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Volume 17, Issue 20

Serving Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall

Durham selectmen discuss safety and road signs By Stephanie Wilcox Town Times The selectmen were surprised to learn at the Aug. 23 Board of Selectmen’s meeting that Durham Fitness was robbed last week. During public comment at the end of the meeting, Roger Kleeman reported that the fitness center located on Route 17 was broken into in the early morning hours on Wednesday, but only a few quarters were stolen. He stated that an alarm also went off next door at Cozy Corner that morning, but it appeared the doors had only been rattled. First Selectman Laura Francis said this was the first she was hearing of the incident, to which resident Trish Dynia commented that she believes the town is not as safe as people think. “Residents are overly confident,” she said. A call to resident state trooper Pete DiGioia for more information did not get returned by press time. On a different topic related to safety, Francis reported that Millers Pond is not

maintained as a swimming pond, and that is why there is no lifeguard on duty. This was in response to resident Donia Viola’s concern about the absence of a life guard at the location. Because signage is posted accordingly, Francis announced that people can be ticketed for swimming at the pond. Alex Sololow, from the Department of Environmental Protection, gave Viola’s request for a lifeguard to his supervisor. Crooked Hill Road and Local Traffic Authority The board approved a full bond release for Crooked Hill Road requested by Brian Ferris. Francis said she did some research and learned that the Local Traffic Authority (LTA) does not have the authority to put up “No Thru Traffic” signs. The Department of Transportation is the only authority that can determine if a street should be a “No Thru Truck” street, See BOS, page 28

Friday, August 27, 2010

School bells will be ringing Kindergarten Bus Day is the chance for students entering kindergarten to practice riding the bus. “It’s the separation process for parents and kids,”

said a Dattco Bus representative Wednesday at John Lyman School. Above, this group confirmed that riding the bus was actually “lots of fun.” Left, this little rider practiced holding the handrail, which he learned in the safety video earlier that morning. Photo bottom of page, a thumbs up from a proud parents to this excited kindergartener. See Photos by Stephanie Wilcox more photos from the bus ride on page 15.

The last hurrah before school starts Tori Piscatelli Special to Town Times Although the summer is coming to an end, there is still time for plenty of fun. A fun thing to do around this time of year for parents and their children or anyone is to think of a favorite thing

In this issue ... Bus Schedule .............15-22 Calendar............................4 Durham Briefs................13 Middlefield Briefs...........14 Obituaries ......................35 Spotlight..........................25 Sports ..........................33-34

they would like to do before the summer ends. Every August, my mom would ask me and my two brothers and I something we would like to do before the start of school, and rather quickly this became a tradition. My youngest brother always picks Mini-Golf, so we started visiting different Mini-Golf places close to home. Two of his favorites are Prehistoric Mini-Golf in Portland and the Berlin Batting Cages and Mini Golf off of the Berlin Turnpike. Both of these courses are fun and affordable, and a great way to get out of the house. Although the actual game of Mini-Golf may become very competitive, it’s a great way

to have fun together and reminisce on the summer. My other brother almost always picks going to Lenny and Joes Fish Tale located in Madison and Westbrook. In my familiy, everyone would order something different and share a little with each other so we could have that final taste of summer. Be it fried clam strips, King Crab legs, or fries, we always felt full after eating at Lenny and Joes. However, we always made sure we had room for ice cream after. When it was my turn to pick a favorite thing to do, I usually chose going shopping at Clinton Crossings or

See Summer, page 11


2

The Aquatudes

From noon-2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 28, on the Main Stage, The Aquatudes, a local Durham surf rock band, will play two sets of traditional surf rock classics and early rock ‘n roll favorites during the all-day car and craft show for the Plainville Fire Company’s 26th annual Hot Air Balloon Festival at Norton Park on South Washington Street (Rt. 177) in Plainville.

You are invited to the picnic Summer isn’t over just

Town Times Community Briefs

Friday, August 27, 2010

The event will be held Sunday, Aug. 29, from 4 to 8 p.m. at Camp Farnam on Maiden Lane in Durham. We hope you will join us for this lowkey, relaxing evening. CVEF is a non-profit organization whose mission is to promote creativity and excellence in education for all ages in the communities of Durham and Middlefield.

this year are Kelley and Sean Moore, who will share how cancer has changed their lives and offer inspirational messages. For more information or to register, contact the Cancer Center at MidState at 203694-8353.

yet, and the Coginchaug Valley Education Foundation invites you to enjoy the last of the season at their second annual community picnic. The community picnic is free and open to all Durham and Middlefield residents to share a picnic dinner with neighbors and spend an evening splashing in the pool, roasting marshmallows, listening to music under the pavilion and playing horseshoes and volleyball on newly renovated courts. CVEF provides the facilities, drinks, and a free visit from the ice cream truck — all you have to do is bring a picnic dinner for your friends and family.

Index of Advertisers

Finding Jewish ancestors through Cancer genealogy Survivors’ Day The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut will meet on Sunday, Aug. 29, at 1:30 p.m. at the Godfrey Memorial Library, 134 Newfield St. in Middletown. This meeting is free and open to all. The first part of the program will be a report on the International Association of Jewish

Corrections We strive to bring you the most accurate information available each week, but if you see something in Town Times that isn’t quite right, give us a call at 860-349-8000, and we’ll do our best to make things right. The correct dates for this year’s Durham Fair are Thursday, Sept. 23, through Sunday, Sept. 26.

The Cancer Center at MidState Medical Center announces its annual Cancer Survivors’ Day to be held on Sunday, Sept. 12, from 2 to 4 p.m. at Meriden’s own Hubbard Park. This day is dedicated to honoring the lives of our cancer survivors, especially those treated at MidState Medical Center. The theme of this year’s event is “The Magic of Survivorship.” Cancer survivors are encouraged to bring their family and friends to share in the day. Activities for children include face painting, balloon animals and caricature drawings. Survivors can treat themselves to a relaxing chair massage, and everyone can enjoy musical entertainment and refreshments. Featured musicians

The future of Middlesex County The Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce Young Professionals’ Alliance will present “The Future of Middlesex County: A Panel Discussion Focusing On What Lies Ahead For Our Great County” on Wednesday, Sept. 29, at 8 a.m. at the Inn at Middletown, 70 Main St. Featured panelists include Larry McHugh, president, Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce and chairman, UConn board of trustees; Fred Carstensen, executive director, the Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis; Bill Warner, director of planning, conservation and development for the city of Middletown; and Phil Miller, first selectman of Essex. The cost for this event will be $15 and will include a continental breakfast. To register, contact Jeff Pugliese at 860-347-6924 or jpugliese@middlesexchamber.com.

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To advertise in the Town Times, call Joy Boone at 860 349-8026 A O Carroll and Agostini Co......35 Gossip .......................................10 Addy & Sons..............................31 Grace Lutheran Preschool ........11 Advanced Dental.......................12 Grosolar.....................................14 Adworks.......................................5 Home Works..............................30 Affordable Excavation ...............28 Hot Spot Stove & Spa ...............23 Allan’s Tree Service ..................33 Ianniello Plumbing.....................30 Anderson Lawn Care ................31 J Randolph Kitchens .................30 APEC Electric............................33 JC Farm & Greenhouse ............11 Apple Rehab..............................14 Joe Riffs Music..........................25 Appraisal One Associates.........34 Las Eng .....................................33 Avenue Enterprises...................28 Lyman Orchards..........................7 Batters Box..................................6 Masonicare .......................24 & 36 Berardino Realtors..............3 & 35 Middlefield Children’s .................6 Berlin Bicycle Shop .....................7 Middlesex Community College .26 Binge Bruce...............................28 Middlesex Dance Center...........10 Bond Dinettes............................10 Molecular Neuroimaging .............2 Brick Construction .....................28 Mountain Spring Water ............31 Brockett Paving ........................31 Movado Farm ............................29 Cahill & Sons.............................33 Neil Jones Home Improvements32 Carlton Interior...........................11 Paint Spot..................................23 Carmines Restaurant ..................5 Paws Pet Resort & Spa ............25 Centurion Exterminating ...........33 Pet Stop.....................................32 Cieslik DMD...............................13 Petruzelo Agency Insurance.....34 Classic Wood Flooring ..............30 Planeta Electric .........................30 Company ‘N Tempo ..................13 Raintree Landscaping ...............32 Conroy, John DMD....................13 Realty Associates......................29 Ct Gymnastics ..........................13 Rli Electric ..........................5 & 34 Ct Home Additions ...................29 Roblee Plumbing.......................31 CV Enterprises ..........................29 Rockfall Co. ...............................34 Desjarlais, Marsha ....................35 RSDL Home Improvements .....28 Drummonds Cleaning ...............30 Sacred Heart Church........23 & 27 Durham Auto Center .................11 Sharon McCormick Design ........5 Durham Dental ............................3 Singles Alternative.......................5 Durham Family Eyecare .............7 T-N-T Home & Lawncare..........28 Durham Fitness...........................3 Torrison Stone & Garden,...6 & 31 Durham Pharmacy...............16-22 Town and Country Preschool....23 Durham Market............................7 Triplethreat Dance ....................11 Durham Wine & Spirits................3 Two Mikes Electric ....................32 Executive Offices.......................34 Uncle Bob’s Flower & Garden.....6 Family Tree Care ......................34 VMB Custom Builders...............29 Fine Work Home Improvement.33 Whitehouse Construction..........29 Fuel & Service ..........................12 Whitney Ridge Stables..............32 Fugge David M..........................32 Wild Wisteria .............................12 Glazer Dental Associates............5 Windows Plus............................14

Genealogical Societies Conference held in Los Angeles in July. The second part of the meeting will be an opportunity to use an array of works in the JGSCT Library. Among the reference materials available, will be the new, two-volume Yad Vashem Encyclopedia of the Ghettos During the Holocaust. For more information, visit www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org or call Marcia Indianer Meyers at 860-638-3819.


Town Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

3

Coginchaug High School athletic facility project in full swing By Stephanie Wilcox Town Times The start of school in District 13 is less than one week away, and those piles of material at Coginchaug’s athletic facility don’t look like much yet. Many people are wondering how the upgrades to the facility are going and what students and faculty can expect when they head back. According to project manager Steve Meader, who is responsible for overseeing, scheduling and monitoring the quality of the project,

everything is on track (no pun intended), and the various pieces of the puzzle are coming along. The faculty parking lot will be ready for teachers when they return to Coginchaug on Monday, Aug. 30. However, the area designated as student/event parking will not be completed for the start of the school year. Students who drive in will be directed to park on the lawn next to the varsity softball field, directly across the street from Coginchaug (next to Korn School). “We anticipate being able

to meet any student’s needs,” said principal Andre Hauser, who worked with building and grounds supervisor Rob Francis to find a “legal and safe” temporary location until the student parking lot is ready. He expects the area to be roped off by next week. Meader adds that the student parking lot was never expected to be ready by Sept. 2. In fact, the faculty parking lot was the only piece scheduled to be completed Nov. 12, the “substantially complete”

An aerial view of the athletic facility under construction at Coginchaug. More photos on page 33. Photo by Bill Currlin

See Facility, page 33 1161086

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Town Times & Places

4 FRIDAY

August 27

Safety Program S.I.P. Kids is a fingerprinting and photography event for children to provide statistical information quickly in the event your child is missing. They will be providing free digital fingerprinting and photos for all children at Robert’s Chrysler Dodge, 120 South Broad St. in Meriden, from 2 to 6 p.m. today and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow. There will be free face painting, balloons, cookies and juice. For more information call Jacki at 319-268-4111 or e-mail to Jacki@sipkids.com. Tailgate Party Durham/Middlefield Falcons Football and Cheerleading will hold their annual tailgate party at the New Haven Raccoon Club, 853 New Haven Rd. in Durham, from 7 to 11 p.m. There will be a southern barbecue prepared by Kevin Smith, music and lots of fun. BYOB. Tickets are $30 and available by calling Carrie Anderson at 860-346 8954. Letterboxing From 4 to 6 p.m. take a hike and find a couple letterboxes at Wadsworth Falls State Park in Middletown. To register, contact Lucy at everyoneoutside@att.net or 860-395-7771. For info, visit www.everyoneoutside.org.

SATURDAY

August 28 Dudley Farm Market The Dudley Farm farmers market will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the corner of Routes 77 and 80 in North Guilford. The market features produce, shell fish, beef and lamb, maple syrup, honey, baked goods, pickles and crafts. For more information, call 860-349-3917. Corvair Car Show Connecticut CORSA presents an all-Corvair car show on the grounds of the Apple Barrel market from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For information, call Ron at 860-621-7551. Golf Show Dennis Walters will provide a demonstration of precision golf at 1 p.m. at the Lyman Orchards Golf Club,

with help from his super dog Bucky and some unusual clubs, such as a fishing rod, crutch and even a cell phone. Call 860-349-6031 or visit www.lymangolf.com for information.

SUNDAY

August 29 Songwriting Workshop Art at Murray Pond presents David Massengill’s songwriters workshop at 2 p.m. Learn David’s song writing tricks and create a song you can play in David’s concert that evening. David Massengill is a very talented songwriter, singer, dulcimer and guitar player and raconteur, who will make you laugh and cry! Don’t miss it! Ticket are $75 and include a ticket to the concert at 7 p.m. Tickets to just the concert are $20. To register, call 860663-1169 or visit www.joanlevyartist.com. Jewish genealogy The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the Godfrey Memorial Library, 134 Newfield St. in Middletown. This meeting is free and open to all. There will be a report on the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Conference and an opportunity to use the reference materials, including the new, two-volume Yad Vashem Encyclopedia of the Ghettos During the Holocaust. For more information, visit www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org or call Marcia Indianer Meyers at 860-638-3819. Community Picnic The second annual CVEF community picnic will be held today from 4 to 8 p.m. at Camp Farnam off Maiden Lane in Durham. This event is open to all residents of Durham and Middlefield. Attendees should bring a picnic supper; CVEF will provide drinks, ice cream and s’mores, and the pool will be open. High Holy Days Workshop Rabbi Rachel Goldenberg of Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek in Chester will conduct a High Holy Days workshop, “Making the High Holy Days Meaningful and Workable

For You and Your Kids” at 7 p.m. at a home in Madison. The workshop is designed to help parents prepare for Rosh Ha Shonah and Yom Kippur, the most sacred of Jewish religious holidays. To RSVP and for directions, e-mail bethshalom@snet.net or call 860-526-8920. Free Concert The Composer’s Choir, under the direction of Daniel Shaw, will present a concert of original compositions at 4 p.m. at the Middlefield Federated Church. All are welcome to attend.

MONDAY

August 30 InkHeart The Russell Library, 123 Broad St. in Middletown, will show the film InkHeart at 2 p.m. as part of their books in films series for young people. After a man with the power to bring books to life by reading out loud finds himself trapped in a story with his daughter, he must use his power to get them out of danger. Light refreshments will be served. For info, call 860-347-2528. Free Movie The Middletown Senior Center, 150 Williams Street, offers a free movie every Monday at 12:30 p.m. Today’s movie is The White Ribbon with Susanne Lothar and Ulrich Tukur.

TUESDAY

August 31 Summer Sounds Enjoy a free concert with Elite Syncopation playing ragtime and early jazz at 7 p.m. at the South Union Park at the corner of Old Church and Main Street in Middletown.

WEDNESDAY

September 1 TOPS Durham TOPS Club meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. on the third floor of the Durham Town Hall. For information, call Naomi Klotsko at 860-349-9558 or Bonnie Olesen at 860-349-9433. Stroke Survivors MidState Medical Center stroke support group, an interactive group designed to

Friday, August 27, 2010

assist stroke survivors and their caregivers in learning more about stroke and recovery issues, as well as share common challenges and experiences, will meet today. The group meets the first Wednesday of each month from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in Conference Room 7 at MidState Medical Center. Make a Schultüte Come to the Middlefield Women’s Club open House at 6:30 p.m. at the Middlefield Community Center and make a schultüte, a decorated cardboard cone filled with school supplies, candy and small toys for a child’s first day of school. The Middlefield Women’s Club is donating all the supplies for this craft, and the items inside, so it is free. RSPV by e-mailing Maureen at mhamilton27@comcast.net.

THURSDAY

September 2 First Day of School All schools in District 13 open today.

Historical Society The Middlefield historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. in the Community Center. They will meet each Thursday until May. Walk-ins and new members always welcome. Membership is only $10 per year. For more information, call 860-349-0665. Korn Open House Korn School will have an open house tonight beginning at 6 p.m.

FRIDAY

September 3 Business Networking The local chapter of Business Networking International will meet in the United Methodist Church, 24 Old Church St. in Middletown at 7:30 a.m. Contact Kirk Hagert at 860-349-5626 for info. Baked Bean Supper United Churches of Durham will have a baked bean supper beginning at 6 p.m. in the air-conditioned Fellowship Hall on the corner of Main Street and Route 66. The suppers include

baked beans, scalloped corn, macaroni dishes, salads and homemade breads and pies. Dinners are $7 for adults and $4 for children under 10.

SATURDAY

September 4

Notre Dame tag sale Notre Dame Church on Main Street in Durham will have their monthly tag sale and flea market, rain or shine in the church hall, church garage, parking lot and on the lawn from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The sale features tons of household goods, crafts, furniture, clothing ($2.50 per bag), and much more. Breakfast and lunch are available in the church hall. Vendor space is $15 and available by calling Bob Smith at 860-349-0356. Corn Maze The Lyman Farm corn maze opens today. Call 860349-1793 or visit www.lymanorchards.com for information on tickets and hours. Girl Scouts For girls who are not currently Girl Scouts and want to learn more about being a Girl Scout, join them at Wesleyan University in Middletown. Kindergarteners and first graders can meet at either the 10 to 11:30 a.m. or noon to 1:30 p.m. session. Girls going into second through fifth grades can explore jewelry making in the 10 to 11:30 a.m. session. Space is limited, so please call Nancy Sherman at 860347-5768, Extension 3752 to reserve your place. Dudley Farm Market The Dudley Farm farmers market will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the corner of Routes 77 and 80 in North Guilford. The market features produce, shell fish, beef and lamb, maple syrup, honey, baked goods, pickles and crafts. For more information, call 860-349-3917.

MONDAY

September 6

Stroke Club Middletown Stroke Club will meet at 1 p.m. in the community room at Sugarloaf Terrace in Middlefield. For info, call Ida at 860-3449984 or Ray at 860-349-9226.


Town Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

5

Rock ‘n roll meets ice cream at 80 Licks in Durham By Stephanie Wilcox Town Times

SATURDAY DANCE August 28th • 8 p.m.-1 a.m. in the ballroom of the

Farmington Hotel 15 Farm Springs Rd., Farmington 06032 1170936

(Exit 37/Fienemann Rd. off I-84)

“for SINGLES only ...” dances Info: (860) 633-0600 • 1-800-824-3083 www.singlesdances.com (inc. map)

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See Ice Cream, page 36

P O S T M A S T E R: Send address changes to Town Times, P.O. Box 265, Middlefield, CT 06455.

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USPS 021-924 Published weekly by Record-Journal Publishing Co., d/b/a Town Times, P.O. Box 265, Middlefield, CT 06455. Periodicals Postage Paid at Middlefield, CT and at additional mailing offices.

Submitted photo

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They even met Ronnie James Dio of Black Saabath in his dressing room after a concert where they shared a bottle of wine and 80 Licks ice cream. “Ronnie, the ice cream people are here!” Jill remembers hearing upon their entrance to Dio’s room. When asked what thrills them more, ice cream or music, the response is: “Music is the passion; Ice cream is the vehicle, and everybody loves both. All these artists are getting older, and we want to help carry on their legacy — immortalize them in sugar and cream,” explained Jill. John added that the goal for this fall and winter is to solicit partners and connections to take 80 Licks to the

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Jill B Colon and Johnny Kniejzneski can’t find the exact words to describe their ice cream facility, 80 Licks Ice Cream, on Parsons Lane in Durham. It’s not a mass-producing factory, rather a handcrafted, small-scale, microcreamery artisan shop. At least when it comes to describing what sets them apart from other ice cream makers, they’ve got it nailed: they’re a gourmet ice cream shop featuring flavors that reflect rock ‘n roll artists and songs. When Jill met Johnny in 2003 through their shared love of rock ‘n roll, all Johnny talked about was reviving his earlier days of owning an ice cream place. Then one evening after a Kid Rock concert, Jill reached for a pint of Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream while they bantered about the “music of today.” Jill eventually told Johnny he had better watch out or she would open her own ice cream shop with all rock ‘n roll flavors and “Kid Rocky Road” would be the first. The next thing they knew, they had come up with nearly three pages of flavors, such as “Metallica Chip.” “Then we were like, ‘Now what do we do?’” said Jill. They investigated how to make ice cream and looked into equipment, and one by one things fell into place. In 2005, 80 Licks opened in Portland where customers were greeted by Elvis (alright, it was a life-size statue). But much to the shop owners’ thrill, the real-life Dee Snider from Twisted Sister made a guest appearance once for their homemade ice cream. “We wanted top shelf gourmet — all the decadence of a rock star — so we use the highest butter fat and least amount of air,” said Jill, who makes the ice cream. The most popular flavor they make is “Oreo Speedwagon” (get it? REO Speedwagon!), which is really Cookies and Cream. They also make dog ice cream, “Nikki’s Lixx,” named after their dog Nikki who is named after Motley

Crue’s Nikki Six. The sweet treat is a creation of local yogurt with honey, bananas, peanut butter, pumpkin, etc. While all was good and fun, there were limits on time and space at the Portland location. Today, that shop is closed but 80 Licks is open in Durham where the pair makes ice cream, distributes to 15 to 20 locations and does special orders for pick-up. Eventually, they would like to open up another shop for patrons by popular demand, but that’s where the really cool part about Jill and Johnny’s story comes in. Jill and Johnny have taken their ice cream backstage at concerts where stars like Motley Crue, Heaven and Hell (Black Saabath minus Ozzy), Kenny Chesney and Charlie Daniels, who requested the flavor “Southern Pecans’ Gonna do it Again,” have indulged in their treats.

Jill and Johnny with superstar Charlie Daniels, enjoying 80 Licks.

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Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

Farm to Dinner event at Starlight Gardens in Durham

On Sunday, Aug. 29, at 6 p.m., Starlight Gardens and Max Restaurant Group team up to bring you an all-organic “Chef to Farm Dinner.” The Chef to Farm Dinner Series is an opportunity for guests to enjoy the freshest foods and produce amidst the beauty of Starlight Gardens. “Programs like this are catching on,” said David Zemelsky of Starlight Gardens. “It’s a way for people to

feel more connected to who’s growing their food.” The menu at the dinner, created by Executive Chef Scott Miller from Max Oyster Bar in West Hartford, will feature only organic products, with a heavy emphasis on vegetables from Starlight Gardens in Durham. “Most dinners (in the Chef to Farm Dinner program), ours included, source as much food as possible from

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the farmer, like potatoes, onions and eggplants,” said Zemelsky. “Our big emphasis this year is heirloom tomatoes, so Scott will do a lot of cooking with those.” Zemelsky said Max Restaurant Group is probably the most progressive business in terms of working with farmers in the state to source locally. His wife Ty added that the chef is “extremely creative and will un-

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doubtedly utilize our vegetables in amazing ways.” Starlight Gardens has five greenhouses in Durham and an adjacent field, where guests will be served dinner “at real tables with real knives and forks,” said Zemelsky, noting that this is not a paper plate affair. All of their farm products are certified organic and use organic fertilizers such as green manures, compost and alfalfa meal. There is no pest management system because there aren’t many pests, but there is a gauze-like cover to protect some of the vegetables. The multiple course dinner will include local wines

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Tickets will not be mailed; your name will be at the farm when you arrive. Star Light Gardens is located at 54 Fowler Avenue in Durham. (additional reporting by Stephanie Wilcox)

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and specialty beverages. There will also be musical entertainment by the local bluegrass band, Poxy Nave, who’s members work for the Zemelskys. There is limited seating available, and seats are $95 plus tax and gratuity. Please call 860-522-9806, ext.15 or visit http://www.maxdiningcard.com/store.php?StoreLe vel=3&productid=1203 to buy tickets.

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Town Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

7

Summer fun and future plans at Camp Farnam in Durham From Camp Farnam director Michael Doyle: We had 15 families sign up for the Family Swim at Camp Farnam in Durham this summer, and we hope to expand on that program next summer. The morning adult lap, from 6 to 8 a.m. Monday through Friday, had eight dedicated morning participants, and this program will likely run into early fall. Across the board, families praised the new swim program. Many families commented on the low cost

and convenience, as well as the beautiful, peaceful setting. Professional lifeguard staffing was provided during all the swim programs. The Durham Travel Basketball Club also ran a program at Camp Farnam this summer called Sunset Hoops, which taught drills and fundamentals to our upand-coming future basketball stars. The participation in this summer’s program was the highest turnout in our three-year program. Looking ahead, there will be a FREE Community Pic-

nic this Sunday, Aug. 29, sponsored by the Coginchaug Valley Education Foundation from 4 – 8 p.m. Please come out and join us at Camp Farnam.

Top right photo, due to rainy conditions last Monday, the pool was empty during Family Swim; but on a beautiful day last summer, this photo, right, was taken of kids enjoying the pool.

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8

Opinion Page

Friday, August 27, 2010

Honoring the 90th anniversary of women’s right to vote Town Times 488 Main St., P.O. Box 265, Middlefield, CT 06455 http://www.towntimes.com News Advertising Fax Marketplace

860-349-8000 860-349-8026 860-349-8027 877-238-1953

news@towntimes.com advertising@towntimes.com (toll-free)

Town Times is published every Friday by the Record-Journal Publishing Co. and is delivered to all homes and businesses in Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall. Sue VanDerzee, Editor Stephanie Wilcox, Reporter Brian Monroe, Advertising Director Joy Boone, Advertising Sales Wendy Parker, Office Manager Contributors: Tori Piscatelli, Chuck Corley, John Esposito, Steven Tyc.

Seneca Falls, New York, in It’s remarkable to think Stephanie Wilcox 1848 where delegates gaththat this time last century, ered for a Women’s Rights females were considered unConvention. Into the 20th fit for politics. Thankfully, century, attempts to amend too many courageous women the U.S. Constitution hit a and men did not agree that roadblock of conservative an American had to be male to have a say in the democracy, and we have Southern senators. As the only way around it, the women suffragists decided to win the these folks to thank for giving women the vote by amending every single state constiright to vote. tution. One. By. One. We hear all the time how Americans President Woodrow Wilson helped push must exercise their right to vote, but I wonthe amendment through and states slowly der how many of us are actually proud of started ratifying, but only one state needed that right and how many of us take it for was left. And it wouldn’t budge. Tennessee granted. It was August 26, 1920 — 90 years faced vigorous opposition from the liquor ago — that these words were written into industry, which was sure if women could law as the 19th Amendment to the Constituvote, they’d use the right to pass Prohibition: “The right of citizens of the United tion. States to vote shall not be denied or Thanks to Harry Burn, or rather his abridged by the United States or by any mother, who swayed her 24-year-old son, State on account of sex.” the youngest member of the House in TenThese are powerful words that weren’t nessee, in a letter to vote “yes” on August easy to get in writing. The suffrage movement made slow progress since it began in

Guest Editorial

See Vote, page 36

Letters to the Editor Letters policy The Town Times intends to present a forum for the lively exchange of ideas and issues. To facilitate the publication of your contributions, several guidelines should be followed. Letters to the editor must be signed, with a phone number included. The writer will be called to confirm authorship. No anonymous letters will be printed. Contributions by any individual or group will not be published more frequently than once a month. Every effort will be made to print all letters received. However, the selection and date of publication will be at the discretion of the editor. Finally, the opinions expressed by our letter writers are not necessarily those of this newspaper. Deadline: Tuesday noon for Friday publication.

We’re on the Web: www.towntimes.com Send your letters to news@towntimes.com

Special election letter rules In order to allow the largest number of citizens to express their opinions on the upcoming elections, we set a few special election season letter rules. Number one, the deadline for election letters will be Monday at 5 p.m. Number two, election letters will be limited to 250 words. Also, in order to allow as many people as possible to weigh in, we will not print letters that have already been printed in another publication. For the last week before elections (deadline Oct. 22), only positive letters of support will be accepted. Of course, only signed letters with phone numbers, so we can verify authorship, will be accepted.

It’s not a mosque, it’s not at Ground Zero A lot of controversy has been stirring about Obama’s approval of the so-called ‘Ground Zero Mosque’ that is in the process of creation. I’ve read and heard things so extreme as the ‘mosque’ would be a training ground for terrorists and a “tribute to medieval Islam subjugation of the west”. Simply put, those that believe this proposed site is a mosque are extremely misguided. The fact is that there IS no mosque. Keith Olbermann recently dedicated part of his show to explaining all the facts of the issue and the resulting video has become a YouTube sensation in a very short amount of time. The fact is that the new building will be an Islamic community center, not a mosque. Located at 45 Park Place in Manhattan, the new center will be open for everyone’s use and will include basketball courts and a culinary school. The top two floors of the 13-story center will be used for prayer. An Islamic

mosque is a center in which only prayer is allowed to be exercised…so clearly this is not a mosque. Additionally, the center is located approximately two blocks from Ground Zero. Saying that the center is located on Ground Zero is completely incorrect. I strongly encourage everyone, regardless of your political intuition, to go onto YouTube and watch this video. The video is full of facts about the new community center, including information directly from the building contractor. You can find it by typing in ‘There is no Ground Zero Mosque’ into the ‘Search’ bar on the YouTube site. It is not my objective in this article to force my own political ideas onto the reader. The goal of this letter is to encourage you to educate yourselves before forming your opinion and to not believe everything you hear. The mainstream media/radical politicians can sometimes act very quickly to twist a story around to inject fear into the reader/listener. My only advice is that you educate yourself before you take a stance on an issue. Zach Martowski, Durham

Ensure our fiscal future After two years of a struggling economy, the people of the 100th House district, Middlefield, Durham and Middletown, are more than ready for a state representative at the capitol who will be a fiscal conservative and end the budget madness. That person is john Szewczyk. John Szewczyk is on record for holding the line on spending. He believes we cannot continue to spend, spend, spend. He knows we cannot mortgage the future of our children and grandchildren. I feel the same way. I do not want the state to borrow any more money just to balance the budget. I want a state rep who will hold the line on spending and know how to set priorities for spending. John Szewczyk is the state rep I want for our district. Please, let’s ensure our fiscal future. Join me is supporting John Szewczyk this November. Mark Laudano, Durham


Town Times Columns

Friday, August 27, 2010

9

New school year, new questions Death of the mortgage broker great ideas and enIt’s almost the end Andre Hauser, thusiasm come in to of August, and the CRHS Principal plan our freshman long, lazy days of orientation. They all summer are drawing came with a few to a close. But wait a questions on their minute … we’re alminds, and here is a ready pretty busy bit of what they here at Coginchaug. Our graduated seniors have left us wanted to know. What about the rumors we are for college, and the rest of our students have one more week of sum- hearing about homeroom? We have mer vacation, but that doesn’t mean been hard at work developing a new curriculum and interesting activithe school has been resting. Just like they do every summer, our ties for homeroom, and we have custodial staff has been busy washing, some initial changes ready that will waxing or repairing everything in hopefully make it more interesting sight. Our school secretaries have and relevant for everyone. I can’t been just as busy doing all of the be- promise that homeroom will be perhind-the-scenes work it takes to make fect on Day 1, but I can promise that the start of the school year look effort- we will keep looking for new ideas less. There is also the steady stream of and suggestions from students and teachers, many of them with their kids teachers until we have something in tow, coming in to update curricu- that really works well. Who’s new in the teaching ranks lum and prepare their classrooms and lessons for the students they will be this fall? For starters, Brian Bodner recently replaced me in the assistant seeing again soon. Then there is the small army of principal position. And most of our construction workers tearing up and “new faces” in the faculty are alreplacing the track, field and tennis ready familiar to the students. Jeancourts. Most mornings this summer nie Rodriguez, Spanish teacher from I have started the day with a game of Strong, is joining our World Lanconstruction I-Spy: Was that hole guage department, and former longthere yesterday? What happened to term subs Douglas Frasier, math, the big trench that was running Michelle McClintick, English and across the driveway? How many Amy Jacques-Purdy, history, have been hired to fill open positions. back-hoes are here today? And of course, there are the kids Matthew Taber will be joining the who keep stopping by the school. A science department, and special eduhigh school is a pretty quiet place in cation teacher Melissa GonzalezJuly, but it really comes back to life Moreno has moved to the high in August. Although freshman ori- school from Memorial. What other new ideas are in the entation will have come and gone by the time this column gets printed, I works? Parents will be getting the wrote it a week earlier. We filled the morning announcements e-mailed office on Monday with volleyball home this fall. We need e-mail adplayers who stopped in to meet the dresses to do this, so if we don’t have new assistant principal during a yours yet, send it our way. We also break from their clinic, but who end- plan to update the website more freed up staying to visit for most of quently, including pictures of stutheir lunch break. A few days later, we had a crew of students full of See School, next page

A View From District 13

Suzio and Davenport qualify for public financing The Elections Enforcement Commission recently certified that Len Suzio and Lisa Davenport, Republican candidates for state Senate in Connecticut’s 13 and 12th Senatorial Districts have qualified for public campaign financing. Suzio has raised a total of $15,694.34 – most of it ($9,100) from 365 residents of Cheshire, Meriden, Middlefield and Middletown and 130 residents outside the district. As a result, he will receive $88,400 dollars from the Citizens Election Fund to

communicate with voters between now and Election Day. Davenport has raised a total of $15,978 – most of it ($12,710) from 350 residents of Branford, Durham, Guilford, Killingworth, Madison and North Branford. As a result, she will receive $87,800 dollars from the Citizens Election Fund to communicate with voters between now and Election Day. Under Connecticut’s campaign fiSee Campaign, next page

As a longtime owner Kirk and operator of Fairground Mortgage Company Inc. on Main Street in Durham, it was not an easy decision to close my mortgage company after more than 11 incredibly successful years of operation. I am sincerely thankful for the many new relationships and the opportunity to help literally thousands of people in the area buy and refinance homes at highly competitive rates. I am proud to report that in that time, Fairground Mortgage had a perfect customer service record with the Better Business Bureau and Department of Banking; not a single complaint. This is not an insignificant accomplishment in a business as controversial as mortgage lending. In fact, the BBB actually referred business to our company as one of just a handful with such a record. Through hard work and perseverance, Fairground Mortgage provided me and my employees with a good income, and allowed my wife Sheila and I to totally renovate a historic Main Street landmark, enhancing the Historic District’s row of fine, old buildings. We lived in the home for six years while I worked toward building a business that would always be there for me … or would it? The mortgage crisis, which started sometime in 2007 and intensified as the recession wore on, has permanently changed the financial landscape in America, impacting millions of lives. While the finger-pointing continues, legislators draft thousands of pages of legislation which is intended to make sure that a crisis like this never happens again. There is no question that greed played an enormous role at all levels, from the street level loan originator to the most well-heeled bankers on Wall Street and at Fannie Mae. Easy mortgage money created a vast amount of wealth for an industry at a time when everything seemed to be going right. And then the bottom dropped out. Sub-prime mortgage products, which had been developed with little regard for the long term security of borrowers and investors, began to

unravel as the incessant spiral of real estate depreciation and mortgage defaults spun wildly out of control. Even today, as approximately one in seven mortgages nationwide is in some stage of default, the crisis is far from over. A new wave of foreclosures looms, at least one in five Americans are under water, owing more than their homes are worth. Somebody had to be blamed; somebody had to pay the price. Politicians, in an effort to “do something” about the crisis, began to “fix” the problems. New laws prohibited mortgage brokers from ordering real estate appraisals or even speaking to an appraiser during a transaction. Other laws were written, limiting the compensation that a mortgage broker could make; HUD created piles of new disclosures with strict regulation; reporting and disclosure requirements mushroomed, overwhelming small mortgage offices. Slowly, public opinion was turned against the mortgage broker. Certainly they knew better. Ironically, a broker had to constantly walk the line between delivering enough business to their suppliers (wholesalers) to stay in their good graces, while rejecting risky business for due cause. Before long, wholesale suppliers smelled blood. What had once been their most profitable conduit for business was also standing in their way of even bigger potential profits. Brokers discerned that the banks were now trying to eliminate them permanently from the lending landscape. One by one, wholesalers began to halt wholesale operations, focusing instead on developing their own retail businesses once again. It would be the best thing for the nation … allow the banks to control lending, and greed would disappear! Now, the weakest of the brokers and mortgage company loan officers who could not pass the difficult, new tests simply went to work for the banks, where testing and education were not required and where the

Hagert

Guest Column

See Mortgage Broker next page

Web update By press time, 23 people answered our poll, Are you planning to enter something into the Durham Fair? Forty eight percent said No, 17 percent said Maybe and 35 percent said Yes. For those who answered Yes, turn to page 24 in this issue to see the entry form and exhibit deadlines. Go to www.towntimes.com to answer next week’s poll question.


Town Times

10

School

(Continued from page 9)

dents in all sorts of school activities, so make sure to check it often once the school year starts. Of course, these are just the tip of the iceberg as we keep moving into the future at CRHS, so stay tuned for more exciting updates here and on the school website throughout the year. How will the building project affect student parking? The project isn’t expected to be complete until sometime in the late fall, so it will impact parking at the start of the school year. Our solution for temporary parking is students who drive to school will park on the lawn next to the varsity softball field direcly across the

street from the high school. This is right next to Korn School. What is happening with the dress code? I’m not sure how this rumor got started, but no, we are not changing the dress code. Students can still wear shorts and tee-shirts if they want to, but how about a return to the “Sport Coat Tuesday� trend of a few years ago? So there you have it; short answers to a few of the big questions on students’ minds this August. Now enjoy those last few precious days of summer vacation, and we’ll see you all on opening day!

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new regulations did not apply. The downturn in housing sales forced many small mortgage companies to cut staff, while reporting and disclosure requirements increased dramatically. Mortgage brokers had no choice but to merge with larger players, quit entirely or be steamrolled. They closed their businesses in droves starting in 2007. Suddenly, banks did not have to compete with the broker, which in 2006 had commanded nearly 70 percent of the national mortgage market share. Broker market share dropped to an incredible 10 percent in just three years. Then a very predictable thing happened. Mortgage origination profits in the banking industry began to rise dramatically. Because there was no longer competitive pressure from reputable (or not so reputable) brokers, banks could

(Continued from page 9) price their mortgages with wider margins (it’s OK, the customer happily paid, and endured often terrible customer service at the hands of the mega-banks). Year over year, the amount of closing costs charged to the consumer have increased 37 percent; an enormous increase, resulting from increased legislation and regulation, as well as the elimination of competition from mortgage brokers. This is not meant to be a cynical diatribe by just another “mortgage broker casualty.� This loan officer/author continues to write a steady stream of business and is committed to the industry for the long haul. It is intended to be an admonishment to any local business person who will listen. We need to take care of each other in our communities. We should run our businesses without reproach,

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striving to offer customer service that only a small town business person can offer. Small businesses need to survive by providing something that mega-businesses cannot and will not ever offer. My plea to the small town entrepreneur is to stay focused on what really matters ‌ conducting one’s business in the most morally upright and competitive way to ensure a steady stream of business for years to come. Your survival depends upon it. Your future depends upon it. If you forget, you’ll wake up one day to find that someone has taken it all away. Kirk Hagert is now a Sr. Mortgage Advisor with Northpoint Mortgage Co., a regional provider of mortgages with local offices in Rocky Hill.

Campaign (Continued from page 9)

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Friday, August 27, 2010

nance law, a candidate for state Senate must raise at least $15,000 and receive donations from 300 district residents in order to qualify for public financing. Suzio is among the fastest 15 senate candidates to have qualified this year. “This is an important milestone for our campaign,� said Suzio. “The volunteers and supporters participating in this campaign are motivated by the goal of changing the business-asusual approach in Hartford. They identify with our message of a smaller, more accountable state government and they want to make sure that entrenched Democrats like Tom Gaffey are held responsible for their abysmal record of job losses, high taxes, record deficits and out-ofcontrol government spending. We now have the resources to compete and to make a real difference.�

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Davenport recently launched her blog, Lisa’s Listening, where followers can see what neighbors have been telling her on the campaign trail.

Celebrating our 19th Season!

“Hartford politicians have become out of touch with the concerns of our local communities,� she said.


Town Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

Lyman Orchards Corn Maze

11

Summer (Continued from page 1)

Photos taken from the air to capture the entire corn maze at Lyman Orchards. Top, view from a distance. Bottom, up close. Look closely: can you see this year’s theme? Find out when the maze opens Sept. 4 through Oct. 31. Visit www.lymanorchards.com for more info. Photos by Bill Currlin

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Town Times wants to say a special thank you to our interns Tori Piscatelli and Joe Adinolfi for helping out this summer. Good luck going back to school!

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just a day with my mom. Clinton Crossings is a fun way to be outside and shop, and it can even become a day trip! The outlets are full of great deals and sales, so you can almost always come back home with something new. Although the boys might not be happy being dragged to go, shopping with mom is always a good way to get ready for the new school year, but still have some summer fun. There are so many great places to visit in the summer Above, intern Tori Piscatelli with her mom, aunt and in Connecticut that the list can go on and on. Just think cousin after a day of back-to-school shopping. of something you want to do or somewhere you want to go, CARPET SALE NEW FOR SEPT. and do it. There’s still time SAVE 10% OFF 2010! this summer to go out and go Your entire order of Carpet, mini-golfing, or to your faEARLY DROP OFF AND Pad & Installation vorite restaurant, or on a day EXTENDED DAY OPTIONS • Select styles only trip with mom to get ready • Minimum 40 sq. yd. order for school. Enjoy the rest of Grace Lutheran Preschool • Sale ends 9/25/10 summer! 1055 Randolph Rd

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Town Times Arts

12

Friday, August 27, 2010

Concert Association Middlesex Dancers in New Hampshire Middletown The Greater Middletown The two-opera series will On Aug. 2 and 3, dancers from the Middlesex Dance Center in Middlefield, with director ToniLynn Miles, traveled to Nashua, New Hampshire, to attend the Northeast workshop for dancers. The group participated in 13 hours of dance classes over two days in both technique and choreography in ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical and hip-hop. Instructors included Debbi Dee and Keith Clifton as well as LA’s Darryl Retter, Dena Rizzo, Mary Price-Boday and Bill DeRicco. Joan Lather presented high-energy hip hop classes and recognized Monika Malek for her enthusiasm during class. Monika Malek and Gina DeSimone, both 16, from Durham, have been studying at MDC for 12 years. Kayla Keathley and Meghan St. Amand, from Rockfall, have been MDC Dancers for 10 years. Abbey Girasuolo, Kayleigh Crocetto and Brianna Gasior have been at the Middlesex Dance Center nine, eight and seven years respectively. Pictured, from left are Brianna Gasior, Kayleigh Crocetto, Meghan St. Amand, Gina DeSimone, Abbey Girasuolo, Monika Malek and Kayla Keathley.

Concert Association has announced its upcoming 2010-11 season of six outstanding performances, which includes a three-concert series, a twoopera series and a special holiday Albano’s Nutcracker ballet. The season will begin on Saturday evening, Sept. 25, with Hollywood Live, filled with songs Hollywood made famous. A second series concert in February will feature the Collage International Dance Ensemble of 15, performing traditional and choreographed dances of many countries, and in May a third series concert will feature the well-known Chamber Music PLUS Southwest’s ClarkSchuldmann Duo, returning to Connecticut after having relocated to Arizona in 2008.

Photo submitted by Toni-Lynn Miles

include Mozart’s delightful The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflote) in November and the dramatic Italian opera Tosca by Puccini in May. Both are co-presented by the Connecticut Lyric Opera and the Connecticut Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Adrian Sylveen, artistic director. English subtitles are projected above the stage. Albano’s Nutcracker ballet for young and old will welcome in the holiday season on Saturday, Nov. 27, at 3 p.m. All six performances will be at the new MHS Performing Arts Center in Middletown. For series subscriptions or single tickets, call 860-347-4887 or 860-346-3369 or visit www.greatermiddletownconcerts.org.

Do you like to sing? The Middlesex Hospital Vocal Chords will resume their weekly rehearsals on Tuesday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m. at the Rev. Msgr. M. Davitt Fox Parish Center, St. Francis Church, Elm Street in Middletown. There are no resident restrictions, and you do not need to be a hospital employee. Call 860-342-3120 for more information. No auditions are necessary, and new members will be accepted until Sept. 21. Check for information at www.VocalChords20.org. 1161087

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Durham Town Briefs

Friday, August 27, 2010

Route 68 work On Aug. 28, the milling of Route 68 from Wallingford to Route 17 begins, and on Aug. 30, paving begins. Work is expected to finish Sept. 8. During the project, one lane will be open during the working hours of 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be no work done on Labor day. School buses will be given special attention similar to ambulances.

Special town meeting

Vote audit

Durham Government Calendar

The Secretary of State’s office has selected Durham for a scheduled audit of the computerized voting equipment from the political primary held on Aug. 10. The audit will be conducted on Sept. 7 at 9:30 a.m. on the third floor of Town Hall and is open to the public. Connecticut is the only state with an independent audit of its voting equipment, helping ensure a fair, legal and constitutional election process. For more information, call the registrar at 860-349-3453.

(All meetings will be held at the Durham Library unless otherwise noted. Check the town Web page at www.townofdurhamct.org for updates.) Tuesday, August 31 7 p.m. — Ethics Commission Wednesday, September 1 7:30 p.m. — Planning and Zoning Commission Tuesday, September 7 6:30 p.m. — Public Safety Committee 7:30 p.m. — Midstate Regional Planning, 100 DeKoven Dr. in Middletown 7 to 8:30 p.m. — Board of Assessment Appeals Wednesday, September 8 7 to 8:30 p.m. — Board of Assessment Appeals Monday, September 13 7 p.m. — Board of Selectmen at Town Hall 7:30 p.m. — Inland Wetlands and Watercourses

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At a special town meeting on August 23, residents voted to approve four transfers that were recommended by the Board of Finance . The first was the transfer of $20,363 from Contingency to Building and Health Town Engineer Consultants in 2009-10 fiscal year. First Selectman Laura Francis said most of the money relates to the Maiden Lane project. The second item approved was the transfer of $33,844 from Contingency to Tax Refunds in 2009-10 fiscal year.

Though tax refunds are not budgeted for during the normal budget process, for various reasons there are times refunds need to be made to taxpayers. The third item was the transfer of $42,869.62 from Reserve for Highway Equipment to Capital Equipment Lease in 2010-11 fiscal year. According to Francis, this was budgeted for and the money was placed into a reserve account for a Freightliner Cab with Tenco body. Finally, to transfer $23,050 from Undesignated Fund Balance to Summer Intern Salaries and $2,638 to Grant Program in 2010-11 fiscal year. The grants were from Workforce Alliance to provide summer employment as part of their Youth@Work program. (From minutes/Stephanie Wilcox)

13

DMIAAB closed The transfer station will be closed on Monday, Sept. 6 for Labor day, but open on Tuesday, Sept. 7, from 8 a.m. to 7:45 p.m.

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Middlefield Town Briefs

14

Middlefield Government Calendar (Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings are held in the Community Center.) Tuesday, August 24 7 p.m. — Zoning Board of Appeals Thursday, September 2 7 p.m. — Economic Development Commission Monday, September 6 7 p.m. — Board of Selectmen Tuesday, September 7 7 p.m. — Levi E. Coe Library Association at the library 7:30 p.m. — Midstate Planning, 100 DeKoven Dr., Middletown Wednesday, September 8 6:30 p.m. — Planning and Zoning 7 p.m. — Water Pollution Control Authority Wednesday, September 15 7 p.m. — Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Agency 7:30 p.m. — Board of Education at Lyman School Thursday, September 16 7 p.m. — Board of Finance 7 p.m. — DMIAAB at Durham Library

We’re on the Web at www.TownTimes.com Send your news and information to News@towntimes.com

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BOF supports street light removal Meeting on Aug. 19, the Board of Finance held a lengthy discussion with the first selectman, Jon Brayshaw, about the removal of street lights throughout town. Since eliminating 43 street lights, Brayshaw has received 10 complaints about their removal, with most people worried about home safety instead of road safety. While Brayshaw was mostly updating the board on what was happening with the street light removal, they also discussed some possible solutions for informing people about the light removal. One suggestion was that the town could tie a ribbon around any street lights that are due for removal. Finance board member Lucy Petrella also suggested that Brayshaw could write an article explaining the process used by town officials to decide which lights should be removed. While home secu-

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was the reason for the exceptions in both cases. As home security was the main complaint from residents, board chairman Rebecca Adams added that the regular police presence in town should be enough to cover any security needs. Beyond the complaints, however, Brayshaw also reported that the town has benefited from a noticeable difference in its electric bill. He attributed it partly to the removal of street lights, but also to the town’s recent change to a greener energy company. He has also received several “It’s about time� comments with regard to the street light removals. Other business Brayshaw updated the board on the state of MIRMA, an insurance provider. He mentioned that MIRMA is still trying to obtain money from various former client towns, but that the finance director is currently taking a low key approach to the insurance company, rather than directly confronting them about the $66,000 charge to the town. Middlefield may still need to settle with MIRMA, but Adams reported that the matter is primarily in the hands of the state right now. Looking to the future, Brayshaw felt that the town needs to turn its attention to its infrastructure in coming budgets, particularly the town’s roads and guardrails. He stated that simply chip

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rity was one concern for residents, Brayshaw reported that some residents felt “singled out.� Petrella felt that the feeling of being singled out could be alleviated by explaining how the various town departments, such as the fire department and police department, worked together to create a list of lights that the town could do without. Board member Jeremy Renninghoff suggested that some lights might not need to be removed and instead have their wattage reduced. While many of the lights along Main Street are scheduled for removal, many of the lights also use 100 watt bulbs. Some of these lights could be reduced to 70 watt bulbs. However, the board stressed that not too many exceptions should be made to the street light removal plan. All the same, at least one street light was kept on Powder Hill Road after further review by the board. Another light may remain as it is by a bus stop, where it is important for cars to see children waiting for the school bus. However, road safety

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Back to School

Friday, August 27, 2010

15 CRHS 860-349-7215 Strong School 860-349-7222 Memorial School 860-349-7235 Korn School 860-349-7210 John Lyman School 860-349-7240

During John Lyman School’s kindergarten bus ride, one mother said her son, Alex Fang, has been talking about riding the bus for the last few days. Another mom said her daughter, Tatum Hultgren, said, “This is the most exciting day of my life.” Photo above, this kindergartener seems just as excited. Right, the faces say it all: “Here we go! This is it.” And photo top right, the bus returns to Lyman School with students who are now ready for the start of school on Sept. 2.

Brewster School 860-349-7227 TEMS 203-639-8403 Vinal 860-344-7100

Photos by Stephanie Wilcox

District 13 Morning Bus Routes by School D indicates Durham, MMiddlefield and R-Rockfall

Brewster pre-K BUS NUMBER 24 19 Sunrise Ridge R 8 am 172 Main St. M 8:06 am 75 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:08 am 324 Jackson Hill Rd. M 8:11 am 15 Stowe St. M 8:12 am 255 Foot Hills Rd. D 8:25 am 65 Wildwood Ln. D 8:39 am Dolphin Days Daycare - 21 Ozick Dr. D 8:46 am Brewster School 8:50 am

Lyman School BUS NUMBER 1 140 Main St. R 7:58 am 130 Main St. R 7:58 am 133 Ross Rd. R 8:03 am Crnr Wildwood-Ross Rd. R 8:03 am 71 Ross Rd. R 8:04 am Crnr Spring St. R and Sunrise Ridge R 8:05 am Crnr Spring St. R and Peters Ln R 8:06 am 145 Peters Ln R 8:07 am 82 Cedar St. R 8:08 am Crnr Jackson Hill Rd. M and Oxford Dr. 8:09 am 80 Jackson Hill Rd. M 8:10 am Crnr Harvest Wood Rd. M and Sylvan Ridge 8:13 am 97 Harvest Wood Rd. M 8:14 am 33 School St. M 8:23 am 40 Maryland Dr. M 8:24 am 2 Valley Heights Dr. M 8:28 am 9 Maryland Dr. M 8:30 am

58 Valley View Dr. M 8:33 am 181 Jackson Hill Rd. M 8:34 am 405 Jackson Hill Rd. M 8:37 am 57 Mack Rd. M 8:38 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 2 575 Main St. M 8:00 am 36 Elihu Rd. M 8:07 am 188 Skeet Club Rd. D 8:08 am 114 Skeet Club Rd. D 8:09 am Crnr Powder Hill Rd. and Turkey Hill Rd. D 8:10 am 500 Powder Hill Rd. D 8:10 am 475 Powder Hill Rd. D 8:11 am 433/436 Powder Hill Rd. D 8:11 am 410 Powder Hill Rd. D 8:12 am 371 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:13 am 142 Powder Hill Road M 8:15 am 54 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:17 am 27 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:17 am 320 Baileyville Rd. M 8:19 am 359 Baileyville Rd. M 8:22 am Crnr Lake Shore Dr. and Pawnee Rd. at Beach Lot 8:25 am Crnr Baileyville Rd.and Rosemary Ln/Elem M 8:28 am 43 High St. M 8:29 am 76 Way Rd. On Chestnut Hill Rd. M 8:31 am Crnr Burt Dr. M and Louis Rd. M 8:31 am 64 Toad Ridge Rd. M 8:37 am 41 Toad Ridge Rd. M 8:38 am Crnr Dwight Dr. M and Chestnut Hill Rd. M 8:39 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 3 34 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:55 am 80 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:56 am 88 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:56 am

Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Stefanie Dr. D 7:56 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Old Yankee Way D 7:58 am Crnr Carriage Dr. D and Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:59 am Crnr Maiden Ln D and Weathervane Hill D 8:00 am 360 Maiden Ln D 8:01 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Sumner Woods 8:05 am 238 Foot Hills Rd. D 8:07 am 229 Foot Hills Rd. D 8:07 am 118 Foot Hills Rd. D 8:09 am 571 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 8:11 am 509 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 8:12 am Crnr Winterberry Ln D and Arbutus St. D 8:17 am 403 Maiden Ln D 8:20 am 277 Maiden Ln D 8:21 am 95 Wheeler Hill Dr. D 8:27 am 103 Wheeler Hill Dr. D 8:27 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 6 133 Stagecoach Rd. D 8:00 am 167 Stagecoach Rd. D 8:00 am Crnr Stagecoach and Erica Ct D 8:03 am 62 Barbara Ln D 8:07 am 966 New Haven Rd. D 8:09 am 770 New Haven Rd. D 8:10 am 58 Canterbury Dr. D 8:16 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Old Washington Tr D 8:17 am Crnr Howd Rd. D and Patterson Ln D 8:18 am 176 Howd Rd. D 8:19 am Crnr Howd Rd. D And Side Hill Rd. 8:20 am 67 Pleasant Ter D 8:22 am

84 Pleasant Ter D 8:26 am 170 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 8:27 am 109 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 8:28 am Crnr Tri-Mountain Rd. and Augur Ln D 8:28 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 7 274 Jackson Hill Rd. M 7:55 am 266 Jackson Hill Rd. M 7:55 am 53 Cedar St. R 7:57 am 19 Cedar St. R 7:58 am 35 Derby Rd. R 7:59 am Crnr Main St. and Aresco Dr. M 8:00 am 301 Main St. M 8:00 am 43 High Meadow La M 8:06 am 59 High Meadow La M 8:12 am Crnr Strickland Rd.and Cherry Ridge M 8:14 am 51 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:18 am 75 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:19 am Crnr Of Cherry Hill Rd. M and Garden Hill Rd. 8:20 am Crnr Of Cherry Hill Rd. M and Greenview M 8:21 am 22 Day School Dr. M 8:25 am 28 Hubbard St. M 8:30 am 62 Hubbard St. M 8:30 am 68 Hubbard St. M 8:31 am 22 Whisper Winds Rd. M 8:31 am 82 Whisper Winds Rd. M 8:32 am 25 Rosemary Ct M 8:34 am 134 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:35 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 11 287 Higganum Rd. D 8:00 am 121/122 Higganum Rd. D 8:02 am Crnr Cherry Ln D and Hellgate Rd. D 8:04 am 99 Old Blue Hills Rd. D 8:08 am 140 Old Blue Hills Rd. D 8:09 am

Crnr Green Ln D and Pine Ledge Tr D 8:10 am 81 Green Ln D 8:11 am 76 Green Ln D 8:11 am 60 Mattabasset Dr. D 8:20 am 232 Bear Rock Rd. D 8:21 am 244 Bear Rock Rd. D 8:22 am Crnr Sycamore Dr. D and Bear Rock Rd. D 8:23 am 650 Main St. M 8:35 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 21 56 Cedar Dr. D 7:57 am 78 Cedar Dr. D 7:58 am 136 Creamery Rd. D 7:59 am 125 Creamery Rd. D 7:59 am Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Park Pl D 8:00 am Crnr Crooked Hill Rd. D and Ivy Way D 8:02 am Crnr Banta Ln D and Surrey Dr. D 8:04 am 244 Guilford Rd. D 8:07 am Crnr Indian Ln D and Boulder View Ct 8:12 am 85 Saw Mill Rd. D 8:13 am 26 Saw Mill Rd. D 8:14 am Crnr David Rd. D and Casa Ln D 8:18 am 54 Deer Run Rd. D 8:22 am Crnr Casa Ln D and Deer Run Rd. D 8:22 am 119 Wildwood Ln D 8:26 am 315 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 8:27 am Crnr Parmelee Hill Rd. and Summit Dr. D 8:28 am 37 Pent Rd. D 8:29 am Crnr Skeetfield Point M and Skeet Club Rd. D 8:33 am John Lyman School 8:40 am Continued on next page


Back to School

16 Durham

PHARMACY

BUS NUMBER 22 Dolphin Days Daycare - 21 Ozick Dr. D 8:00 am Crnr Tuttle Rd. and Clark Rd. D 8:08 am 238 Tuttle Rd. D 8:09 am 95 Tuttle Rd. D 8:11 am Crnr St. Johns’ Way and Maple Ave D 8:18 am Korn School / Basrep 8:23 am 79 Middlefield Rd. D/Doorside 8:29 am John Lyman School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 23 32 Main St. D 7:55 am 14 Southend Ave D 7:57 am 53 Sand Hill Rd. D 8:00 am Crnr Pisgah Rd. and Laurel Brook Rd. D 8:02 am Crnr Dead Hill Rd. D and Goldfinch Rd. 0642 8:04 am Crnr Shunpike Rd. D and Chalker Rd. D 8:06 am Crnr Main St. and Packing House Hill D 8:09 am 67 Royal Oak Dr. D 8:11 am Crnr Wilcox Dr. D and Austin Rd. D 8:13 am 36 Edwards Rd. D 8:15 am 102 Oak Ter D 8:18 am 47 Oak Ter D 8:20 am 11 Oak Ter D 8:22 am 464 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:24 am 40 Miller Rd. M 8:27 am 2 Pond Meadow Pl M 8:29 am 10 Pond Meadow Pl M:2 8:31 am Crnr Main St. M and Race Track Hollow M 8:33 am 4 Long Hill Rd. M 8:36 am 140 West St. M 8:38 am John Lyman School 8:40 am

Brewster/Korn

BUS NUMBER 4 324 Jackson Hill Rd. M 7:59 am 80 Jackson Hill Rd. M 8:03 am 72 School St. M 8:07 am 11 Valley Heights Dr M 8:11 am Crnr Valley Heights Dr and Sunset Ln. M 8:16 am 53 Mack Rd. M 8:19 am 19 Toad Ridge Rd. M 8:20 am 41 Toad Ridge Rd. M 8:23 am 64 Burt Dr M 8:24 am Crnr Burt Dr M and Louis Rd. M 8:25 am 139 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:27 am 410 Powder Hill Rd. D 8:29 am 427 Powder Hill Rd. D 8:29 am Crnr Powder Hill Rd. and Turkey Hill Rd. D 8:30 am 55 Clementel Dr D 8:33 am Brewster School 8:34 am 78 Maiden Ln. D 8:39 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 8 82 Cedar St. R 8 am 185 Peters Ln. R 8:01 am 139 Peters Ln. R 8:01 am 15 Ballfall Rd. M 8:04 am 136 On Ballfall Rd. M 8:04 am 53 Harvest Wood Rd. M 8:06 am

®

321 Main Street Durham, CT 349-3478

78 Harvest Wood M 8:06 am 56 Meriden Rd. M 8:07 am Crnr Spring St. R and Peters Ln. R:1 8:09 am 114 Spring St. R 8:09 am Crnr Spring St. R and Sunrise Ridge R 8:10 am Crnr Wildwood Circle Dr R and Wildwood Acres Rd. 8:11 am 137 Ross Rd. R 8:15 am 9 Derby Rd. R 8:16 am 35 Derby Rd. R 8:16 am 136 Main St. R 8:20 am 99 Main St. R 8:22 am Crnr Main St. R and Sunset Dr R 8:22 am 26 Maple St. R 8:23 am Brewster School 8:34 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 9 Crnr Main St. M and Aresco Dr M 8:06 am 339 Main St. M 8:07 am 383 Main St. M 8:07 am 35 High Meadow La M 8:10 am 40 High Meadow La M 8:14 am 53 Day School Dr M 8:22 am 238 Main St. D 8:30 am Brewster School 8:35 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 10 111 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:52 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Old Yankee Way D 7:52 am 169 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:53 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Cesca Rd. 7:53 am 204 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:54 am 249 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:54 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. D and Carriage Dr D 7:55 am 347 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:55 am 65 Johnson Ln. D 7:57 am 255 Johnson Ln. D 7:58 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Foot Hills Rd. 8 am 238 Foot Hills Rd. D 8:02 am 107 Foot Hills Rd. D 8:03 am 581 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 8:05 am 520 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 8:06 am 493 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 8:06 am 1298 Arbutus St. D 8:07 am 19 1216 Arbutus St. D 8:12 am 286 Maiden Ln. D 8:15 am 31 Mattabasset Dr D 8:21 am 227 Maiden Ln. D 8:22 am 215 Maiden Ln. D 8:23 am 70 Wheeler Hill Dr D 8:23 am 160 Daisy Ln. D 8:27 am 184 Maiden Ln. D 8:29 am Brewster School 8:34 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 12 204 Madison Rd. D 8 am 17 Sand Hill Rd. D 8:02 am 24/29 Pisgah Rd. D 8:03 am Crnr Pisgah Rd. and Laurel Brook Rd. D 8:04 am Crnr Cream Pot Rd. and Dionigi Dr D 8:10 am 35 Dionigi Dr D 8:10 am Crnr Banta Ln. D and Surrey Dr D 8:13 am

Customer Appreciation Day Sept. 11th

Crnr Crooked Hill Rd. D and Ivy Way D 8:14 am 597 Guilford Rd. D 8:15 am 83 Meeting House Hill Rd. D 8:19 am 115 Meeting House Hill Rd. D 8:19 am 7 Cedar Dr D 8:20 am 36 Cedar Dr D 8:21 am 58 Cedar Dr D 8:21 am Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Cedar Dr D 8:23 am 165 Creamery Rd. D 8:23 am 152 Creamery Rd. D 8:23 am 18 Creamery Rd. D 8:24 am 31 Main St. D 8:28 am 59 Main St. D 8:28 am Brewster School 8:34 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 13 Crnr Dinatale Dr D and Bernadette Ln. D 8 am Crnr Dinatale Dr D and Anna Ter D 8:04 am Crnr Dinatale Dr D and Gina Dr D 8:04 am 335 New Haven Rd. D 8:05 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Old Washington Tr D 8:07 am 813 New Haven Rd. D 8:08 am 13 Barbara Ln. D 8:10 am 73 Camera Rd. D 8:14 am 1060 New Haven Rd. D 8:15 am 970 New Haven Rd. D 8:16 am 64 Coe Rd. D 8:18 am 219 Stagecoach Rd. D 8:19 am 64 Wagon Wheel Rd. D 8:20 am Crnr Old Farms Rd and Wagon Wheel Rd. D 8:21 am 28 Flintlock Rd. D 8:22 am Crnr Old Farms Rd. and Buckboard Rd. D 8:23 am 163 Stagecoach Rd. D 8:24 am Crnr Stagecoach Rd. and Christian Cross. 8:25 am Crnrn Stagecoach and Erica Ct D 8:27 am 24 Schoolhouse Ln. D 8:29 am 6 Stagecoach Rd. D 8:30 am 16 Saw Mill Rd. D 8:33 am Brewster School 8:35 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 14 168 Main St. D 8:01 am 58 William Dr D 8:04 am 157 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 8:05 am 47 Ernest Dr D 8:06 am Turn Around Cul-De-Sac/ No P/U’s 8:10 am 17 Tri-Mountain Rd/Private Drive D 8:12 am 70 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 8:12 am 15 Pleasant Ter D 8:14 am Crnr Pleasant Ter D and Etzel Dr D 8:18 am Crnr Bailey Rd. D and Etzel Dr D 8:21 am 251 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 8:22 am Crnr Mauro Dr and Howd Rd. @ 5 Mauro Dr D 8:23 am 35 Mauro Dr D 8:27 am Crnr Howd Rd. D And Side Hill Rd. 8:28 am

175 Howd Rd. D 8:29 am 108 Howd Rd. D 8:30 am Crnr Howd Rd. D and Patterson Ln. D 8:30 am Last House On Howd Rd/New Haven Rd. D 8:30 am Brewster School 8:35 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 15 Crnr Wallingford Rd. and Lake Grove Driveway D 8 am 22 Pent Rd. D 8:01 am 68 Pent Rd. D 8:02 am 80 Pent Rd. D 8:02 am 321 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 8:03 am 65 Wildwood Ln. D 8:05 am 277 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 8:06 am 139 David Rd. D 8:08 am Crnr Casa Ln. D and Deer Run Rd. D 8:09 am 51 Deer Run Rd. D 8:13 am 122 David Rd. D 8:14 am 76 David Rd. D 8:15 am 34 Saw Mill Rd. D 8:17 am 541 New Haven Rd. D 8:19 am Crnr James Rd. D and James Rd. E D 8:19 am 16 Canterbury Dr D 8:29 am Crnr Indian Ln. D and Arrowhead Ct D:1 8:31 am 41 Indian Ln. D 8:31 am 319 Tuttle Rd. D 8:32 am 263 Tuttle Rd. D/Little Flock Day Care 8:33 am Crnr Tuttle Rd. and Clark Rd. D 8:33 am 176 Tuttle Rd. D 8:34 am Brewster School 8:35 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 16 178 Baileyville Rd. M 7:48 am 385 Baileyville Rd. M 7:54 am Crnr Lake Shore Dr and Pawnee Rd. at Beach 7:57 am 22 High St. M 8:02 am 130 Way Rd. M 8:04 am 26 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:05 am 32 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:06 am 76 Powder Hill Rd. M 8:07 am 83 Long Hill Rd. M 8:08 am 79 Long Hill Rd. M 8:08 am 111 West St. M 8:09 am 50 Elihu Rd. M 8:18 am 37 Elihu Rd. M 8:18 am 200 Skeet Club Rd. D 8:19 am Dolphin Days Daycare - 21 Ozick Dr D 8:26 am Crnr Clearidge Dr D and Wallingford Rd. 8:29 am Korn School 8:33 am 42 Tuttle Rd. D 8:38 am Brewster School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 17 36 Cider Mill Rd. M 7:55 am 51 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:58 am 75 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:58 am 25 Rosemary Ct M 8 am Crnr Hubbard St. M and Edgewood Ct M 8:01 am 14 Edgewood Ct M 8:03 am 40 Edgewood Ct M 8:03 am 70 Whisper Winds Rd. M 8:05 am Crnr Whisper Winds Rd. M and

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Wallace Way M 8:06 am 220 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:10 am 323 Cherry Hill Rd. M 8:11 am 11 Pond Meadow Pl M 8:17 am 148 Middlefield Rd. D 8:19 am Crnr Middlefield Rd. and Briarwood Ln. D 8:20 am 413/417 Main St. D 8:22 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr D and Ironwood Rd. D 8:24 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr and Black Walnut Dr D 8:25 am Crnr Black Walnut Dr D and Hemlock Ct D 8:25 am Brewster School 8:35 am Korn School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 18 Crnr Cherry Ln. D and Hellgate Rd. D 8:04 am Green Ln. D and Agerola Rd. D 8:08 am 67 Green Ln. D 8:08 am Crnr Old Blue Hills Rd. D and East Woods Tr D 8:10 am 207 Old Blue Hills Rd. D 8:11 am Crnr Old Blue Hills and Stephen Woods 8:11 am Crnr Shunpike Rd. D and Chalker Rd. D 8:13 am 591 Madison Rd. D 8:16 am 43 Madison Rd. / Before Rt 148 D 8:16 am 258 Blue Hills Rd. D 8:18 am 708 Higganum Rd. D 8:19 am 694 Higganum Rd. D 8:19 am 596 Higganum Rd. D 8:23 am 600 Higganum Rd. D 8:27 am Crnr Higganum Rd. D and Harvey Rd. D 8:28 am 55 Cherry Ln. D 8:29 am 19 Fowler Av D 8:30 am 227 Main St D 8:31 am Korn School 8:32 am Brewster School 8:40 am BUS NUMBER 20 21 Edwards Rd. D 8:10 am 45 Edwards Rd. D 8:11 am 12 Partridge Ln. D 8:15 am Crnr Austin Rd. D and Edwards Rd. D 8:17 am Crnr Wilcox Dr and Austin 8:18 am 108 Oak Ter D 8:19 am 73 Oak Ter D 8:19 am 51 Oak Ter D 8:20 am 254 Maple Ave D 8:22 am 230 Maple Ave D 8:22 am 200 Maple Ave D 8:23 am 172 Maple Ave D 8:24 am 179 Wallingford Rd. D 8:25 am Crnr Dunn Hill Rd. D and Brittany Dr D 8:28 am 68 Brittany Dr D 8:29 am Brewster School 8:34 am Korn School 8:40 am

Memorial TEMS BUS NUMBER 1 196 Peters Ln. R 7:25 am 145 Peters Ln. R 7:26 am Crnr Peters Ln. R and WoodContinued on next page


Back to School

Friday, August 27, 2010

Durham

PHARMACY land Hts R 7:27 am Crnr Harvest Wood Rd. R and Sylvan Ridge 7:31 am 77 Harvest Wood Rd. M 7:32 am Crnr Sunrise Ridge R and Spring St. R 7:37 am 71 Ross Rd. R 7:38 am Crnr Wildwood Cir and Ross Rd. R 7:39 am 127 Ross Rd. R 7:40 am 204 Ross Rd. R 7:41 am 26 Maple St. R 7:42 am 184 Main St. R 7:44 am 55 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:45 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 2 274 Jackson Hill Rd. M 7:23 am 75 Jackson Hill Rd. M 7:29 am 33 School St. M 7:35 am Crnr Valley View Dr M and Maryland Dr M 7:38 am 183 Cedar St. R 7:39 am 53 Cedar St. R 7:41 am 20 Cedar St. R 7:41 am Crnr Main St. and Aresco Dr M 7:43 am 297 Main St. M 7:43 am 301 Main St. M 7:44 am 341 Main St. R 7:44 am 76 Cider Mill Rd. M 7:45 am 65 Cider Mill Rd. M 7:45 am 31 Cider Mill Rd. M 7:46 am Crnr Cider Mill Rd. M and Hickory Ln. M 7:46 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 3 46 Lake Beseck Rd. M 7:25 am Crnr Lake Shore Dr and Pawnee Rd. at Beach 7:27 am 24 Lake Shore Dr M 7:30 am Crnr Baileyville Rd and Rosemary Ln. M 7:32 am 43 High St. M 7:34 am 22 High St. M 7:37 am Crnr Burt Dr M and Louis Rd. M 7:39 am 5 Dwight Dr M 7:41 am Crnr Esther Dr M and Toad Ridge Rd. M 7:43 am 405 Jackson Hill Rd. M 7:46 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 4 Crnr David Rd. D and Casa Ln. D 7:20 am Crnr Casa Ln. D and Deer Run Rd. D 7:24 am 142 David Rd. D 7:25 am 80 Ernest Dr D 7:31 am 16 Ernest Dr D 7:31 am 319 Tuttle Rd. D 7:32 am Crnr Tuttle Rd. and Clark Rd. D 7:33 am 107 Tuttle Rd. D 7:35 am Crnr Clementel Dr and Linmar Dr D 7:37 am 408 Wallingford Rd. D 7:37 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 6 Crnr Powder Hill Rd. and Strawberry Hill M 7:26 am

321 Main Street Durham, CT 349-3478

83 Long Hill Rd. M 7:28 am Crnr West St. and Long Hill Rd. M 7:28 am 56 West St. M 7:29 am 640 Main St. M 7:33 am Crnr Main St. M and Race Track Hollow M 7:34 am Crnr Strickland Rd. and High Meadow Ln. D 7:36 am Crnr Of Cherry Hill Rd. M and Greenview M 7:38 am Crnr Independence Way and Laurel Brook M 7:40 am 85 Laurel Brook Rd. M 7:40 am Whisper Winds Rd. and Hubbard St. M 7:46 am Crnr Whisper Winds Rd. M and Hubbard St. M 7:47 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 7 56 Lyman Rd. M 7:20 am Crnr Skeetfield Point M and Skeet Club Rd. D 7:25 am Crnr Elihu Rd. M and Reeds Gap Rd. M 7:30 am 188 Skeet Club Rd. D 7:31 am Crnr Old Powder Hill Rd. and Powder Hill Rd. D 7:33 am 427 Powder Hill Rd. D 7:34 am 410 Powder Hill Rd. D 7:35 am 371 Powder Hill Rd. M 7:36 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 8 Crnr Bear Rock Rd. D and Sycamore Dr D 7:20 am Crnr Bear Rock Rd. D and Mattabasset Dr D 7:21 am 11 Bear Rock Rd. D 7:22 am 183 Higganum Rd. D 7:24 am 179 Wallingford Rd. D 7:28 am 89 Dunn Hill Rd. D 7:30 am Crnr Dunn Hill Rd. D and Brittany Dr D 7:31 am 56 Brittany Dr D 7:36 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 9 86 Southend Ave D 7:18 am 155 Guilford Rd. D 7:19 am 17 Sand Hill Rd. D 7:21 am 53 Sand Hill Rd. D 7:21 am Crnr Pisgah Rd. and Laurel Brook Rd. D 7:22 am 591 Madison Rd. D 7:30 am Crnr Chaulker Rd. D and Shunpike Rd. D 7:32 am 204 Madison Rd. D 7:34 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 10 Crnr James Rd. D and James Rd. E D 7:20 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Canterbury Dr D 7:21 am Crnr Indian Ln. D and Boulder View Ct 7:23 am Crnr Indian Ln. D and Arrowhead Ct 7:23 am 26 Indian Ln. D 7:24 am 148 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 7:24 am 46 William Dr D 7:25 am 21 Saw Mill Rd. D 7:27 am

To Thank You for Your Patronage

85 Saw Mill Rd. D 7:28 am Crnr Dinatale Dr D and Bernadette Ln. D 7:30 am Crnr Dinatale Dr D and Anna Ter D 7:34 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 11 Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Park Pl D 7:20 am Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Ridge Rd. D 7:21 am 114 Creamery Rd. D 7:21 am 163 Creamery Rd. D 7:22 am Crnr Cedar Dr D and Ridge Rd. D 7:23 am 56 Cedar Dr D 7:23 am 111 Stagecoach Rd. D 7:27 am 167 Stagecoach Rd. D 7:28 am 61 Wagon Wheel Rd. D 7:29 am Crnr Old Farms Rd and Wagon Wheel Rd. D 7:30 am Crnr Old Farms Rd. and Howard Rd. D 7:31 am Crnr Old Farms Rd. and Buckboard Rd. D 7:32 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 12 22 Pent Rd. D 7:11 am 33 Pent Rd. D 7:11 am 68 Pent Rd. D 7:12 am 315 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 7:13 am Crnr Tri-Mountain Rd. and HiLo Rd. D 7:18 am Crnr Tri-Mountain Rd. and Etzel Dr D 7:19 am 223 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 7:19 am 40 Mauro Dr D 7:26 am Crnr Side Hill Rd. D and Howd Rd. D 7:28 am 109 Howd Rd. D 7:29 am Crnr Howd Rd. D and Patterson Ln. D 7:30 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 13 813 New Haven Rd. D 7:15 am 1031 New Haven Rd. D 7:17 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Barbara Ln. D 7:21 am 456 Stagecoach Rd. D 7:23 am Crnr Stagecoach and Erica Ct D 7:23 am Crnr Stagecoach Rd. and Christian Cross D 7:25 am 770 New Haven Rd. D 7:29 am 728 New Haven Rd. D 7:29 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 14 303 Blue Hills Rd. D 7:18 am Crnr Trevor Ln. and Crnr Higganum Rd. D 7:20 am Crnr Lexington Pl D and Green Ln. 7:23 am Crnr Green Ln. D and Pine Ledge Tr D 7:24 am Crnr Old Blue Hills Rd. D and East Woods Tr D 7:29 am Crnr Old Blue Hills and Stephen Woods 7:30 am Crnr Old Blue Hills and Shunpike Rd. D 7:32 am

42 Old Blue Hills Rd. D 7:32 am Crnr Cherry Ln. D and Hellgate Rd. D 7:34 am 10 Memorial School 7:48 am BUS NUMBER 15 1 32 Main St. D 7:18 am 2 Crnr Banta Ln. D and Surrey Dr D 7:24 am 3 Crnr Crooked Hill Rd. D and Ivy Way D 7:25 am 4 115 Meeting House Hill Rd. D 7:30 am 5 Crnr Meeting House Hill Rd. and Anthony D 7:31 am 6 Crnr Cream Pot Rd. and Dionigi Dr D 7:33 am 7 Memorial School 7:48 am 9 Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 16 9 Pond Meadow Pl M 7:35 am 50 Miller Rd. M 7:36 am Crnr Cherry Hill Rd. M and Old Indian Trl M 7:41 am Crnr Of Cherry Hill Rd. M and Garden Hill Rd. 7:46 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 17 Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Old Yankee Way D 7:18 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. D and Stephanie Ct D 7:22 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Cesca Rd. 7:26 am Crnr Carriage Dr D and Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:29 am 373 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:33 am 1216 Arbutus St. D 7:37 am 47 Oak Ter D 7:41 am 8 6 Partridge Ln. D 7:44 am 9 Memorial School 7:48 am 11 Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 18 242 Main St. D 7:18 am Korn School / Basrep 7:22 am 93 Maiden Ln. D 7:23 am 18 Maiden Ln. D 7:24 am 267 Main St. D 7:25 am 397 Main St. D 7:27 am 417 Main St. D 7:28 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr D and Ironwood Rd. D 7:30 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr and Black Walnut Dr D 7:34 am 490 Main St. D 7:36 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 20 65 Johnson Ln. D 7:16 am 89 Johnson Ln. D 7:17 am Crnr Burwell Newton Dr D and Haddam Qtr Rd. 0 7:19 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. & Sumner Woods 7:19 am 804 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:20 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Foot Hills Rd. 7:21 am 199 Foot Hills Rd. D 7:21 am 173 Foot Hills Rd. D 7:22 am 65 Foot Hills Rd. D 7:23 am 571 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:25 am

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528 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:26 am 493 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:26 am 283 Maiden Ln. D 7:29 am 254 Maiden Ln. D 7:29 am 227 Maiden Ln. D 7:30 am 17 Hickory Hill Dr D 7:35 am 160 Daisy Ln. D 7:36 am Crnr Maiden Ln. D and Guire Rd. D 7:37 am 93 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:47 am Memorial School 7:48 am Thomas Edison Magnet 8:25 am BUS NUMBER 24 VAN 91 Old Blue Hills Rd. D 7:34 am 89 Strickland Rd. M 7:49 am Memorial School 7:55 am

Coginchaug and Strong

BUS NUMBER ONE 183 Cedar St. R 6:44 am 104 Cedar St. R 6:45 am 82 Cedar St. R 6:45 am Crnr Sunrise Ridge R and Spring St. R 6:47 am Crnr Ross Rd. R and Spring St. R 6:48 am 67 Ross Rd. R 6:49 am Crnr Wildwood Cir and Ross Rd. R 6:49 am 127 Ross Rd. R 6:50 am 99 Main St. M 6:54 am 174 Main St. R 6:56 am Crnr Derby Rd. R and Main St. M 6:56 am 228 Main St. M 6:57 am Crnr Main St. and Aresco Dr. M 6:57 am 297 Main St. M 6:58 am 301 Main St. M 6:58 am 341 Main St. R 6:59 am 387 Main St. M 7 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER TWO Crnr Jackson Hill Rd. M and Oxford Dr. 6:41 am 75 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:43 am 1 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:44 am Crnr Harvest Wood Rd. M and Sylvan Ridge M 6:46 am 77 Harvest Wood Rd. M 6:48 am 100 Harvest Wood Rd. M 6:50 am 17 Ballfall Rd. M 6:51 am Crnr Peters Ln. and Crestview R 6:53 am Crnr Peters Ln. and Spring St. R 6:55 am 146 Peters Ln. R 6:57 am 196 Peters Ln. R 6:58 am Crnr Derby Rd. R and Cedar St. R 7 am 15 Derby Rd. R 7:02 am 115 Chery Hill Rd. M/Doorside 7:04 am Crnr Of Cherry Hill Rd. M and Continued on next page


Back to School

18 Durham

PHARMACY

Garden Hill Rd. 7:05 am Crnr Greenview M and Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:07 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 4 65 Cider Mill Rd. M 6:44 am 48 Cider Mill Rd. M 6:44 am 20 Janet Dr. M 6:47 am 23 Rosemary Ct M 6:48 am Crnr Hubbard St. M and Edgewood Ct M 6:49 am Crnr Whisper Winds Rd. M and Hubbard St. M:1 6:51 am Crnr Hubbard St. M and Whisper Winds Rd. M 6:52 am 54 Laurel Brook Rd. M 6:58 am Crnr Independence Way and Laurel Brook M 6:59 am 155 Laurel Brook Rd. M 7 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 6 610 Main St. M 6:44 am Crnr Main St. M and Race Track Hollow M 6:45 am 504 Main St. M 6:46 am Crnr Dwight Dr. M and Esther Dr. M 6:50 am Crnr Burt Dr. M and Chestnut Hill Rd. M 6:51 am 28 Way Rd. M 6:53 am 50 High St. M 6:54 am Crnr Way Rd. M and John Lyman Dr.iveway M 6:56 am 671 Main St. M 7 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 7 195 Skeet Club Rd. D 6:35 am 262 Skeet Club Rd. D 6:40 am 218 Skeet Club Rd. D 6:40 am 140 Skeet Club Rd. D 6:41 am 122 Skeet Club Rd. D 6:42 am 88 Skeet Club Rd. D 6:42 am Crnr Powder Hill Rd. and Turkey Hill Rd. D 6:44 am 487 Powder Hill Rd. D 6:44 am 433/436 Powder Hill Rd. D 6:45 am 410 Powder Hill Rd. D 6:46 am 406 Powder Hill Rd. D 6:46 am 371 Powder Hill Rd. M 6:47 am 183 Powder Hill Rd. M 6:49 am 142 Powder Hill Road M 6:51 am Crnr Powder Hill Rd. and St.rawberry Hill M 6:53 am 46 Powder Hill Rd. M 6:54 am 32 Powder Hill Rd. M 6:54 am Crnr West St. and Long Hill Rd. M 6:56 am 45 West St. M 6:58 am Crnr West St. and Orchard Ln. M 6:58 am Crnr Main St. M and Lyman Rd. M 7:01 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 8 111 Johnson Ln. D 6:45 am

321 Main Street Durham, CT 349-3478

125 Johnson Ln. D 6:45 am Crnr Burwell Newton Dr. D and Haddam Qtr Rd. D 6:47 am 804 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 6:49 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. and Foot Hills Rd. 6:50 am 107 Foot Hills Rd. D 6:51 am 39 Foot Hills Rd. D 6:56 am 509 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 6:59 am 411 Maiden Ln. D 7:01 am 388 Maiden Ln. D 7:02 am Crnr Maiden Ln. D and Southwood Ln. D 7:03 am 286 Maiden Ln. D 7:04 am 262 Maiden Ln. D 7:04 am Crnr Maiden Ln. and Wheeler Hill Dr. D 7:05 am Crnr Maiden Ln. D and Guire Rd. D 7:06 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 9 Haddam Quarter Rd. at side Little Rooster D 6:44 am Crnr Wilcox Dr. and Austin 6:46 am 26 Edwards Rd. D 6:47 am 6 Partridge Ln. D 6:51 am 112 Oak Ter D 6:53 am Crnr Oak Ter and Woodland Dr. D 6:53 am 15 Oak Ter D 6:54 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. D and Olde Yankee Way 6:55 am 80 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 6:55 am Crnr St.ephanie Ct D and Haddam Quarter Rd. D 6:56 am Crnr Haddam Quarter Rd. D and Cesca Ln. D 6:57 am 253 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 6:57 am 294 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 6:58 am Crnr Carriage Dr. D and Haddam Quarter Rd. D 6:58 am 1228 Arbutus St. D 7 am Crnr Winterberry Ln. D and Arbutus St. D 7:03 am 450 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:04 am 398 Haddam Qtr Rd. D 7:04 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 10 79 Middlefield Rd. D/Doorside 6:31 am 2 Pond Meadow Pl M 6:33 am 18 Pond Meadow Pl M 6:35 am 30 Miller Rd. M 6:37 am Crnr Middlefield Rd. and Briarwood Ln. D 6:39 am 48 Middlefield Rd. D 6:41 am 437 Main St. D 6:43 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr. D and Ironwood Rd. D 6:46 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr. and Evergreen Ter D 6:48 am Crnr Royal Oak Dr. and Black Walnut Dr. D 6:50 am 97 Black Walnut Dr. D 6:52 am Crnr Main St. D and Little Ln. D 6:54 am 428 Main St. D 6:56 am

Hot Dogs and Hamburgers Balloons, Giveaways 11-3 - Stop By

Crnr Main St. and Marina Pl D 6:58 am 298 Main St. D 7 am 238 Main St. Before Maiden Ln. D 7:02 am 18 Maiden Ln. D 7:05 am 29 Maiden Ln. D 7:07 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 11 155 Wallingford Rd. D 6:46 am 195 Wallingford Rd. D 6:47 am Crnr Dunn Hill Rd. D and Brittany Dr. D 6:52 am 108 Dunn Hill Rd. D 6:53 am 46 Dunn Hill Rd. D 6:54 am Crnr Clementel Dr. and Linmar Dr. D 6:56 am 37 Clementel Dr. D 6:57 am Crnr Clementel Dr. D and Tuttle Rd. D 6:58 am Crnr Tuttle Rd. and Old Wallingford Rd. D 6:59 am 275 Main St. D 7:03 am 293 Main St. D 7:03 am 200 Maple Ave D 7:05 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 12 670 Wallingford Rd. D 6:29 am 385/389 Wallingford Rd. D 6:33 am Crnr Wallingford Rd. and Lake Grove Driveway D 6:34 am Pent Rd. D 6:35 am 68 Pent Rd. D 6:36 am 320 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 6:38 am 39 Wildwood Ln. D 6:39 am 79 Wildwood Ln. D 6:39 am 119 Wildwood Ln. D 6:41 am 29 David Rd. D 6:42 am Crnr David Rd. D and Casa Ln. D 6:48 am 76 David Rd. D 6:50 am 223 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 6:51 am 80 Ernest Dr. D 6:57 am 16 Ernest Dr. D 6:58 am Crnr Tuttle Rd. and Clark Rd. D 6:59 am Tuttle Rd. and Meadow Ln. D 7:01 am 166 Tuttle Rd. D 7:01 am 111 Tuttle Rd. D 7:02 am 85 Tuttle Rd. D:1 7:03 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 13 Crnr New Haven Rd. and Old Washington Tr D 6:21 am 813 New Haven Rd. D 6:24 am 957 New Haven Rd. D 6:25 am 997 New Haven Rd. D 6:26 am 1127 New Haven Rd. D 6:28 am 1140 New Haven Rd. D 6:33 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Barbara Ln. D 6:34 am 1090 New Haven Rd. D 6:34 am 988 New Haven Rd. D 6:36 am 22 Coe Rd. D 6:38 am

6 Coe Rd. D 6:39 am Crnr Stagecoach Rd. and Coe Rd. D 6:40 am Crnr Old Farms Rd. and Buckboard Rd. D 6:41 am Crnr Old Farms Rd. and Howard Rd. D 6:42 am Crnr Old Farms Rd. and Wagon Wheel Rd. D 6:44 am 16 Wagon Wheel Rd. D 6:46 am Crnr Stagecoach Rd. and Christian Cross. 6:47 am Crnr Stagecoach Rd. and Dawns Trail D 6:49 am Crnr Stagecoach Rd. D and Erica Ct D 6:50 am 408 St.agecoach Rd. D 6:51 am 456 St.agecoach Rd. D 6:51 am 485 St.agecoach Rd. D 6:52 am 31 Schoolhouse Ln. D 6:56 am 564 New Haven Rd. D 6:58 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 14 Crnr Howd Rd. D and Patterson Ln. D 6:39 am 109 Howd Rd. D 6:40 am 119 Howd Rd. D 6:40 am 143 Howd Rd. D 6:41 am Crnr Howd Rd. D And Side Hill Rd. 6:42 am Crnr Mauro Dr. and Howd Rd. @ 5 Mauro Dr. D 6:43 am 40 Mauro Dr. D 6:50 am 328 Tri-Mountain Rd. 1st Dr.iveway On Right D 6:52 am 249 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 6:53 am 235 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 6:53 am Crnr Tri-Mountain Rd. and Etzel Dr. D 6:54 am Crnr Tri-Mountain Rd. and HiLo Rd. D 6:56 am 61/77 Tri-Mountain Rd. D 6:58 am Crnr Parmelee Hill Rd. D and Indian Ln. D 7:01 am Crnr William Dr. D and Parmelee Hill Rd. D 7:02 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 15 Crnr Cherry Ln. D and Hellgate Rd. D 6:36 am 591 Madison Rd. D 6:41 am 43 Madison Rd. / Before Rt 148 D 6:41 am 492 Madison Rd. D 6:46 am 380 Madison Rd. D 6:48 am Crnr Shunpike Rd. D and Chalker Rd. D 6:49 am Crnr Old Blue Hills and Shunpike Rd. D 6:50 am Crnr Old Blue Hills and St.ephen Woods 6:51 am Crnr Old Blue Hills Rd. D and East Woods Tr D 6:56 am 257 Old Blue Hills Rd. D 6:56 am 59 Pine Ledge Tr D 6:57 am Crnr Green Ln. D and Pine Ledge Tr D 6:57 am Green Ln. D and Agerola Rd. D 6:58 am Crnr Lexington Pl D and Green

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Ln. 6:59 am Crnr Harvey Rd. D and Higganum Rd. D 7 am 291 Higganum Rd. D 7:01 am 182 Higganum Rd. D 7:02 am Crnr Fowler Av D and Cherry Ln. D 7:05 am Fowler Av @ Fence- Across From Post Off. 7:06 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 16 10 Sand Hill Rd. D 6:41 am 61 Sand Hill Rd. D 6:42 am 15 Pisgah Rd. D 6:42 am Crnr Pisgah Rd. and Laurel Brook Rd. D 6:43 am Crnr Pisgah Rd. and Dead Hill Rd. D 6:46 am 303 Blue Hills Rd. D 6:53 am 322 Blue Hills Rd. D 6:54 am 718 Higganum Rd. D 6:55 am Crnr Trevor Ln. and Crnr Higganum Rd. D 6:56 am 447 Higganum Rd. D 6:59 am Crnr Green Ln. D and Higganum Rd. D 7 am Crnr Of Bear Rock Rd. and Mattabassett Rd. D 7:02 am Crnr Sycamore Dr. D and Bear Rock Rd. D 7:04 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 17 66 New Haven Rd. On Guilford Rd. D 6:39 am 155 Guilford Rd. D 6:40 am 36 Mica Hill Road D 6:42 am 171 Mica Hill Rd. D 6:44 am Crnr Banta Ln. D and Surrey Dr. D 6:45 am Crnr Crooked Hill Rd. D and Ivy Way D 6:47 am 528 Guilford Rd. D 6:48 am Crnr Cream Pot and Little Falls Way D 6:52 am Crnr Cream Pot Rd. and Dionigi Dr. D 6:52 am Crnr Meeting House Hill Rd. and Anthony D 6:55 am Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Cedar Dr. D /North 6:57 am Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Cedar Dr. D 6:57 am 155 Creamery Rd. D 6:58 am 106 Creamery Rd. D 6:59 am 86 Creamery Rd. D 7 am Crnr Creamery Rd. D and Park Pl D 7 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 18 133 Maple Avenue D 6:44 am 97 Maple Ave D 6:44 am Crnr Maple Ave D and St. Johns Way D 6:45 am 29 Maple Ave D 6:46 am 62 Main St. D 6:46 am Continued on next page


Back to School

Friday, August 27, 2010

Durham

PHARMACY

®

321 Main Street Durham, CT 349-3478

Games and Prizes All Day Long Face Painting

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Free or reduced school lunch program for 2010 -2011 District 13 has adopted the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Income Eligibility Guidelines following family size and income criteria for determining eligibility. The following income guidelines will be used in Connecticut from

July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2011, to determine eligibility for free and reduced price meals and free milk in the Child Nutrition Programs. Please see chart below for all eligility guildelines. Children from families whose income is at or below

the levels shown are eligible for free or reduced price meals or free milk. Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents. To apply for free or reduced price meals or free milk, households should fill out the application and re-

turn it to the school. Additional copies are available at the principal’s office at each school. The information provided on the application is confidential and will be used only for the purposes of determining eligibility, and may be verified at any time during the school year by school or other program officials. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year. Under the provisions of the policy for determining eligibility for free and reduced price meals, the business manager, Ron Melnik, will review applications and determine eli-

gibility. If a parent is dissatisfied with the ruling of the determining official, he/she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis. To make a formal appeal, a request either orally or in writing must be made to: Thomas Hennick, Chair, Board of Education, Regional School District #13, P. O. Box 190, Durham, CT 06422 for a hearing to appeal the decision.

2010-11 school lunch prices Full hot lunch price at all schools is $2.75; milk at all schools is $.50; and a la carte items are available at most schools and are priced individually.

District 13 Morning Bus Schedule Continued 32 Main St. D 6:47 am Crnr Indian Ln. D and Arrowhead Ct D 6:50 am Crnr Indian Ln. D and Boulder View Ct 6:51 am 511 New Haven Rd. D 6:52 am Crnr James Rd. D and James Rd. E D 6:56 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Canterbury Dr. D 6:57 am 482 New Haven Rd. D 6:58 am Crnr Dinatale Dr. D and Bernadette Ln. D 6:59 am Crnr Dinatale Dr. D and Anna Ter D 7:03 am Crnr Dinatale Dr. D and Gina Dr. D 7:03 am 63 Main St. D 7:06 am Coginchaug High School 7:09 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 19 369 Baileyville Rd. M 6:48 am 341 Baileyville Rd. M 6:49 am 320 Baileyville Rd. M 6:49 am 40 Lake Beseck Rd. M 6:50 am Crnr Seminole Rd. M and Algonquin Rd. M 6:52 am Crnr Lake Shore Dr. and Pawnee Rd. at Beach Lot M

6:53 am Crnr Fowler Development M and Lake Beseck Rd. M 6:54 am 230 Baileyville Rd. M 6:56 am Crnr Baileyville Rd. and Rosemary Ln. M 6:57 am Coginchaug High School 7:08 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 20 438 Main St. M 6:43 am 86 School St. M 6:49 am Crnr School St. and Valley View Dr. M 6:50 am 201 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:51 am 220 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:51 am 266 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:51 am 274 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:54 am Crnr Jackson Hill Rd. M and Stowe St. M 6:58 am 421 Jackson Hill Rd. M 6:59 am Crnr Strickland Rd. and High Meadow Ln. D 7 am Crnr Strickland Rd. and Cherry Ridge M 7:01 am 341 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:02 am 2 Miller Rd. On Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:03 am 460 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:04 am

515 Cherry Hill Rd. M 7:04 am 148 Middlefield Rd. D 7:05 am Coginchaug High School 7:08 am Strong Middle School 7:10 am BUS NUMBER 24 VAN 17 Ballfall Rd. M 6:42 am 43 Maryland Dr. M 6:50 am 43 High St. M 6:55 am 31 Cider Mill Rd. M 6:59 am 398 Haddam Quarter Rd. D 7:09 am Coginchaug High School 7:15 am Strong Middle School 7:20 am

Vinal and VoAg BUS NUMBER 21 644 Wallingford Rd. D 6:37 am Crnr Linmar Dr and Clementel Dr D 6:39 am 385/389 Wallingford Rd. D 6:41 am Crnr Wallingford Rd. and Lake Grove Driveway D 6:42 am Crnr New Haven Rd. and Old Washington Tr D 6:48 am 1048 New Haven Rd. D 6:54 am

96 Coe Rd. D 6:57 am 5 Stagecoach Rd. D 6:59 am Crnr Indian Ln D and Boulder View Ct 7:01 am 38 Cherry Ln D 7:07 am 19 Fowler Av D 7:08 am 275 Main St. D 7:10 am Crnr Independence Way And Laurel Brook M 7:16 am Vinal Tech 7:20 am BUS NUMBER 22 73-75 Powder Hill Rd. M 6:33 am Crnr West St. and Orchard Ln. M 6:35 am Crnr Main St. M and Race Track Hollow M 6:36 am Crnr Lake Shore Dr and Pawnee Rd. at Beach Lot M 6:41 am Crnr Chestnut Hill Rd. M and Burt 6:44 am Crnr Dwight Dr. M and Esther DrM 6:45 am 63 Mack Rd. M 6:45 am 92 School St. M 6:52 am Crnr School St. and Valley View Dr. M 6:53 am 112 Cedar St. R 6:54 am 43 Cedar St. R 6:55 am

170 Ross Rd. R 6:59 am 81 Main St. R 7:02 am Crnr Derby Rd. R and Main St. M 7:04 am Crnr Main St. M and Aresco Dr M 7:05 am Crnr Cherry Hill Rd. M and Nancy Ln M 7:08 am Crnr Cherry Hill Rd. M and Hubbard St. M 7:09 am Crnr Hubbard St. M and Edgewood Ct M 7:10 am Vinal Tech 7:13 am Middletown High School Voag 7:20 am BUS NUMBER 23 195 Wallingford Rd. D 6:40 am Crnr William Dr D and Parmelee Hill Rd. D 6:45 am 77 Parmelee Hill Rd. D 6:46 am 512 Guilford Rd. D 6:52 am 26 Sand Hill Rd. D 6:54 am Crnr Bear Rock Rd. D and Mattabasset Dr D 7:00 am 199 Foot Hills Rd. D 7:06 am Crnr Main St. D and Winsome Dr D 7:14 am Vinal Tech 7:20 am


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20 Durham ®

PHARMACY

321 Main Street Durham, CT 349-3478

Kids Win Melissa and Doug Art Easel

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Friday, August 27, 2010

District 13 Events for School Year 2010-2011

September 2010 1 Meet the teachers Korn 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. 1 Meet the teachers Brewster 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 2 Opening day for Students 2 Korn open house 6 p.m. 7 Fourth grade district instrumental information night at Lyman 6 p.m. 14 Lyman parent information night K-2 at 6 p.m. for third/fourth grade at 7:30 p.m. 15 Brewster information night 6 p.m. 16 Memorial open house 7 p.m. 20 Lyman volunteer coffee hour 10 a.m. 20 Strong open house 7 p.m. 21 CRHS get acquainted night 6 p.m. 28 OM information night at Lyman 7 p.m. 30 Brewster open house 6 p.m. 30 Senior college parent night at CRHS 7 p.m. October 2010 8 Jazz night with gourmet pizza at CRHS 6 p.m. 14 CRHS Spanish and French Honor Society induction 7 p.m. 16 PSATs at CRHS 7:45 a.m. 17 Dedication of Breck Library at Strong 2 p.m. 21 Lyman family night 6 p.m. 22 Lyman family shares 7 a.m. 22 Korn folder share 7:30 a.m. 22 Strong social 7 p.m. 23 Homecoming dance at CRHS 28 CRHS Choirs Halloween concert 7:30 p.m. 29 Halloween parades: Memorial at 8:30 a.m. Brewster at 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Korn at 1:30 p.m. Lyman at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. November 2010 4 Financial aid night at CRHS 7 p.m. 5 Memorial TGIF for grade six at 6 6:30 p.m. 6 CRHS Craft Fair 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 9 Lyman third/fourth grade concert 2:15 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. 12 CVEF spelling bee at CRHS 16 ASBDA music festival at CRHS 8 p.m. 17-20 CRHS senior class trip to Washington, D.C. 19 Lyman K Harvest celebration 22 CRHS fall sports banquet 6 p.m. 24 Powder Puff football game at CRHS 12:30 p.m. December 2010 1-2 Parent conferences - early dismissal 4 Community round-up 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 7 Korn winter concert at CRHS 6:30 p.m. 9 Lyman winter kindergarten chorus concert 2:15 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. 14 Strong chorus concert 7 p.m. 16 Brewster winter celebration 10:30 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. 19 CRHS holiday concert 2 p.m. January 2011 6 Elementary choice visits begin 11 Korn band performance 2:30 p.m. 12 Lyman Band performance 2:30 p.m. 13 Community Martin Luther King

As of August 25, 2010 (subject to change) Celebration at CRHS 6:30 p.m. Senior class drama play at CRHS 7 p.m. Strong band concert at CRHS 7 p.m. Eighth grade parent curriculum night at CRHS 6:30 p.m. 21 Memorial TGIF grade 5 6:30 p.m. 25 Lyman family shares 7 a.m. 25 Memorial concert at CRHS 7 p.m. 26 Korn School science fair 6:30 p.m. 28 Strong social 7 p.m. February 2011 1-4 Kindergarten registration 2 CRHS National Honor Society induction 7 p.m. 3 Junior college parent night at CRHS 7 p.m. 4 Korn family folder share 7:30 a.m. 4 Memorial TGIF for grade six at 6:30 p.m. 4 Show choir concert at CRHS 7:30 p.m. 14 Lyman Kindergarten loves to learn day 15 POPS Night at CRHS at 7:30 p.m. 17 Brewster Science night 6 p.m. March 2011 1 Strong School reads 6 p.m. 2-29 CMT and CAPT testing window 2 Brewster Dr. Seuss celebration 2 Read Across America at Korn and Lyman 3 Brewster Loves to Read night 6:30 p.m. 6 Incoming Kindergartners visit Lyman and Brewster 1 to 2:30 p.m. 11 Chamber Choir Renaissance Feast at CRHS 6 p.m. 11 Strong Social 7 p.m. 18-19 New England Music Festival 19 CRHS scholarship ball 22 CRHS winter sports banquet 6 p.m. 23-24 Parent conferences (elementary only) — noon dismissal 24 Senior arts showcase at CRHS 6:30 p.m. 25 Memorial TGIF for grade five at 6:30 p.m. 29 Memorial Ensemble night 7 p.m. April 2011 6 Public hearing on budget at CRHS 8 p.m. 7 District Choral Night Gr 5-12 at CRHS 7 p.m. 12 Lyman grade one and two spring concert 2:15 and 6:30 p.m. 14 Brewster second grade performance 6 p.m. 15 CRHS band and chorus trip 26 Grade four to five Transition Night at Memorial 7 p.m. 27 Lyman Family Shares 7 a.m. 27 Korn writer’s jubilee 28 Brewster volunteer appreciation 7:45 a.m. 28 Brewster Young Author’s Day 29 Fajita Fiesta at CRHS 5 p.m. 29-30 Strong School Play 7 p.m. May 2011 2 District meeting at CRHS 8 p.m 3 Strong instrumental concert at CRHS 7 p.m. 5 Brewster second grade Cinco de Mayo Celebration 5 Memorial School drama club Production 14 18 20

6:45 p.m. AP info night at CRHS 7 p.m. Incoming Kindergarten visits to Lyman and Brewster 1 to 2:30 p.m. 6 Strong Social 7 p.m. 6 Willy Wonka Play at Lyman 7 p.m. 7 Willy Wonka Play at Lyman 2 p.m. 10 CRHS instrumental concert 7:30 p.m. 12 Grade six to seven parent orientation at Strong 7 p.m. 13 Lyman grade one and two Special Person’s Day 12 p.m. 17 Strong Spring band concert at CRHS 7 p.m. 19 Brewster Art Exhibit 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. 19 ID Share Fair at Lyman 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 19 Strong Pride and Spirit night 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 20 Lyman Volunteer Recognition Assembly at 9:50 a.m. 21 CRHS prom at Farmington Club 24 Memorial DARE Graduation 6:30 p.m. 25 Lyman third/fourth grade choral concert 2:15 and 6:30 p.m. 26 Korn chorus concert at CRHS 6:30 p.m. 31 Strong School Sports Ice Cream Social 6:30 p.m. June 2011 1 CRHS Underclass Awards 7:30 a.m. 1 BK PTA ice cream Social at Korn 6 p.m. 1 CRHS senior awards night 7 p.m. 2 Incoming Kindergartner visits to Lyman and Brewster 9:30 to 11 a.m. 2 Brewster Dance Festival 2 CRHS spring chorus concert 7:30 p.m. 2-3 Strong seventh grade to Camp Jewell 6 CRHS Band Banquet 6 p.m. 7 Grade four parent step-up event at Memorial 5:30 p.m. 8 Korn and Lyman band concert at CRHS 6:30 p.m. 9 CRHS Latin banquet 6 p.m. 9 Korn fourth grade recognition and intramural awards 11 a.m. 10 Lyman Field Day at Peckham Park 10 Memorial School Field Day 10 Senior Class play at CRHS 7 p.m. 13 Strong School chorus concert 7 p.m. 14 Memorial School concert at CRHS 7 p.m. 15 CRHS Spring Sports Banquet 6 p.m. 16 B/K Field Day at Pickett Lane Campus 16 Lyman recognition assembly 10 a.m. 17 Lyman step-up day 9:30 a.m. 17 Strong Step-up Ceremony at CRHS 9:30 a.m. 20 Memorial closing program 9 a.m. 20 CRHS graduation Ceremony 7 p.m. 20 Last scheduled day of school 5 6

*June events subject to date changes due to school cancellations.


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Friday, August 27, 2010

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New staff members in D13 At Coginchaug, science teacher Mathew Taber, math teacher Douglas Frasier, English teacher Michelle McClintick, assistant principal Brian Bodner and social studies teacher Amy Jacques-Purdy. At Strong School teacher assistant Matthew Callan and Spanish teacher Wanda Gonzalez. At Brewster School, special education teacher Abigail Hogarth. For the district, speech thereapist Amanda Dobler and Alison Silva, and ABA therapists Ashley Myers and Kaitlin Forest.

Fall Sports Practices begin Practices for sthe follwign sports begin next week. all are at the high school, either indoors or ousing fields not currently under construction.

Football practice-has begun at the high school Girls’ Soccer begins Saturday, Aug. 28 at 8 a.m. Boys’ Soccer begins Saturday, Aug. 28 at 10 a.m. Volleyball begins Saturday, Aug. 28 at 9 a.m. Girls’ Cross Country begins Monday, Aug. 30, at 2:20 p.m. Boys’ Cross Country begins Thursday, Sept. 2, at 2:20 p.m.

Adult Education Middletown Adult education offers free high school completion and English as a second language classes to area residents. Three high school completion options are available including the National External Diploma Program, a self-paced program for mature adults. Enrollment is free and ongoing. Day and evening classes are available. Call 860-343-6048 or visit www.maect.org for more information.

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Middlefield Town Briefs

Friday, August 27, 2010

BOF

(From page 14)

sealing the roads may not be enough to adequately maintain them for much longer. While the board was scheduled to finish closing the books on the 2009-10 budget, they chose to hold off on discussing it until finance director Joe Geruch is in attendance. According to Renninghoff, Geruch was under the impression that Adams did not want him coming to the meetings. Adams said she would try to correct that impression and ask him to attend their next meeting. (In attendance/Chuck Corley)

The Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Agency did not have a quorum when they met on August 18, therefore no decisions could be made. In public session, the agency discussed George Pogmore’s proposed

Water on the property has resulted in the land not being used for agricultural purposes for years, to which Curtis said the property is very wet because the drainage ditch has filled and is not functioning properly. He said the system was designed before wetlands laws, therefore the activity should be considered maintenance to the system. However, Marianne Corona said this is the issue that needed to be determined.

The agency planned to look at the site and meet in the next few weeks. It was noted that Pogmore is only looking to redo what he had requested before so he could use the field, and has no intention to change the water course or inland wetlands. The next item discussed was Greg Chhabra’s proposed drainage discharge within 100 feet of a wetland review area at 33 Day School Drive. Corona noted there was a cease and desist order from March 2002 regarding the installation of a pipe into the wetland. The pipe was installed without permission and was removed once ordered to do so. Vito reported, however, that Chhabra is now having problems with water entering his basement and is looking for a place to discharge the water. The homeowner explained that the drain would be from the perimeter of the foundation and would be clean water. He suspected that some of the problems may be from a nearby pond

charge into town land. There was an update on a violation for filling within 100 feet of a wetland review are and filling of wetlands at 369 Baileyville Road. It was also mentioned that a dead tree is leaning toward the street on Cider Mill Road. Lorraine Terrace and the water course behind the houses were discussed as well. The agency went over il-

causing high ground water. The plans call for discharge onto the town property line as Chhabra wants to get the water off his property. The agency discussed the various drainage options, and Chhabra concluded that had he known about the drain prior to moving in it could have been resolved with the town. Instead, Chhabra said it has lowered the value of his house, and other neighbors also dis-

See IWWA, page 26

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drainage channels within 100 feet of a wetland review area at 890 Main Street. In 2001, this exact proposal was deemed not significant activity by the agency and was approved, but when Pogmore asked why he had to seek approval again, Wetlands Enforcement Officer Lee Vito said there were questions about time limitations in the activity. Brian Curtis, town engineer, noted that the channel is not working and the maintenance is needed to allow the agricultural fields to be useable.

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Friday, August 27, 2010

Durham Fair entry form and exhibit deadlines Livestock The livestock entry forms for beef and dairy cattle have to be received by Sept. 15; goats, poultry, rabbits, sheep, swine and llamas by Sept. 1 and for fiber, by Sept. 11. The animals have to be brought to fairgrounds on Thursday, Sept. 23. Beef and dairy cattle, sheep and llamas between 10 a.m. and 9 p.m.; goats and swine from 1 to 9 p.m.; poultry between 2 and 8

p.m.; rabbits from 1 to 7 p.m. and fiber noon to 6:30 p.m. Competitive exhibits In the competitive exhibits, entry forms for photography in Division 4 must be received by Sept. 4; forms for art, canning, crafts and collections and needlework by Sept. 11; fruits, vegetables and all youth classes by Sept. 13; horticulture, giant pumpkins, baking and Divisions 1-5 and 7 photography by Sept. 15; flow-

ers by Sept. 17; and Christmas trees by Sept. 19. Exhibits must be brought to the fairgrounds as follows: Flowers on Wednesday, Sept. 22, from 3 to 8 p.m. Fruits on Tuesday, Sept. 21, from 3 to 9 p.m. Horticulture, on Monday, Sept. 20, from 3 to 8 p.m. Christmas Trees, Tuesday, Sept. 21, from 5 to 8 p.m. Vegetables Tuesday, Sept. 21, from 3 to 9 p.m. Giant pumpkins, Wednesday, Sept. 22, from 3 to 9 p.m. Art, Saturday, Sept. 18, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Canning, Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Baking, Wednesday, Sept. 22, from 3 to 8 p.m.

Crafts and collections, Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Needlework, Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Photography Divisions 1-5 and 7, Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Photography Division 6, Saturday, Sept. 4, by mail/email Youth (ages 5-17) Crafts, special interest, photography and group crafts, Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vegetables, flowers, baking and canning and group baking and canning, Tuesday, Sept. 21, from 12:30 to 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.durhamfair.com.

Volunteer for the fair If you would like to be part of the largest all volunteer fair in North America, sign up to sell tickets, take tickets or hand stamp. Shifts are only three or four hours long and for your time, you will receive a one-day general admission ticket and a parking pass. This is perfect for anyone — including students who need volunteer hours, the Boys and Girl Scouts, and those who just love the fair. For more information, please contact Robin Fujio today at 860344-7243. See you at the fair.

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Friday, August 27, 2010 For the fourth consecutive semester, Raymond Battipaglia, of Durham, was awarded dean’s list designation at Eastern Connecticut State University. He is majoring in Business Administration. Town & Country Early Learning Centers with two childcare and preschool centers in Middletown, has earned accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) – the nation’s

Bonnie Leigh grew up in Durham and has released her newest CD, The E a r l y Years, a compilation of classic country, R&B, soft rock and easy listening. She is the oldest daughter of Midi Sutherland of Middlefield, who performed with

The Sons of the Pioneers, Gene Autry and Roy Acuff, Bonnie Leigh yearned from an early age to follow in her mother’s footsteps. Bonnie has performed on “The Italian American Hour,� and playing trumpet in a Dixieland jazz band all before she was 10. Bonnie Leigh has opened for Mickey Gilley and Barbara Mandrel, as well as being part of shows including Emmylou Harris, Gene Pitney and Allan Jackson. Her remake of Del Shannon’s “Runaway� hit Billboard’s Top 100 in the 1980s, and her video, “Moonwalking,� was one of the most played videos on TNN in 1987 and 1988. Bonnie Leigh has performed all over the United States, Mexico, Brazil, the United Kingdom, Germany, Taiwan and mainland China. For more information, visit www.bonnieleighmusic.com or e-mail to news@bonnieleighmusic.com. Alexandra Turley, a senior at the University of Delaware, has been included on the spring dean’s list. Turley, from Durham, is a major in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Amanda Judson, Jenna Langhans and Colin Turley, all of Durham, have been named to the dean’s list at Union College in New York.

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Free services for veterans “Stand Down 2010,� a daylong program of support services to assist Connecticut’s homeless and needy veterans regain their independence in the community, will be held on Friday, Sept. 10, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the campus of the State Veterans Home, 287 West Street in Rocky Hill. More than 50 government agencies and private organizations will be on hand to offer services and assistance in one central location. Services to be offered include health and dental screenings, VA benefit assistance and information, job counseling, housing referrals, social service and financial assistance, and disposition of misdemeanor and motor vehicle court cases. There is no charge to veterans who participate in Stand Down. Veterans in need who are interested in attending Stand Down are encouraged to preregister by calling 860-6163802 or 860-616-3803 or by visiting www.ct.gov/ctva. However, pre-registration is not required to participate in Stand Down. Free transportation will be provided from locations throughout Connecticut. Veterans who pre-register will be provided information about the closest pick-up locations. “If you are a veteran in need, Stand Down is an excellent way to spend a day get-

ting the help you deserve,� said state Veterans Affairs Commissioner Linda S. Schwartz. “Nowhere else can you get so much assistance in one place in one day.� Stand Down is a term used during the Vietnam War which referred to an area behind the front lines that was safe and that afforded battleweary soldiers a place to re-

lax and attend to personal needs such as showers, haircuts, hot meals and minor health care issues. Businesses, veteran service organizations or individuals interested in contributing resources to help support Stand Down 2010 are asked to contact the CT Department of Veterans’ Affairs at 860-6163605.

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Middlefield Town Briefs

26

Senior center

IWWA (Continued from page 23) licit storm water ordinance, which will provide an enforcement tool in order to manage storm water discharge issues. Durham and other towns have been creating draft ordinances, and Curtis said there will be a data sheet that indicates all the municipal storm water discharge points in town. They talked about additional testing sites and discharge locations. In the his report, the wetlands enforcement officer, Vito, reported that vegetation has been cut around and inside the Strickland Skating pond, and he spoke with the Boy Scout working on

Movies Madness is back on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. No reservation is required. September is mystery movies of the 30’s and 40’s. Featured movies will be I Cover the Waterfront with Claudette Colbert, Charlie Chan in London, Little Caesar with Edward G. Robinson, Angels with Dirty Faces, with James Cagney and the Hound Baskervilles in that order. Movies descriptions are available at the Center. This is a great relaxing way to spend a fall afternoon with friends and neighbors. The movies are free along with the popcorn. The Senior Cafe is open for lunch every Monday,

Wednesday and Friday. Lunch is served at noon and reservations for meals must be made 24 hours prior. Monthly menus are available at the Center. All lunches are served with milk and coffee or tea. They are provided by CRT and served by our volunteers. The suggested donation is $2. A presentation on the new Gatekeepers Program will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 15, at 12:30 p.m. Not only are seniors invited, but people in the public that come in contact with senior citizens on a daily basis. This presentation will focus on noticeable changes in a senior’s physical appearance, mental or emotional state, physical changes or living conditions.

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Historical Society

œÂ§š–™Ž

The Middlefield Historical Society will meet on Thursday, Sept 2, at 7 p.m. in the Community Center. They will meet each Thursday until May. Walk-ins and new members always welcome. Membership is only $10 per year. For more information, call 860-349-0665.

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The Gatekeeper program is part of St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eldercare Solutions. Complimentary breakfast will be served on Thursday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m. Chef Jorge Adorno from Apple Rehab in Middletown will be providing a delicious breakfast. No reservation is required. Free Blood Pressure clinics are held every first and third Wednesday at 12:15. In September, they will be on the 1st and 15th. Play Bocce on Tuesdays at 6 p.m. Just bring a lawn chair! Refreshing cold drinks are served. Knitters/Crocheters meet every Thursday morning at 9:30 a.m. and every Tuesday at 1 p.m. Set back starts up again on Tuesdays at 1 p.m. beginning on Sept. 1. Foot care is provided by Connecticut Visiting Nurses every third Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m, The cost is $30, and it includes a soaking, assessment, toe nail clipping and massage. Appointments can be made by calling the Center. For Baby Boomers or those getting ready to retire, on Tuesday, Oct. 5, at 5, the Center will present a program on understanding Medicare and supplemental insurance and also probate issues and documents you should have for planning. The Middlefield Senior Center is located in the Community Center at 405 Main Street. Call Antoinette Astle at 860-349-7121 for information or to make reservations for any programs.

The transfer station will be closed on Sept 6 for Labor day, but open on Tuesday, Sept. 7, from 8 a.m. to 7:45 p.m.

Friday, August 27, 2010

Shred-it event On Saturday, Sept. 18, the Lions Club of Middlefield will host a Shred-it event with trucks provided by Connecticut Recycling Recovery Authority, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Colmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church. Bring your personal records, bank statements, financial papers, credit card information and other financial and personal assets to be shredded. This is a free community event; a donation to the Lions Club of Middlefield would be greatly appreciated. Come enjoy coffee with the Lions volunteers, protect your ID and get safe in the process.

Produce collections End-of-summer produce collections will be held at John Lyman School on Thursdays, Sept. 9 and 30. Students will be collecting home-grown vegetables and fruits in the boxes in the John Lyman School lobby on these days between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Donations from the community are welcome. The produce will be delivered to the residents of Sugarloaf Senior Housing in Middlefield and Mauro Meadows in Durham. Contact Margo Novak, John Lyman School teacher, at 860-349-7240 or mnovak@rsd13.org.

Portfolio Workshops The Arts Center at Killingworth offers several ongoing, hands-on Portfolio Workshops for artists and students. Art Portfolio Consultations guide adults and teens to develop a comprehensive portfolio for admission to college art programs. Set and achieve specific portfolio goals, tailored to the requirements of individual programs, to create a collection of your best, original, completed artwork. Fine tune your existing portfolio or develop a new one. Schedule your private consultations at 860-6635593 or email artscenterkillingworth@gmail.c om. Visit www.artscenterkillingworth.org.


In Our Libraries

Friday, August 27, 2010

Durham Library

Middlefield Federated Church Youth Group

Levi Coe Library Hours: The library is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays. Visit www.leviecoe.com or call the library at 860-349-3857 for information or to register for any program. You can also renew, reserve and check your library record on the website. The library will be closed, Monday, Sept. 6, for Labor Day. Facebook.com: Be sure to check out the Levi E. Coe Library’s Facebook page for new events and news. Library Passes: Summer is waning. Connecticut State Parks and Forests Day Pass can be checked out for two days and is used to cover the cost of parking at state parks and forests where there is an established parking charge. The pass can also be used to cover the admission fee for up to two adults and four children at state historical sites and exhibit centers at Dinosaur, Fort Trumbull and Gillette Castle state parks. The pass is valid through Dec. 21. Old State House pass provides free admission for up to two adults and two children.At the Old State House, expect to find historically restored rooms, guided tours, an exhibit blending U.S. history, state government, civics and citizenship, and an interactive floor dedicated to the history of Hartford. Story Time: The fall story time will resume on Wednesday, Sept. 8, at 10:30 a.m. Come in and enjoy some great children’s stories and some great company. Regis-

Posing along with 67 new friends, 10 members of the Middlefield Federated Church Youth group stand on the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum with the skyline of Philly in the background and a furious thunder storm about to burst at any moment. See if you can find Sierra Manning, Anastasia Koch, Aubree and Marilyn Keurajian, Erin Holden, Alec and Pat Bandzes, Alexander Staddon, Jen Ochterski and Jesse Azevedo. This was the fourth time the group has partnered with YouthWorks, Inc., but the first time serving homeless in a city this size with temperatures from 95 to 105 degrees every day. Happy to be back home, but happy to have made new friends and served in His name, the kids are already thinking about next year’s trip. Photo by Bryce Johnson, YouthWorks, Inc. tration is required by calling the Children’s Room at 860349-3857 ext. 2. The Levi Coe Book Club will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 15, from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. to discuss The Help by Kathryn Stockett and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows. The club encourages people to come even if they haven’t read the two books to discuss what they’ve read over the summer.

children’s titles include The Body at the Tower by Y.S. Lee, Skyclan’s Destiny by Erin Hunter, New Girl in Town by Julia DeVillers, A Pirate’s Guide to First Grade by James Preller and Roberto and Me by Dan Gutman. To view anticipated arrival dates for new titles, visit www.leviecoe.com, click on Activities and Events and go

SUDOKU ANSWER

to monthly calendars. New DVDs: Furry Vengeance, Four Seasons Lodge, Date Night, Death at a Funeral, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Mother, The Ghost Writer, Kick-Ass, My Baby Can Talk: First Signs and more. Stop by and view the expanded collection. For more information, visit www.leviecoe.com.

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Hours: Regular library hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Visit www.durhamlibrary.org to search the catalog, review your account, register for a program or renew your materials online. For information or to register for a program by phone, call 860-3499544. Be a PAL: September is PALS membership month. Please join, and support all the terrific programs and new initiatives that PALS funding makes possible. The library is looking for members who can volunteer for projects including Taste of Durham, the annual book sale, flamingo flockings and more. PALS stands for Public Association of Library Supporters. Summer Reading Program Results: It was a banner summer for reading at the library. A total of 8,371 books were read by 733 registrants, that represents a 29 percent increase in books read and 15 percent increase in participants over last year. Meanwhile 594 people attended 21 programs, ranging from Mystic Aquarium touch tank, sea glass jewelry to pirate cartooning and kahuna hula. Thanks to PALS who provide the support every year for all these special events. The Book Lover’s Circle will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 1, at 7:30 p.m. to discuss Skinny Dip by Carl Hiaasen. Copies of the book are available at the library. Everyone is invited to join this informal discussion. The Mystery Book Club will meet on Tuesday, Sept. 21, at 7:30 p.m. to discuss Blacklist by Sara Paretsky. New titles include The Cobra by Frederick Forsyth, Three Stations, an Arkady Renko Novel by Martin Cruz Smith, Last Night at Chateau Marmont by Lauren Weisberger and The Last Lie by Stephen White. The Perfect Happiness by Santa Montefiore, Almost Perfect, Fool’s Gold Trilogy by Susan Mallery, Out of Mind, a Court of Angels Novel by Stella Cameron, Austin McKet-

tricks of Texas by Linda Lael Miller and Garrett McKettricks of Texas by Linda Lael Miller are all available in large print.

27

Auditions by Appointment Info: 860-828-0154


Town Times

28

BOS

(from page 1)

which is equal to “No Thru Traffic,” because it includes trucks. In fact, “No Thru Traffic” signs are not legal and need to come down in Durham because they are misleading, Francis said. This includes Talcott Lane and Maple Avenue. The selectmen approved the motion to remove “No Thru Traffic” signs on Talcott Lane and Maple Avenue and make sure the “No Thru Truck” sign that is also on Maple Avenue is visible. Resignation, resolutions and requests The selectmen accepted the resignation of Wendy Manemeit from the Public Safety Committee. Two authorizing resolutions were granted to the first selectman. The first to enter into an agreement with the Connecticut State

Library for an Historic Documents Preservation Grant of $3,000; second to enter an agreement with the State Department of Environmental Protection for a STEAP grant for the Pickett Lane Culvert Project at Allyn Brook. The selectmen also approved two requests; one from P.A.L.S. to serve alcohol at the Durham Public Library’s annual reunion on Friday, Aug. 27, 2010, and from Steven Angelo for use of town roads for a charity bicycle race, Bruce’s Ride, on Sunday, Oct. 30, 2010. Old/new business The grand opening of the Durham Activity Center is scheduled for Sept. 19 from 1 to 3 p.m. with an open house for the public. Construction started this week on Route 68 and is anticipated to end Sept. 10. In new business, Francis said she will be attending

Friday, August 27, 2010 Meeting dates

freshmen orientation at the high school. She also said the selectmen are scheduled to talk to high school students throughout the year as they did last year, however Francis wants a different format to create more discussion with students.

The regular meeting on Sept. 27 was rescheduled for Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. A Public Hearing on Storm water Ordinance was set for Sept. 20 at 8 p.m. A Special Town Meeting will be held Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. for the following purpose: to transfer $287 from Contingency to Recreation Expenses in the 2009-10 fiscal year; to transfer $166 from Contingency to Household Hazardous Waste in the 2009-10 fiscal year; to transfer $8,651 from Skating Pond Repair Reserve Fund to Skating Pond Repairs and $2,845 in the 2009-10 fiscal year and $5,806 in the 2010-11 fiscal year; to transfer up to $81,705 from Building Maintenance Reserve to Public Works Project for Storm water Permit Site Improvements in the 2010-11 fiscal year; to approve carryovers totaling $75,043 into the fiscal year 2010-11 budget

She also announced that the superintendent of District 13, Susan Viccaro, said a decision was made at the executive level to not use the crossing guard on Pickett Lane behind Strong School. Also school related, Francis reported that Regional School District 13 is scheduled to receive $354,043 of the $110 million the state is giving from the federal Education Jobs Fund (Ed Jobs) program. This money will provide assistance to local education agencies to save or create education jobs in the 2010-11 school year for early childhood, elementary and secondary education.

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(Emergency Services Facility $66,873; Maintenance $6,758; Clean Energy Task Force Grant $1,412); to approve an amendment to the Ordinance to Provide Property Tax Relief for Emergency Service volunteers. The meeting adjourned after an executive session on the Blue Trail Range.

Want to cut back the cost of owning your home? The Home Energy Solutions (HES) program, a residential in-home service, helps homeowners reduce their energy use and cost by providing professional energy assessments and weatherization improvements. This program is funded by you! All CL&P and UI electric rate payers subsidize this program through the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. Participating in the Home Energy Solutions program can save you hundreds of dollars a year on your energy bills. Not only does the HES program save you money, it decreases our country’s consumption of coal and oil, resulting in less air pollution. For $75, 10 percent of the service’s worth, Competitive Resources Inc. (CRI) will perform your energy audit. In addition to providing the cost-effective, thorough, and environmentally beneficial services of the HES program, CRI will be donating funds to the CT Sierra Club for every home that participates in the program. Go to http://connecticut.sierraclub.org/ to print out a coupon provided by CT Sierra Club for an additional $25 off the $75 cost of your energy audit. Visit http://www.hesprogram.com/ for additional information on the HES Program and to sign up for your home energy audit. You can also view an informational video and customer testimonials at http://www.hesprogram.c om/video-listings/.


Town Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

Middlesex County Business Expo

tertainment this year,” says Nick Curci, president of Connecticut Expos. “We are sensitive to the impact that the current recession is having on the families in the Northeast, so we are offering free admission to all attendees who visit our website by printing a free admission VIP pass to the expo.” The Connecticut Expo Center is located at 265 Reverend Moody Overpass, Hartford, CT 06120. Admission is $10 at the door (kids 12 and under, free). A portion of the proceeds from this event will be donated to Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

This years’ Comcast Connecticut Women’s Expo is bigger and better than ever before with many new exhibitors, sponsors, seminars and stage events. The soap opera star appearances from “Days of our Lives,” “All my Children” and “One Life to Live” will surely draw a record crowd. Attendees will have an entire weekend full of unique shopping and en-

Visit www.ctexpos.com for event details and to download a free VIP admission pass.

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The CRHS reunion for the graduating classes of 1979, 1980 and 1981 is scheduled for Oct. 16. Contact Steve Annino at finorugby@aol.com for details.

wellness tour will be at the event all weekend to provide free health screenings to attendees, including total cholesterol levels, blood pressure, bone density, glucose levels, waist circumference and body mass index. These screenings will provide critical foundations for early disease detection and prevention. The value of these screenings is $140 per individual.

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It’s no wonder that the Comcast Connecticut women’s expo attracts more than 16,000 visitors each year. This highly anticipated event continues to offer a truly interactive experience designed just for women. Discover new beauty breakthroughs, meet your favorite

daytime drama stars, plus visit over 400 exhibits and enter to win a shopping spree worth $500 at the Windsor Price Chopper grocery store. Eric Martsolf, who plays Brady Black on NBC’s “Days of Our Lives,” will appear on Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. and on Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. He will be providing attendees with a free personalized autographed photo. Free special stage events include Dress Barn fashion show, Totally Kickin Fitness/Kelly K’s Sensual Dance, kickboxing, Kathy Faber fashion show, active wear fitness fashion show, fitness step/Hip Hop blue fish presentation, Zumba dance fitness demonstration and ballroom dance instruction. The AARP/Walgreens

1165350

Durham 60+ Club will resume meetings on Monday, Sept. 13, at the United Churches of Durham Fellowship Hall at the corner of Route 68 and Main. The blood pressure clinic will be held at noon with the regular meeting at 1 p.m. There will be a bake sale and produce sale which the public is welcome to attend.

The eighth annual Comcast Connecticut Women’s Expo will take place on Saturday, Sept. 11, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 12, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Connecticut Expo Center in Hartford. Attendees will experience psychic readings, free samples, shopping with hundreds of unique vendors, prizes, celebrity appearances, fashion shows, book signings, live demonstrations, beauty makeovers and free health screenings by AARP/Walgreen’s.

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The Middlesex County Business to Business Expo is just around the corner. Don’t miss the opportunity to be part of Connecticut’s premiere business showcase. For over a quarter of a century, this fall tradition continuously grows as some of the finest names in the business will be present. Expo 2010 will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 27, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., followed by a Chamber of Commerce executive evening event from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza in Cromwell. This year’s show is sure to please everyone with a wide array of products and services presented by over 100 local, state and national vendors. Expo 2010 will be host to seminars, workshops, the Middlesex County Health and Wellness Fair, Middlesex County Fall Career Fair along with the Kick Off Breakfast and Key Note Luncheon with special guest speakers. If you would like more information about this year’s event or to participate, contact Johanna Bond at 860347-6924 or johanna@middlesexchamber.com.

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Town Times

30

Friday, August 27, 2010

The soldiers are marching again! In anticipation of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the Middlesex County Historical Society is pleased to sponsor a living history event, an encampment of Company G, Fourteenth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry on Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The General Joseph Mansfield House backyard will be alive with demonstrations of camp skills and cooking, drilling, and firearms demonstrations. Participants will be able to interact with the reenactors who are recognized for their high standards of authenticity. Company G’s present membership has five members whose ancestors fought with the original 14th Connecticut. The civilian women of the group will be presenting activities performed by women on the

home front that contributed to the Northern War effort. The day’s events will also include a performance of Civil War era music at 11 a.m. by the ensemble Back Swamp. The group consists of local musicians Mary Cooke, Joe Mayer and Nancy Meyers on fiddle/violin, Wayne LePard and Tom Worthley on guitar, and Ron Krom on accordion. Songs by Middletown’s own Henry Clay Work will stir the audience along with traditional love ballads like “Lorena” and “Shenandoah.” At 12:30 p.m., William Hosley will present his new program, “Monumental Accomplishment: The Civil War and the Making of History.” Prior to the Civil War there was no tradition of public memorialization, almost no statues or monuments commemorating

great events or deeds in the life of our country, and only a small emerging corpus of historical narrative and scholarship. After the Civil War, the supply and demand for these things surged. It was not an accident. The Civil War, an event of cataclysmic emotional and cultural significance, coincided with a wave of nostalgia and loss induced by the transformation of an agrarian society into an urban industrial society. The period’s new engineering capabilities enabled the ultimate expression of this newfound turn to remembrance; the remnants include much of our most inspiring public sculpture, a wide layer of art and material culture, and some of our most auspicious public buildings and landmarks, including the Connecticut State Capitol. Bill will pro-

vide an armchair tour of Civil War monuments, art and material culture in Connecticut and related places. Bill Hosley, the principal of Terra Firma Northeast, is an independent scholar, cultural resource consultant, planner, writer and photographer. He was a curator and exhibition developer at the Wadsworth Atheneum, most recently working on and writing the exhibition catalog for “Sam and Elizabeth: Legend and Legacy of Colt’s Empire.” Admission for this event is $5, with children under 12 free. In the event of heavy rain, the encampment will be cancelled, but the music and talk will be held. The Mansfield House, headquarters of the Middlesex County Historical Society, is located at 151 Main St. in Middletown. Call 860-346-0746.

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Our e-mail addresses: news@towntimes.com advertising@towntimes.com


Town Times

Friday, August 27, 2010

31

24th annual Rockfall Symposium

Zilkha Gallery in Middletown presents “Connectivity Lost”

The 24th annual Rockfall Symposium titled, “Changes to Regional Planning – New Opportunities to Share State & Local Services,” will be held on Friday, Oct. 8, from 9 a.m.– 12:15 p.m. at Essex Steam Train & Riverboat in Essex. Four distinguished speakers will help participants understand what can be done to achieve necessary efficiencies and assure citizen participation to keep and improve Connecticut’s quality of life. They are: David Kooris, vice president and Ct. director of Regional Plan Association, Stamford; Emerging Regions - The Context for Middlesex County John E. Harmon, Professor Emeritus CCSU Department of Geography; Rational Regions - Looking at Connecticut’s Tangle of Overlapping Regions Linda Krause, executive director Connecticut River Estuary Regional Planning Agency, Old Saybrook; Regional Planning Options in the Lower Connecticut River Valley - How are we different? Tim Brennan, executive director, Pioneer Valley Regional Planning Organization, Springfield, Mass.; Choosing to Collaborate - Innovative Ways to Get Cities and Towns to Work Together Who Should Attend? Local elected and appointed officials, land use planners, developers, architects, attorneys, real estate agents, educators, town planning, zoning, wetlands and appeals board and commission members, and all who are concerned with effective community planning. Registration: The Symposium fee of $50 includes all materials and coffee breaks. A reduced fee of $45 is offered to those who respond prior to Oct. 1. Registration is on a first-come, firstserved basis and must be received by Oct. 4. Optional buffet lunch must be ordered in advance. No refunds can be made after Oct. 7. Schedule: 9 a.m.-12:15

Connections between the systems that shape our existence are frayed, eroded, even gone. A major shift in our social environment has occurred, removing the direct and instinctual connection with our fellow man and environment. Instead, simple interactions have become complex, awkward, tenuous, requiring mediation and facilitation. Points of interface, of systems coming together, are no longer seamless, but instead have broader environmental and social implications. We may have hundreds of “friends” on Facebook, yet we are lonely; we have no idea of the origins of the foods we eat; a landscape of parking lots and big-box stores has supplanted rural or agricultural lands. We have come to rely on, believe

p.m., program (8:30 a.m. registration); 12:30-1 p.m., optional catered lunch; 12:30, optional ride on the Essex Steam Train. (To reserve seats at the group rate, call 860-767-0103 and mention Rockfall Symposium. See www.essexsteamtrain.com.) Program and registration information available at www.rockfallfoundation.org or contact the Rockfall Foundation office at 860-347-0340. The Rockfall Foundation, located in Middletown, supports environmental education, conservation programs and planning initiatives in Middlesex County. Its primary goal is to help promote a healthy balance in Middlesex County between development and environmental conservation.

in and inhabit an abstracted, constructed reality. The exhibition Connectivity Lost presents the work of nine international artists, known and emerging, working in a range of media, that addresses the ways we are estranged from each other and from the environment in which we live. Artists working in painting, installation, video, prints, photography and mixed media include Daniel Alcalá, Chris Ballantyne,

Richard Barnes, Matthew Bryant, Brian Collier, Maria Hedlund, Jason Middlebrook, Matthew Moore and Lucy+Jorge Orta. Connectivity Lost will be on view in Wesleyan University’s Zilkha Gallery from Sept. 11 through Dec. 6. The public is invited to attend the opening reception on Friday, Sept. 10, from 5 to 7 p.m. with a gallery talk at 5:30 p.m. For information, visit www.wesleyan.edu/cfa or call 860-685-3355.

Last baked bean supper This is your last chance to enjoy a traditional baked bean supper in the air-conditioned Fellowship Hall building located at the corner of Route 68 and Main Street in Durham on Fridays, Sept. 3. The supper will feature dishes such as baked beans, scalloped corn, macaroni dishes, salads and homemade breads and pies. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children under 10. Serving begins at 6 p.m. and all are welcome.

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Town Times

32

Friday, August 27, 2010

A day in the life of an explorer By Steven Tyc Special to the Town Times

however three explorer posts; Middlefield ESU Explorer post #82, Durham exSome teenagers spend plorer post and Killingworth their spare time with video explorer post have chosen to games or just sleeping late, spend their free time learning about fire fighting and emergency medical services. On Saturday, Aug. 21, early in the morning, the groups met at the Middlefield Volunteer Fire Department’s t r a i n i n g building for some handson training. group Above, Captain Russ Donovan shows The Jay Norton, Ryan Salke, Jerrod Ravid was fortunate to have capand Chris Ziemba proper method for tains Roger

hose and nozzle.

Kindschi and Russ Donavan from the Meriden Fire Department, as well as Battalion Chief John Ricci of the Middletown Fire Department as their instructors for the training, they were also joined by advisors and other members of the fire department. The group of explorers was there to learn new skills that they can potentially use when they become volunteer firefighters or if they pursue a career in fire fighting. The skills they were trained in were roof ventilation; pulling ceilings which is necessary to ensure there is no extension at fires. They learned how to breach walls and search and rescue techniques. Being an explorer is belonging to a group who is dedicated to learning about emergency services. For

Above, a group of explorers learn from Battalion Chief John Ricci about techniques for breaching walls and venting a structure.

All photos by Steve Tyc

some it is a stepping stone to either a career in fire fighting or for others it could be a stepping stone into the emergency medical field. I am sure they will all agree it was quite warm outside, however there was plenty of cool drinks on hand and

everyone learned something new, thanks to Roger, Russ and John for taking their free time to teach very valuable lessons. Anyone with an interest in becoming an explorer can contact the Middlefield fire house at 860-349-7124.

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Above, Steven Tyc is assisted by Battalion Chief John Ricci and demonstrates breaching walls and crawling through them in case it is needed to find other means of exiting a structure.


Town Times Sports

Friday, August 27, 2010

33

Commemorating VC Hawks football The Coginchaug Football team wanted to commemorate their years of playing with Vinal Tech, so they burried a jersey where the new end zone will be once construction is completed at the Coginchaug athletic field. The “ceremony” took place on Wednesday, Aug. 25, the best time to do it while the field is in the process of being constructed. Helping “make the past part of the future” were co-captains Zach Faiella and David Wheeler. This wil be Coginchaug’s firs year playing as their own team.

Above, the athletic facility looking toward where the grand stand will be. Right, the track and field under construction.

Facility (Continued from page 3)

Photo by Hans Pedersen Photos by Bill Currlin

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date for the entire project. According to Meader, the project, which started on July 1, is still anticipated to be finished mid-November. Aside from parking, the eight-lane synthetic track is in the process of being layered with crushed stone, a pavement sub base, asphalt binder course, asphalt top course and track surfacing. The new field is also in progress, and will include layers of finished stone, sand and rubber, and the synthetic turf. Currently, neither of these look as they will when finished, but they are moving along. The old surface of the tennis courts have been pulverized, but won’t see any significant construction for a while because “it is nowhere near as intense of a project as the field,” said Meader. “This is our biggest focus.” Only the foundation and slab for the public restroom and locker room will be constructed due to lack of funds. Similarly, only the light bases — not the light poles — will be put into the ground. Meader clarified that there is no press box included in the project, but the grand stand, which will seat 1,000, will be assembled beginning next week. Building Committee chair Bill Currlin said he is very happy with the construction project so far as everything is working on schedule.


Town Times Sports

34

Friday, August 27, 2010

Super sophomores gain all area team honors the team in steals and is a tough defender. Mancinelli is the team’s point guard and floor general. She led the team in assists and steals and was second on the team in scoring. Sam sees the whole floor when running the offense and hits the open man. She can also penetrate to the hoop and score when she sees the opening. Mancinelli was named the team’s co-MVP along with Taylor Edinger. Sam was named All-Shoreline conference honorable mention as well. Esposito plays forward for the team and was third on the team in scoring, second in assists and second in steals. Her ability and speed to get down the floor on the fast break or hit the open jumper makes her a double treat at all times. Many times she was assigned the job of guarding

By John Esposito Special to Town Times

Audrey Biesak, Lauren Esposito and Samantha Mancinelli were named to Middletown Press’s All-Area team for girls’ basketball. Dubbed the “Super Sophs” by CRHS coach Tony Calcagni, these three ladies helped lead the team to its most successful season in school history. The team made it all the way to the Final Four of the Class S state tournament. Biesak is the team’s shooting guard and led the team in scoring for the second year in a row. She was also named to the All-Shoreline Conference First team. She has the ability to get open and hit the big shot in two ways, by driving the lane or with her lethal jump shot. This was integral to the team’s success. She was also third on

Fun Run 8

From left, Lauren Esposito, forward; Samantha Mancinelli, guard; Audrey Biesak, guard. their opponent’s best player because of her tenacious defense. She was awarded the team’s sixth man award for being the sparkplug off the bench. All three ladies are coming back for their junior years. With the addition of

senior captains Amanda Boyle and Cassidie Cade and a very talented group of players, the CRHS Lady Blue Devils are poised to again be a force to be reckoned with in the SLC and Class S for the 2010-11 season.

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Durham Fun Run results for the Aug. 17, run: Colin Giannini 19:26, Zach Moller-Marino 20:26, Walter Tregoning 20:46, Eric Bogdan 21:14, Noel Roberts 21:29, Paul Cienewicz 22:22, Larry Hodge 23:35, Lauren Hodge 23:35, Stephen Bogdan, 24:48, Mike Moller-Marino 24:39, Guy Pulino 24:56, Scott Ely 25:19, Olivia DeFrances 30:13, Rebecca Durfee 36:08, Pam Durfee 36:47 and Madison Kowalski 36:47.

Fun Run 9 Durham Fun Run results for the Aug. 24 run, the last one for the year. Ed Mokoski 20:25, Kevin Markowski 20:40, Eric Bogdan 20:49, Noel Roberts 20:55, Bill Varhue 21:40, Larry Hodge 21:43, Chris Slight 23:35, Scott Ely 24:59, Donald Rawlings 25:38, Jim Ledford 26:11, Becca Durfee 30:30, Pam Durfee 30:35 and Madison Kowalski.

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Residential Wiring Specialist Landscape Lighting Design • Install • Service

Piano For Sale Yamaha upright piano for sale with oak finish. Well maintained in excellent condition.$2.500. Call Connie at 860-349-6850.

One Schwinn men’s and one Peugeot ladies’ lightweight 28 inch bike, 21 speed, original price $350. Ridden only a few miles each- asking $65 each. Also new bike carrier for car $45. Call Pete or Florence at 860-632-7211.


Town Times Obituaries

Rosemarie C. Salzano

Rosemarie Clemintina Toannoia Salzano, or “Mom,” “Grammy Rosey,” “Grammy Water,” or “Ro” depending on who you are … she was amazing. She was loved and respected by everyone lucky enough to know her. Never said a bad word about anybody. Didn’t care what other people thought of her because she knew that whatever she was doing, it was the right thing to do. A loving and moral person, a devout, faithful person. Always focused on the well-being of everyone around her before her own. She was, and is, and will probably always be the most unselfish, altruistic person most of us have ever known. If some people pass on to become angels, I know none of

Suzanne “Sue” Hendley Suzanne “Sue” (Atwell) Hendley, 79, wife of the late John Redford Hendley Sr., of Powder Hill Rd., Middlefield, died Wednesday, Aug. 18, 2010, at her home. Sue was born in Middletown, April 14, 1931, the daughter of the late Stanley and Elizabeth (Nicholson) Atwell, Sr. Prior to her retirement she was a medical assistant at Middlesex OB/GYN. Sue was a member of the Middlefield Federated Church, serving as a Sunday school teacher for several years; served on the Board of Appeals in Middlefield, was an avid bowler and a member of the Red Hat Society. She is survived by her two sons, James A. Hendley of Ledyard and John R. Hendley, Jr. of Middlefield; two

daughters, Jan H. Frederiksen of Centerbrook and Judy H. Clapp and her husband David of Cromwell; a brother, Stanley Atwell, Jr. of Middlefield; seven grandchildren, Dylan Passinese, Hayley Frederiksen, Clayton Clapp, Suzanne Sirico, Courtney Clapp, Cody Hendley, and Jessica Hendley; and four great grandsons, Nickolas Passinese, Collin Clapp, Kristopher and Matthew Sirico; also several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her special friend, Porter Pratt.

Sue’s family is grateful for the care and compassion given by Timi Eckhoff.

Funeral Services were held at the Middlefield Federated Church, Main Street, Middlefield. Burial will be private at Middlefield Cemetery. Those who wish may send memorial contributions to Connecticut Chapter of the American Parkinson Disease Association, 27 Allendale Dr., North Haven, CT 06473.

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Grandma loved everybody

Grandma had quite a mischievous side … Even in her last few months at the rest home, you might catch her launching ice cubes off a spoon at you or giving a stealthy eye-roll at something Grandpa said. She was especially sassy when she was sticking up for us. One afternoon while getting dressed for church, grandpa told me I couldn’t wear sandals. Grandma scoffed at him and said, “Oh please, Jesus wore sandals!” I don’t think Grandpa had much of a comeback for that.

us would be surprised if she was tryng out her new wings right now.

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Remembering Grandma Salzano

They all had a little heart drawn in one of the corners with a short note or an “I love you” written inside. And even though over the course of a dozen years the pen might have faded away, I think we could still all pick out which corner she wrote it on from looking at it every night.

35

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Rosemarie C. (Tannoia) Salzano, 84, of Stow Street, Middlefield, beloved wife of James Salzano, passed away Sunday, Aug, 8, 2010, at Middlesex Hospital. Rosemarie was born Sept. 9, 1925 in New Haven, the daughter of the late Joseph and Berta (Roy) Tannoia, and raised by her aunt and uncle, Philip and Rose (Broncotti) Tannoia. She was employed with Armstrong Rubber Company during World War II. Throughout her life she was an active member of the St. Colman’s Church Community. Rosemarie was a foster mother through Catholic Charities for many years. Her greatest joy was being a mother, grandmother and great grandmother. In addition to her husband, she is survived by her children, Theresa Bagenski and her husband Robert, James L. Salzano, Jr. and his wife Lynn, MarieAnn Salzano, Steven Salzano and his wife Carolyn, and Christine Salzano; two sisters, Adele Nuzzo and Dorothy Shepa; a twin brother, Richard Tannoia; eight grandchildren, Florence Bagenski, Thomas Bagenski, Heidi-Lynn Bagenski, James P. Salzano and his wife Amanda, Maygan Salzano-Morello and her husband Jake, Grant Salzano, Heather Salzano, and Derek Salzano; five great grandchildren; and many foster children. She was predeceased by a son, Stephen John Salzano; a sister, Clementina Martino; and two brothers, Onesime and Dominic Tannoia. The funeral was held at St. Colman with burial at All Saint’s Cemetery in North Haven. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Rosemarie’s name to Catholic Charities Development Office 839 -841 Asylum Avenue, Hartford, CT 06105. To share memories or express condolences online, please visit www. biegafuneralhome.com. The family wishes to thank the parishioners of St. Colman as well as the residents of Rockfall and Middlfield for their support.

and everything. Honestly I think the only thing she ever disliked were those darn squirrels that kept the little birds from eating the bread crumbs and seeds she put out for them on the back deck. She did everything she could for everybody else before even beginning to think about what she wanted. And it was all out of love. While raising her own children, she fostered hundreds of kids through Catholic Charities for many years. It wasn’t a hard thing for her to do, she had all the love in the world to give and the more she could share it, the happier she was. We all have our memories of Grandma. And those memories, special to each of us, are what warms our hearts and keeps a faint smile on our face through our tears. Many of us have memories of staying overnight at Grandma’s. From Grandma smuggling Heidi and Lori from New York under blankets on her lap in the back seat just so she could keep them for the summer, to Maygan’s endless back scratches while we watched Wheel of Fortune. And we know from experience … Those were pretty good. Grandma always made cookies and if you were lucky enough, she taught you the secret family recipes. But she was also the Grandma who would start a flour fight while making those cookies, or who would go on a roller coaster with you despite being 70 years old at the time. We all got a quilt from Grandma, and they are the greatest things in the world.

DURHAM

Friday, August 27, 2010


Town Times

36 Jill B Colon, of 80 Licks Ice Cream in Durham, says the batch freezer that she’s standing in front of is really no different than her grandmother’s old ice cream maker, which she is holding. Photo by Stephanie Wilcox

Ice Cream

Friday, August 27, 2010 (Continued from page 5)

national level. If someone can help make this happen, they have a dozen or so national artists who are willing to sign up for flavors. In other words, their operation runs in a variety of ways. They’ll either create a flavor first, then hopefully meet the artist who it’s named after and share it with them. Or they meet an artist at a concert and are inspired to create a flavor. Or they come up with ideas but reach out to the artist first for their thoughts. “We always want their blessing,” said Johnny, “and most are flattered.” In fact, when they hand their busi-

ness cards to an artist, which are cleverly marketed guitar picks, they usually get a pick in return. In the near future, they hope to distribute products at festivals and restaurants across the U.S. and work with artists’ charities. To accomplish this, they need someone with a vision, be it an entrepreneur or restaurant/business person. In the meantime, they’re fueled by the fun and creativity between the two of them, and that is fueled by a love for ice cream adn rock ‘n roll. For more information,, visit www.80licks.com.

Independent Living at Masonicare Health Center

E

njoy Affordability and Peace-of-Mind

If you’re tired of shoveling snow, mowing the lawn and keeping up with home repairs, consider independent living on the Masonicare Health Center campus in Wallingford. “When we saw Masonicare’s independent living apartments, making the decision to downsize was easy. We have all the conveniences — and the freedom to just pack up and go wherever we want without worrying about a thing.“ Shirley & Chris Richter

With access to a host of activities, volunteering, spiritual services and amenities, it’s the perfect setting to enjoy a more relaxed lifestyle. Our over-55 apartment options vary in size and features, but all have: r One monthly rent that includes extended basic cable and all utilities except telephone r A 12-month lease contract r 24-hour emergency response and security services r On-site laundry room r4BGF DPOWFOJFOUQBSLJOH

r0QUJPOBMIPVTFLFFQJOH services, meal plan and online access r.BTPOJDBSF.FEJDBM0GGJDF Building just steps away with physicians and laboratory services r4IPVMEZPVOFFEJU QSJPSJUZ access to Masonicare Health Center, its hospital unit and rehab therapy units

This lifestyle is popular, so plan ahead by getting your application in now. For more information, call us at 203-678-7744.

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The independent living apartments at Masonicare Health Center include the Hawkins, Johnson and Wells Apartments.

Vote

(from page 1)

18, 1920. Burn got up and waved that letter around, saying that a mother’s advice is always the safest for a boy to follow. Mothers are always right. At that moment, with twothirds of the states having ratified the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, women finally won the right to vote. This is important because it opened up doors for females to participate in making some of the most important decision in history and they began to get their voices heard in other ways. That’s why today, I hit no roadblocks when I want to have a say in whether town budgets should pass or who will be our country’s president. I don’t even have to think twice about this privilege, but I wish I did. In the end, for the suffragists, it took 56 referendum campaigns directed at male voters, plus “480 campaigns to get legislatures to submit suffrage amendments to voters, 47 campaigns to get constitutional conventions to write woman suffrage into state constitutions, 277 campaigns to get state party conventions to include woman suffrage planks, 30 campaigns to get presidential party campaigns to include woman suffrage planks in party platforms and 19 campaigns with 19 successive congresses.” It also took women like our mothers, sisters or wives being thrown in jail where conditions were deplorable for demanding that American women be given the right to vote. So what are we doing to ensure that we don’t take all their courage for granted? The Young Women’s Leadership Program, of which I am a steering committee member, marked the occasion by holding a voter registration drive on the 90th anniversary, August 26, a day also recognized as Women’s Equality Day. Our goal is to get women ages 18-35 to register, as this group is the least likely to do so. So encourage your daughters to register, and encourage them to vote. It’s the least we can do to express our gratitude to those who earned us the right.


8-27-2010 Town Times Newspaper