community Security (CJCS NSW)

JCA Destinations 2019


SECURITY & ADVOCACY

Jewish advocacy and leadership in media, politics and the broader community

This essential service ensures that the voice of our Jewish community is heard at the highest levels of Federal, State and Local government. It is the peak program for community advocacy in the media on an ongoing basis, as well as in times of crisis. It is also an inclusive voice for outreach to communities of all faiths across Australia and delivers a powerful message against antisemitism, racism and bigotry.

Funding Target

$1,715,000 Key Impact Stats

• 17 advocacy initiatives • 22 events attracting 2,200+ participants in 2018 • 1,000+ media engagements on behalf of the community in 2018 • Constant advocacy to promote respect for diversity and the importance of condemning racism, bigotry and antisemitism

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The NSW Jewish Board of Deputies (JBD) works hard to build an Australia in which freedom and the civic protections of our civil society are able to flourish. Creating strong coalitions enables defence of Israel’s place in the world, fosters support for democracy and pluralism and safeguards freedom of worship for all. Advocacy: The JBD builds relationships with members of parliament and government, and with media, in order to advance the community’s message. A recent example of its political advocacy was spearheading a three-year campaign which achieved the passage of legislation outlawing incitement to violence on the basis of race, religion, gender and sexuality. Coalition Building: The JBD builds alliances among diverse ethnic and religious groups to advance issues of common concern. Fundamental to the mission is the belief that the wellbeing of the Jewish community is integral to that of other faith and ethnic groups. Strategic Communications: An impactful media presence allows the JBD to amplify their advocacy efforts. Through over 1000 appearances in the media every year - television and radio, press releases, and newspaper columns – the JBD impacts the public debate on their top priorities. Combatting Antisemitism: Antisemitism has been called the world’s oldest hatred. This, like all forms of racism, is a tangible threat not only to Jews, but also to the fabric of democratic societies. The JBD delivers that message constantly and has the carriage of responding to, and combatting, antisemitic incidents on the community’s behalf.

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Program Beneficiaries All members of the Jewish community, through advocacy, coalition building, protection against antisemitism and promotion of a culture of social justice across Australian society. Program Provider NSW Jewish Board of Deputies Founding Year 1945 Joined JCA 1967 Website nswjbd.org President Lesli Berger CEO Vic Alhadeff

JCA Destinations 2019


SECURITY & ADVOCACY

Promoting a culture of tolerance in public high schools

“Respect, Understanding, Acceptance” is a schools harmony program aiming to engender a culture of tolerance in senior students at public and non-Jewish schools. The program promotes respect for diversity across a range of cultural, religious and socio-economic communities.

Funding Target

$40,000

Key Impact Stats • 35 participating schools, with ongoing potential for more to join • Approximately 1000 students participate every year • Teaching and promoting respect for diversity across cultural and religious boundaries

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The program teaches current generations about the threats of bigotry, race hate and antisemitism. While the increased use of social media and technology has massive potential for good, it also means that false information and conspiracy theories are easily disseminated. Without extensive education and awareness of the issues which inform antisemitic and racist views, and the need to have the courage to speak out, the proliferation of antisemitic incidents can only continue to rise. This program teaches students that even relatively minor acts of prejudice and bigotry can fuel hate and lead to abuse and violence, which makes the importance of not being a bystander so essential. The anti-racism component of the program is critical to the key take-outs which we impart to the participants. The program sees senior students from both the public and private systems, from many cultures, socio-economic backgrounds and religions, coming together in an ambience of relaxed camaraderie to discuss and focus on the values of respect for diversity and the importance of speaking out against bigotry.

Program Beneficiaries Approximately 1,000 senior school students in the broader community, annually. Program Provider NSW Jewish Board of Deputies Founding Year 1945 Joined JCA 1967 Website nswjbd.org President Lesli Berger CEO Vic Alhadeff

The program is run over a full day, with thousands of students having participated since its inception, and with the potential for those numbers to increase dramatically. Without this funding, this program could not happen.

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JCA Destinations 2019


Sector

Program

Provider

Target

#

Aged & Community Care

Retirement living rent subsidy for elderly ineligible for government funding

B'nai B'rith

$50,000

4

Kosher meals on wheels

COA

$100,000

6

Support services for individuals and families in crisis

JewishCare

$850,000

8

Social support and advisory services for the aged living at home

JewishCare

$550,000

10

Disability support services for children, adults and their families

JewishCare

$460,000

12

Financial support for pensioners to be provided quality residential aged care

Montefiore

$500,000

14

Wellness programs for seniors living outside of The Burger Centre aged care facilities

$95,000

16

Respite for carers program

The Burger Centre

$190,000

18

Private hospital specialising in rehabilitation, medical and palliative care

Wolper Jewish Hospital

Self-funded

20

Community planning and enrichment

JCA

$550,000

22

Community relationship management system

JCA

$300,000

24

ACT Jewish Community

$200,000

26

B'nai B'rith

Self-funded

28

Jumpstart - engaging 20 and 30 year olds in our community

JCA

$50,000

30

Yiddish and Hebrew cultural immersion

Jewish Folk Centre

Self-funded

32

Adult sport – supporting a healthy lifestyle

Maccabi NSW

$70,000

34

All abilities and youth sport program

Maccabi NSW

$130,000

36

Young mothers in crisis outreach program

Mum for Mum / NCJWA

$40,000

38

Australasian Union of Jewish Students (AUJS) Shalom / AUJS

$200,000

40

Inclusive young adult and adult cultural programming

Shalom

$485,000

42

Shalom Baby and PJ Library

Shalom

$335,000

44

Community Continuity

Culture, Creating Jewish engagement within the Engagement regional Canberra community & Outreach Social, cultural, advocacy and antidiscrimination programs

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Sector

Program

Provider

Target

#

Holocaust, History & Heritage

Community-wide archiving and digitisation of local Jewish history

Australian Jewish Historical Society

$75,000

46

Holocaust and heritage online archive

Australian Jewish Historical Society, Sydney Jewish Museum

$75,000

48

Holocaust commemoration and social justice outreach events

NSW Jewish Board of Deputies

$205,000

50

Holocaust and Judaism education programs for NSW school students

Sydney Jewish Museum

$855,000

52

Jewish education in public schools

Board of Jewish Education (NSW)

$775,000

54

Immersive Jewish experiences for high school students

Board of Jewish Education (NSW)

$150,000

56

Progressive Jewish education and cultural programming

Board of Progressive Jewish Education

$155,000

58

Jewish Day School fee assistance for families in need

Emanuel, Masada Moriah, Mount Sinai

$2,600,000

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Ensuring inclusion for students with special needs

Emanuel, Masada Moriah, Mount Sinai

$500,000

62

University Jewish education and development Fund for Jewish of future Jewish educators Higher Education

$100,000

64

Supporting religious day school diversity

Kesser TorahCollege

$350,000

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Year 10 trips to Israel for Jewish students at public and private schools

Youth 2 Israel

$250,000

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Security for the NSW Jewish community

CSG NSW

$2,000,000

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Jewish advocacy and leadership in media, politics and the broader community

NSW Jewish Board of Deputies

$1,715,000

72

Promoting a culture of tolerance in public high schools

NSW Jewish Board of Deputies

$40,000

74

Jewish Education

Security & Advocacy

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JCA Destinations 2019


Our Vibrant Network For more information about any of these programs and how you can make a difference, please call JCA on 9360 2344 or visit www.jca.org.au

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