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VOL. TWO ISSUE #1

Ianuali 2013

Ho‘ohuli ka Lima

The Ke Ala ‘Ike Scholars Newsletter


Latest Breaking News & Important Announcements Ke Ala ‘Ike Welcomes New Faces in the New Year! Ke Ala ‘Ike is proud to welcome new scholars! E komo mai! Let’s all work hard and support our fellow scholars old and new. Have a great semester! Print Services No Longer Available Starting spring 2013, Hālau ‘Ike O Pu’uloa will no longer offer free printing services. As many of you know, this wonderful service was provided by the Ho’oulu Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program. Printing will be restored to its original purpose as a Ho’oulu member service. Mahalo to the Ho’oulu staff for their tremendous generosity in extending their kōkua these many years. For print services near the Hālau, please visit the Leeward Copy Center in GT-104, Monday - Thursday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM and Friday: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM. New Hālau Hours and Service Information Please see our new spring semester hours to the right and also take note of library and laptop usage times. Preparing for graduation this spring? Ke Ala ‘Ike graduation prep services are available at the front desk. In addition to these services, we are fortunate and grateful to have Chris Matz, our head librarian, to offer research help on Wednesdays and Thursdays in the Hālau! Please stop by during the librarian research help hours listed to the right.

Spring Semester Hālau Hours M - F: 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Evening Hours M - W: 4 PM - 6 PM

Library and Laptop Hours M - W: 1 PM - 6 PM R & F: 1 PM - 3 PM

Librarian Research Help W: 3 PM - 5 PM R: 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM


News & Announcements Cont. Course Withdrawals Monday, January 28th is the last day for course withdrawals with a 50% refund. Please make any necessary adjustments to your enrollment at this time; withdrawals after this date are no longer eligible for a refund of the course tuition. Upcoming Holidays No classes will be held on Monday, February 18th in observance of President’s day. Hālau Reminders Whether you are a seasoned Hālau visitor or a newcomer, visiting kumu, friends, or studying on your own, please remember to always sign in at the computer near the front door. Signing in helps to track usage and growth of the Hālau so that we can better serve our Hawaiian community here at Leeward. Please kōkua and remind your peers to sign in as well.

Annual Photo-book Makes its Debut! Titled, “Pūpūkahi,” Hālau ‘Ike O Pu’uloa’s newest publication is an annual photo-book, featuring memorable moments of events, workshops, graduation and more. The current issue features photo-year 2012. To view Pūpūkahi, please click here. Your help is needed to make the photobook a success! Pūpūkahi can be released at the end of every semester with enough photos for a substantial layout. We are currently looking for spring 2013 photos of Ke Ala ‘Ike, Ho’oulu, and Kahiau events as well as any photos of students and staff around the Hālau and attending workshops. Please send all inquiries to pukani@hawaii.edu.


Past Events & Reviews Cultural Workshop: Hawaiian Protocols On the first Friday of the semester, Kahiau po’o, Lloyd Reinhardt, hosted his last workshop as head of the Leeward CC Hawaiian Club. Taught by Kalani Hiapo, the workshop featured the Kāhea Chant written by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui. Copies of the original document that Mrs. Pukui herself had written on were given to the class among other ‘oli and prayer. Guided by Kalani’s voice, the class learned about proper intonation and pronunciation of certain chants as well as how the strength and tone of one’s voice should match the message being conveyed. As the first line of Mrs. Pukui’s Kāhea Chant translates, “Fragrant with the breath of hala and lehua,” if the voice of the chanter is listless, Kalani jokes, the message will not “sound” very fragrant. Overall, the workshop was informative yet fun; participants walked away with a knowledge of different Hawaiian protocols and how they apply today, in modern Hawai’i. Cultural workshops are currently held every other Friday during the semester. The next cultural workshop will be held this Friday, January 25th and the following workshop, February 8th. For more information and workshop times, please see the Ho’oulu calendar near the front desk or speak to a staff member.


Success Connection Workshop Dates 1/29: Class Presentation Tips 1/30: Science Success 2/05: School, Work, Life -- How to Plan it all 2/06: What’s... Critical Thinking? 2/12: Group Work: Get Along, Get it Done 2/13: Using Evidence -- Thesis 2/19: How to Read Your Textbook 2/20: Research Beyond Google 2/26: So You Want to be an Engineer 2/27: Transferring to a Four-year College

Upcoming Events & Scholarship Info Success Connection Workshops These workshops are geared toward invoking success in school and beyond. No sign-up is needed to attend. Workshops are held in LC-102, 12 - 12:50 PM. Workshop dates are listed to the left.

Kupuohi X-perience: Kaliko Kupuohi X-perience Dates Cycle 1; 1/17, 1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14 Cycle 2: 2/20, 2/27, 3/6, 3/13, 3/20

A new Kupuohi series began on January 24th and runs until February 14th. Workshops are held every Thursday and focus on career and educational success. Another cycle of the Kupuohi experience will begin again on February 20th and will run until March 20th. Please inquire at the front desk.

Leeward CC General Events

2/27: Financial Fitness Fair, 10AM - 1PM in the library concourse

2/28: Job Prep Services OPEN House, 9AM - 12PM AD-222

E Kulia I Ka Nu’u


Events & Scholarship Cont. UH System Scholarship Application The UH System Common Scholarship application is currently open for submissions at uhsys.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com All students applying for any UH System scholarship must complete this application by March 1, 2013. Please fill out pages 2-7 as well as the page corresponding to your home institution.

Other Scholarship Applications & Resources • Kamehameha Schools Ho‘oulu Data Base: genealogical registry for Native Hawaiians who wish to benefit from Kamehameha Schools programs: www.ksbe.edu/datacenter/ • Kamehameha Schools ‘Imi Na‘auao: Merit-based Scholarship, Application due March 8, 2013 apps.ksbe.edu/finaid/scholarships/imi_ naauao • Kamehameha Schools Nā Ho‘okama a Pauahi: Need-based Scholarship, Application due April 22, 2013 apps.ksbe.edu/finaid/scholarships/na_ hookama • Hawai‘i Community Foundation - Dec. 2012 – February 2013 www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org

Scholarship Essay Tips 1. Different scholarships have different requirements; be sure to read thoroughly before planning your essay. 2. Prepare for your essay by thinking carefully about what you want to write about; jot your ideas down and then put them in outline form. 3. Review your outline to make sure all the requirements are covered. 4. When writing your essay, use clear and concise language. An elaborate use of fancy words and jargon may give the impression that you are trying too hard. Use natural and professional language. 5. If writing about your accomplishments, focus less on the accomplishment itself and more on how your accomplishments will benefit your overall goal and the community. 6. Read your essay aloud to hear the “flow” of your words. If the paragraph you are reading does not feel natural, think about how to re-word that section. 7. Get a second or third opinion on your essay and have someone with strong writing skills proofread it before submitting.


Cultural News & Educational Opportunities Transition University: A Sustainable Future

Native Hawaiian Programs

Cultural and educational opportunities are available through classes and workshops hosted by Transition University, a new educational project on ‘Oahu devoted to sustainability and a low-carbon future (www.transition-university.org). These workshops can be especially beneficial as supplemental education for those students planning to go into Hawaiian studies, agriculture, sustainability or environmental fields.

For information about all Native Hawaiian student programs in the University of Hawai’i System, a directory is now available for the 2013 calendar year. A link to the directory is provided below.

Discounts for classes are available to all UH students; there are also senior and group discounts as well. The current schedule of spring classes is as follows: Saturday, 1/26 - Traditional Hawaiian Plant Medicines with David Bruce Leonard. To register, please click here: http://goo. gl/2qJFb Sunday, 1/27 - Beekeeping for beginners with Howard McGinnis. To register, please click here: http://goo.gl/YpKdY Sunday, 2/3 - Herbal Remedies from Local Plants with ethnobotanist Laura Shiels, who teaches at UH Hilo. Participants will be able to take preparations home. To register, please click here: http://goo.gl/B70As Classes are a “full day,” at Honolulu Farms in Palolo Valley, starting at 9:30 AM and ending at 5 PM. Please bring your own lunch or potluck item. For general inquiries or problems with registration please contact Stuart Scott, President, at 808-392-5288.

https://docs.google.com/a/hawaii.edu/file/ d/0ByU1tAxohfO4Ti15ejdSWS0zU00/edit


Cultural News & Educational Opportunities Cont. Community Involvement Getting involved with the Native Hawaiian community does not only mean volunteering within your own ahupua’a -- volunteer opportunities are available across the island and many cultural sites are in need of your kōkua! Below you will find a list of organizations that hold regular community workdays. Keep in mind that if you are seeking an organization to volunteer with to fulfill community service hours or extra credit for a class, you will need confirmation of attendance. Be sure to sign in and notify the organization’s volunteer coordinator that you are in need of a confirmation. To find out more about the opportunities available, please visit the websites and send inquiries to the provided contacts.

Hoakalei Cultural Foundation (Ewa): Regular volunteer opportunities available to preserve cultural sites. www.hoakaleifoundation.org contact: kepa@hoakaleifoundation.org Papahana Kua’ola (Windward): Community workdays available to participate in lo’i kalo and stream maintenance/ restoration. www.papahanakuaola.org contact: mahilapierre@gmail.com Paepae O He’eia (Windward): Regular volunteer opportunities available to preserve and maintain fishpond systems. www.paepaeoheeia.org contact: 808-236-6178

Haleiwa Loko ‘Ea (North Shore): Community workdays available to participate in fishpond restoration project. contact: kimi.apiki@gmail.com Ka’ala Farm (Wai’anae): Volunteer opportunities available on an asneeded basis. Please call to inquire about volunteer services. www.kaala.org contact: Eric Enos 808-696-4954 Volunteering Directory: For a list of other organizations in need of volunteer kōkua on ‘Oahu as well as other islands, please visit http://preservehawaii.org/volunteer/


Culture Spotlight: Uncle Lloyd Momoa Reinhardt Chances are, if you frequent the Hālau often, you’ve seen a man with kind eyes and a warm smile interacting with students and staff, sharing his aloha and mana’o with anyone open to receive it. That man is Lloyd Momoa Reinhardt -- “Uncle Lloyd” or “Uncle Momoa” to many. A graduate of Kamehameha Schools, Uncle Momoa spent over 25 years in the hospitality industry and is now majoring in Liberal Arts at Leeward CC with intent to pursue a nursing career. Momoa’s dream is to help kupuna on the Wai’anae side where he grew up and would like to return. At the end of this semester, he will be one step closer to that dream, graduating with an Associate of Arts degree. Through a Hawaiian language course, Uncle Momoa was introduced to Hālau ‘Ike O Pu’uloa where he joined Kahiau Hawaiian Club. Momoa was solely nominated to lead Kahiau at the end of Kepo’o Keli’ipa’akaua’s term. After accepting the responsibility of Kahiau Po’o, Momoa organized and hosted a variety of cultural activities and workshops that were enjoyed by club members and nonmembers alike. Though many of us have benefitted from the numerous workshops and gatherings of Kahiau, as graduation nears for Uncle Momoa, he will step down as Kahiau Po’o, making way for the next set of nominees to head the club. He will be missed as Po’o, but will still be active as a member and foresees himself interacting with the club even after he graduates, showing dedication not just to the club but to the Hawaiian community and culture as well. Uncle Momoa’s fondest memory of Kahiau is of trips to Haleiwa Loko Ea where he hopes to frequently return to kōkua the fishpond restoration project. We would like to give a fond mahalo to Uncle Momoa, honoring him not only for his time as Kahiau Po’o but also for contributing his time to the Hawaiian community. Mahalo, Uncle Momoa. J


Editing: Auli’i Silva, Kamalani Hurley Title: Kalani Flores Layout/Composition: TaraMarie Panoke


Ho'ohuli Jan. '13  

Volume two, Issue #1 of Ho'ohuli ka Lima, the Ke Ala 'Ike Scholars newsletter.

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