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Volume 20, Number 5 Serving Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall

www.TownTimes.com

Friday, May 10, 2013

Middlefield emerges

Photo by Lee Roski

This magnificent apple tree at Lyman Orchards, Middlefield, has an otherworldly look as it reaches out to connect to the rows and rows of trees waiting for the right moment to bud. See more extraordinary views of Middlefield on pages 8-9. This is the Town Times second installment of our tri-town tour that features the beauty and diversity found in the communities of Durham (featured last week), Middlefield and Rockfall.

The restoration of Allyn Brook at White’s Farm By Laura Francis

Submitted photo

An aerial view of Allyn Brook through White’s Farm. Improvements to the brook should reduce flooding.

Calendar ........................22 Government Meetings...23 Middlefield ...................8-9

Obituary ........................21 Seniors...........................18 Sports.............................24

of either of these two parcels. In 2011, the town of Durham contacted the state’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Wildlife Division, Wetlands Habitat and Mosquito Management Program (WHAMM) to review the site and formulate a

plan to restore 3,200 linear feet of Allyn Brook. Working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the town’s engineer, plans were prepared and the necessary permits were obtained. Additional information on fisheries habitat was coordinated with the state’s DEEP Inland Fisheries Division. A great deal of dis-

See Restoration, page 5

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In this issue ...

Allyn Brook, which flows through the Town of Durham, is formed by the confluence of Fowler Brook and Herzig Brook and is considered a third order tributary of the Conginchaug River. Following a storm in spring of 2008, an upstream dam breached and a stretch of the brook, located on town open space property known as White’s Farm, was filled by sediment and debris. The brook overflowed its banks and diverted flow in two directions; one flowed north through the White’s Farm cornfield to Route 68 and the other flowed south through a grassland field used for passive recreation and parking for the Durham Fairgrounds. This diversion of flow created very wet soil and seasonal standing water conditions which resulted in loss of use

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Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Corrections We strive to bring you the most accurate information available each week, but if you see something in Town Times that is incorrect, give us a call at (203) 317-2448, and we’ll do our best to make things right.

Zumba party fundraiser for Old Home Days fireworks

Index of Advertisers

The Middlefield-Rockfall Old Home Days committee will host a Zumba Party to help raise funds for the fireworks finale that closes the event. Old Home Days is scheduled for June 7 and 8. Zumba is a Latin inspired dance and exercise fitness experience. Organizers say the Zumba experience is suitable for all regardless of age, sex, or weight and all that matters “is a desire to try something new.” Instructor Anita Dempsey White will lead the program scheduled for 7 p.m., Friday, May 17, at the Middlefield Federated Church Fellowship Hall, 402 Main St, Middlefield. There is a fee to attend. All proceeds to benefit the fireworks fund. Dempsey White offers modifications for beginners. For more advanced exercisers, the pace is increased. Comfortable clothes, a water bottle, a towel and well-fitting sneakers are needed. Organizers promise a fun experience with a chance to take time for one’s self and find out why Zumba has become such a popular fitness craze. Contact any member of the Old Home Days committee for tickets or contact Jean Gay at (860) 638-8833 or jeannieg625@comcast.net. - Submitted by Jean Gay

To advertise in the Town Times, call Joy Boone at 203-317-2313

Tour de Cure 2013 The American Diabetes Association has scheduled its 22nd annual Tour de Cure cycling event for Sunday, June 9, at the Durham Fairgrounds. The first start time is 9 a.m. The event features several scenic courses, from a family friendly 12K to a 100 mile century ride. Proceeds benefit the American Diabetes Association’s mission to prevent and cure diabetes. For more information, call 1-888-DIABETES or visit www.diabetes.org/cttourdecure. www.linosmarket.com

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Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Meriden man pleads guilty to federal charge in Middlefield robbery By Lauren Sievert Special to Town Times MIDDLETOWN — A Meriden man who pleaded guilty in connection with an attempted robbery at gunpoint at a Middlefield home in 2011 also pleaded guilty in federal court April 30 to illegally possessing a firearm during that incident. Shane Leverette, 44, of 156 Grove St., also known as Shane Baltas, pleaded guilty to first-degree burglary, firstdegree reckless endangerment and second-degree assault in Middletown Superior Court March 26. Leverette

was taken into federal custody April 30, and appeared in U.S. District Court in New Haven. The state’s case was continued until June 4, when Leverette will be sentenced to a conditional discharge, according to defense attorney James McKay. According to a statement from U.S. Attorney David B. Fein, Leverette will be sentenced in the federal case on July 23, and faces up to 10 years in prison. The federal charges stem from possessing a gun during the Middlefield incident, which is a felony offense for a

previously convicted felon. According to Fein, Leverette was convicted in 1999 of racketeering, narcotics and firearm offenses. A co-defendant in the case, Randy Cochran, 31, of 6 Lynn Ave., Plantsville, pleaded guilty to first-degree burglary and attempt to commit first-degree robbery. Cochran was sentenced to five years in jail and five years special parole. The incident took place on Feb. 16, 2011, when state police traced a 911 call to an active burglary at a home on Jackson Hill Road in Middlefield, Fein said. The victim told police he

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New and or Renewal applications for the CT Elderly Homeowner and Totally Disabled Tax Relief Programs and the Durham Senior Tax Relief Freeze and Deferral Programs are being accepted at the Assessor’s Office in the Town Hall. The filing period for all Tax Relief Programs are from February 1 through May 15, 2013. Failure to re-file will result in the removal of this benefit from your July tax bill. Late applications will NOT be accepted. Please call the Assessor’s Office at 860-343-6709 for additional information or go onto the town web site: www.townofdurhamct.org.

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said he had never seen either of the men before that night, according to the warrant. When police questioned Leverette, he said he went to the home looking for pills and money, according to the arrest warrant. Leverette told police he found the gun he used in the burglary under the victim’s couch.

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had been in bed with his girlfriend when two men wearing scarves on their faces entered the bedroom and demanded money and drugs while pointing guns at the two victims, according to the arrest warrant. The victim said one man hit him on the head with his gun, causing the gun to fire into the ceiling. When the men went to leave the home, police were already outside, according to the warrant. The victim had a head wound that required five staples at a hospital. The victim

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Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Briefs

Family movie night

The Durham Cooperative Nursery School has scheduled its fourth annual family movie night for Saturday, May 11, at 8 p.m., at the Durham Fairgrounds. The event features Dr. Suess’ The Lorax. Rain date is Saturday, June 1. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Music with a live band, face painting, hair tinsel, tattoos, and a crafts table will be offered. Food and drink will be available for purchase. The public is welcome to

USPS 021-924 Published weekly by Record-Journal at 11 Crown Street, Meriden, CT. Periodicals Postage Paid at Meriden, CT and at additional mailing offices. P O S T M A S T E R: Send address changes to Record-Journal, P.O. Box 915, Meriden CT 06450

bring chairs and blankets to view the movie, which is scheduled to begin at dusk. A fee is charged. Tickets are available at the door. For more information and tickets, call (860) 349-9885.

Fun night, dance The Durham Middlefield Youth and Family Services has scheduled a fun night and dance for fifth and sixth grade students on Friday, May 17, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at the Middlefield Community Center, 405 Main St., Middlefield. The event features dancing, board games and more. Food and snacks will be available for purchase. A fee is charged. Chaperones are needed. Students are asked to bring a non-perishable food item for the Children’s Nutrition Program. For more information, call (860) 349-0258 or email jmoen.dmyfs@comcast.net.

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The fifth annual Help Willy’s Friends Pet Fair is scheduled for Sunday, May 19, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Coginchaug Regional High School, 135 Pickett Lane. In addition to food and live music, a variety of canine demonstrations are planned, including search and rescue, agility and husky mushing. Children’s activities are also scheduled. For pets, a variety of free services will be available. Rabies vaccinations and micro-

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The MOMS Club of Durham/Middlefield has scheduled a multi-family tag sale for Saturday, May 18, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., at 241 Higganum Rd, Durham (no early birds, please). Proceeds benefit Newtown through The Sandy Ground Project.

Evening & Saturday Hours

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William J. Witkowski, D.M.D. 360 D Main Street, Durham Allan A. Witkowski, D.M.D. (860) 349-1123 We will submit claims to all insurances

chipping is scheduled for a fee. The event also features a “Parade of Stars”, featuring a parade of adoptable dogs. For more information, call (203) 988-1718 or visit www.helpwillysfriendspetfair.org.

E.J.K. Car Show The 8th annual E.J.K. Car Show is scheduled for Saturday, June 1, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Xavier High School, 181 Randolph Rd., Middletown. (Rain date, Sunday, June 2.) All cars and motorcycles are welcome. A fee is charged. The event features, food, raffles, trophies and musical entertainment. Proceeds benefit Eric J. Kalber Xavier High School Memorial Scholarship Fund. For more information, call (860) 870-8590, email ejkcarshow@gmail.com or visit www.ejkcarshow.com.

The Rockfall Foundation Applications for The Rockfall Foundation’s annual awards program, highlighting youth achievement, are available online at www.rockfallfoundation.org. The Virginia R. Rollefson Youth Environmental Leadership Awards recognizes Middlesex County high school students who are involved with programs and projects in areas of natural resource preservation, conservation, restoration or development. The award includes a cash gift for those individuals and/or groups honored, with up to two awards given each year. Application deadline is June 3. Winners will be selected and announced in October. The public presentation will be part of Rockfall’s Annual Meeting and Awards ceremony in November.

Memorial Day Parade The 2013 Durham Memorial Day Parade is scheduled for Monday, May 27, rain or shine. The parade will step

off at 9:15a.m. at the corner of Haddam Quarter Road and Main Street, and continue down Main Street to the Durham Town Green. Parade participants should assemble at the corner between 8:15 and 8:30 a.m. A ceremony, at the Town Green, honoring the nation’s servicemen and servicewomen, is scheduled for immediately after the parade. For more information or to participate in the parade, contact parade Chairman Bob Francis at (860) 349-0881.

Friendship Force International

Friendship Force International is a worldwide network of local clubs that advance the mission of promoting global understanding across the barriers that separate people. This is done by organizing visits to and from different countries During an exchange, local hosts open their homes to visitors from other countries and cultures and share meals, the routines of daily life and take them to places of interest. Visitors to Connecticut enjoy visiting the shoreline, the Mark Twain House, Yale University and the Mashantucket/Pequot Indian Museum. This year the Friendship Force Club of Southern Connecticut plans to host a group from Turkey from June 25 to July 2. It also is organizing a trip to the Amazon River in November. While the club always welcomes new members, it is not necessary to join the club in order to participate. For the exchange from Turkey, there is still a need for hosts for one couple and for day hosts for the exchange from Turkey. Contact Erika Reen at (203) 421-8309 or reenmichael@sbcglobal.net.


5

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Restoration Continued from page 1 cussion and cooperative effort by the first selectman’s office, Public Works Department, Conservation Commission, Inland Wetlands and Watercourse Agency, DEEP and NRCS was necessary to make this restoration effort possible. Town meetings were held and a Memorandum of Agreement between the town and DEEP had to be developed and signed before work could progress. The work began in midSeptember 2012. Elevation grades were established and the WHAMM Program crew used a laser level to follow the grade. The WHAMM crew used a heavy duty Fecon mower mounted on a tracked Bobcat skidsteer and an amphibious Marsh Master II with a deck mower to mow the heavy grass and shrub land areas where the restored streambed would be. Several trees and dead snags had to be removed as well. Because of the soft, wet soils, excavation

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of the brook was done using three specialized low ground pressure Kobelco Excavators, the Bobcat skidder and an Argo ATV. Additionally, two 6cu. yd. Komatsu Crawler Carriers were rented to haul material to an adjacent disposal site. The town tested the material for contaminants and sifted out any bulky debris

(rocks, limbs). Initial test results showed an elevated level of barium existed in a small part of the pile. We are waiting for results of higher level testing to determine exactly how to properly dispose of the affected soils. Once that is complete, all material will be removed. To initially stabilize the site following com-

stream bank stabilization in those highly erodible stretches of stream, and the installation of root wads and rock diversions in the channel to enhance fish habitat. As part of the long term monitoring plan, fixed photo stations, fish and wildlife surveys and a maintenance plan will be developed. The DEEP Wildlife Division will also consider similar stream clearing activities further downstream, north of Rt. 68, where the Brook flows into the Durham Meadows Wildlife Management Area prior to connecting with the Coginchaug River. The Allyn Brook project took a great deal of time and effort but in the end, showed how the cooperation of municipal, state and federal agencies as well as concerned citizens can achieve remarkable results. (Laura L. Francis is first selectman for the Town of Durham.)

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pletion, a conservation seed mix was used on the exposed stream banks and raked in. In areas of lower stream velocity, the grassed banks held well. The first phase of this project, the restoration of the channel, was completed in December, 2012. Results were immediate and dramatic. The Brook flowed readily through the new channel and adjacent grass fields and agricultural fields on White’s Farm became drier. Due to the unconsolidated nature of the sandy soils and the seasonal high flows of the Brook, some further bank erosion and instream shoaling occurred and are expected until the system achieves some level of equilibrium. This project was funded by the town at a cost of $212,000. The contract with DEEP was for $80,000. The remaining funds will be used to complete the project. Future plans for Allyn Brook include further

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6

TownSchools

Graduates

Flagler College, Florida Derek Casciano, Joseph Neri, of Middlefield.

Scholastic achievements

Taylor Lauretti, of Middlefield, was recently awarded the ECSU Foundation Scholarship from Eastern Connecticut State University. Hannah Malcolm, of Middlefield, was recently awarded the Doris K. Brown Scholarship from Eastern Connecticut State University.

Robert D. Booz recently earned a Master of Arts degree in gastronomy from Boston University. William W. Booz recently earned a Master of Engineering in mechanical engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey.

Xavier honor roll Xavier High School has named the following students to its third term honor roll. High honors Ryan DeVille, James Rosborough, Lawrence Bourland, Connor Marszalek,

DR. JASON GLAZER & DR. KATE GLAZER

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Town Times Friday, May 10, 2013

Nicholas Cumello, George Trapp, of Durham. Honors Christopher Fusco, Tushar Vig, Joseph Braun, Sean Doyle, John LaTorre, Noah Palo, Timothy Morris, Christopher Peach, Joseph Prifiera, John-Rudy Fronc, of Durham; Timothy Boyle, Trevor Root, Emmett Brayton, John Yusza, Patrick Booth, Michael Scherer, Paul Martorelli, of Middlefield.

TECHNO Camp Vinal Technical High School has scheduled its free TECHNO Camp for students entering grades seven and eight. The camp is scheduled

Local recognized Lindsay Atkop, of Durham, was recently presented the Educational center for the Art’s South Central Area Superintendent’s Award in recognition of accomplishments based on academic, extra-curricular and community service criteria. Artkop is a student at both the Magnet Half Day High School for the Performing Arts in New Haven and Coginchaug Re- Atkop gional High School. She plans to attend Berklee College of Music in the fall. for Mondays through Thursdays, July 8 through 26, from 8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., at the school campus at 60 Daniels St., Middletown. Students may explore career opportunities in trades

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Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Many happy returns

My story

Submitted by Amanda Pedersen

The Senior Center celebrated April birthdays recently. Pictured: John Oryell and Pat Gordon. Not pictured: Stuart Keating and Irene Slight.

Submitted by Patti Checko

Young Authors’ Day was held recently at Brewster School. Students wrote and illustrated a story which was published into his or her own book. Visiting storyteller Tom Lee met with each grade level for a workshop. Students then had an opportunity to share their book with their peers. Pictured, Lee tells a story to first grade students.

Advertise in the Town Times: 203-317-2313

Food bank

to march, or ride on the float, in the Durham Memorial Day Parade.

Sunday, May 19th Come join us at Creative Hair Studio for a Cut-A-Thon to benefit Cystic Fibrosis. You pay just $10 for a haircut, and the proceeds go to the Cystic Fibrosis foundation to help find a cure for this disease. No appointment necessary.

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8

TownOpinion

Town Times Friday, May 10, 2013

Commentary

Letters policy

Middlefield of dreams This week our tri-town tour takes us to Middlefield via the photography of Lee Roski and research compiled by contributor Diana Carr. Last week, we visited Durham, and soon we will make our way to Rockfall. If you were to dream up a pretty town with lots to do and fascinating stories to tell, Middlefield might rise up as that vision. Much of what is written about Middlefield begins with the phrase: “The town has an abundance of...” And then these descriptions go on to tell of the history, natural resources, recreational opportunities - even a skateboard park - that come together in this one small corner of the world along with a community of talented people dedicated to their town.

Lee’s photos depict many of these aspects. Most like Lyman’s Orchard and Powder Hill Dinosaur Park are majestic. But the one that catches the eye and takes your breath away as the epitome of life in a small town is the photo of a sign for “Grace’s fresh eggs”. The scene is complete with a hand-painted chicken and a chair set out in case you need to rest your weary bones. In researching Middlefield, Diana submitted the usual facts and figures about the town. But then she also included an unusual snippet of history that some may view as a fun fact, others may find unsavory and want to forget, while others might like to tell us more about what happened. The editors

did not include it in the town profile, but we insert it here for your consideration. Carr wrote: “Longtime residents may remember the Powder Ridge Rock Festival that was to be held at Powder Ridge Ski Area from July 30 to Aug. 2, 1970, and the legal injunction that forced the event to be cancelled just a few days beforehand. It was a year after Woodstock, rock festivals were often looked upon with suspicion, and Middlefield residents were worried about the impact of the crowd on their small town.” Local authorities posted warning signs on every highway leading to Middlefield that said “Festival prohibited, turn back.” However, 30,000 people showed

up to find no food and no entertainment. Drugs were openly available and there were some ‘bad trips.’ Powder Ridge made national news because of the arrival of tens of thousands of ticketholders despite the event’s cancellation.” Do you remember the festival-that-wasn’t? If so, we’d like to hear. Send your recollections to news@towntimes.com. - The editors

- E-mail letters to news@towntimes.com; mail to Town Times, P.O. Box 265, Middlefield, CT 06455; or 11 Crown St., Meriden, CT 06450 or fax to (203) 639-0210. - The Town Times will print only one letter per person each month. Letters should be approximately 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters for grammar and content. Letters should be on topics of general interest to the community. We do not list names of people, organizations and businesses being thanked. Names of businesses are not allowed. Letters must be signed and names will appear in print. Include a phone number so Town Times can contact you for verification. - Letters must be submitted by noon on Monday to be considered for publication that week.

Town Profile: Middlefield Established: 1866 Population: 4,300 Square miles: 13.3 Elevation: 210’ Bordered by: Durham, Middletown, Meriden, Wallingford Natural features: Wadsworth Falls, Lake Beseck, Coginchaug River, Besek Mountain, Higby Mountain Known for: Powder Ridge Ski

Area (Closed in 2007, now under construction for re-opening), Old Home Days (held annually in June), Lyman Orchards, Lyman Orchards Golf Club Points of interest: Peckham Park, Middlefield Dog Park, Powder Hill Dinosaur Park Number of businesses: 245 (in 2011) Schools: Independent Day School, John Lyman Elementary School, Memorial Middle School Churches: Middlefield Federated Church, St. Colman Church, Victory Christian Church Median income for households: $83,541 Median age: 44.4 About: Middlefield got its name because it is halfway between Middletown and Durham, and halfway between Middletown and Meriden. It was settled around 1700, and at that time was

part of Middletown. Middlefield is the English translation of the name given by the Mattabassett Indians, who used the area for their hunting grounds. The first burial at the The Old North Burying Ground was in 1738. The town seal is a view of Middlefield as seen through a gun sight. The crosshairs represent the gun sight manufacturing that has taken place in Middlefield for many years. The four quadrants of the gun sight are broken into different aspects of the town of Middlefield. The upper left-hand quadrant is a picture of the 1700s saltbox homes that still stand in Middlefield. The upper right-hand quadrant represents the orchards and farmland that make up much of the open space of Middlefield. The lower left-hand quadrant represents many of the outdoor activities that go on in Middlefield such as fishing, hunting, boating, skiing, golfing and many other activities. The lower right-hand quad-

rant is the old pistol shop that used to be a major part of Middlefield’s makeup. The seal was designed by Donald Ginter. Sources: propertywhale.com, csginc.org, Middlefield’s town hall, earlyamericanancestors.com, Wikipedia, ct.gov, mailamap.com, zoomprospector.com. - Compiled by Diana Carr


9

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Meander through Middlefield

Clockwise from top left: This quaint sign for eggs announces a small business in Middlefield. Top right: This fence along the Old North Bury Grounds border makes an interesting composition with the gravestones in the background. Below right: At Powder Hill Dinosaur Park Marc Imme and his nephew Michael Imme look for fossils along the rock ledge in the park. The park was originally the site of a summer home for Wesley Coe. Coe granted permission to Middlefield to use the stone on his property to create the Beseck Dam in 1846. While excavating the stone, the dinosaur footprints were discovered. The park is located on Powder Hill Road. (Park information from Town of Middlefield website.) Below left: Brenen Branciforte practices stunts at Middlefield’s skateboarding facility located at Peckham Park. The “Crown Jewel” of Middlefield, Peckham Park is located in the center of town, off of Strickland Road. This 26-plus acre park has baseball and soccer fields, a basketball court, a walking path, exercise stations, a skateboard park, playground, picnic area and pavilion. It is a popular destination spot for many of Middlesex County. The Peckham Park Pavilion is available to rent for private parties and functions. (Park information from Town of Middlefield website.)

Photos by Lee Roski


10

Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Commentary

Middlefield wrap-up: ‘There’s a lot going on’ By Jon Brayshaw Special to Town Times

Part of my personal aging process is acknowledging the culmination of nearly 70 years of developing the “memory lapse” syndrome. And its cousin the “not putting things back” syndrome. How do you put things back if you forgot where they go? My wife thinks I should teach a night course on selective memory lapses. Anyway. A lot is going on in town. Lest my mind wander, while writing this piece...try to follow this important issue. We bought Powder Ridge in December 2008. We stripped its latent value by removing its ability to be developed into housing or condos (like you

know who wanted to). That I do remember. In September 2012 after three failed tries, we finally sold PR to Brownstone. We didn’t sell all of the 246 acres to Brownstone, because No. 1, they didn’t need all the acreage. No. 2, it left more cash in their pockets to rebuild a multi-million dollar ski operation on life support. So, we kept out a certain 19.67 acre parcel. Soon after the PR closing, the town was approached with an “unsolicited” offer of $300,000 from neighbors Vogel/Brown. They own and operate the adjacent horse farm and were looking to expand their horse farming activities. Following negotiations the selectmen voted to sign the initial agreement. This triggered

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From The Desk Of The First Selectman a public hearing held on April 9. At the hearing concerns were noted and the agreement was modified. Soon there will be another public hearing followed by a Town Meeting that is needed to sell town property. My opinion is simple. I like the $300K a lot. I like the fact that the land will be used for agricultural purposes.

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I like the fact that one only house can be built in the rear of the property. The front acres will enjoy a conservation easement. I like the fact that the $300K will be placed on the principal thereby reducing the money we owe on the PR purchase. Selling will reduce your taxes, keeping it will increase your taxes. Speaking of your taxes, the “tid-bit” for the day is that the state of Connecticut enjoys the ominous distinction of touting the latest “Tax Freedom Day” in the nation...May 13 this year. I read recently that the state has 371 different taxes and fees. I wonder why companies and people are leaving. Speaking of which, this May we will be dealing with your taxes to support another yearly budget to run the town and school. The school budget referendum was held May 7. The school budget amounts to about 70 percent of our tax burden The Board of Finance has picked apart every line

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item in the town budget and has done an outstanding job. We are hovering slightly below a one mill increase which equates to a $141 increase on the “average” home. One noteworthy budget issue has to do with the student enrollment percent increase between Durham and Middlefield/Rockfall. It finally dawned on me that the $400,000 shift to Middlefield may be the unintended consequence of a number of power outages in the past few years. My advice is if you want to keep your taxes in check (when the power goes out) light a candle and play checkers. It also dawned on me that blackouts eventually result in more electric customers for CL&P. Unintended, I’m sure. And finally the Lake Beseck Environmental Committee is busy learning and getting things lined up on dealing with plant growth and water quality issues. Old Home Days

Musical Director - Tim Fisher


11

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Commentary

Lake Beseck: From tranquil beauty to pea soup By Amy Poturnicki Special to Town Times From tranquil beauty to pea soup, Lake Beseck’s water quality has a personality

Old Home Days Middlefield/Rockf all Old Home Days has vendor openings for the June 8 celebration. The event is hoping to add to the menu with foods that promote health and made with natural ingredients. For more information and rates, call Carol Schweitzer-Schilling at (860) 346-5081 or email carolsschilling@yahoo.com.

that is a bit out of balance. For almost a year and a half, the Lake Environment Committee has been looking into solutions, working with ecofriendly scientists and engineers to reduce or eliminate the invasive weeds, algae blooms and muck. High phosphorus counts and algae has kept the eutrophic lake on the EPA’s “impaired” list for years. Aside from fertilizers, animal waste, and sedimentation coming from our watershed and outfalls, we have rapidly increasing populations of invasive plants that are outnumbering our native plant species and further contributing to the bright green algae blooms. Years ago the town ob-

tained funds to install sewers in an effort to help with water quality. Now the state is shelling out over $2 million dollars to repair the leaking dam. To acquire additional funding, the DEEP has requested plans and studies to prove that environmental projects won’t be failures. There are limited funds to help. Although state owned, it is our lake. Our legislators, and most recently Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro, have also told us; we need to complete required studies as soon as possible if we want to coordinate the rare drawdown opportunity of the dam project with funding for work in the lake bed. After seeking grant money for 17 months, the town’s

Board of Selectmen and Board of Finance have agreed that the town needs to take stewardship of the lake. As a catalyst to help us to acquire grant funding, our town budget for next year includes funds for required water studies and soil testing. Middlefield Parks and Recreation has been working with an environmental firm to best manage the weed issues in the swim area. Some of the invasive plants in the lake will be reduced by the lengthy drawdown for the dam repair, but the curly leaf pondweed that is concentrated in the swim area will not be impacted as it can reproduce by multiple means and is difficult to eliminate. The town is taking an ini-

tiative by budgeting funds for the lake. Parks and Recreation is working on solutions to the complaints regarding weeds in the swim area. An ad hoc committee is advising the Board of Selectmen on lake environmental issues. Watershed property owners are being asked to help protect our lake against further damage. Our state and federal legislators have been working to find funding to improve the water quality and recreational opportunities in Lake Beseck. (Amy Poturnicki is chair of the Middlefield Parks and Recreation Commission.)

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12

Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Commentary: Book Review

‘Geek Mom’ is a state of mind By Olivia L. Lawrence News editor Here’s a cool treat for

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less curiosity about the world they live in - or any kind of world that can be imagined. Mothers are at the forefront of the digital revolution, the authors say and so “Geek Mom” explores unusual portals into the imagination, science and adventure all within the context of families doing stuff together and not spending a lot of money. The illustrated paperback is made up of essays from each of the women. Projects have simple instructions and require little or no cost. Here are just a few of the topics found in the pages of “Geek Mom.” Why superheros matter: “A superhero provides a compelling image: the ordinary looking person sees someone

Dr. William Boylin, Ph.D. Family Therapist

around him or her in trouble and springs into action revealing a hidden hero.” Of course, a variety of superhero costume instructions follow. On a similar theme is the chapter “Creating a secret lair”. For this, “you need at least one eager child, a large cardboard box, crayons, glitter” and an array of crafts items – then let the imagination run wild. Other topics range from “fitness for gamers” to genealogy which is deemed a “very geeky pursuit.” Cartography and the “lost art of reading maps” and writing one line horror stories are other pursuits with a geekyeducational twist. Musical instruments and

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ARTHRITIS VS. THE FOOT Over time, our feet experience extreme wear and tear. The joints and cartilage can wear out, resulting in deformation of the bones. This triggers the buildup of fluids, which causes pain. The resulting condition is referred to as osteoarthritis. A similar sort of condition, perhaps determined by hormones or genetics, is called rheumatoid arthritis. In either case, the results can usually be painful and can have long-lasting, debilitating consequences. Numerous diagnostic medical tests can help to determine the exact nature of the discomfort. After a diagnosis has been made, there may be a nonsurgical treatment recommended, such as shoe inserts or the use of a cane. Surgical options are reserved for severe cases. Several medications from acetaminophen to corticosteroid injections are available to treat Osteoarthritis. At AFFILIATED FOOT CARE CENTER, LLC, we believe that you deserve individualized and distinguished care so you can run, jump, or just enjoy a stroll that’s free from pain. Under our care you will see for yourself how advanced training and solid technique can benefit everyone. Since any difficulties with your feet can adversely affect your comfort and lifestyle, we invite your call for an appointment to maximize your health and well-being. Good foot health can enhance your daily existence and improve your quality of life. Office hours in Middlefield are Mon. 9-5, Wed. 3-7, and Fri. 9-5; Tues. & Thurs. 9-5 in Wallingford. For our patients’ convenience we offer on-site X-rays, and diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasounds.

Mom’s Day that goes both ways - a book brimming with humorous inspiration for modern mothers complete with plenty of good times for kids. It’s the best of all worlds - the gift-giver gets as many happy returns as the recipient. “Geek Mom - Projects, Tips, and Adventures for Moms and Their 21st -Century Families” is a collaborative effort of four women, founders of the geekmom blog. Natania Barron, Kathy Ceceri and Corrina Lawson live in the New England region (Lawson in Connecticut) and Jenny Williams lives in Arizona. The Geek Mom crew believes “being a geek is a state of mind” - a mind with end-

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gadgets figure prominently in the world of geek. Science is huge and kids learn how to make a Mobius maze puzzle and how to use Fibonacci numbers to create the golden ratio in crafts. Lava lamps, homemade “blobs” and “make your own tornado” are just a few of the twisted science projects readers will encounter. Exploring the world with a geek-eye may lead to unusual discoveries in everyday places. A parking lot or the local greasy spoon can hold secrets for those who know how to observe. There’s a chapter on traveling back in time with the help of a rock hunt and a discussion about “five robots I’d like to have in my home.” Readers will learn that “computers were people once.” That’s right - back in the 1640s the term didn’t refer to a machine but to a person who did computations. Geek Mom also goes into depth on the topic of how a geek family navigates its daily tasks in the chapter “How to get your kids to make supper.” Throwing a hobbit feast is one solution to the perennial lament, “Ma, there’s nothing good to eat.” “I’d call teaching the kids to make supper one of the more successful strategies of my parenting career,” writes Cereci. “Geek Mom - Projects, Tips, and Adventures for Moms and Their 21st -Century Families”, published by Crown Publishing, is available on Amazon and also as an e-book. For more information go to geekmom.com.


13

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Commentary

Remember to thank mom, for everything By Nick Carroll Assistant news editor

desert highway in that thing – alone – music blaring, no destination in mind. And, of course, no Baby Einstein, no Binky, no Diaper Genie ... Yeah, going from a prebaby quiet house, to a mad house, was jarring for me. Meanwhile, my wife – typical mom — took having a newborn in stride. She seemed to enjoy every minute with our screaming, stinky bundle of joy. While I’d seek solitude in the man cave, she’d take our daughter for a stroller ride, or read her a book. While I’d ignore the whimpering coming from the nursery at 2 a.m., my wife would vault out of bed. One year in, I’m a changed man. Bathing the baby is ac-

tually kind of fun now, and when my daughter cries I can figure out rather quickly what the problem is, and deal with it. My wife beat me to that point by several months, and I’m sure that’s not unusual. The iconic image of “mother” is her holding a baby. But that is just the beginning of the mom journey. Eventually mothers transition out of the role of fulltime caregiver. As kids mature, moms change too. They become teacher, coach,

cheerleader, beautician, dietician, money manager, psychiatrist, spiritual guru, wedding planner; the list goes on. Motherhood is a tough job indeed; the toughest in the world perhaps. And the moms I know best do it with a smile. Well, I’ll leave it there. I’ve gushed enough. Anyway, I should get home – my mom has been there all day babysitting. Happy Mother’s Day, ladies.

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It has been said being a mother is the toughest job in the world. While that’s debatable, one certainly would be hard-pressed Nick Carroll to find a person more serious about her job than good ‘ol ma. Think about it: Before we are even born, our mothers love and take care of us. Once mom learns baby is on board, she eats the right things, goes to all her prenatal appointments, and stays home reading What to Expect When You’re Expecting while her girlfriends are out on the town. And mothers suffer for baby. As her belly grows, mom finds it more and more difficult to get off the couch — literally. Heartburn sets in. Sleep is interrupted by many, many trips to the bathroom, and the flailing elbows and knees of her little one. Still, mom finds the energy to go to work, decorate a nursery and pick out just the right outfit for baby to wear home from the hospital. Ah yes, the hospital. What mothers go through to get baby into the hands of a doctor is no easy thing, obviously. Heck, watching what my wife experienced on the table was no picnic. That’s why stories about dads fainting and/or vomiting during labor are not uncommon. (Good luck living that down, fellas.) Moms stay strong however, and alas, baby is born. We knew our mom right off the bat. Incredibly, newborns recognize the natural smell of their mother, and their parents’ voices. So in that chaotic hospital room, with bright lights and people in surgical masks all around, babies find comfort nestling with mom. Now that’s pretty cool. Mom really shows her

mettle and stamina once baby arrives home. There are countless feedings to tend to, diapers to change, spit-up soaked Onesies to wash, tantrums to squelch. As all parents know, the first months with baby can be frustrating, sleepless ones. Dads help out a lot (pat myself on the back), but from my experience, moms handle the situation with far more grace. Consider this anecdote from my early days as a father: On my drive to work, tired and bleary-eyed, I would pass a house with a RV for sale in the front yard. Looking at the rig, I’d allow my mind to wander. I pictured myself flying down a

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Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

2013-14 school budget passes in low turnout vote By Mark Dionne Town Times

Durham and Middlefield passed the proposed 2013-2014 school budget, 668-475, at a referendum with low turnout May 7. Voters approved a total amount of $36,618,830. The final prepeared budget contains a net increase of 1.42 percent. The original proposal for the 2013-2014 school budget carried a 4.39 percent increase. Middlefield passed the budget by four votes, 177-173. In recent years, Middlefield has consistently voted down the budget. Recent school budgets have passed when Durham voters have accepted the budget by a larger margin than Middle-

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for this year’s referendum, 500 fewer than last year’s turnout, which was considered low at the time. One year ago, the school

budget passed by a margin of 865-778, reflecting the views of 1,643 voters, causing then BOE chair Tom Hennick to say, “My frustration with the turnout is

Troop 27 spring hike Boy Scouts from Troop 27, with five adults and a dog, hiked up Mount Higby recently. The steep and rocky surface of the trail they took went along the cliff side and paralleled I91. The scouts found two geocaches, an old plane crash and what is said to be a pet cemetery. The hike took about four hours and the weather was perfect, if chilly, at first. The boys learned local legends of the mountain like the Black Dog and the Leatherman. It was an opportunity to see nature, bird watch and get fresh air. The troop said it was important to be aware of copperhead snakes when hiking here during the summer. Boys in grades five and six, are welcome to visit Troop 27 meetings on Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the United Churches of Durham Hall. Submitted by Nate Knowlton

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The Young People’s Center for Creative Arts is accepting enrollment for its 2013 summer theater camp. YPCCA is a nonprofit theater arts camp devoted to bringing musical theater to students in the central Connecticut area. The camp is scheduled for July 1- 28 at East Hampton High School for students entering grades six through freshman year of college. A fee is charged. For more information and a brochure, call (860) 267-2911, email Info@ypcca.org or visit www.ypcca.org.

field voters rejected it. Durham passed the budget by a count of 489-302, a tally which includes two absentee ballots. Board of Education chair Kerrie Flanagan said, “Of course we’re thrilled. The administration and the board worked really hard and appreciate the community support in getting it passed.” Flanagan said the board and administration used community input and “pulled together a good budget.” Asked about the low turnout, Flanagan said, “It would be helpful to the board to have a larger turnout” to get a better sense of community thought, and added, “I’m happy for the support we had.” There were 1,143 voters total

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Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Willy invites you and your pup to his annual pet fair By Patty Szczygiel Special to Town Times

The idea for Help Willy’s Friends organization started in 2008, after Mark and Sharon Paturzo, of Durham, collected pet food donations around Christmas time for surrounding rescue shelters. After collecting about 300 cans of food, the couple decided to continue this process by creating Help Willy’s Friends, a non-profit animal welfare organization - with their own rescued dog Willy as the inspiration. Since then, Help Willy’s Friends has collected and delivered pet food donations to shelters all over Connecticut and surrounding areas, including Mansfield, New

Britain, New Haven, Cheshire, Meriden, Southington, Wallingford, and even to pets affected by Sandy on Staten Island. Usually, deliveries are made by Mark Paturzo and Willy. The organization also has worked with Meals on Wheels by donating pet food, which is then delivered with human food to homes that are lacking both. In addition, Help Willy’s Friends has visited schools to spread awareness about rescue shelters and pet care. “Before rescuing Willy, my wife and I didn’t really hear much about how to rescue a pet. We just want to get the word out there and show the possibilities to people,” Mark Paturzo said.

For the fifth consecutive year, HWF is hosting its annual pet fair in Durham. Admission is free and donations are welcome. A majority of the proceeds go directly to food, supplies, and medical needs for rescue shelters. “We just wanted a fun, free day for family members and their pets to come and get nail clippings for their dog, or face paint for their kids, a fun photo with their pet,” said Mark Paturzo. Last year, about 45,000 pounds of food were collected at the fair. “And it increases every year,” he said. Each year The Willy Award, a grant from a portion of the money raised from the organization, is giv-

Master works Submitted by Christine Davis

Students at John Lyman School worked with local illustrator David Wenzel recently. Wenzel taught students how to use illustrations to tell a story, spoke with student artists about how to interpret a story, and showed the kindergarten students how to use basic shapes to draw animals. He concluded the day with a presentation of his work to the school. Pictured, Wenzel works with Aurora, a fourth grade student.

See Pet, page 23

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Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Faith Briefs Community supper

of God’s Divine Love. For more information, visit www.ct-eckankar.org.

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A free community supper is scheduled for Sunday, May 19, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., at the Church of the Epiphany, 196 Main St. All are welcome.

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Town Times P.O. Box 265, Middlefield, CT 06455 www.towntimes.com News Advertising Fax Marketplace

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Town Times is published every Friday by the Record-Journal Publishing Co. and delivered to all homes and businesses in Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall.

Worship services, for people of all faiths, are scheduled for the second Sunday for each month at the Eckankar Temple of Connecticut at 10 a.m. The temple is located on Rt. 66 and Harvest Wood Road. Topics include reincarnation, soul travel and practicing the presence

Executive Vice President and Assistant Publisher - Liz White Senior Vice President of Operations and Major Accounts – Michael F. Killian Managing Editor Online/Weeklies – Carolyn Wallach News Editor – Olivia L. Lawrence Assistant News Editor – Nick Carroll Advertising Sales - Joy Boone Advertising Director - Kimberley E. Boath Reporter - Mark Dionne

Notre Dame Church, 280 Main St., has scheduled its monthly flea markets and tag sale for Saturday, June 1, July 6, Aug. 3, Sept. 7 and Oct. 5, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event will be in the church hall, rectory garage, parking lot and the side lawn of the church, rain or shine. The event features household goods, pots and pans, dishes, craft supplies, sewing supplies, furniture, clothing,

shoes, antiques, toys, collectibles, books, Christmas decoration, and more. A jewelry table will be set up inside. Breakfast and lunch will be available for purchase. Vendor space is available for rent. For more information, call Bob Smith at (860) 349-0356.

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TownSeniors

Book discussion

The Levi E. Coe library and the Middlefield Senior Center have scheduled a book discussion for Monday, May 20, at the Senior Center. The book is “The Shoemakers Wife” by Adriana Trigiani. Books are available at the Middlefield Senior

Center and the Levi E Coe library. For more information or to register, call (860) 349-7121. The public is welcome.

Container gardening Diane LaRosa, master gardner, is scheduled to pres-

Town Times Friday, May 10, 2013

ent “Learn Easy Container Gardening” on Wednesday, May 29, at 1 p.m., at the Middlefield Senior Center. Participants will make a container planting. Supplies are included. Registration, by May 22, is required. For more information, call Antoinette at (860) 349-7121.

BBQ The annual “Kick Off Summer BBQ” is scheduled for Tuesday, June 4, at 4 p.m., at the Middefield Senior Center. Menu includes grilled burgers, side salads, summer beverages and sheet cake. The evening will include the summer sounds of John Banker Duo, “The Riverboat Ramblers” and (weather permitting) Bocci on our back lawn. A fee is charged. Reg-

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istration deadline is Thursday, May 30. For more information and to register, call Antoinette Astle to 860-3497121

Author visit Lucy Burdette, author of the Key West Food Critic mysteries, is scheduled to speak Wednesday, June 5, at 1 p.m., at the Middlefield Senior Center. The program is sponsored by the Levi E. Coe Library. The program is free; registration is required. The public is welcome. For more information and to register, call the Middlefield Senior Center at (860) 349-7121 or the Levi E. Coe Library at (860) 349-3857.

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Get in shape

The Senior Center has scheduled exercise classes for seniors every Monday and Friday, at 7:45 a.m. Yoga classes are scheduled for Wednesdays, at 7:45 a.m. The classes are on a drop-in basis and free to Middlefield seniors, age 60 and older. Bring a water bottle and mat. For more information, call (860) 349-7121.

Knitting and crocheting

Knitters and crocheters meet every Thursday, at 9:30 a.m., at the Middlefield Senior Center for coffee and knitting. Bring your unfinished project or learn a new one. The group also makes Afghans for the Middlesex Cancer Center and the MidState Cancer Center. Yarn and needles are available.

Blood pressure screenings

Free Blood Pressure Screenings are held every first and third Wednesday of each month, at noon, at the Middlefield Senior Center. No appointment is necessary.

Durham senior lunches

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Senior lunches are offered every Monday and Wednesday, at the Durham Activity Center, 350 Main St. The Elderly Nutrition program is designed to provide nutritional meals, at a low cost to persons ages 60 and over and their spouses. To cover the cost of the meal, a suggested donation is welcome. To make lunch reservations, call Amanda Pedersen, senior cafe manager, at (860) 349-

See Seniors, next page


19

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

ble Islands, to name a few. The bus schedule can be Continued from page 18 found at various establish3153. Bingo is offered every ments in Durham, such as Wednesday, at 1 p.m., follow- the library, the Durham Activity Center, Town Hall and ing the luncheon. online at www.townofdurhamct.org. Call (860) 347The Durham/Middlefield 5661 Monday through Friday, Senior Bus is available for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., to make a transportation to activities reservation. on Tuesday and Wednesday. There is no fee for this service. Planned trips include: Dial-A-Ride provides curbThe Christmas Tree Shops in to-curb transportation for Manchester and Orange, Yanthe elderly and disabled. This kee Candle in Deerfield, service can be used for medMass., IKEA, Mohegan Sun, Foxwoods, Evergreen Walk, ical appointments, shopping, WFSB Better Yet Connecti- banking and other places, cut, Stew Leonards, Foot and is available five days a Prints, Maritime Aquarium, week. Call (860) 347-3313 for a Mystic Village and the Thim- reservation. There is a fee.

Seniors

Senior exercise

Senior Bus

Senior exercise is offered Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at the Durham Activity Center. Two classes are offered: 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. There is no cost for Durham residents 60 and over.

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St. Luke’s Eldercare St. Luke’s supports successful aging and independent living serving veterans and elders. Free services provided are friendly visiting, out-of-area medical transportation, transportation for elderly veterans to VA hospitals, grocery shopping services, minor home repair, information/resource referral, in-

dividual case management, education/advocacy, The Gatekeeper Program, Access4Care and St. Luke’s Apartments on Broad Street in Middletown. For specific information on their services, call (860) 347-5661. St. Luke’s is located at 760 Saybrook Road in Middletown. The Middlefield Senior Center is located in the Middlefield Community Center at 405 Main Street. If you have any questions or would like to sign up for any programs or

for lunch (monthly menus can be picked up at the senior center or Town Hall) in the Senior Café (serving on Monday, Wednesday and Friday), contact Antoinette Astle at (860) 349-7121. The Durham 60 Plus Club meets at the Durham Activity Center the second and fourth Monday of each month, September through June, at 1:30 p.m. The next meeting is Oct. 22 at 1:30 p.m and newcomers are most welcomed.

To submit sports information Town Time welcomes news and scores from all sports leagues in Durham and Middlefield. Information and photos can be sent to: Town Times, P.O. Box 265, Middlefield, 06455. Information also can be faxed to (203) 639-0210, or emailed to: news@towntimes.com.

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Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Reviews

‘Annie’ a crowd-pleaser with ‘outstanding’ performances By Elisabeth Kennedy Special to Town Times

“Annie” is always a feelgood show, but a feel-great show when it showcases local talent. Through the efforts of the John Lyman Parent Association, “Annie Jr.” was brought back to the stage of Coginchaug Regional High School. More than 81 students at Regional School District 13 thrilled audiences during three outstanding performances. Evan Matthew Brown had the role of a police officer. He said “this is a really good show with a lot of good lessons.” Scott Romeyn, an eighth grade student at Strong Middle School, was one of the stars of the May 3 perform-

ance, playing Oliver Warbucks. Scott was so committed to his role that he shaved his head. Asked what he likes most about JLPA Theater, Scott said it was the power of RSD 13 students from grades one through eight working together. “Younger kids get exposed to acting and singing. Everyone did a great job,” he said. Jordan Moore, who played Annie, said she was proud of herself and her fellow cast members. “At first I was super nervous, but while singing the first song, I realized, I’m okay, and I did great, we all did great,” she said. Jordan expressed gratitude to JLPA for the opportunity to grow as a performer. “Two years ago I was in Willie Wonka, and I was so afraid. Now, I’m the lead,”

she said. “Annie” director, Heather McCutchen Kannam told a similar story. “My favorite part is watching the kids grow. Two years ago we put on Willie Wonka. Jordan Moore was so afraid to speak, she cried. Today, she is the lead.” While it is a lot of work involving the wide age range that JLPA Theater works with, it is powerful. “There is so much talent in these towns, and the kids work so hard. Eighth graders are role models to first and second graders,” McCutchen Kannam said. “Annie” producer, Mark Dionne said he was thrilled with the result of months of hard work and planning. He expressed thanks to the many people “who said yes”

and contributed to the success of the production. He was so pleased that student actors enjoyed big crowds who cheered enthusiastically. Kudos to all, we look forward to the next JLPA production, and perhaps seeing a few of these stars on Broadway one day.

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Wrap-up

Continued from page 10

is around the corner. We are looking for exhibitors, talent, floats, food vendors and all that will go into this downhome small town event. And yes, Billy there will be fireworks. Yes, brush pick-up is in progress. No cheating - brush only, no Sequoia’s. Speaking of brush, the dry spring brought two (could have been serious) fires. One at night west of the Higby Reservoir and the other south of Powder Ridge. If you have a burning permit be careful and call the number on your permit before you start. And finally we have an almost new paving machine. And yes, we do know that the snow plowing pushed countless bituminous curbs all over. As we have time and money, hopefully most curbs will be restored this summer. Be patient. And finally, Boston! We have some unhappy people living on planet Earth. It’s been that way since day one and will continue until it’s over. Only the names, dates and events will change. Evil doesn’t develop in a vacuum. It takes food, time and a purpose. We are not called to deal directly with a mixed up planet of 6 billion but we have been given this most unique opportunity for our four thousand to purpose not to let a sliver of unkind behavior make its way into our lives. And finally, check out the daffodils. (Jon A. Brayshaw is first selectman for Middlefield.)


21

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Obituary

Reviews

Stanley J. Waz, Jr.

‘Don Giovanni’ shows off singers’ range in legendary tale in the Mozart style. Resika, with a voice twice the size, was for once not an aging, pudgy buffo caricature, but a slimy and comical foil to his master. Once again, maestro Adrian Sylveen vividly conducted his esteemed Connecticut Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra in its absolute specialty, which is this composer’s music. For more information or tickets to the May 11 performance, call (860) 347-4887. For the final performance at the Naugatuck Valley Community College, May 18, go to thevirtuosi.org or ctlyricopera.org.

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On May 3, the Connecticut Lyric Opera closed its alltoo-short 10th anniversary season with a well sung production of Mozart’s classic “Don Giovanni”, which will make its way to Middletown High School’s Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m. As always, opening night is always at New Britain’s Trinity-0n-Main, and is reviewed here. This masterpiece, based on the legendary Spanish womanizer Don Juan, premiered in 1787 and has long been considered by musicologists to be “the perfect opera” from a composition point of view. It is not - its sheer three hour length and string of basically static (but gorgeous) stand-up-and-sing arias makes for too long an evening for today’s audiences. However, what music should be cut - especially when most of it was as good as it was in this performance? “Giovanni” is a bass-baritone heavy opera and many singers throughout history (including a couple of this cast’s members) have sung two, three, or even all four of its lower-voiced male characters throughout their careers. Thus, it was a refreshing ray of sunshine to hear the sweet legato tones of tenor Christopher Lucier as Ottavio. There are also three sopranos in this, the most “ensemble” of ensemble operas, though the light, white, rather young voices of Heather O’Connor (Elvira) and Emily Hughes (Zerlina) could have used more of the darker mezzo tints in their lower ranges to make the former’s revenge tirades and the latter’s earthiness more palpable. Nonetheless, the quality and quantity of the work’s most difficult singing falls

upon the vocal chords of Donna Anna, and here the CLO’s resident diva Jurate Svedaite did not disappoint. As expected, she easily mustered up both the spinto thrust and the coloratura agility that her role requires. As for those bass-baritones, the performance was dominated (exactly as it should be) by the title role, played by Luke Scott, and his sidekick, Leporello, played by Nathan Resika. This was Scott’s first go at the rake, and predictably, he showed all the makings of a firstrate Don - suave and svelte, handsome, and well-steeped

N

By Larry Kellum Special to Town Times

Stanley J. Waz, Jr., 62, husband of Debi (Barker) Waz, of Middlefield, passed away April 28, 2013. S t a n l e y Waz was born in Meriden, Feb. 25, 1951, the son of the late Katherine (Powers) Renals and the late Stanley Waz. He was a manager at Stew Leonard’s in Newington. Stashu spent his earlier years on the softball field and hockey arena with his kids. Once they left, golf filled that void for him. His weekly rides with his four legged child, Leuger, were always a highlight of the

week. He loved card nights and playing horseshoes with his beloved friends. Stashu was always the first to be there for a friend in need. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his son, C.J. Waz of Orlando; his daughter, Jenna Waz of Chicago; his sister, Barbara Jenkins of Middletown, as well as many nieces and nephews. A celebration of his life and sharing of stories was held May 2, 2103 at at the Durham Fire House. Those who wish, may send memorial contributions to the Jenna and CJ Education fund, c/o Liberty Bank, Attn: Mary Ann Lentz, 315 Main Street, Middletown, CT 06457. To share memories or express condolences online, visit www.biegafuneralhome.com.


TownCalendar

22

Ken Ritucci; cuer will be Sue Lucibello. For more information, call (860) 3498084 or (203) 272-7463.

May 10

Friday

Musical - Strong School has scheduled a production of Getting to Know Oklahoma for Friday, May 10, at 7 p.m. A fee is charged. Tot Time -The Moms Club of Durham-Middlefield meets every Friday at Peckham Park at 10 a.m. Parents and children of Durham and Middlefield are welcome. For more information, email momsdurhammiddlefield@gmail. com. Square dance - The 4C’s Square Dance Club has scheduled a dance for Friday, May 10, from 8 to 10 p.m. at Brewster School, Durham. The caller will be

11

Saturday

Plant sale - Projection Graduation has scheduled a Mother’s Day plant sale for Saturday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Strong School parking lot. Family movie night The Durham Cooperative Nursery School has scheduled its fourth annual family movie night for Saturday, May 11, at 8 p.m., at the Durham Fairgrounds. The event features Dr. Suess’ The Lorax. Rain date is Saturday, June 1. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Music with a live band, face painting, hair tinsel, tattoos, and a crafts

table will be offered. Food and drink will be available for purchase. The public is welcome to bring chairs and blankets to view the movie, which is scheduled to begin at dusk. A fee is charged. Tickets are available at the door. For more information and tickets, call (860) 349-9885. Musical - Strong School has scheduled a production of Getting to Know Oklahoma for Saturday, May 11, at 7 p.m. A fee is charged. Historical Society - The Durham Historical Society, 38 Town House Rd., is scheduled to be open to the public Saturday, May 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Concert - The Middlesex Hospital Vocal Chords has scheduled a concert “A Musical Tribute to all Who Served” for Saturday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m., at Portland High School, 95 High St.,

Town Times Friday, May 10, 2013 Portland. The concert will featured Broadway tunes and a patriotic tribute. A fee is charged. A discount for active military and veterans will be applied. For more information, call (860) 347-2787 or (860) 342-3120 or visit www.vocalchoards20.org.

12

Sunday

Plant sale - Projection Graduation has scheduled a Mother’s Day plant sale for Sunday, May 12, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Strong

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Wednesday

TOPS meeting - Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Middlefield Community Center. For more information, contact Naomi Klotsko at (860) 349-9558 or Bonnie Olesen at (860) 3499433.

Thursday

Farmers Market - Farmers Market is scheduled for Thursdays, on the Durham Green, from 3 to 6 p.m., through mid-September.

17

Lic. & Ins. EI 183930

Monday

60+ Club - The Durham 60+ Club is scheduled to meet Monday, May 13, at 1:30 p.m., at the Durham Activity Center, 350 Main St. A variety table will be available. A blood pressure meeting is scheduled prior to the meeting. New members are always welcome. Get stitchy - Get Stitchy, an open sew event for quilters and sewers, is scheduled for Monday, May 13, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Durham Activity Center, 350 Main St. Bring a sewing machine and project materials. For more information, contact Pam at (860) 349-0493, carey_clan@sbcglobal.net or Vicki at (860) 343-0879, vberry11@comcast.net.

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Friday

Golf tournament - The Middlefield Volunteer Fire Company has scheduled its golf tournament for Friday, May 17, at Lyman Orchards Golf Course. The event is a 9 a.m. shotgun start, and includes breakfast, golf, dinner and awards ceremony. A fee is charged. For more information, email middlefieldfiregolf@gmail.com.


TownCalendar

22

Ken Ritucci; cuer will be Sue Lucibello. For more information, call (860) 349-8084 or (203) 272-7463.

May 10

Friday

Musical - Strong School has scheduled a production of Getting to Know Oklahoma for Friday, May 10, at 7 p.m. A fee is charged. Tot Time -The Moms Club of Durham-Middlefield meets every Friday at Peckham Park at 10 a.m. Parents and children of Durham and Middlefield are welcome. For more information, email momsdurhammiddlefield@g mail.com. Square dance - The 4C’s Square Dance Club has scheduled a dance for Friday, May 10, from 8 to 10 p.m. at Brewster School, Durham. The caller will be

11

Saturday

Plant sale - Projection Graduation has scheduled a Mother’s Day plant sale for Saturday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Strong School parking lot. Family movie night The Durham Cooperative Nursery School has scheduled its fourth annual family movie night for Saturday, May 11, at 8 p.m., at the Durham Fairgrounds. The event features Dr. Suess’ The Lorax. Rain date is Saturday, June 1. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Music with a live band, face painting, hair tinsel, tattoos, and a crafts table

will be offered. Food and drink will be available for purchase. The public is welcome to bring chairs and blankets to view the movie, which is scheduled to begin at dusk. A fee is charged. Tickets are available at the door. For more information and tickets, call (860) 3499885. Musical - Strong School has scheduled a production of Getting to Know Oklahoma for Saturday, May 11, at 7 p.m. A fee is charged. Historical Society - The Durham Historical Society, 38 Town House Rd., is scheduled to be open to the public Saturday, May 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Concert - The Middlesex Hospital Vocal Chords has scheduled a concert “A Musical Tribute to all Who Served” for Saturday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m., at Portland

Town Times Friday, May 10, 2013

High School, 95 High St., Portland. The concert will featured Broadway tunes and a patriotic tribute. A fee is charged. A discount for active military and veterans will be applied. For more information, call (860) 347-2787 or (860) 342-3120 or visit www.vocalchoards20.org.

12

Sunday

Plant sale - Projection Graduation has scheduled a Mother’s Day plant sale for Sunday, May 12, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Strong School

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Wednesday

TOPS meeting - Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Middlefield Community Center. For more information, contact Naomi Klotsko at (860) 349-9558 or Bonnie Olesen at (860) 3499433.

Thursday

Farmers Market - Farmers Market is scheduled for Thursdays, on the Durham Green, from 3 to 6 p.m., through mid-September.

17

Lic. & Ins. EI 183930

Monday

60+ Club - The Durham 60+ Club is scheduled to meet Monday, May 13, at 1:30 p.m., at the Durham Activity Center, 350 Main St. A variety table will be available. A blood pressure meeting is scheduled prior to the meeting. New members are always welcome. Get stitchy - Get Stitchy, an open sew event for quilters and sewers, is scheduled for Monday, May 13, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Durham Activity Center, 350 Main St. Bring a sewing machine and project materials. For more information, contact Pam at (860) 349-0493, carey_clan@sbcglobal.net or Vicki at (860) 343-0879, vberry11@comcast.net.

16

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parking lot.

Friday

Golf tournament - The Middlefield Volunteer Fire Company has scheduled its golf tournament for Friday, May 17, at Lyman Orchards Golf Course. The event is a 9 a.m. shotgun start, and includes breakfast, golf, dinner and awards ceremony. A fee is charged. For more information, email middlefieldfiregolf@gmail.com.


23

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Government Meetings Wednesday, May 15 Durham Planning and Zoning, Library, 7 p.m. Government Thursday, May 16 Calendar Public Safety Facility

Parade The Old Home Days Parade Committee is signing up marchers and musical units for its 2013 parade scheduled for Saturday, June 8, at 10 a.m. The parade will step off at Rogers Manufacturing, continue through the center of Rockfall and Middlefield and end at Peckham Park. Any organization interested in being part of the 2013 Old Home Days Parade should contact Carrie Anderson at (860) 3468954.

Brush pick up scheduled

Frog Fridays are scheduled for May 17 and June 7, at Highlawn Forest, Rockfall, at 4 p.m. Observe frogs, frog and salamander eggs, tadpoles, salamander and insect larvae, etc. The program is free of charge. Registration is required. Participants should bring water and a snack; leave your pets are home; wear sturdy shoes and children must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. For more information, call Lucy at (860) 395-7771 or visit www.EveryoneOutside.org.

Planning Committee, Durham Firehouse, 6:30 p.m. DMIAAB, Middlefield Community Center, 7 p.m.

Middlefield Government Calendar

“Money comes in and we just give it back out. That’s what Help Willy’s Friends is about,” Paturzo said. To donate or to learn more about the organization and how to help, visit helpwilly’sfriends.org, or come to the 5th Annual Help Willy’s Friends Pet Fair, Sunday, May 19, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Cocinchaug Regional High School.

Pet Continued from page 16

(Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings are held in the Community Center.) Wednesday, May 15 Inland/Wetlands Commission, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 16 DMIAAB, 7 p.m. Board of Finance, 7 p.m.

en out to a shelter at the pet fair. Those who are eligible are asked to write an essay beforehand explaining what they would do with the money if given the award. Last year’s winner, the Branford Compassion Club, was granted nearly $5,000.

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The Town of Durham Public Works Department continues its annual spring curbside brush pick up. Brush should be less than four inches in diameter and not longer than six feet in length. Brush should be stacked at roadside in an open area, away from mailboxes, trees, telephone poles and other structures. Brush should be stacked perpendicular to the roadway, butt end toward the road. No leaves, stumps, wood or foreign matter will be picked up. Each household will be strictly limited to one truck load during this collection. In an effort to be more efficient, it is recommended that neighbors combine piles on property lines. Loads shall not measure any larger than four feet high, six feet wide and eight inches long, unless combined with a neighbor. If loads do not follow these guidelines, it will not be removed. Because brush pick up can only be done in fair weather, it is recommend that residents get piles ready for pick up and not wait until you see areas of town listed. The crew is presently working in the north end of town and continuing south. For more information, call the Public Works office at (860) 349-1816.

(Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings are held in the Durham Library. Check the town website at www.townofdurhamct.org for updates.) Monday, May 13 Inland/Wetlands, Library, 7 p.m. Annual Budget meeting, Coginchaug High School, 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 Board of Finance, Town Hall, 7 p.m. Conservation Commission, Town Hall, 7:30 p.m. Library Board of Trustees, Library, 7:30 p.m. Durham Volunteers Fire Company, Durham Firehouse, 8 p.m.

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24

TownSports

Town Times Friday, May 10, 2013

Blue Devil Notes

Solid showing for CRHS at invitational; Trombetta and Neri honored By Jim Bransfield Special to The Town Times

The highlight of the athletic week at Coginchaug was the Marty Robbins Invitational track meet held at Coginchaug Regional May 4. The Blue Devils turned in solid performances, finish-

ing fourth in the boys competition and third in the girls event. Old Saybrook won both events, scoring 96 points in the boys meet, thus edging past North Branford’s 90 points. Plainville was third with 85 points and Coginchaug scored 79 points. In the girls competition,

Old Saybrook had 132 points to Sacred Heart’s 111. Coginchaug had 82 points for third. First places were won by Samantha Drop in the girls 3,200 (5:53.29), Kelly Donovan in the 300 meter hurdles (:51.86) and Jeremy Brown in the boys 3,200 meter run (10:15.10). Second place finishes were recorded by David

Trombetta in the boys 100 meter dash (:12.02), Christian Alberico in the boys 1,600 meter run (4:55.91), Jake Ober in the 300 meter hurdles (:44.75), Ben Tabor in the boys 800 meters (2:01.99), Jessica Drop in the girls 800 (2:26.93) and the girls 4x400 meter relay team of Bailey Thayer, Liz Harlow, Bailey Maus and Jessica Drop (4:22.03).

Other Sports

Adult recreation.

Third places were taken by Mike Decker in the 400 meters (:53.52), Zach Taylor in the 300 meter hurdles (:45.19), Alison Doolittle in the girls 300 meter dash (:28.75), Lauren Trombetta in the girls

Women’s Open Gym Basketball is scheduled for Mondays, May 13, 20, June 3, 10, at 6 to 9:15 p.m., at Strong School. Co-ed Volleyball is scheduled for Wednesdays, May 22, 29, June 5, 12, at 6 to 9:15 p.m., at Strong School.

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long jump (14 feet, five and a quarter inches) and Caryn Sibiskie in the girls javelin (77 feet, one inch). The baseball team (9-6) defeated Valley Regional Monday, 4-1, scoring three times in the top of the seventh inning. Jack Granger homered as the Blue Devils snapped a two-game losing streak. The team lost the only game it played last week, 4-1, to North Branford. The Blue Devils were on the road with Old Saybrook Wednesday and come home Friday to take on defending Class S state champion Cromwell. The softball team also won Monday, defeating Valley, 115, behind 12 strikeouts from Gabby Diaz. Last Thursday the team lost to North Branford, 4-2, and at 6-7, must win two more games to qualify for the state tournament. The boys golf team lost to Hale-Ray Friday to fall to 2-4. The team played Old Lyme Tuesday, was at Cromwell Wednesday and Old Saybrook Thursday. The girls tennis team (2-10) had a tough week, losing three matches to North Branford, 5-2, Old Saybrook, 6-1, and Haddam-Killingworth, 52. The team was home Wednesday with East Hampton. The boys tennis team (5-9) won two of three last week, beating H-K, 5-2, and North Branford, 4-3, while losing to Old Saybrook, 7-0. But the Devil netmen lost to Old Lyme, 6-1, on Monday.

Scholar-Athletes The CIAC Scholar-Athlete dinner was held at the Aqua Turf in Southington Sunday evening. Each high school names its outstanding senior boy and girls scholar-athlete and the CIAC recognizes their athletic and academic achievements each year at a gala dinner. Coginchaug’s winners for 2012-2013 are Lauren Trombetta and William Neri.


25

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Play ball! Scenes from Little League Opening Day in town: Izzy Milardo makes a play at third base, and Bailey Zettergren fires in a pitch.

Great game Photo by Karen Lipka

Coginchaug girls softball team, Around the Clock Heating and Cooling, came back from a 1-6 to 8-6 final against Madison during an April 30 game. Pictured are head Coach Mike Mancini, Mike Grenier and Tom Lipka.

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Summer Playground Wednesday, June 26 through Friday, Aug. 16, for children entering first through seventh grade living in Durham. Playground meets every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings, from 9 a.m. to noon, at Allyn Brook Park. Arts and crafts, sports, and special events. A fee is charged. Little people Program Monday, June 25 and through Friday, Aug. 9, for children ages 4 and 5 living in Durham. Program meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. Two little people program sessions are scheduled, Session 1, from 9 to 10:30 a.m., and session 2, from 10:30 to noon. Pre-registration is required. A fee is charged. Night Recreation Youth Program meets every Tuesday and Thursday evenings, from June 27 to Aug. 8, at Strong School for students entering grades 5 through 8. Open to Durham and Middlefield residents. Activities include table games, music, volleyball, basketball, and special events. A fee is charged.

Town Times Service Directory

336 Main St. Durham 860-349-8868


26

Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

Library Briefs

Durham Library

Hours: Regular library hours are Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www.durhamlibrary.org to search the catalog, review your account, register for a program or renew your materials online. For information or to register for a program by phone, call (860) 349-9544.

Pre-School Mother Goose (18 to 30

months) Mondays, at 10:15 a.m. Time for Tots (2 1/2 to 3 1/2) Wednesdays, at 10:15 a.m.

Preschool Storytime

(3 1/2 to 5) Tuesdays, at 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Bedtime Storytime (2 to 4) Mondays, at 7 p.m. (wear pajamas) To register, call the library at 860 349-9544. Children Preschool Storytimes (April 22 to May 15). Drop in. Mother Goose: (18 – 30 months) Mondays, at 10:15 a.m. Time for Tots: (2 1/2 – 3 1/2 years) Wednesdays, at 10:15 a.m. Preschool: (3 1/3 – 5 years) Tuesdays, at 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Bedtime Storytime: (2 – 5 years) Mondays, at 7 p.m. Teens Super Smash Brothers Tournament - The library has scheduled a Super Smash Brothers tournament for Saturday, May 25, at 2 p.m. Winner of the two hour tourna-

ment will receive a prize. Snacks and Drinks will also be provided. Ages 10-18, please register. Adults PALS Annual Book Sale - Saturday, May 18, open at 9 a.m. for special, preview admission and 10 a.m. for general admission. Donations (of gently used books, DVDs and CDs) are accepted. Please, no magazines, textbooks or encyclopedia.

Levi E. Coe Library 414 Main St., Middlefield, (860) 349-3857 or www.leviecoe.com. Hours: Mondays-Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Closed Fridays. Levi E. Coe Library is

scheduled to be closed Saturday, May 25 and Monday, May 27 for Memorial Day weekend. The library will be closed on Saturdays beginning May 25. Phonathon The Levi E. Coe Library would like to thank everyone for their donations during this year’s annual Phonathon fundraising event. If we missed you, or you would like to donate to our Phonathon fundraising event, please call (860) 3493857 drop by the library. Children’s Room display case Do you have a collection you’d like to share? Are you a community group interested

Town Times Service Directory Grippo Gutters LLC

1276067

Jon McNamara - Owner/Operator

Riding Lessons

860-852-3397 Quality Siding and Gutter Products and Services.

Adults and children NEW Spring & Summer Programs

Call for a Free estimate today!

349-8728 Route 17, Durham, CT www.movadofarm.com

Commercial and Residential Siding & Seamless Gutter Installation, Repair and Cleaning. Fully Licensed and Insured Lic. #HIC.0633535

www.GrippoGutters.com GrippoGutters@att.net

Family Pest Control LLC

1284383

DURHAM DURHAM POWER POWER EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT

“Our family serving Your family” Locally Owned and Operated Since 1977

Russell Library 1283030

• Tractors • Blowers • Lawn Mowers • Hedge Trimmers • Tillers • Snow Blowers • Trimmers • Chainsaws • Generators Sales - Repair (All Models) - Parts Welding - Pick-up & Deliver - Buy & Sell Used Equip. 860-349-3854 Stan Prusinski 152 Guilford Rd. - (Rt. 77) - Durham Durhampowerequipment.com

Wallingford: (203) 265-7328 Toll Free: (800) 269-0948 www.RidOfBugs.com

KENNETH R. JAY Landscape Maintenance & Construction LLC

Joy Boone Advertising

Stone Work and Pavers Commercial, Residential, Industrial

Call for Your Free Quote on Stonework Now! 1268726

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1276068

www.jaylandscape.com

Connecticut Business License # B-2045

Russell Library, located at 123 Broad St. in Middletown, is open from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays.

...serving Durham, Middlefield & Rockfall

Complete Lawn and Shrub Bed Maintenance Landscape Design and Installation Service HIC #0621170

92 Jackson Hill Road, Middlefield, CT 06455

1283031

Movado Farms Inc.

in showcasing your work? If so, please contact the Children’s Department at (860) 349-3857 to use the downstairs display case. Paperback Book Sale Saturday, May 4, from 8 a.m. to noon. A concert, featuring the Middlefield Ukulele Club, is scheduled from 11 to 11:30 a.m. No registration necessary. Book discussion Monday, May 20, from 1 to 2 p.m. The book is The Shoemaker’s Wife, by Adriana Trigiani. Program is scheduled for the Middlefield Senior Center. Books are available at the library and the Senior Center. Author visit - Lucy Burdette, author of the Key West Food Critic mysteries, is scheduled to speak Wednesday, June 5, at the Middlefield Senior Center. She has also written the Golf Lover’s mystery series and the Advice Column mysteries, under the pen name of Roberta Isleib. For more information, call the library at (860) 349-3857 or the senior center at (860) 3497121. Walk-ins are welcome.

11 Crown Street, Meriden, CT 06450 203-317-2313 • fax 203-235-4048 advertising@towntimes.com

Ads for the stores you shop, every week in the

Town Times


27

Friday, May 10, 2013 — Town Times

Real Estate Page 1284876

Submission reminder

203-317-2313

FOR RENT

860.301.9102 860.324.9959 SHERRI AHERN ELLEN PAKLOS

Mom won’t tell you what she REALLY wants for Mother’s Day.

1284878

Upscale Middlefield Apartment in Rural Setting Two bedrooms, hardwood floors, veranda with water views, $950 per month. Security and references required

1284878

Town Times

1284424

Town Times welcomes submissions regarding upcoming events happening in the community. Please specify “calendar item” if you would like your submission to appear in the weekly calendar of events. We do our best to run a submission at least one time. However, due to space constraints, we cannot guarantee a submission will be published on a specific date. To ensure your submission runs exactly as you would like it to, contact our sales representative Joy Boone at (203) 317-2313.

To advertise your business, call the

860-712-3020 1st & 2nd Floor Master Suites MLS G644529

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Unwind With Stunning Views MLS G649586

The Perfect Home for Entertaining MLS G641077

Kitchen Big Enough For Family to Gather MLS G648826

Carefree Condo Living MLS G649586

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Playroom for the Entire Family MLS G650532

A Move In Condition Historical Home MLS G646128

Now Leasing 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments - Starting at $825.00 Heat & Hot Water Included. Call now: 860-346-1292 Email: astonegate@sbcglobal.net Web: stonegateapartmentsct.com 1160-1150 South Main St., Middletown 1282915

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SUDOKU ANSWER

CROSSWORD ANSWER

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Tireless and with a smile, mom works 24/7. She takes care of everyone and asks so little in return. Call me. Together we can find just the thing to make every day, Mother’s Day


28

Town Times — Friday, May 10, 2013

They Are “Public Notices” For A Good Reason DON’T LET CONNECTICUT OFFICIALS REMOVE YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW FROM THE NEWSPAPER. KEEP PUBLIC NOTICES IN YOUR NEWSPAPER! Pending legislation may remove your right to read public notices in newspapers, moving them from the public domain to government controlled web sites. We’re concerned. And you should be, too. Public notices are an important tool in assuring an informed citizenry. They have helped develop America into a participatory democracy for hundreds of years and where it counts the most: how your tax dollars are spent, how policy is made and how our futures are charted. They are located in easy-to-find sections of your newspaper. And they are fully accessible to everyone - unlike the internet, which is not accessible to everyone.

Less than 10% of the U.S. population views a local, state or federal government website daily, according to the May 2009 release of U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of Resident Population. This means more than nine out of ten people may never see a given notice. This compares dramatically to the fact that 83% of adults read a community newspaper every week, according to the National Newspaper Association. Furthermore, a public notice printed in the newspaper produces a permanent record. The internet does not, nor does it assure timeliness. And a newspaper is archived for years; not subject to computer crashes and hackers. Newspapers are easily verifiable, fully transparent and represent a secure third party who has nothing to gain from any notice.

Connecticut’s recent ethical lapses shed a glaring light on the full meaning of this problem. It’s like putting the fox in charge of the hen house. Every public notice, which runs in a Connecticut daily newspaper, is automatically uploaded to that newspaper’s web site and CTPublicNotices.org. Newspapers are your watchdogs. Don’t let that role be changed now. Voice your opinion. To keep your notices in the newspaper, contact your local legislator to oppose Senate Bill #1112 - An Act Concerning the Publication of Legal Notices by Municipalities. Governor’s Office - 860.566.4840 Senate Democrats - 860.240.8600 House Democrats - 860.240.8500 Senate Republicans - 860.240.8800 House Republicans - 860.240.8700

Visit www.ctdailynews.com to contact your legislator today

Tow n Times 1280426


Town Times May 10, 2013