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To que magazine

volume 5


N TOXIQUE Magazine is a free online art magazine which visually tries to describe relevant artistic and haute couture trends internationally. TOXIQUE is a magazine which normally seeks to capture current trends in arts and culture by bringing interviews, reportages and articles about galleries, organisations, art fairs, events and both established and upcoming artists from all kinds of artistic genres and styles. In this fift issue of TOXIQUE, the magazine brings forcus on the mysterious collection VOID by haute coture fashion designer Yvonne Laufer. Secondly you will be able to read a long and very personal interview with the world famous artist Kate MccGwire and her incredible feather installations. Finally TOXIQUE features a visually inspiring article about ROCKS and RABBIT - beautiful handmade jewrelly. Zoom in by clicking at a page and zoom out by clicking once more. Turn pages by using the left/righ arrows on your keyboard. Remember to check out all the hidden links in the e-magazine! Marie Wengler / TOXIQUE-TEMA Photographer Emil Friis-Jensen Jupin MUA and hair Pil Brøndum Gad Model Ida Marie / Le Management

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Want to have your art featured in the next issue of TOXIQUE? Join a free art competetion! Send us a mail or write a message to us at Facebook


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THEME The familiar made strange (inspired by artist Kate MccGwire, see p. 44) SPECIFICATIONS 1-3 pictures pr. participant (need not necessarily be photographic art) jpeg (high quality), 150 ppi short description of thoughts behind picture(s) + artist statement


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VOID / Yvonne Laufer Interview with an upcoming contemporary haute couture fashion designer

THE FAMILIAR MADE STRANGE

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Interview with world famous artist Kate MccGwire

ROCKS AND RABBIT

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Handmade jewrelly that begs to be touched ...


10 - 39

40 - 105

110 - 169


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Quote of the month Art is long Life is short - Hippocrates


void Photographer Julio Clavijo Make-up artist Nicolas Grivaz

yvonne Laufer


question / 1 Dear Yvonne, please give a brief description of yourself. Where are you from, what is your background and how, when and why did your carrier as an artistic conceptual haute-couture fashion designer begin?

I am a fashion designer with german roots currently based in Berlin, Germany. I graduated with an MA degree from The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design in Copenhagen, Denmark last year. Before I studied in the Netherlands where I completed my BA degree at the Academy of Fine Arts & Design in Maastricht. With a passion for fields that I know little about I always like to explore new methods and techniques that inspire both silhouette and surface of my designs. I love projects that combine fashion with other disciplines like art or science and express the zeitgeist. The concept is really important during the development of a collection. I want the clothes to carry a message and complexity so that in the end every piece is a work of art in itself.


question / 2 Where  would you place your work between design, style and art in your own opinion?

I think it is a balance between all three aspects. The conceptual approach is rather artistic whereas the product focuses a bit more on the design. 


question / 3 When you brainstorm your concepts and collections, do you start with a complete concept or do you begin with something more vague that develops over time into something more concrete? What’s your post-production workflow?

A concept for me is something that develops over time. It starts with a feeling, some ideas, some sketches, some pictures and literature. I am very inspired by looking at artists, architects and scientists and the way they work. Fashion design is limited to shapes that form around the human body. Before I start thinking about an actual piece of clothing I like to think out of the box and do something that might not relate to fashion at all. It makes me feel less limited. 


question / 4 Generally speaking, what single most important factor - according to you - is important to make a great piece?

I think it is the uniqueness of a design. It expresses something special that you never saw anywhere else. 


question / 5 Dear Yvonne, I love the  simplicity in your design. Your clothes really separates themselves form todays mainstream fashion trends. I’m therefore curious to know what or who is your inspiration? Do you pursue certain ‘themes’ in your design? 

Albert Einstein once said: “The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science.” It is hard to describe what inspires me in general but I guess it is this spark of mystery that you find in certain things. It makes you want to dive into a different world and create something that possesses this mysteriousness. 


question / 6 What is your idea behind VOID? What is your thoughts/ theme? How did you come up with the idea to the collection? 

I am fascinated by the world of science. It is a world that I know little about and that is surrounded by a mysterious aura. During this project I wanted to be part of this universe and adopted the role of a scientist. I created my own rules, methods and frameworks that resemble those of regular scientists. From my fascination of plants in combination with man made objects, I conducted experiments where both components interact: Plants are growing in and outside a confined space. While experimenting, I came across the concept of VOID or negative space which gives the plant the ability to grow. I developed various laser cut techniques based on the concept of negative space. Some cut outs leave space for a second layer or another fabric, others form some kind of modern lace.  VOID is a collection that embraces the presence of negative space. It explores the boundaries between form and non-form as well as materiality and nothingness. A universe for imaginary spaces. 


question / 7 What has been the biggest challenge and best experience in your artistic career so far?

I think I am going through the biggest challenge right now. After graduating it is very tough to find a way of continuing as a conceptual fashion designer without financial support. The best experience so far was the attention after graduating. I didn’t expect it and was really happy to read the thoughts about my work. It was amazing to see that just the pictures of the collection could communicate my thoughts behind the collection. 


question / 8 Do you have a favourite personal piece or a piece by another fashion designer, which you really adore? 

My favorite piece from the last collection is the black jacket with the drapings.


question / 9 Which piece has been the most difficult for you to create so far? 

A lot of the pieces were quite difficult to make because I never laser cut before. So if I calculated something wrong I could do it all over again. But I remember that it was very hard to make the gloves. All the tiny pieces had to come together.


question / 10 What characteristics would you say are necessary for an artistic designer to be successful today?

I think that it is important to have a strong signature. People should recognize that it is one of your designs when they see it. Furthermore the concept should be strong with a clear message. Fashion is a form of communicating and we should use it. 


question / 11 How do your family and close friends relate to your choice of career as an artistic conceptual designer and to your design in general?

My family always supported me in my choice of career as well as my close friends. But of course some people relate to my work better than others. I guess its just not so easy to understand clothes with an artistic approach if you are not really into fashion. But since a lot of my friends studied something design or art related they can also relate to my work. 


question / 12 Is there anything that you’re working on now that feels really new, unique, and challenging?

I am working with irregular materials and unusual techniques which makes it hard to foresee problems. Some pieces need a lot of prototypes and tests until they are finished. Even after that you can get some surprises. But I am really fond of experimenting and think that it is a way to innovate. 


question / 13 What role does an artist (which I really believe you are) and art in general have in society according to you?

To me art is philosophy and science expressed through materiality. It questions, innovates and mirrors the zeitgeist of the constant now. 


question / 14 Dear Yvonne, where do you hope to see yourself in the future? 

I hope to continue with my work as a conceptual fashion designer, and to be involved in projects that combine my vision of fashion with other disciplines like science, art and other fields of design.


question / 15 What do you have to say to the next generation, particularly for those hoping to follow in your footsteps?

Believe in what you do and do it good.


Anima (2012) Mixed media with dove/pigeon feathers in antique dome 69 x 43 x 43 cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Ian Stuart courtesy of All Visual Arts

the familiar made strange kate mccgwire


Skein (2012) Mixed media with mallard feathers in antique dome 52h x 26d x 26w cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Ian Stuart courtesy of All Visual Arts

Dear Kate, I know you were born in Norfolk and now live in London, educated in at the Royal College of Art, specialised in MA Sculpture. But I’m curious to know more about your background and how, when and why you first began creating art and became interested in arts? 

As a child growing up in rural Norfolk I was always drawing and making things. The nature and birds around me inspired me to make art from an early age. Going to London and the British Museum was also hugely influential; seeing the relics from Tutankhamen’s tomb and the Japan exhibition was like nothing I had ever seen before, it inspired my interest in patterning and set the foundation for my childhood fascination with art and objects. At the age of 16 I moved to Paris to work as an au pair. Having the wealth of Paris’s galleries and incredible architecture at my finger tips opened my eyes to painting and sculpture and set me on my path to where I am now.


Skein (2012) Mixed media with mallard feathers in antique dome 52h x 26d x 26w cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Ian Stuart courtesy of All Visual Arts

I’ve read that your art studio is a Dutch barge moored on a semi-derelict island on the Thames. How do you experience working artistically so close to water? Does the placement of your studio have an influence on your creativity?

Working on the river is amazing because you get this constant fantastic light. I’m totally aware of the seasons, nature and temperament of the river, and that really feeds into what I make. The island itself is also of endless inspiration to me, the lack of road access means the island has remained largely unchanged since the end of the Second World War. The rusty warehouses, bomb shelters and out-houses still survive today. It’s extremely rare to experience this kind of unkempt rural environment so close to London, but this island very much belongs to the wildlife, craftsman, artists and musicians who also inhabit this unusual terrain. It is a very creative and stimulating place to be.


Cleave (detail, 2012) Mixed media with dove/pigeon feathers in antique cabinet 62w x 46d x 162h cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo JP Bland

from malice and fear to seduction and beauty


CORVID (2011) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Narcis (2012) Mixed media with mallard feathers in antique dome 50w x 55h x 24d cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

Have you ever experimented with other forms of artistic genres before installation/sculpture or have you always been confident with your artistic medium? And have your artistic expression changed over the years? 

I went to art school expecting to be a painter but then spent a couple of years making animations of my work making itself - initially with a Super-8 Russian clockwork camera, but then moving on to digital animation. It’s something I would like to return to at a later stage. Following my explorations into alternative mediums I realised that making objects was where my passion lay. Sculpting enabled me to explore my fascination with the natural world and the beautiful materials it has to offer, which will always be the greatest source of inspiration to me.


Narcis (2012) Mixed media with mallard feathers in antique dome 50w x 55h x 24d cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

What is your creative workflow when creating a piece? Do you carefully plan eachinstallation/ sculpture or do you have a general idea from which you work?

I reflect, consider and fabricate pieces over and over again in my mind before I ever commit anything to paper. The mind is a malleable canvas, while physical mistakes can be hard to undo, I can work through the design and practical considerations in my head before I begin to work. Once a sculpture is started the form and scale will have been decided but the process of feathering is much more like painting; fluid and expressive but meticulous and meditative. I often become completely immersed in the act of making and often look back at a finished piece of work and think ‘did I make that?’ It’s like they have a life of their own.


Sepal Speculum II (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Lan Stuart courtesy of All Visual Arts

Once a sculpture is started the form and scale will have been decided but the process of feathering is much more like painting; fluid and expressive but meticulous and meditative.


Occulus (detail,2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Occulus (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

I often become completely immersed in the act of making and often look back at a finished piece of work and think ‘did I make that?’ It’s like they have a life of their own.


STIGMA shend (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Orchis (2012) Mixed media with mallard feathers in antique dome 35w x 44h x 24d cm Artist Kate MccGwire

Sculpting enabled me to explore my fascination with the natural world and the beautiful materials it has to offer, which will always be the greatest source of inspiration to me.

Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


DWELL NIMBUS (2011) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

What or who inspires you/have an influence on you when creating art? Are there other artists you relate to or consult with in your creative process when you experiment with new artistic ideas?

In terms of other artists who helped inform my artistic identity, I would have to mention Eva Hesse for her repetitive use of materials and the organic nature of her work. Also Doris Salcedo for her use of scale and exquisite detail in large sculptural objects. Louise Bourgeois was also particularly influential for her fearlessness in harnessing sexual icons and her binary references to both brutality and nurture in her work. With all three artists it is also the ambition of their works, which marked them out as seminal to my own artistic practice. In terms of my own work, I don’t really consult with other artists, but my partner Carlo, who is an engineer, is really helpful when it comes to working with a new material that I know little about.


BEGUILE (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Gyre (2012) Mixed media with crow feathers 275h x 770w x 415d cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Whelm II (moire) (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Gyre (2012) Mixed media with crow feathers 275h x 770w x 415d cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

I think the sensual textures and contours of my pieces echo the human form


A lot of your works uses bird feathers. But why feathers? How did you come up with the idea? What meaning do feathers hold for you? 

On a basic level it’s a childhood fascination, connected to collecting and wanting to touch things. On a more macro scale it’s about this seemingly impossible object than could never be recreated by man, a scientific marvel, an alien object of the everyday. As an object, a feather is full of contradictions: beautiful and light, but also seemingly dark and dirty. I liked that a simple object could carry so many binary meanings. Even across the range of bird feathers that I use; crow, pigeon, dove, there are ingrained cultural associations that add additional meaning to the pieces when investigated and experimented with.


I’ve read that some years ago you wrote a dissertation on the use of hair in contemporary art. How come? Is there comparability between working with feathers and hair - both formally and in a symbolic sense?

Nature is inextricably linked to my practice so it’s completely ingrained to use materials from the natural world. I have used bones and hair in the past and intend to revisit these materials in the future, however, I am enjoying primarily using feathers for now. Both feathers and hair carry both a universal and personal significance, they are at once both familiar and alien, as materials this makes them exciting to employ. They also share the protein Keratin as their chief component.


Pigeon Feathers Photo Jonty Wilde


Cleave (2012) Mixed media with dove/ pigeon feathers in antique cabinet 62w x 46d x 162h cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

We have all heard and learned about the bacteria and diseases associated with birds and their feathers. Therefore, how do you handle this very basic problem in your artistic practice? 

I use the same technique as the London Natural History Museum where the feathers are frozen at -20 for three weeks. This destroys any bacteria that may be present on the feather. After three weeks the feathers are then removed and kept in mothproof containers until they are ready to be used. Once a piece is complete it also returns to the freezer for another three weeks to insure it is completely free from contamination.


Cleave (2012) Mixed media with dove/ pigeon feathers in antique cabinet 62w x 46d x 162h cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

When looking at your wonderful installations and sculptures with feathers I can’t help thinking that you must spend months - maybe even years - creating a piece. But how on earth you manage to collect enough feathers in order to make your ideas come true? 

It’s a time consuming process but I enjoy the fact that the materials I use can’t be bought as with conventional art materials, in a way they are miraculous. To collect the volumes needed for a single piece of work there is a certain level of persuasion, I must convince others of my vision. My main supply comes from pigeon racing clubs and racing enthusiasts who have been invaluable in their support and interest in my work. As the feathers are only naturally shed around April and October the amount needed for large-scale work may take a period of years to amass. I collect numerous types of feathers, and sort them into boxes according to size and shape and colour, but can only embark on a new piece when I have enough of particular type. White pigeon/ dove feathers for example, are particularly tricky to source so I can only make one or two pieces a year. By letting the materials guide the work I have learnt the importance of both collection and creation, and enjoy how intertwined the processes can be.


Boxes of Feathers Photo Jonty Wilde


What has been the biggest challenge and bestexperience in your artistic career so far?

Biggest challenge: Rebuilding the studio after it was accidentally burnt down in 2007 at the same time destroying all my work to date. Best experience: Having two shows in Paris simultaneously with one of them being at the beautiful Galerie de Paléontologie et d’Anatomie Comparée at the Natural History Museum the other at the la Galerie Particulière.

Do you have a new pieces or series of pieces in mind for the future? 

Recently I have been playing with the less appreciated areas of the feather, most notably the quills and trimmings. I’m working on a series called Tally, which are companion pieces to the feather works. I often get asked how many feathers are in each piece, so Tally is a visual record of the traces that are left behind. The series uses the keratin trimmings of the quill to create an ornamental demonstration of my metronomic method.


Dear Kate, I get this very special feeling when studying your installations and sculptures. This feeling of looking at something strange but yet familiar, something darkly seductive and dangerous but yet and aesthetic and beautiful, something alive but yet death and timeless. I’m therefore very curious to get to know weather you have certain themes and ideas that you pursue in your art? 

The works themselves are open to interpretation however I am intrigued by the notion of the uncanny, the familiar made strange. This unnerving quality can provoke all manner of reactions, from malice and fear, to seduction and beauty. Freud’s notion of the ‘Unheimliche’ or ‘unhomely’ is referenced throughout my practice to conjure up a feeling of the familiar made strange; it toys with context and perspective and asks to viewer to question the uncertainty that lurks behind the truth of the everyday.


Splice (2012) Mixed media with magpie feathers 30w x 32d x 130h cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo JP Bland

Kate, you live in the Britain. How would you describe the art scene and the political incitement for supporting artists - established as well as upcoming in the Britain (especially now, during a financial crisis)? 

Personally I have been incredibly blessed with a full diary of shows in the UK and abroad over the past three years, and luckily the collectors’ enthusiasm doesn’t seem to have been dampened by the recession. I do think however during this recession that its far more difficult generally for artists to get funding for projects which I dearly hope will change soon.


Splice (2012) Mixed media with magpie feathers 30w x 32d x 130h cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo JP Bland

I know you have worked with Garage Fashion Magazine and have inspired the fashion icon Helmut Lang. It must have been wonderful to experience how your art not only inspire at the art scene but also in the fashion world. Therefore, do you have any plans about participating in new fashion projects in the future and/or bring more focus on fashion in your art? 

While I think the sensual textures and contours of my pieces echo the human form, there is a transient side to fashion that can be a danger compared to Fine Art. Although the patterning in my work readily lends itself to fabric design I am keen for my work to have a sense of longevity to it, and as a result am weary of venturing too deep into the fashion world. Though I may tentatively explore the possibilities of fashion there won’t be a Kate MccGwire fashion line anytime soon.


Evacuate (2010) Mixed media with game feathers 400 x 250 x 120 cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Jonty Wilde


Evacuate (detaIL,2010) Mixed media with game feathers Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Jonty Wilde


Taunt (2012) Mixed media with crow feathers 90H x 50W x 50D cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

Dear Kate, where do you hope to see yourself in the future? 

I would love to show my cabinet pieces alongside real specimens in public collections, such as the V&A or the Natural History Museum, making the viewer question what is real. It’s a goal of mine and something I want to work towards.


Taunt (2012) Mixed media with crow feathers 90H x 50W x 50D cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

Any words of advice for aspiring artists? 

When I left the RCA Sculpture school in 2004, I was a little lost - suddenly I didn’t have the structure of a course and I found the total freedom debilitating. I was however given some good advice (which I regularly pass on to students) Don’t just concern yourself with one residency, prize or work, apply to a few at a time - each time you do, you will become better at it. It’s a useful discipline and a way of giving yourself real deadlines. And when you do (and you will) get a rejection it isn’t quite such a blow to your confidence as there are other possibilities out there. The career of an artist is a complicated one and if you can avoid being knocked off course by rejection, it is a very useful skill. There are many wonderful things about being an artist, a career where you are constantly inspired by fascinating things, you can travel and meet incredibly talented people in amazing places but it’s not for the faint hearted.


SURGE (columba) (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


Host (2012) Mixed media with pigeon tail feathers 36d x 61w x 15h cm Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts


CLEAVE and CORECE (2012) Artist Kate MccGwire Photo Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts

Kate MccGwire LURE - solo show Winchester Art Gallery, The Discovery Centre 21 June to 28 of August Open-West 2013, Newark Park, Gloucestershire, National Trust property 6 July to 18 August Cheltenham Art Gallery + Museum 12 October to 6 November In Dreams - Cobb Gallery, London, 7 June to 27 July

f w Represented by All Visual Arts, www.allvisualarts.org


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handmade jewellery that begs to be touched

Photographer Emil Friis-Jensen Jupin MUA and hair Pil Brøndum Gad Model Ida Marie / Le Management


C O M P A N Y Rocks & Rabbit is an ever expanding space of art, design and jewelry. To the creators and sisters, graphic designer Kathrine Bach and Kaospilot Anne Bach, Rocks & Rabbit is an universe of magic and the fulfillment of our desires. It is the physical manifistation of nature. The materials that represent and tell the story of time and space through stones, precious metals and outer space meteorites.


Small Finger Ring Amethyst


Finger Ring Amethyst


Necklace Mountain crystal


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The silhouettes and details are kept simple, the focus is on oversized pieces which celebrates the beauty of precious metal and unprocessed stones. A balancing act between the fine and the raw. There is always a link through an industrial approach to conveying nature in a piece of jewellery. Each piece we make is thoroughly thought out and made with a purpose. There is hard edge mixed with a delicate detail and an organic understanding.


I N S P I R A T I O N Everything and everybody. Poetry, art, architecture, the meeting with all things new to us, the cycles of nature and people in it. We are drawn to both beautiful and non aesthetic aspects of the world. Inspiration arises in the meeting and connection with other objects or people. When we were children we would write short stories and poetry about love and adolescence. We would share and switch papers, continue and finish each others stories. In many ways this is how we work with our designs today. We are a huge inspiration to each other, but couldn’t make it without our collaborative partners - We are always seeking for someone to disturb our balance. This fall we will be collaborating with the art forum iDOART and the international gallery No Mans Art Gallery for exhibitions in Århus and Amsterdam.


Necklace Amethyst


Necklace Bottle with platinum


Finger ring, angular Meteorite


Often our ideas collide with the materials and a new story is evidently told. We animate towards a certain design, but the materials might lead us in a whole new direction. Our designs are a sensory experience, and so are the process of creating them. We are obsessed with the idea that our pieces can empower people in their journey through life. And that our inspiration may become theirs. We are fascinated with the art of nature, how it is compressing molecules into rock solid stones - It is as if you are wearing the story of ancient time. We work with outer space meteorites, which are 550 mill. years old. Meteorites that are literally from another world animates wonder and awe of nature and us in it.


Necklace Pyrite


Necklace Mountain Crystal


C R E A T I V E C O NN E C T I O N We have always had a creative connection and have always sought out to find a common expression. A couple of years ago we created an art installation at the National Museum of Art Cluj-Napoca. Thats when we realised exactly how well we work together. From this new projects arose Rocks & Rabbit is the aesthetic and practical platform we use to work on these projects. It contains both the commercial side; the jewelry collections we sell at our store, as well as several art exhibitions that we are working on opening this fall.


Finger Ring, Round Meteorite


Necklace Meteorit and Mountain Crystal


Necklace Rosa Quartz


Finger Ring Oxidized Cuff


E V O L V I N D R E A M

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Our dreams change with experience. It has always been our dream to start our own brand and work independently. This is a job driven by curiosity. We are here because of hard work and passion. We are evolving and so are our dreams, which is why it is beautiful that Rocks & Rabbit can contain further experimentation and projects beyond the jewelry design. To us it is essential and a way of doing as much as possible of the things we love. It is a path of fulfilling our true essence and being true to ourselves.


Necklace Meteroite and Mountain Crystal


Necklace Meteroite and Mountain Crystal


Finger Ring Mountain Crystal


Finger Ring Crystal


Finger Ring Mountain Crystal


Pheasant head piece


Finger Ring ‘Forever’ NEW COLLECTION


Finger Ring ‘Tripple Drop’ NEW COLLECTION


Necklace Rosa Quartz


Necklace Meteroite


Finger Ring ‘Triangle’ NEW COLLECTION


Earrings


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Pyramid ring, Silver crystal ring, oxidized


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TOXIQUE no. 5