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Communications Standards

COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE


Communications Standards COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE • Overview • Logo and Graphic Identity Guidelines • Editorial Process • Editorial Style Guide • Writing Tips • Dealing with the Media • Speakers’ Bureau • Online (Websites and Social Media)

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GEORGIA HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS Overview Georgia Health Sciences University Communications Standards are designed to strengthen the university’s communications with internal and external audiences through its visual identity and editorial style guide.

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Materials that require review include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Certain GHSU materials, such as magazines and the university-wide Annual Report, can be produced only by the Office of University Communications. Smaller-scale materials can be produced in other departments, but those representing GHSU for an external audience or mass GHSU audience must be approved by the Office of University Communications for visual and editorial content before printing, broadcasting or Web publishing. To ensure quality and compliance with GHSU Communications Standards, assistance at the beginning of the production process is highly recommended. Delays will likely result if extensive revisions are needed at a late stage of production.

Newsletters* Brochures* Advertisements Letterhead* Business cards* Catalogs Handbooks Books Recruiting/promotional videos Broadcast ads and public service announcements Direct-mail materials Invitations Announcements Flyers Posters Tickets External surveys Web content Lab coat embroidery/patches Promotional items/giveaways PowerPoint backgrounds

* Use approved templates only. Visit www.georgiahealth.edu/ identity Materials excluded from the review requirement include: • • • •

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Private correspondence Contributions to scientific journals Grant applications Campus surveys


LOGO AND GRAPHIC IDENTITY GUIDELINES Several components comprise our logo. Whenever possible, the logo should appear as a complete entity. The following definitions are provided to explain its parts.

Icon

wordmark

logo

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Signature System

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A logo is the cornerstone of a visual identity program. Optimal recognition and perception of GHSU requires adherence to a family of logos, or signature system as outlined. The logo should appear in the two primary colors, whenever possible. It also should appear no smaller than 1/2� tall. Please contact the Office of University Communications for special exceptions.

Minimum Size

1/2�

Special Uses

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For special uses such as glassware, embroidery, etc., the logo may appear in all dark blue, all black or white (reversed out). It may also be foil-stamped, watermarked and screened. All special uses must get approval from the Office of University Communications.

This logo is not to be confused with the university seal. The seal is reserved for formal documents and should not be used without permssion from the Provost.

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Secondary Signatures

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Sub-brands are available for the Colleges and major centers.

Medical College of Georgia College of Graduate Studies

College of Allied Health Sciences

College of Nursing College of Dental Medicine

Sub-Brands

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The following subbrands have been officailly approved by the President and Provost.

Vision

Brain & Behavior

At Georgia Health Sciences University

At Georgia Health Sciences University

Discovery Institute

Discovery Institute

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Incorrect Usage: Mistakes to avoid

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Office ofCollege a Department Medical of Georgia Do Not create your own sub-brand or type onto the existing logo.

Do Not rearrange or reset any elements. Use only the approved provided logos.

Georgia Health Sciences University

Do Not use any reverses other than the approved option. (The building must appear “white.�)

Do Not distort by compressing or stretching the proportions.

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Correspondence Faculty, staff, departments and programs must use the official formats for letterheads, envelopes and business cards. In the event of spacing problems, contact the Office of University Communications, which will work with Printing Services to adjust the official layout. Special purpose, e.g. fundraising, Letterhead—Option A Division Name Here Name of Building, XX-XXX• 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX • F: 706-434-XXXX www.georgiahealth.edu

Business Card

Name Title

College of XX Name of Building, XX-2201 1120 15th St. • Augusta, Georgia 30912 XX@georgiahealth.edu P: 706-721-XXXX • F: 706-434-XXXX www.georgiahealth.edu

An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Educational Institution

Home of the Medical College of Georgia

Envelope 1828

1120 Fifteenth St. Augusta, Georgia 30912

Letterhead—Option B

Division of Name Here Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

Office of Name Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

Office of Name Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

Office of Name Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

www.georgiahealth.edu

Home of the Medical College of Georgia An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Educational Institution

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1.5” Division of Name Here Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

.75” Office of Name Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

Office of Name Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX

Division Name Here

F: 706-434-XXXX

2”

Name of Building, XX-XXX• 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX • F: 706-434-XXXX www.georgiahealth.edu

Office of Name Name of Building, XX-XXX 1120 15th St. Augusta, Georgia 30912 P: 706-721-XXXX F: 706-434-XXXX

2.5”

www.georgiahealth.edu

Home of the Medical College of Georgia

1”

An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Educational Institution

.75”

.75”

Please observe the margin guidelines above when typesetting letter content.

An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Educational Institution

Home of the Medical College of Georgia

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1”


Colors

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The university logo may only appear in the two primary colors as depicted on page 4. White reverse is available only for special use through the Office of University Communications due to technical constraints. Gold or silver foil are reserved for special use only. (Permission required from the Office of University Communications.)

Georgia Health Sciences University Colors

Color publications that represent the university should have GHSU Dark Blue. Secondary colors may be used to in conjunction with GHSU Dark Blue. Designers may use the expanded color palette for additional options.

Secondary Colors

Primary Colors

PMS 540

PMS 2727

PMS 5415

PMS 300

PMS 187

PMS 128

PMS 7529

PMS 556

print only: cmyk 100,55,0,55 web only: rgb 0,43,88 #002b58

cmyk 71,42,0,0 rgb, 78,132,196 #4384c4

print only: cmyk 42,8,0,40 web only: rgb 89,120,139 #59788B

cmyk 100,44,0,0 rgb 0,121,193 #0079c1

cmyk 0,100,79,20 rgb 196,18,48 #c41230

cmyk 0,11,65,0 rgb 255,222,117 #ffde75

cmyk 0,4,12,17 rgb 217,207,192 #d9cfc0

cmyk 42,0,33,27 rgb 114,164,146 #72a492

PMS 544

PMS 432

PMS 5135

PMS 472

PMS 358

PMS 360

PMS 383

PMS 463

cmyk 30,6,0,0 rgb 172,212,241 #acd4f1

cmyk 23,3,0,77 rgb 69,84,95 #45545F

cmyk 47,64,28,0 rgb 149,110,142 #956e8e

cmyk 0,34,52,0 rgb 251,180,128 #fbb480

cmyk 27,0,38,0 rgb 189,223,178 #bddfb2

cmyk 58,0,80,0 rgb 115,193,103 #73c167

cmyk 20,0,100,19 rgb 178,187,30 #b2bb1e

cmyk 30,56,100,37 rgb 128,86,27 #805618

Secondary Colors

Typography

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The logo consists of the font families. But supporting type is not limited to these fonts. Text for official communications may appear in Arial, Calibri, and Cambria.

Arial

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890

GHSU Logo Typeface

Gotham (Bold)

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890

Calibri ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890 n n n n

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Cambria

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890


EDITORIAL PROCESS Steps

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Editorial process for campus communications produced outside the Office of University Communications: STEP 1: Submit copy and/or script to the Editorial Office in a Word document for editing. STEP 2: The Editorial Office will edit the copy using Microsoft Word’s tracking function and return the edited document to the originator.

Copy/scripts one to five pages long: Approximately two working days

• Copy/scripts five to 20 pages long: Approximately five working days • Copy/scripts exceeding 20 pages: Contact editorial manager for individualized timeline STEP 3: The originator of the project will proceed with production based on the edited copy/script., then submit the completed project to the Editorial Office for final review before publication, broadcast, Web-posting or other means of dissemination. •

Projects one to five pages long or broadcasts shorter than five minutes: Approximately two working days

• Projects five to 20 pages long or broadcasts lasting five to 30 minutes: Approximately five working days • Projects exceeding 20 pages or 30 minutes: Contact editorial manager for individualized timeline For more information or assistance at any stage of production, contact the Office of University Communications at 706-721-2124, FI-1040 or cderiso@georgiahealth.edu.

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EDITORIAL STYLE GUIDE Style Guide GHSU uses the Associated Press style guide, other than in rare exceptions noted in this section. Copies of The Associated Press Stylebook are available on loan from the GHSU Editorial Office or on sale from the GHSU Bookstore (706-721-3581). Style guidelines are listed alphabetically. For more information or for points not covered in the stylebook, contact the GHSU Editorial Office.

Academic Degrees—Other than in lists and business cards, do not follow a name with “letter” degrees. Wrong: Jane Doe, Ph.D. Right: Dr. Jane Doe Wrong: John Doe, M.S.N. Right: John Doe Establish credentials in the body of copy, if necessary: “John Doe earned a master’s degree in nursing from Ohio State University.” When titles are used in lists and/or business cards, use periods after letters and no spaces between letters and periods. Acronyms—Readily understood acronyms are acceptable on subsequent reference (GHSU, UGA, USG, NIH, CDC, etc.), but in general, avoid alphabet soup and do not place an acronym in parentheses after a first reference. Offices, institutes, foundations, associations, departments, etc. can often be shortened in subsequent references as “the office,” “the foundation,” etc. Capitalization—Capitalize formal names: the GHSU School of Medicine, the GHSU School of Dentistry, the Department of Anesthesiology, the Section of Pediatric Cardiology, etc. Lower-case informal references: the university, the medical school, the dental school, the department, the section, etc. Likewise, titles are capitalized when immediately preceding a name (President John Doe) but otherwise are lower-case (John Doe, president of…) Chairs—The title is “chairman” or “chairwoman,” but a person can chair a committee or endow a chair. Commas—Use commas to separate elements in a series, but not before the conjunction in a simple series: The flag is red, white and blue. Courtesy Titles—The only courtesy titles used are “Dr.” and formal titles, such as “President” or “Provost,” and then only on first reference. “Mr.,” Mrs.,” “Miss” and “Ms.” are not used. The courtesy title “Dr.” is used for any kind of doctor (M.D., Ph.D., D.M.D., Ed.D., etc.), a deviation from AP style. The title precedes the full name in the first reference but is not used on subsequent references. Example: Dr. John Smith has been named chairman of the National Society of Physicians. Smith, a 1988 graduate of the GHSU School of Medicine…. Example: Dr. Mary Smith has been named chairwoman of the National Society of Dentists. Smith, a 1988 graduate of the GHSU School of Dentistry…. Example: GHSU President John Smith has been named chairman of the

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National Society of Educators. Smith, who earned a doctorate in education from the University of…. Example: John Smith has been named chairman of the National Society of Wordsmiths. Smith, who earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism…. Example: Mary Smith has been named chairwoman of the National Society of Wordsmiths. Smith, who earned a master’s degree in journalism… First Names—First names are acceptable on every reference for children (age 18 and younger). The same is occasionally true of adults referred to in feature stories. The tone of the story should dictate first-name usage in these cases. When in doubt, use last names on second and subsequent references. Health care—Two words. Georgia Health Sciences University—Refer to as GHSU on second and subsequent reference in copy. Rewrite entire name only in quoted material. Also acceptable for second and subsequent reference: the university (not college), Georgia’s health sciences university, the institution. Multiple Titles—Use only one title to precede a name: Dr. John Doe or GHSU President John Doe. Nicknames—Use as part of a first reference only if subject prefers it and is commonly called by it. If preference is unclear, use formal name (William rather than Bill). Numerals—Spell out one through nine and first through ninth; starting with 10 and 10th, use figures. Exceptions: Always use figures for ages (“She is 2 years old”) and percentages (“100 percent”), and spell out a numeral at the beginning of a sentence (“Twelve committee members attended…”) Temporary Titles—The title-holder’s preference applies: interim or acting. Tenses—Articles should be written in the past tense, except for occasional feature articles that may be written in the present tense, depending on the tone of the story. The tense should be consistent throughout the article. (Example of present tense: “GHSU is a great place to work,” says John Doe, an administration assistant in the Department of Wordsmithing.) Headlines and photo captions are written in the present tense.

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Compiled by the GHSU Editorial Office, 706-721-2124


WRITING TIPS Style and Structure The Office of University Communications works to ensure the most effective messaging possible when disseminating GHSU-related information. These guidelines are intended to optimize understandability, accuracy, consistency and other key components of good communication.

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• Clarity is vital and must trump any other consideration (creativity, cleverness, originality, etc.) when writing. These other elements can be incorporated into copy, but not at the expense of clarity. • Write in the active voice (for instance, “The Georgia Health Sciences University is recruiting volunteers....” rather than “Volunteers are being recruited by the Georgia Health Sciences University....”) • Use the inverted-pyramid structure when conveying news-oriented information, beginning with the most pertinent information and proceeding in descending order. • Incorporate storytelling and humanization as much as possible in featurewriting. For instance, when tackling a broad topic, it’s often helpful to begin with a single compelling and personalized story that encapsulates the theme. The broader picture can come later. A reader who cares about a single story connected to the theme will ideally be invested in the message and more likely to continue reading. • Avoid cliched and often-inaccurate terms such as “unique” and “cuttingedge.” A compelling message should stand on its own merits. • Avoid redundancies, such as “research study” and “free gift.” • Use elements such as all-caps, exclamation marks and superlatives very sparingly, keeping in mind that the more they are used, the less impact they have. Oversold messages forfeit impact and credibility. • Be truthful. Once a reader catches you in a single inaccuracy or exaggeration, he will distrust everything else you write. • Fact-check. Spell back a name to your source, check official Web sites for verification, double-check titles, etc. • Once you’ve drafted copy, reread it from a reader’s perspective. Do you have all the information you need? If you’re referring to an upcoming event, for instance, do you include the date, time, place, cost, contact information, etc.? Information should be concise yet thorough.

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Writing for the Web

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Web content is more likely to be scanned than read. Pointers for optimizing the impact of Web content include using:

For More Information

• Short paragraphs, with one idea per paragraph.

Office of University Communications

• Inverted-pyramid structure, citing the most important information first. • Active rather than passive voice. • Half the word count (or less) of conventional writing. • A “facts—just the facts” approach. Hyperbole and oversold messages are transparent, ineffective and unnecessarily space-consuming. • Spartan punctuation, avoiding exclamation marks and all-caps. • A friendly, informal tone, avoiding esoteric information or didactic delivery. • Bulleted lists, when appropriate, like this one. (Use parallel structure.) • Multiple pages, if necessary, to avoid excessive scrolling. • Photos and/or other visuals to complement text, but without appearing busy or cluttered. • Hypertext links when helpful and relevant, but used sparingly and with short, precise link text. • Concise headlines, if needed, that summarize main points. Headlines should be sentence “skeletons” that omit the articles “a,” “an” and “the” and replace the word “and” with commas. • User-friendly instructions. • Professional input regarding coding, typography, graphics, layout and colors. This is important both for technical considerations (different browsers and operating systems display elements differently) and esthetic ones. Non-professionals tend to overdo and overcomplicate. When in doubt, think “less is more.”

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Christine Hurley Deriso Editorial Manager 706-721-2124 cderiso@georgiahealth.edu


EXTERNAL RELATIONS Dealing with the Media Contact: Office of University Communications Toni Baker Public Relations Manager 706-721-4421 tbaker@georgiahealth.edu Jennifer Hilliard Scott Public Relations Coordinator 706-721-8604 jhilliard@georgiahealth.edu

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As a public university committed to the highest standards of integrity, the Georgia Health Sciences University prides itself on honesty and transparency in all of its communications. The university also takes pride in the many articulate, well-informed members of the GHSU community who help shape and disseminate our message. To ensure consistent messaging, please contact the Office of University Communications before interacting with the media as an GHSU representative. This is particularly vital when a media interaction involves photography, videography or other means of recording. As both a university and health center, GHSU is legally bound to safeguard privacy on many levels. The Office of University Communications can help prepare you for print, broadcast or online interviews; establish talking points to ensure consistent messaging; coordinate scheduling; handle any paperwork necessary, such as forms related to privacy and informed consent; and address any other issues or concerns you may have. A member of the office will be present if photography, videography or other means of recording are involved. A member of the office will also be onsite for other media interviews upon request or at the discretion of the office. If the Office of University Communications contacts you regarding a media inquiry, press conference or other form of publicity, please do everything possible to assist. Breaking news, for instance, may necessitate unplanned interviews or requests to provide information quickly. The office will do everything possible to optimize your convenience, but a dynamic environment often requires a prompt response. Be assured that any requests for assistance are intended to promote GHSU’s reputation and advance its mission.

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Speakers’ Bureau

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The Office of University Communications maintains a Speakers’ Bureau to help inform the public about advances and other areas of interest on campus. A continually updated database includes names and contact information of those willing to give speeches, presentations and other forms of communication regarding their areas of expertise (http://news.GHSU.edu/ speakers-bureau/). The office encourages the participation of every faculty member, as well as other members of the GHSU community with specific expertise regarding an GHSU service or operation. The office will work with you to prepare a speech or presentation, including establishing talking points to ensure consistent messaging; coordinate scheduling; handle any paperwork necessary; and address any other issues or concerns you may have.

Contact: Office of University Communications Toni Baker Public Relations Manager 706-721-4421 tbaker@georigahealth.edu Jennifer Hilliard Scott Public Relations Coordinator 706-721-8604 jhilliard@georgiahealth.edu

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2/25/11


GHSU comprehensive standards book  

GHSU identity book, 4 color, 8.5"x11"

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