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See you at the Durham Fair in 2010!

Volume 16, Issue 25

Serving Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall

Friday, October 2, 2009

Durham Fair, 90th edition, in the ‘books’ — 2009 boasts the usual array of food, fans, farm life & fun “I thought Friday started quiet in the morning, but we ended up with a very good-sized crowd by 5 p.m. On Saturday, the crowd really started to come in, and by 2 p.m. it got good-sized. Looking at Broadway and Canfield, there was no open space. That’s always a good sign, although there’s nothing scientific about it. On Sunday, there were still a few people, but unfortunately the weather wasn’t as beautiful as the rest of the weekend.” Gene Chiappetta, Durham Fair president

In this issue ... Business Briefs...............22 Calendar............................4 Durham Fair ......16-21 & 27 Obituaries .......................29 Sports ..............................24 Town & Library Briefs.11-15

Above, A.J. Alexander, 7, of Fox Hollow Farm in Goshen, holds her llamas Audrey Rose, left, and Shame on Us Musketeer. At right, a new state record pumpkin grown by Jason Traylor, of Preston. Below, crowds throng the walkways on Friday, a perfect fair day! More fair photos and information on pages 16-21 & 27.


A wildlifefriendly yard

Would you like to turn your yard into a haven for wildlife? Learn how at an upcoming workshop, Creating Backyard Wildlife Habitat:

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The symposium fee of $50 includes all materials and coffee breaks; the buffet is optional at $15. Advance registration is required. For program and registration information, visit www.rockfallfoundation.org or call (860) 347-0340.

Rockfall Symposium The 23rd annual Rockfall Symposium, “Green Light for

Corrections We strive to bring you the most accurate information available each week, but if you see something in Town Times that isn’t quite right, give our news department a call at (860) 349-8000, and we’ll do our best to make things right. In our last issue, we reported that the joint MiddlefieldMiddletown wind energy committee had received a $150,000 grant; unfortunately, they are only in the process of applying for such a grant. Also, they visited a functioning 1.5 megawatt generator at a high school in Portsmouth, R.I. In the same article, we reported that Marianne Corona had asked that Middlefield adopt Durham’s method of reading town meeting minutes at the end of a town meeting and accepting them. Reader Donia Viola pointed out that in recent years, that tradition has been mostly abandoned in Durham with voters routinely making a motion to suspend reading of the minutes in favor of going home more quickly.

Hedda Kopf to speak at library Hedda Kopf, associate professor at Quinnipiac University, returns to the Durham Public Library for another evening of stimulating conversation, thanks to the support of the Public Association of Library Supporters (PALS). On Wednesday, Oct. 7, from 7:30 to 9 p.m., Professor Kopf will discuss Phillip Roth’s Exit Ghost and on Wednesday, Nov. 4, the novel will be Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. Both titles deal with the indirect effects 9/11 has had on different segments of the population. Hedda Kopf has always been one of the library’s most popular guest speakers as she engages the imagination of her audience and shares her captivating interpretation of the material. Both programs are free, and all are welcome!

Class of 1969 reunion Durham High School Class of 1969 is having their 40th Reunion on Saturday, Oct. 24, at 6:30 p.m. at the San Souci Restaurant in Meriden. For info and reservations, contact Gail or Bill Thody at (860) 349-8094.

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To advertise in the Town Times, call Joy Boone at (860) 349-8026. Addy & Sons..............................20 J. Randolph Kitchens ................21 Affordable Excavation ...............24 J.C. Farm & Greenhouse ..........13 Allan’s Tree Service ..................27 KC Masonry...............................27 Allen Lawn Care........................20 Ken Marino Sales & Service .......7 APEC Electric............................27 Lema, William J., D.M.D............11 Auto Body Specialities ..............24 Lino’s Market ...............................2 Barillaro, Michael.......................12 Lyman Orchards........................17 Behling Builders ........................21 MHS Primary Care at Durham..12 Berardino Company Realtor .....36 Michael John’s Pizza...................7 Berlin Fair ..................................14 Micheli Unisex Styling Salon.....10 Binge, Bruce, contractor............22 Middlefield Democrats.................3 Bloomingdale’s by Mail Ltd. ......35 Middletown Plate Glass.............22 Boylin, Dr. William .......................3 Movado Farm ............................24 Brick Construction .....................21 Neil Jones Home Imp................23 Brockett Paving & Construction 27 Orthodontic Specialist of Cen. Ct.19 Cahill & Sons.............................20 Peaceful Healing .........................7 Carlton Interiors.........................15 Pet Stop.....................................24 Carmine’s Restaurant .................3 Petruzelo Agency Insurance.....27 Carolyn Adams Country Barn .....3 Prete Chiropractic Center..........10 Conroy, John, D.M.D.................17 Raintree Landscaping ...............24 CV Enterprises ..........................23 Realty Associates......................29 Desjarlais, Marsha, realtor ........29 RLI Electric ................................22 Durham Democratic Town Com. .. Rockfall Co. ...............................22 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 Durham Dental ..........................15 Saldibar Construction................22 Durham Healthmart Pharmacy ...5 Santi, Shirley .............................15 Family Tree Care ......................22 Sharon McCormick Design .......20 Ferguson & McGuire Ins. ..........13 Sisters Cleaning Service...........27 Fine Work Home Improvement.27 Skincare Studio ...........................6 Glazer Dental Associates............7 Southern Ct. State Univ. ...........15 Golschneider Painting...............21 Split Enz ....................................27 Grosolar.....................................10 T-N-T Home & Lawncare..........23 Hitching Post ...............................6 TD Banknorth ............................35 Home Works..............................20 Tile Renovators .........................23 Hunters Pool and Spas .............14 Torrison Stone & Garden ..........21 Huscher, Debbie, realtor ...........28 Uncle Bob’s Flower & Garden...11 Ianniello Plumbing.....................24 U.S. Insulation ...........................19 Independent Day School.......6, 11 VMB Custom Builders...............23 It’s A Dog’s Life .........................23 Whitehouse Construction..........20 J.C. Tonnotti Contractors ..........17 Whitney Ridge Stables..............21

Friday, October 2, 2009

Our Economy,” will be held on Friday, Oct. 9, from 8:30 to 12:15 p.m. at Middlesex Community College, 100 Training Hill Road in Middletown, in Chapman Hall. Five distinguished speakers will help participants understand what effects new green jobs, refreshed energy policy and progressive education will have on Middlesex County’s environment and economy. The program will be followed by an optional buffet lunch.

will be available. There is no fee for the workshop; however registration is required. Don’t delay to register — space is limited for this very popular workshop. For more information or to register, contact Vivian Felten, resource conservationist, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, at (860) 626-8258 ext 202, or vivian.felten@ct.usda.gov. The program is sponsored by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District and Project Green Lawn.

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VFW Post 10362 Middlefield/Rockfall has the honor of being the color guard during the Field of Flags ceremony on Saturday, Oct. 10, at 11 a.m. sharp on the town green. Assistance with the set-up of flags is needed for Friday, Oct. 9, at 9 a.m. Post Commander John Capega Jr. welcomes all members who are able to participate in this event.

Diversity on a Suburban Lot, Sunday, Oct. 4, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The workshop will take place at the home of Middletown resident Eleanore Milardo, who has transformed her lawn-dominated threequarter-acre suburban lot into a diverse array of habitats, now featuring 120 plant species that enhance the site’s value to wildlife. DEP wildlife biologist Peter Picone will give an on-site presentation and walking tour, describing the plant choices she has made, and the relationship between the native plants and the abundant insects, birds and mammals that now share the garden. Participants will gain an understanding of the four basic elements that wildlife need for all four seasons. Handouts

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Town Times Community Briefs

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Town Times

Friday, October 2, 2009

3 NEW FRIENDS: Kate Schulten, left, of Durham, and Mary of Uganda forged a new friendship last week while sharing stories and beads. See Guest Column on page 8 for the full story and an opportunity to meet these Ugandan children.

Photo by Jen Schulten

POETRY IN MOTION: Mrs. Leach’s 3/4 class performed original poems put to music and movement at the Sept. 17 assembly at John Lyman School. From left, Melissa Fowler, David Skelps, Alyssa Sperl, Tommy Koba, Aidan O’Connell and Sierra Astle. Photo by Betty Hadlock

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The Crown Jewel is Tarnished Peckham Park is potentially a “crown jewel” in Middlefield, but right now it looks depleted and deplorable. Mary Beth Johnson, the democratic candidate for First Selectman, calls for effective management of Peckham Park. The present First Selectman has been ineffective in overseeing Peckham Park, even though he is the chief administrator and executive officer of Middlefield. Crabgrass is conquering the ball fields, weeds grow in the brick paths, broken basketball nets hang down, 3/4 of the built-in bathrooms are closed, trashed tables are stashed in a park corner, and picnic tables need painting. The First Selectman failed in his responsibility to administer this jewel. Johnson’s administration recommends that Park and Rec commission continue to be responsible for field use and programs, while the Town crew is responsible for mowing fields, collecting trash, and maintaining bathrooms. Oversight of the Park should be by the First Selectman. If you meet Mary Beth Johnson at your door or an event, ask her how she could economically polish this crown jewel. Mary Beth has the answers. Vote for Mary Beth in November.

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EVERYONE’S INVITED TO THE PARTY: Last minute details are being finalized for the 75th anniversary Preparations are in full swing for the Middlefield Volunteer Fire Company’s 75th anniversary celebration parade and fireworks on Saturday, Oct. 10. Plan on spending the afternoon and evening celebrating this special occasion. The parade steps off at 4 p.m. from the Rockfall Garage . It will proceed down Main Street and conclude at Peckham Park. Entertainment and fireworks will conclude the day. Please show your support to all the firefighters.

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Town Times & Places

4 FRIDAY

October

October 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Theater A performance of The Woolgatherer, featuring Anita Vlad and Michael Eck, will be held at Oddfellows Playhouse, 128 Washington St. in Middletown, at 8 p.m. There will be readings by poets prior to the performance as well as an art exhibit. For tickets, call (860) 346-6051 or e-mail tickets@MiddleCityStage.org.

SATURDAY

October 3 Tag Sale Flea Market Notre Dame Church in Durham will hold its monthly tag sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be many items inside and out in the parking area. Breakfast and lunch are available in the Church Hall. Tag Sale The MOMS Club of Durham/Middlefield is holding a multi-family tag sale at 21 Main St. in Durham from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., with a rain date of Oct. 4. The tag sale will feature lots of baby and children’s clothes, equipment and toys. Proceeds of the tag sale will benefit the Susan G. Komen Foundation and the MOMS Club. Pasta St. James Episcopal Church, Rte. 81 and Little City Road in Higganum, will have a pasta night from 5 to 7 p.m. Enjoy spaghetti and meatballs with salad, bread and homemade desserts. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children under 12 and $7 for seniors. Take-out is available. For info, call (860) 344-1828. Farmers’ Market The Dudley Farm farmers’ market will run every Saturday, rain or shine, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at 2351 Durham Rd. (Route 77) in Guilford. For information, call (860) 349-3917. Walk on the Wild Side Potapaug Audubon presents a hiking nature program, at the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge, Salt Meadow Unit, 733 Old Clinton Rd. in Westbrook, at 1 p.m. Enjoy refreshments, including hotdogs, after the program. For info, call (860) 304-1650. Hazardous Collection Day Residents of Middlefield

and Durham may participate in a free hazardous waste collection held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Moody School, 300 Country Club Rd. in Middletown. Waste items collected include batteries, paints, automotive fluids, cleaning chemicals and more. Call (860) 347-7214 or (860) 278-3809 for info. Hammonassett Festival Celebrate nature and native America at Hammonassett State Park in Madison from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and tomorrow. Admission is $5, children under 10 are free. Visit www.hammonasset.org for information. Tea Party The Middlefield Women’s Club will hold tea party from 10 a.m. to noon at the Middlefield Community Center. Tea, treats, craft and photo are included. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for children three and up. Call Nina at (860) 349-3145 for reservations.

SUNDAY

October 4 12-Step Healing My Father’s House Retreat, 39 North Moodus Rd. in Moodus, offers a Catholic 12-step healing program every first Sunday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. This program is open to everyone. Call (860) 873-1581 or visit www.myfathershouse.com for info. Symposium The Unitarian Universalist Church, 328 Paddock Ave., in Meriden, will present “Awakening the Dreamer, Changing the Dream symposium from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Connect with people who care about environmental sustainability, spirituality and social justice. For info, visit www.uumeriden.org/dreamerevent. Car Show Middlesex County Historical Society’s annual antique and classic car and truck show and flea market will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pat Kidney field on Farm Hill Road in Middletown. Admission is $3, children under 12 admitted free. For

info, call (860) 346-0746. Wildlife Workshop Learn how to make your backyard a wildlife haven at a workshop “Creating Backyard Wildlife Habitat: Diversity on a Suburban Lot,” from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the home of Eleanore Milardo, in Middletown. DEP wildlife biologist Peter Picone will give an on-site presentation and walking tour. Registration is required for this free program by contacting Vivian Felten at (860) 626-8258 ext 202, or vivian.felten@ct.usda.gov. Train Show The New Haven Society of Model Engineers, Inc. will sponsor its second annual train show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Durham Fairgrounds Commercial Building. Dealers from around the state will have model railroad items and antique collectables. Tickets for adult are $6, for senior $5, children 5-12 years $1 and under five are free. For more information, visit www.nhsme.org or e-mail info@nhsme.org.

Friday, October 2, 2009

ing is all about from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at John Lyman School in the media center. All girls must be accompanied by an adult. For info, contact Lisa Deschnow at (860) 347-5768 ext. 3751.

short sleeved shirt/blouse. Call Antoinette at (860) 3497121 with questions.

WEDNESDAY

Business Networking The local chapter of Business Networking International will meet at the United Methodist Church on the South Green at 24 Old Church St. in Middletown at 7:30 a.m. today and every Friday. Contact Kirk Hagert at (860) 349-5626 for info. Hypnotist Dan LaRosa Vinal Technical School and the parent/faculty organization will host Dan LaRosa, the comedian hypnotist, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $9 for adults and $7 for students, sold at the door. Autumn Art Trail The public is invited to kick off the autumn art trail with an opening reception from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Rose Room, Clinton Town Hall, 54 East Main St. Tomorrow begins the free outdoor arts festival at Clinton Landing. Tickets to visit the studios are $10 for a weekend pass, free for children 12 and under. For tickets, call (860) 663-5593 or visit www.artscenterkillingworth.org Rockfall Symposium The 23rd annual Rockfall Symposium will be held at Middlesex Community College, 100 Training Hill Rd. in Middletown, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Symposium fee of $50 includes all materials and coffee breaks; the buffet is optional at $15. Advance registration is required. For program and registration information, visit www.rockfallfoundation.org or call the Rockfall Foundation at (860) 347-0340.

October 7

MONDAY

TOPS Durham TOPS Club meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. on the third floor of the Durham Town Hall. For information, call Naomi Klotsko at (860) 349-9558 or Bonnie Olesen at (860) 349-9433. Hedda Kopf in Durham Hedda Kopf, associate professor of Quinnipiac University, will discuss Phillip Roth’s Exit Ghost from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Durham Library. This book deals with the indirect effects 9/11 has had on different segments of the population. All are welcome. Middlefield Women The Middlefield Women’s Club will meet at 7 p.m. in the Middlefield Community Center. All are welcome.

October 5

THURSDAY

Stroke Club Middletown Stroke Club will meet at 1 p.m. in the community room at Sugarloaf Terrace in Middlefield. The Stroke Club meets the first Monday of every month. For info, call Ida at (860) 3449984, Ray at (860) 349-9226 or Ann at (203) 235-4275. Jim Calhoun The Middlesex Chamber of Commerce breakfast meeting will be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Cromwell from 7:45 to 9 a.m. The guest speaker is Jim Calhoun, UConn basketball coach. For tickets, call (860) 347-6924 or e-mail info@MiddlesexChamber.com.

TUESDAY

October 6 Uganda Children’s Choir The Destiny Africa Children’s Choir of Uganda will bring their joyous sound tonight at 7 p.m. at Coginchaug. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students and will only be sold at the door. All proceeds, including donations, will help fund the growth and maintenance of the Kampala Children’s Centre. Girl Scouting Come see what Girl Scout-

October 8 Art Guild The Art Guild of Middletown will present watercolorist Charles McCaughtry as their guest demonstrator at 7 p.m. at the Middlefield Federated Church, 390 Main St., Middlefield. The public is public is invited and welcome. A $3 donation is suggested for non-members. For info, call (860) 632-7334. Benefit Soup Supper The Fox Parish Center at St. Francis of Assisi Church, 10 Elm St. in Middltown, will host the Amazing Challenge Soup Supper from 5 to 7 p.m. Fill your bowl with soup and fill their bowl with donations to help support the Amazing Grace food pantry and St. Vincent DePaul Place. Call (860) 344-0097 or email ron@svdplace.org for information. Farmer’s Market The Durham Farmer’s Market returns to the town green from 3 to 6 p.m. Middlefield Flu Shot The Middlefield Senior Center will offer flu shots from 9 a.m. to noon. No appointment necessary. Bring insurance cards, including medicare card, and wear a

FRIDAY

October 9

SATURDAY

October 10

Fireman’s Parade The Middlefield Fire Department will celebrate 75 years with a parade at 4 p.m. beginning at Rockfall Garage and winding down Main Street to Peckham Park where entertainment and fireworks will conclude the day. Field of Flags The Field of Flags dedication ceremony will take place on the Middlefield Town Green at 11 a.m.


Friday, October 2, 2009

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Friday, October 2, 2009

Town Times

Board of Ed goes over athletic facility details, again By Chris Coughlin Special to the Town Times The Board of Education held their bi-monthly meeting this past Tuesday, Sept. 29, in the Memorial Middle School Library. The meeting began with board chairman Tom Hennick stating that this was going to be different than a normal Board of Education meet-

ing. Rather than discuss the typical topics, this meeting would be focused on the building projects going on at Coginchaug High School. First, however, Hennick presented board member Deb Golschneider with a pin commemorating her 10 years of service with the board. Bill Currlin, who is also chairman of the Building Committee, gave a brief back-

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ground on the facilities project taking place at Coginchaug. Several years ago, the board sat down and recognized that they were investing thousands of dollars every year in repairing the outdoor track, which is almost 30 years old. Not only that, but anyone who has seen the tennis courts near the high school knows that they are in serious need of repair. An engineer was hired by the board, and it was determined that the track was not repairable and that the most logical thing the town could do would be to replace it. At this point the Board of Education formed a Building Committee to further assess the current situation with the track and other athletic facilities near Coginchaug. The result of the study showed that there weren’t enough fields to hold larger events. Based on this, an architectural firm was hired to consider possible solutions for improving the athletic facilities at Coginchaug. These initial plans for replacing the track were passed in a referendum, but

hit some road blocks when it came to issues such as the 80 foot lights that are part of the proposed plan. The plans were redefined, and after some due diligence, the committee decided to hire a firm to design the future fields at Coginchaug. After taking many bids for the project, a firm named Clough Harbour and Associates (CHA) was chosen, based on their background with doing the type of architecture, engineering and landscaping that would fit the scope of this project. After bringing everyone up to speed with the project, Currlin introduced Dick Webb, an architect from the sports division of CHA. Webb echoed the opinion that the current outdoor track is not a candidate for just being repaired and resurfaced. According to Webb, after almost 30 years, the track is at the end of its useful life and it now warrants a complete restructuring. Webb presented a design for a large eight-lane track that would be usable for large track meets and would include areas for all of the

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jumping and throwing events. The location and orientation of the track would remain the same as it is now, but it will be completely redone from the ground up. There will also be a 216foot soccer field (a championship-size soccer field is 225 feet). The field, made of a synthetic grass material, would be large enough to handle two activities at once, and could be used for multiple purposes, such as field hockey, lacrosse and other sports. Directly adjacent to the track and field will be a 1000-seat bleacher grandstand. There will be handicapped access to the bleachers, and space will be left for a possible press box in the future. Certain regulations state that one parking space is required for every four spectator seats in the grandstand, and that the parking spaces can’t be more than 500 feet from the seating. To accommodate this, the paved parking at Coginchaug will be reconstructed, and a gravel parking area will be developed in the wooded area next to the current parking lot. This will bring the total parking to around 249 spaces, an increase of 25-30 spaces. Webb also proposed a 4000square-foot multi-purpose support facility next to the track. There will be two large rooms, large enough to support any teams’ needs. The rooms will be different sizes, one with the capacity to hold 40 players and the other able to hold 20 players. CHA envisions the smaller room functioning as a visiting team changing area. Behind these two rooms will be public restrooms, and behind that a 100square-foot storage area for sports equipment. The tennis courts will also be incorporated into this planned redevelopment. Currently, there are four tennis courts near Coginchaug that are in pretty rough shape, and seven tennis courts are required to hold a proper tournament. CHA proposes reconstructing the courts and adding an additional court where there is currently a wooden practice wall to hit tennis balls against. See BOE, next page


Friday, October 2, 2009

BOE

(from page 6)

savings in maintenance are easy to see: you won’t need fertilizer, it doesn’t have to be mowed, and the lines for different sports don’t have to constantly be repainted. Instead, maintenance for the field is more a matter of brushing and grooming the artificial surfacing. When it becomes excessively dry, you can hose it down. Lines for sports such as soccer and football can be permanently put into the turf. Maintenance takes a few hours every couple of weeks.

The questioning then turned to the artificial grass surfacing that will be used at the proposed facility. Webb explained that they decided to use artificial turf because CHA wants the community to get as much use out of this investment as possible. When using natural grass it will wear down and will need time to recover. This is not the case with artificial turf, and many large sports conferences and colleges have begun switching over to artificial turf. The

Training for the maintenance is done by the turf manufacturer. The manufacturer also videotapes their initial training so that when future generations of maintenance staff begin to care for their field, they don’t have to pay the cost of having someone come out to retrain. The life expectancy of the actual grass carpet layer itself can go as high as 10 to 12 years, depending on the amount of use it receives. The bottom layer of drainage ma-

terial will be made by recycling the track material currently onsite, and it will last the entire life of the track. The rubber inlay material that sits between the drainage material and the synthetic grass will require maintenance, again depending on the amount of use. The company who produces this artificial turf will come out every year to test the quality of the field and to make any necessary repairs. Webb addressed two common concerns over the artificial turf. There were concerns that the rubber inlay material might leak out carcinogenic waste, but recent independent extensive studies have proved that this is

not the case. CHA is conducting an additional study on the material, just to make sure. Another concern is the heat of the artificial turf during the summer. Webb said that it is true that the artificial grass itself can get very hot during very sunny days in the middle of the summer, but the heat is concentrated on the surface of the material so it is not as if a player’s entire body will be burning up; their feet would just feel hot. If clouds were to pass overhead or if the field was watered, the heat would instantly drop. Despite these health conSee BOE, page 28

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the facility and that this was the best orientation they could construct. Webb reiterated that the bleacher parking could not be more than 500 feet from the bleacher grandstand, but he joked that “this is a community that knows how to park cars.” Additional parking would be available at Korn School, as well as along Pickett Lane. Webb also addressed a concern that the proposed athletic facilities would affect parking on Pickett Lane, which Webb said is not the case.

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At this point, CHA does not have any plans to redo the existing basketball courts. The sand volleyball court will have to be relocated, most likely somewhere further north. Lastly, CHA also envisions having two grass practice fields developed around these new facilities. At this point, Webb fielded questions from the board and members of the audience. Deb Golschneider asked if sports players who have spikes and cleats on their shoes would damage the new track’s material. Webb answered that there was no risk for damaging the actual material, and that the only problem with player’s cleats would be that they could make the track dirty. To prevent this, some schools put a tarp or pad over the track when other sports will be going through that area. Board member Merrill Adams asked about the possibility of adding a ticket or concession stand area to the proposed facilities. Webb replied that although that may not be feasible based on the cost, there would be an area flanking the support building that would be ready for such a project in the future. Another board member raised the question if there would be enough parking to host larger events at Coginchaug. Currlin explained that they played with the layout of

7

Town Times

Dr. Jason R. Glazer, D.M.D. General Dentist

Dr. Kate M. Glazer, D.M.D. Pediatric Dentist


Town Times Opinion

8

Friday, October 2, 2009

Sharing ‘the most wonderful backyard in the world’ Guest Column

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Town Times is published every Friday by the Record-Journal Publishing Co. and is delivered to all homes and businesses in Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall. Sue VanDerzee, Editor Stephanie Wilcox, Reporter Brian Monroe, Advertising Director Joy Boone, Advertising Sales Wendy Parker, Office Manager Contributors: Betsy White Booz, Chuck Corley, Chris Coughlin, Kathy Meyering, Judy Moeckel.

Special election letter rules In order to allow the largest number of citizens to express their opinions on the upcoming elections, we set a few special election season letter rules. Number one, the deadline for election letters will be Monday at 5 p.m. Number two, election letters will be limited to 250 words. Also, in order to allow as many people as possible to weigh in, we will not print letters that have already been printed in another publication. For the last week before elections (deadline Oct. 27), only positive letters of support will be accepted. Of course, only signed letters with phone numbers, so we can verify authorship, will be accepted.

Vote for Stevens

I encourage all registered voters in Durham to cast a vote for Laurie Stevens in this year’s election for the Board of Finance. Her tireless efforts on behalf of Durham have touched virtually everyone who lives here. If you’ve ever been to the library, she’s there as president of PALS (Friends of the Durham Library) and organizer of the annual “Taste of Durham.” I’ve admired her leadership as chair of the Democratic Town Committee, and although much of her work is behind-the-scenes, we see her taking charge of the booth at the Fair, being elected to the Board of Assessment Appeals, and directing and participating in many local campaigns. What you may not know about Laurie is that before

made quick friends with the Our back yard may be the boys as they soon realized most wonderful place in the Jennifer Schulten boys from opposite sides of world. We have a massive the globe play the same way. maple tree that lets dappled He also enjoyed finding sunshine through in the sumUganda on the map of Africa mer. The kids have tons of with some of the chorus members. room to run around, dig for colonial treasures As John and Debbie had hoped, they providand swing under the tree’s huge limbs. We are ed us all with country fun, but this time with a also lucky enough to have great neighbors, John and Debbie Summers, who have a beauti- lesson. We learned that these children were all products of an organization called “Kampala ful horse farm adjacent to our back field. Children.” All are orphaned as a result of the This week, thanks to Debbie and John, my fallout from the AIDS crisis or acts of war family was treated to something really special. within their country. “Kampala Children” has The Children’s Choir “Destiny Africa” was opened a school and provides a loving home visiting their farm. John had stopped by in the where they learn and live with opportunity for morning to tell me that he had invited kids the future. The Destiny Africa Choir allows from Uganda to enjoy a morning of good counthe children to become ambassadors of this notry fun, riding horses, drinking apple cider ble effort. And what ambassadors they are! As and playing around the farm. I decided to pick we were saying our good-byes, three of the up my kids from school for a couple of hours to boys broke out in a song — a wonderful song have them help welcome the visiting children. for us to remember them by. We brought with us some necklace chains and You , too, have the opportunity to meet them glass beads to share with the kids. As I by seeing their benefit concert at 7 p.m. on watched the kids from Uganda enjoy riding Tuesday, Oct. 6, at Coginchaug auditorium. the horses, I also enjoyed watching how quickThe next time we visit John and Debbie’s horsly my children and the visitors befriended es, the songs of each other. the Ugandan They laughed children will and chatted as linger while we they picked remember our through colorspecial visit. ful beads and Now we have my daughter another reason Kate helped we love our put them backyard! around their To learn necks. Soon more about they were all these amazing running to kids, go to help Debbie www.kampala feed the horses. My son Peter Debbie Summers with some old and new friends. children.com.

Letters to the Editor she began her career as a Durham volunteer, she worked in a business environment for over 25 years. Her experience as VP of Operations for a production and import business lends her tons of credibility as a qualified, smart and capable candidate for this vital position in Durham. Laurie’s business skills – attention to detail, ability to grasp the big picture, and effective communication – set her apart as a candidate for the Board of Finance. I can assure you that if elected, Laurie will continue her tradition of outstanding and quality service to our community. Kary Strickland, Durham

Vote for Devaux I am pleased to introduce to you Cathy Devaux, a candi-

date for the Planning and Zoning Commission in Durham. A resident of Durham for 54 years, Cathy has always been an advocate for children. She was a well respected teacher in District 13 for 38 years of her 40-year career. She particularly understands the positive role sports can play in developing the character of young people. Cathy organized the first girls’ softball program in town, managed the All Star team and shepherded them to the regional title in 1974. She has also coached Little League and varsity softball and field hockey. Since recently retiring, Cathy devotes her time to her two children and two grandchildren; another is on the way. She can also be found in her flower garden, on the golf course, or rooting

for the Time Out Tavern softball team on which her son, Dave, plays. Cathy also continues to devote her time to Durham. She is a member of the Recreation Committee. She is a library volunteer. And, for the last two years, Cathy has served ably on the Planning and Zoning Commission. Because of her breadth of experiences, her dedication to our town and its youth, and her thoughtful contributions to planning and zoning, I highly recommend Cathy Devaux for your consideration at election time. Gene Riotte, Durham

Vote for Spooner Voters of Durham: As a long time resident of Durham, I am pleased to bring before you the name of Chad Spooner as a candidate

for the Board of Finance. I have known Chad for many years and respect him as a hard-working, honest and reliable person. Married and the father of two children, Chad and his family live on Cesca Road in Durham, and he serves as the CEO and COO of Powerhold Inc. in Middlefield. His duties as executive officer of that company require a depth of knowledge which more than qualify him for a seat on our Board of Finance. I urge you to vote for Chad in the coming election. He will serve our town honestly and faithfully. Lewis Hinman, Durham

We’re on the Web: http://www.towntimes.com


Friday, October 2, 2009

Town Times Columns

Meeting (Be still my heart!) country singer Blake Shelton

If I was lucky my best questions, my enough to spend a day whole game plan Stephanie Wilcox at the Durham Fair changed. with Blake Shelton, we In the moments would eat cotton candy ticking down to my (his favorite fair food), precious time one-onwatch the oxen pull (his favorite one with Blake, I dropped my previous event), ride a pony (his favorite fair questions and considered asking him ride because he’s “a wimp”), spend if there was a place for me on tour with time looking at the rabbits (his fa- him, or, better yet, though slightly vorite fair animal) and check out his more gutsy, if he would ditch his girlgiant watermelon (something he has friend and fellow country singer Mithat’s worthy of being exhibited). Un- randa Lambert for me. When it came fortunately, I wasdown to it, those n’t given an entire seemed like the day with him — two most imporjust a few pretant questions to cious minutes, ask. But I didn’t which was want to ruin my enough to ask him reputation — or some fun quesworse — be estions about what corted out withit would be like to out having any go to the fair with material to write Blake Shelton. a column. What I couldn’t, of would I have told course, because of my editor? In his rising popufact, just minutes larity in the counearlier, upon try music world, meeting Kevin, thanks to his lathe told me he est album would answer “Startin’ Fires” my questions for which features Blake. In other the number one words, he would song “She Wouldpretend to be n’t Be Gone.” Blake. Plus, a good-look“Really?” I ing 6-foot 5-inch asked, honestly Oklahoman who not sure if it was says “yes, ma’am” a joke or a reand “ya’ll” would sponse. What kind of column would have stood out like a sore thumb. Speaking of, I heard one time that a that be? After a nod of his head, I journalist should dress the way their pushed, “Are you serious?” Another interview subject does as a way to put slow and hesitant nod. And then, bethem at ease and make them feel like cause I still wasn’t sure what to do or you’re one of them. Hence, on Friday say next, I uttered “Oh man, that of the Durham Fair, I strolled in wear- stinks.” I’m not sure if that sold him, ing my country-best: jeans covered in or the disappointed look on the face of patches, a semi-boring blue shirt and a small-town reporter looking to exmy dusty cowboy boots (yes, I own a pand her resume and life experience pair that I actually wear). It was bor- by interviewing a country star. Whatder-line not professional enough to in- ever it was, Kevin softened up and terview a big name country singer, agreed to let me have a few minutes but when Blake Shelton stepped out of with the real Blake. So when the time came and Kevin his trailer wearing fitted blue jeans, a flannel shirt and snakeskin cowboy turned to me and said, “You’re on, boots, I knew I had chosen just the Steph,” there was no time to think right outfit. And as I watched him twice about feeling nervous or shy. “Hi Blake, I’m Stephanie, nice to from eight feet away greet one fan after the other, I remembered that this meet you!” I exclaimed with my hand is just another country bumpkin who outstretched, shocked by my own conlikes drinking beer, hunting and sit- fidence. I was relieved to see his pearly whites exposed and a twinkle ting by a campfire writing music. Like any good reporter, I was origi- in his deep blue eyes. Even more renally prepared with a mix of questions lieved when he paid me a nice complirelated to his music, personal life and ment about my appearance (I knew some fun questions, but when Blake’s he’d like the cowgirl look.) strict yet almost-charming manager See Blake Shelton, next page Kevin said I could only ask him two of

Guest Column

9

The arts in Durham

I am writing this arand cities that have ticle on the rainy Sunactive arts commisday morning of our sions are not only sucpremier event in town, cessful in promoting the Durham Fair. I am the development of loamazed how our volcal talent, but offer opunteers stay so posiportunities for culturtive and focused, even al and economic beneunder adverse condifits. Maybe this can tions. This is more serve as a way to bring proof of how valuable our town together for events such as the communal benefit as Durham Fair are to a the Durham Fair does. community. I concur with Amy Not only does the that this idea deserves Laura Francis, Durham fair fund scholarships some attention. I and other grants and would like to create a provide fund-raising task force to research opportunities for local how viable an arts non-profits, but it also council or commisincreases economic sion would be for activity for certain Durham. This is a simbusinesses in town. The Durham Fair ilar model we used to determine also demonstrates our commitment whether or not the Agriculture Comto our agricultural heritage, some- mission would be an asset. Together, thing that we institutionally did by Amy and I have drawn up a list of peopassing an ordinance that created the ple who would possibly be interested. Agriculture Commission. Wouldn’t it However, I know that there are more be nice if we could have similar like-minded people who might also events, scaled down of course, during like to participate. If you are a practicthe rest of the year? ing artist or simply one who wants to Resident author Amy Bloom visited support and promote the arts, please me a few weeks ago inquiring about call (860) 349-3625 or lfrancis@townofthe possibility of forming a town-spon- durhamct.org and you will be added to sored arts council or commission. Al- the list. We will then meet to brainthough we have plenty of talented storm together and determine how we artists of different media, we do not should proceed. Thanks, Amy, for a have a local association for that popu- great idea and to all those who strive lation to collaborate, organize and to improve our community. I look forpromote the arts. I have done some re- ward to working on this project tosearch and have learned that towns gether.

From The Desk Of The First Selectman

Web update Very interesting poll and question of the week responses this week, but why should we be surprised — this was all about the Durham Fair! First, it is true that most people go to the fair, at least most people who also visit our website and answer our polls. Of 105 respondents, 68% went to the fair, 30% did not and 3% were undecided (hopefully they answered before the fair). The question of the week asked what is your favorite or least favorite aspect of the Durham Fair. Ten people commented — more than on any other topic so far — and guess what? The newly raised prices and the brandnew parking fees were the concern of all of those who wrote. Eight of those felt that there should be discounts for local residents or booth volunteers. One supported the fair’s need for additional income, and our favorite wrote: “I agree with the other folks that the admission is a little expensive. Just to get in the door was $40 for me, my husband and three kids ($30 admission and $10 parking). But guys, this is OUR fair....the sense of community, seeing friends, our kids having a chance to be with their friends and ride the rides in the midway....there's nothing like it in my opinion. We do spend a good $200 (at least) every year but it's something we expect, we know it's coming and we plan for it. I wouldn't miss it for anything.” We’ll keep this question up one more week. Chime in!

Remember sunshine ads? Well, we’re happy to report they’re coming back. If you don’t remember, they’re small personal ads Town Times used to print. Husbands used them to wish their wives happy birthday, moms used them to congratulate their kids, neighbors used them to thank other neighbors. They’re easy, fun and only $10 in cash or check. Watch for further details next week and then start bringing sunshine to one and all!


Friday, October 2, 2009

Town Times Columns

Meeting (Be still my heart!) country singer Blake Shelton

If I was lucky my best questions, my enough to spend a day whole game plan Stephanie Wilcox at the Durham Fair changed. with Blake Shelton, we In the moments would eat cotton candy ticking down to my (his favorite fair food), precious time one-onwatch the oxen pull (his favorite one with Blake, I dropped my previous event), ride a pony (his favorite fair questions and considered asking him ride because he’s “a wimp”), spend if there was a place for me on tour with time looking at the rabbits (his fa- him, or, better yet, though slightly vorite fair animal) and check out his more gutsy, if he would ditch his girlgiant watermelon (something he has friend and fellow country singer Mithat’s worthy of being exhibited). Un- randa Lambert for me. When it came fortunately, I wasdown to it, those n’t given an entire seemed like the day with him — two most imporjust a few pretant questions to cious minutes, ask. But I didn’t which was want to ruin my enough to ask him reputation — or some fun quesworse — be estions about what corted out withit would be like to out having any go to the fair with material to write Blake Shelton. a column. What I couldn’t, of would I have told course, because of my editor? In his rising popufact, just minutes larity in the counearlier, upon try music world, meeting Kevin, thanks to his lathe told me he est album would answer “Startin’ Fires” my questions for which features Blake. In other the number one words, he would song “She Wouldpretend to be n’t Be Gone.” Blake. Plus, a good-look“Really?” I ing 6-foot 5-inch asked, honestly Oklahoman who not sure if it was says “yes, ma’am” a joke or a reand “ya’ll” would sponse. What kind of column would have stood out like a sore thumb. Speaking of, I heard one time that a that be? After a nod of his head, I journalist should dress the way their pushed, “Are you serious?” Another interview subject does as a way to put slow and hesitant nod. And then, bethem at ease and make them feel like cause I still wasn’t sure what to do or you’re one of them. Hence, on Friday say next, I uttered “Oh man, that of the Durham Fair, I strolled in wear- stinks.” I’m not sure if that sold him, ing my country-best: jeans covered in or the disappointed look on the face of patches, a semi-boring blue shirt and a small-town reporter looking to exmy dusty cowboy boots (yes, I own a pand her resume and life experience pair that I actually wear). It was bor- by interviewing a country star. Whatder-line not professional enough to in- ever it was, Kevin softened up and terview a big name country singer, agreed to let me have a few minutes but when Blake Shelton stepped out of with the real Blake. So when the time came and Kevin his trailer wearing fitted blue jeans, a flannel shirt and snakeskin cowboy turned to me and said, “You’re on, boots, I knew I had chosen just the Steph,” there was no time to think right outfit. And as I watched him twice about feeling nervous or shy. “Hi Blake, I’m Stephanie, nice to from eight feet away greet one fan after the other, I remembered that this meet you!” I exclaimed with my hand is just another country bumpkin who outstretched, shocked by my own conlikes drinking beer, hunting and sit- fidence. I was relieved to see his pearly whites exposed and a twinkle ting by a campfire writing music. Like any good reporter, I was origi- in his deep blue eyes. Even more renally prepared with a mix of questions lieved when he paid me a nice complirelated to his music, personal life and ment about my appearance (I knew some fun questions, but when Blake’s he’d like the cowgirl look.) strict yet almost-charming manager See Blake Shelton, next page Kevin said I could only ask him two of

Guest Column

9

The arts in Durham

I am writing this arand cities that have ticle on the rainy Sunactive arts commisday morning of our sions are not only sucpremier event in town, cessful in promoting the Durham Fair. I am the development of loamazed how our volcal talent, but offer opunteers stay so posiportunities for culturtive and focused, even al and economic beneunder adverse condifits. Maybe this can tions. This is more serve as a way to bring proof of how valuable our town together for events such as the communal benefit as Durham Fair are to a the Durham Fair does. community. I concur with Amy Not only does the that this idea deserves Laura Francis, Durham fair fund scholarships some attention. I and other grants and would like to create a provide fund-raising task force to research opportunities for local how viable an arts non-profits, but it also council or commisincreases economic sion would be for activity for certain Durham. This is a simbusinesses in town. The Durham Fair ilar model we used to determine also demonstrates our commitment whether or not the Agriculture Comto our agricultural heritage, some- mission would be an asset. Together, thing that we institutionally did by Amy and I have drawn up a list of peopassing an ordinance that created the ple who would possibly be interested. Agriculture Commission. Wouldn’t it However, I know that there are more be nice if we could have similar like-minded people who might also events, scaled down of course, during like to participate. If you are a practicthe rest of the year? ing artist or simply one who wants to Resident author Amy Bloom visited support and promote the arts, please me a few weeks ago inquiring about call (860) 349-3625 or lfrancis@townofthe possibility of forming a town-spon- durhamct.org and you will be added to sored arts council or commission. Al- the list. We will then meet to brainthough we have plenty of talented storm together and determine how we artists of different media, we do not should proceed. Thanks, Amy, for a have a local association for that popu- great idea and to all those who strive lation to collaborate, organize and to improve our community. I look forpromote the arts. I have done some re- ward to working on this project tosearch and have learned that towns gether.

From The Desk Of The First Selectman

Web update Very interesting poll and question of the week responses this week, but why should we be surprised — this was all about the Durham Fair! First, it is true that most people go to the fair, at least most people who also visit our website and answer our polls. Of 105 respondents, 68% went to the fair, 30% did not and 3% were undecided (hopefully they answered before the fair). The question of the week asked what is your favorite or least favorite aspect of the Durham Fair. Ten people commented — more than on any other topic so far — and guess what? The newly raised prices and the brandnew parking fees were the concern of all of those who wrote. Eight of those felt that there should be discounts for local residents or booth volunteers. One supported the fair’s need for additional income, and our favorite wrote: “I agree with the other folks that the admission is a little expensive. Just to get in the door was $40 for me, my husband and three kids ($30 admission and $10 parking). But guys, this is OUR fair....the sense of community, seeing friends, our kids having a chance to be with their friends and ride the rides in the midway....there's nothing like it in my opinion. We do spend a good $200 (at least) every year but it's something we expect, we know it's coming and we plan for it. I wouldn't miss it for anything.” We’ll keep this question up one more week. Chime in!

Remember sunshine ads? Well, we’re happy to report they’re coming back. If you don’t remember, they’re small personal ads Town Times used to print. Husbands used them to wish their wives happy birthday, moms used them to congratulate their kids, neighbors used them to thank other neighbors. They’re easy, fun and only $10 in cash or check. Watch for further details next week and then start bringing sunshine to one and all!


Town Times

10 Blake Shelton (Continued from page 9)

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Then I heard Kevin’s voice, “I told her she can ask you two questions.” “Well actually, I have four questions, but I’ll be quick,” I corrected, again amazed at my confidence, but not sure if that would get me kicked out. It

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didn’t, so I then explained how I’m a huge fan of his and know a lot about his music career so would rather ask him fun questions. He was all for it, probably relieved I was mixing it up for him. In fact, he seemed to have fun coming up with responses to my fairrelated questions. After all, who hasn’t been to a fair? When it was all said and done, Kevin joked that I ended up asking (a whopping) five questions — not four. But the best part of all is that Blake said it was the best interview he’s ever had (take that, Kevin). I could have died right there, but I was glad I didn’t be-

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cause Blake asked if I was going to watch his show (of course I was!) and said he’d see me out there (thank goodness I was sitting in the fan club section). As far as I’m concerned, we became good friends right there in that moment. And sure enough, Blake stuck to his word, and at the beginning of his set and at the end of the night, he scouted me out up front, pointed at me and winked! In between those winks, his show was packed with great country tunes like “Green,” “The More I Drink,” “Redneck Girl” and “Some Beach.” He told the crowd “I hope ya’ll don’t take me too se-

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Friday, October 2, 2009 riously, because I don’t take myself too seriously.” Sure enough, the 33-year-old singer got goofy when he performed a little accoustic jingle to the “Free Credit Report” song that we’ve all come to know from the commercials. The crowd loved it. But then he showed a mellow side with the sweet ballad “Home” that quieted the audience, which stretched across the entire hillside and filled in gaps by the PLR tent and petting zoo and beyond where my eyes couldn’t even see. Even Blake said he didn’t expect to see “people all the freakin’ way to the back and over there to the left.” After his show was rained out at last year’s Durham Fair, it was that much more exciting to have him back under a clear evening sky. Blake, too, said he was happy to finally see what “this Durham Fair” is all about. Maybe he’ll come back sometime to see more of it, now that he’s gotten a taste. You never know. If you see a tall, dark, handsome cowboy eating cotton candy and riding a pony, it very well might be Blake Shelton.

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Durham Town Briefs

Friday, October 2, 2009

ZBA cancels meetings with no applications

The Zoning Board of Appeals did not hold their scheduled Sept. 10th meeting. Their Oct. 8th meeting has been canceled as well. Check the Durham government calendar for when they will meet next.

The business meeting will be at 10 a.m. and the program will begin at 11 a.m. Sampson will talk about planting for your home’s particular microclimate and the greater environmental context of your plantings. The club is currently taking orders for decorated holiday wreaths. Please call Flo Flynn at (860) 349-0504 for more information.

Senior programs

Durham Garden Club

Amy Sampson, a residential and commercial landscape designer, will discuss sustainable residential landscaping at an open meeting of the Durham Garden Club Thursday, Oct. 8, in the Durham Public Library.

Durham senior exercise classes are held at the Durham Firehouse every Monday and Wednesday morning. Two classes are offered. The first class is for the more active senior from 9 to 10 a.m., and the second class, from 10-11 a.m., is for the senior who may want to use a chair and work out at a

slower pace. Yoga classes meet on Fridays at the firehouse from 9 to 10 a.m. for the more active seniors, and from 10 to 11 a.m. for an easier yoga class. New participants always welcome. Bingo will be played at the Durham Library on Wednesdays from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on Oct. 7, 21, Nov. 18, Dec. 16, Jan. 6, 20, Feb. 10, 24, March 10, 24, April 7, 21, May 5, 19 and on June 9. Join the fun and bring a friend. Bingo cards are $1 apiece. Watercolor art classes for seniors age 60 and over will begin on Friday, Oct. 2, at the Durham Library from 10 a.m. to noon. The art class fee is $50, and students bring their own supplies. Call (860) 343-6724 or (860) 349-3153 for more information on these programs.

William J. Lema, D.M.D. 1130891

Saturday & Evening Appointments Available

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• Wood Stoves • Pellet Stoves • Fence Installation and Sales

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(All meetings will be held at the Durham Library unless otherwise noted. Check the town Web page at www.townofdurhamct.org for agendas and last-minute changes.) Monday, Oct. 5 6:30 p.m. — Emergency Management at Town Hall 7 p.m. — Board of Selectmen at CRHS auditorium 7:30 p.m. — Inland Wetlands Commission 7:30 p.m. — Clean Energy Task Force at Town Hall 8 p.m. — Annual town meeting at CRHS 8 p.m. — Historic District Commission Tuesday, Oct. 6 6:30 p.m. — Public Safety Committee 7 p.m. — Fire Department Trustees at firehouse 7:30 p.m. — Midstate Planning, 100 DeKoven Dr., Middletown Wednesday, Oct. 7 6:30 p.m. — Volunteer Ambulance Corps at Ambulance Bldg. 7:30 p.m. — Planning and Zoning Commission Thursday, Oct. 8 7 p.m. — Public Safety Facility Renovation Planning Commission at firehouse 7:30 p.m. — Zoning Board of Appeals at Town Hall Monday, Oct. 12 7 p.m. — Board of Selectmen at Town Hall

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Middlefield Town Briefs

Flu shot clinic

Middlefield Government Calendar (Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings are held in the Community Center.) Monday, Oct. 5 7 p.m. — Board of Selectmen Tuesday, Oct. 6 7:30 p.m. — Midstate Regional Planning, 100 DeKoven Dr. in Middletown Thursday, Oct. 8 7 p.m. — Park and Recreation Commission Wednesday, Oct. 14 6 p.m. — Planning and Zoning Commission 7 p.m. — Water Pollution Control Authority 7:30 p.m. — Board of Education at Brewster School Thursday, Oct. 15 7 p.m. — Board of Finance Tuesday, Oct. 20 7 p.m. — Board of Selectmen 7 p.m. — Conservation Commission Wednesday, Oct. 21 7 p.m. — Inland Wetlands Commission Monday, Oct. 26 11:30 a.m. — Housing Commission at Sugarloaf Terrace Wednesday, Oct. 28 6 p.m. — Planning and Zoning Commission

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E E V T SA DA E TH

Senior Fair

Friday, October 23, 2009 Wallingford Senior Center 238 Washington St.

Exhibitors & Sponsors Welcome!

10am - 6pm

Contact Nancy Frede at

Presented by:

The town of Middlefield is offering a seasonal flu shot clinic on Wednesday evening, Oct. 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Community Center. No appointment is necessary and insurance is accepted. Contact Lee Vito at the Health Department at (860) 349-7123, ext. 14, if you have any questions.

Flu shots, legacies and Rx bus coming to Senior Center Flu shots The Middlefield Senior Center office will offer flu shots on Thursday, Oct. 8, from 9 a.m. to noon. No appointment necessary. Bring insurance cards, including medicare card, and wear a short sleeved shirt/blouse.

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For more information, call Antoinette at (860) 349-7121. Legacies Everyone has stories to tell and so do you! No one knows your story better than you, but unless you put them on paper, they will be lost forever. “Written Legacies” is a six-week memoirwriting course that teaches you how to write about your experiences one story at a time. Your instructor is former Hartford Courant columnist Marlene Clark. She has been a professional writer and editor since 1976 and was the writing coach for Wesleyan University’s Upward Bound program. Marlene has helped hundreds of people write their stories and is looking forward to helping you find and write yours. A free introductory presentation will be held on Thursday, Oct. 15, at 1 p.m. The six-week course will start on Monday, Oct. 19, at 1 p.m. Sign ups will be available at that time. The classes will be an hour and a half long. The fee for the six weeks is $25. Bring a snapshot of one of your favorite events/people to the presentation. Come and learn! This will be a lasting gift for your family. Call Antoinette at (860) 349-7121 if you have any questions and to register for the free presentation. Kindly reserve your seat by Friday, Oct. 9.

An ageless commitment to caring.

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Silver Sponsors • Benchmark • Regency House Wallingford • The Law Offices of Joseph D. DiMauro

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Exhibitors (to date) • BCI financial Mortgage • Beacon Financial Group • Beecher & Bennett Funeral Service • Benchmark • Brook Hollow Health Care • Central CT Senior Health Services • Coccomo Memorial • Comfort Keepers • CT Housing Finance Authority • Custom Travel • Elim Park Place • Eurohome LLC • Eye Health Professionals PC • Franciscan Home Care & Hospice • Gaylord • Genesis Healthcare • Johnson Brunetti • Kilbourne & Tully • Masonicare

• Meriden Chamber of Commerce • Meriden Senior Center • MidState Medical Center • My Partners In Living • New England Financial Group • Prudential CT Realty • Quinnipiac Chamber of Commerce • Regency House • Shaw’s/OSCO Drug • Tastefully Simple • The Highland Health CC • The Law Offices of Joseph D. DiMauro • The Rockfall Company LLC • The Scooter Store • Vision Dynamics • Wallingford Senior Center • Wallingford YMCA • Westfield Care & Rehab

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Shuttle transportation provided from the Meriden Senior Center.

Registrars of voters

Local news Local events Local issues

More Activities to Come!

• “The ABC’s of Estate Planning”

The Rx Bus The Middlefield Senior Center and Social Services office will sponsor the event on Wednesday, Oct. 28, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. to help residents get access to state assistance. The state Department of Social Services Rx Xpress Bus will be in the parking lot at 405 Main Street, Middlefield. State eligibility workers and CHOICES counselors from Senior Resources, will be available to help residents apply for food stamps, Medicare Part D, Medicare Savings programs, ConnPace (Connecticut Pharmaceutical program). The income guidelines for food stamps has increased recently, so program participants are encouraged to meet with a state representative to see if they are eligible. Residents should bring a photo ID, income verifications for the last four weeks, all recent utility bills, proof of other government benefits and bank statements. Also bring a list of your prescription drugs and the doses. Please call Antoinette Astle at (860) 349-7121 to make an appointment. Democrats On Friday, Oct. 2, meet the Democratic candidates running for selectmen in Middlefield. At 12:30 p.m. Mary-Beth Johnson and Ken Blake will be on hand to talk to you and answer any questions, suggestions or concerns. No reservations are necessary. All are welcome.

The Middlefield registrars of voters will be in their office at the Community Center, 405 Main St., on Saturday, Oct. 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to register voters.

Special Activities (to date) • “Losing Your Balance-Get Back on Your Feet

Friday, October 2, 2009

Dr. Brad Wilkinson Dr. Tanya Feke Amber Bowell PA-C Dina Palmer PA-C

Greta Wilt - Memorial Middle School - Grade 5

Town Times and every day on the web at www.towntimes.com


Town & Librar y Briefs

Friday, October 2, 2009

Adult ed classes

Durham Library Hours: Regular library hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Visit www.durhamlibrary.org to search the catalog, review your account, register for a program or renew your materials online. For information or to register for a program by

phone, call (860) 349-9544. Kids Evening Adventures is back for kids in grades one to three, each Monday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. (They will not meet on Oct. 12.) Book discussions will focus on the following books: Arnie the Doughnut, Nate the Great, Moses Goes to a Concert, Young Cam Jansen & The Missing Cookie, and Sam and the Tigers. The Book Lover’s Circle will meet on Wednesday, Oct. 7, at 7:30 p.m. to discuss Exit Ghost by Philip Roth. Copies of the book are available at the library. Everyone is invited to

join this informal discussion. College application essay workshop: A workshop for high school seniors, juniors and parents by Durham author Jan Melnik on Wednesday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. Jan, the author of One-Hour College Application Essay, will facilitate an interactive workshop about the highly competitive college admissions process and present inside secrets from admissions deans from colleges and universities. Scarecrow event: The library will be sponsoring the

See Durham Library, page 28

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Hours: The library is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, and beginning on Saturday, Oct. 3, on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit www.leviecoe.com or call the library at (860) 3493857 for information or to register for any program. You can also renew, reserve and check your library record on the website. Storytime will be held on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. Registration is required by calling the Children’s Room at 349-3857, ext. 2. Do-It-Yourself Jewelry: From Tuesday, Oct. 13, until Tuesday, Nov. 17, the Children’s Room will be hosting a DIY jewelry program for ages 10-14. The program will run each Tuesday at 3:30. Seating is limited to eight, so please call the library to register. New DVDs: Valentino, Crank 2, Gifted Hands, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, Sugar, State of Play and more. Coming soon: Away We Go, Monsters vs. Aliens, Observe

and Report and much more. New youth and children’s titles include The Ask and the Answer by Patrick Ness, Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins, The Alphas by Lisi Harrison. Coming soon are Rapture of the Deep by L.A. Meyer and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters by Jane Austen and Ben Winters. Great new titles include The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman, The Red Leather Diary by Lily Koppel, A Quiet Belief in Angels by R.J. Ellory, Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem, The Charm School by Susan Wiggs and Wife of the Gods by Kwei Quartey.

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There is still time to register for District 13 adult education classes. Adult education classes are held at Coginchaug High School in Durham and Memorial Middle School in Middlefield. Classes are open to residents and non-residents for the same fee, and older children and teens are welcome. For more information and to register, please call (860) 349-2232 or email to scarroll2@sbcglobal.net. New York City Bus Trip: A day on your own! Leave Durham at 8 a.m. and return around 8 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 11 ($40). Home and Gardening New! A Dog’s Life: Thursday Oct. 8 ($20). Fresh Holiday Centerpieces: Tuesday Dec. 1 ($32-$35). Arts & Crafts New! Crocheting Basics for Afghans, Scarves and Shawls: Wednesday Oct. 21, 28 and Nov. 4 ($39). Photography Using Your Digital Camera: Monday Oct. 26, Nov. 2 and 9 ($70). Advanced Photography: Monday Nov. 16 ($25). New! Pottery, Mosaics and Tile Making for Adults and Kids 10+: Tuesday starting Oct. 5, 10 weeks ($159). January 2010 Pottery: Tuesdays Jan. 5, 12, 19 and 26 ($59). Fresh Holiday Centerpieces – see home and gardening section above. Cooking New! Special Italian Dishes for the Holidays at First and Last Tavern, Middletown: Tuesday Oct. 6 ($34). New! German Cuisine of the Oktoberfest: Wednesday Oct. 14 ($34) New! Italian Sauces and Focaccia Bread: Thursday Nov. 5 ($34). Wine Dinner at Time Out Taverne Restaurant, Durham: Tuesday, Oct. 20 ($60). Mind & Body Yoga with Janet Karp. Ongoing class through June, may be joined at any time. Held every Wednesday evening 7 to 8:30 except school vacations. Fall I: Oct. 6 to Nov. 18, ($65 - 6 sessions). Fall II: Dec. 2 to Dec. 16, ($33 – 3 sessions). Specials: Attend both fall I & II ($100) or attend seven sessions during falls I and II ($75). Walk-ins are always welcome ($12 per class). Memorial Middle School Music Room, Middlefield.

Levi Coe Library

13


Town Times

14

T S ST

61

SARY R E V I N N A 1128663

BERLIN FAIR

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Durham/Middlefield Youth and Family Services (Unless noted, all events take place at the Youth Center in the Middlefield Community Center.) After-School and No-School Hours The center is open daily from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. There are openings available. They will be open all day on Oct. 9 and 12, from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., for school closure. BINGO – Seniors ONLY (55+) Friday Oct. 2, from 7-9 p.m. $5 includes coffee and donuts; prizes, too. RSVP to Nicole by Sept. 30 at (860) 349-02858. Babysitting Class American Red Cross babysitting program on Oct. 3, 10 and 12 from 9 a.m. till 12 noon. Must take all three classes for certification. Fee $55. 7th & 8th Grade Dance Friday, Oct. 16, from 7-9:30. All dances are $5. Pizza/Soda/Water and Candy $1 each. Parents must sign children in and out. Family Halloween Social/Haunted House Friday, Oct. 23, from 4-7 p.m. Come in costume, and be ready to have a great, family-filled afternoon of fun! Arts and crafts, games and prizes too. Fee $2 per person. Halloween Dance for 5th & 6th Graders On Friday, Oct. 30, from 7-9:30 p.m. Come in costume and win prizes. Costumes are optional. All dances have a $5 entry fee. Pizza, soda, water and candy $1 each. Parents must sign children in and out. Photo Contest: See website at www.dmyfs.org.

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• Sheep, Swine, Cattle, Rabbits & Poultry • Arts & Crafts • Food • Exhibits • Truck, Tractor, Oxen & Horse Pulls • Open Horse Show • Rodeo • 1/4 Midget Race Track

Friday, October 2, 2009


Town Times

Friday, October 2, 2009

15

Arson ‘not proved’ in three-year-old Durham case By Stephanie Wilcox Town Times

Delivered to your home or business every Friday; online every day at www.towntimes.com

William J. Witkowski, D.M.D. 360 Main Street P.O. Box 177 Allan A. Witkowski, D.M.D. Durham, CT 860-349-1123

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LLC, was lost, totaling $865,984 in damages. They also claim to suffer from emotional distress. After the fire, the Magnattas lived in a trailer on their property for a year, but they have since rebuilt a home on the property.

1127237

The civil case regarding possible arson tied to a house fire that took place in the early morning on Sunday, June 11, 2006, finally closed on Friday, Sept. 18. The suspect, Daniel Esteves (legal last name Slasky), of Portland, ended up not being charged with arson. Three years ago, homeowners Paul and Magda Magnotta were vacationing with their 16-year-old son Joshua in upstate New York when they received a call that their house at 12R Little Lane in Durham was completely destroyed. While investigating, officials said the cause of the fire was “very suspicious,” and they felt they had reason to believe the fire was set to cover a burglary. According to officials, the front door was wide open, though the Magnottas said they had locked the house prior to leaving for vacation. The family later reported that two speakers, a rifle and a bag of bullets and three paint ball guns were missing. Though they don’t know if anything else was taken, the known missing items — minus one paint ball gun — were retrieved. A few days after the fire, Esteves, then 17, was charged with burglarizing the home and spent 90 days in jail. The arson case remained open and under investigation. Esteves was a classmate at Vinal Technical High School of Joshua Magnotta.

According to records, Es- thought we would win,” said teves had been under the in- Magda. “Apparently there fluence of drugs and alcohol wasn’t enough evidence to the night he burglarized the prove our case.” home. Reports show he was The Magnotta’s entire also charged in connection with a stolen purse and SUV home, including Paul’s homein Portland. A car seat and run business, Raccoons Plus, cushions matching the stolen 2001 Nissan X-terra were found on the Magnotta’s lawn, suggesting Esteves was making room for stolen items. Though Esteves was not charged with criminal arson, the Magnottas plan to file an appeal. “We thought Just some of the documents that we would win, amassed by the Magnottas over the we honestly three years the case dragged on.

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At the Durham Fair 2009

16

Friday, October 2, 2009

Llamas lead the pack in the 2009 mural painting contest

Betsy Booz took this photo of all the 2009 murals on the side of President’s Hall.

And the winner is…Cindy Satton, of Durham. Her lifelike mural of her children gazing at the llamas in the llama barn was the clear favorite, as voted by this year’s fairgoers. Cindy is thrilled, as are six-year-old Lexie and eight-year-old Connor. Although the winner was

supposed to be announced on the fair’s main stage during the Sunday afternoon performances, with soggy weather prevailing, mural contest organizer Betsy White Booz chose to have the announcement made over the fair’s PA system, instead. “I was just about to leave

the fairgrounds,” recalls Cindy, “when I thought I heard my name on the loudspeaker.” Friends at the Durham Cooperative Nursery School chicken booth knew, for sure, that it was Cindy’s name that was announced as the winner, and they started cheering. When

Cindy was asked to report to the fair office, she reversed course and went to get the good news in person. “All of the mural painters did a fabulous job,” stresses Betsy. They include (see photo of all murals, left to right) Norah Khalil, Cindy, Sue Cummings, Lanya Staneika and Carol Hare. With the exception of Hare, who is from East Hampton, all the other artists are from Durham. Amazingly, Khalil is only 10 years old. Since Betsy participated in the first mural painting contest two years ago, she speaks from experience when she says its fun, but it’s also a big job. “The weather – particularly the hot August and September sun – is not your friend,” she recalls. This year’s winner concurs. “I’ve never painted a mural before. I didn’t add up the hours, but I pretty much spent a chunk of September going to the fairgrounds…I haven’t

New state record for giant pumpkins

Were You Spotted at the Durham fair? Go to towntimes.com 1127224

Check the fair Spotted Galleries for your photos. Thanks to our Fall Festival Sponsors TIRE and SERVICE CENTER

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had time for much else.” She recounts, “I like painting in detail; I love doing animal portraits; and I wanted to incorporate my children into my painting.” Cindy says she used about a dozen photos, along with her kids actually posing, to create her intricately detailed mural. “The three llamas (in the painting) even have nametags of my friend Tina Jay’s daughters, Hannah, Emma and Samantha.” Each mural painter has her own tale to tell. Norah managed to complete her first painting effort around school, homework and after school activities. Sue finished her beautiful collection of fruits and vegetables in just two days (but, after all, this is her third mural in as many years). Lanya, also a student, finished her mural at 11 p.m. the night before the fair – literally, in the dark, while Carol managed to get her creation done amid a particularly stressful September, driving over from East Hampton whenever she could. Fair organizers are happy with the results of this year’s competition, and they say interest has already been expressed for next year’s contest by several local artists. Fairgoers also liked seeing the 2009 murals posted at various locations around the fairgrounds.

Connecticut has a new “Queen of the Pumpkin Patch!” The results of the giant pumpkin weigh-in at the Durham Fair are in! The grand prize winner is Jason Traylor from Preston. Jason’s pumpkin weighed in at an amazing 1,449.5 lbs — smashing the old record by 96.5 lbs. This is a new Durham Fair record as well as a new Connecticut record. Jason’s record-breaking pumpkin gained an average of 30.5 lbs. each day over a 41-day period. In one single day the pumpkin gained an astounding 46 lbs. For the third year in a row, the fair has the privilege of announcing a pumpkin state record-holder. In 2007, Bart Toftness set the new record at 1,171 lbs. followed by Matthew DeBacco in 2008 whose pumpkin weighed in at 1,353 lbs.


Kids at the Durham Fair

Friday, October 2, 2009

Directly above, Aaron DeYoung, of Middletown, asks if he can take the giant pumpkin home. Center, Luke Anderson, 4, of Cheshire, fishing with determination. Top right, Joshua Zubec, 7, of Higganum enjoys “fair fries.” Right, Philip Crock (in yellow), of Delaware, flies high with his brother Nathan. Left, Ashley Vicchitto, 4, of Pa. was Visiting her grandma Shirley Vicchito, formerly of Durham. Ashley’s dad is serving in the Army and was injured, but the family expects him home for the holidays. Photos by Judy Moeckel, Kathy Meyering and Stephanie Wilcox

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Raising Money at the Durham Fair

Above, a group of students draws attention to their booth by dancing out front. Left, tending the Benchwarmer booth are Hannah Goulis, Zhining Feng and Devin Kokoszka. Below, selling lemonade with free smiles are Dan Fonseca, Mike Finley, Jack Bascom and Tayler Dontigney, members of Future Business Leaders of Ameriour ca at CRHS!

SAVE THE DATE! &

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October 23rd Wallingford Senior Center VENDORS: For booth information, call Nancy Frede at 860-529-5579 Watch this newspaper for more details!

Photos by Judy Moeckel and Stephanie Wilcox

Friday, October 2, 2009

Above, Stasia Simcox Matyjas, a fifth grader at Memorial, visits her good friend, Ashley Dana, a fourth grader at John Lyman, at the Corn Booth. Below, Town Times freelancer Judy Moeckel is usually on the other side of the camera, but here she takes her turn at the Epiphany apple raffle booth. Submitted photos


Friday, October 2, 2009

Agriculture at the Durham Fair

19

Above, Aaron Abby VanDerzee considers how good those giant watermelons might taste. Below, up close and personal with a draft horse.

Above, Ellie Kaminski, of New Britain, befriends a baby goat. Left, Kristyn Wielgosz, of Meriden, on a big red tractor. Above, Kelsey Strom, 14, of Keepsake Farm in Putnam, with her one-year-old Lincoln sheep, Ruba, and two-yearold sister Megan. Left, Eileen Kukish hanging a blue-ribbon begonia. Below, Hannah Balay, of Durham, with a sample of Epiphany apples.

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Art & Music at the Durham Fair

20

Friday, October 2, 2009

Above, Dan Shoemaker points out a detail in Above, Holly Pearce Bisson hands a poster to Dick Duval as they set up his “Last Birthday” painting, modelled on flower arrangments in DaVinci’s “Last Supper” in the “Humor in Art” the Horticulture Buildcategory. Left, ing; middle top, Blake M e y e s a Shelton got to sing on Tetrault, of Friday after being Durham, fashrained out last year; ions a copper right, artistry in icing — rose in the Farm a map of the Durham Museum under Fair on a cake top. the tutelage of Bill Kroll, blacksmith.

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Rain and Families at the Durham Fair

Friday, October 2, 2009

21

Left top, Allison Cross, 8, Olivia Cross, 6, and Alexa Cross, 2, came all the way from Monroe in their boots and raincoats on Sunday; center left, Bailey Scozzari, of Durham, celebrated her (rainy) 8th birthday at the fair; bottom left, Megan Earnshaw, 4, and borther Finn, 2, took refuge in the Horticulture Building. Mom Tracy is the librarian at Coginchaug. Below, Mary Ann Zieminski and Ashley Struchowski, both of Rockfall, came prepared on Sunday to enjoy the fair in the rain.

Grace White Kelsey, seated above, is 102, and she has been to every Durham Fair since the first one in 1916. With her are her three daughters, from left, Grace Ann Harmon, Marion Seifert and Isabel Wimler. All photos this page by Judy Moeckel

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22

Friday, October 2, 2009

Town Times

Greek pizza comes to town

Help available for finding a college By Stephanie Wilcox Town Times

If applying for college feels like a foreign process that you’re terrified of screwing up, Absolute College Counseling Solutions is for you. Absolute College Counseling Solutions launched this summer and helps high school students and their parents find colleges, fill out the necessary paperwork and get through the whole process. Owner Kristen Kleeman says the service is particularly valuable to Durham and Middlefield students because most schools have both counseling and guidance departments for this process, but District 13 does not. “College counseling is big on Long Island and in Fairfield County, but lots of parents from small towns don’t know about this service,”

said Kleeman. Kleeman is the owner of Durham Fitness, but prior to that she was a high school math teacher and tennis and skiing coach. Prior to that she was a Coginchaug High School student recruited to play Division I tennis, but she had no idea how to go about the college process, let alone fill out her NCAA forms. With some help from college coaches, she taught herself the process of getting enrolled in the school on time and as directed. “I am here to help with tricky forms like NCAA and FAFSA,” said Kleeman, who was encouraged by friends to start the business after she successfully helped them understand and complete the arduous process. Kleeman said the service is primarily for high school

juniors to help them pick a school that is a good fit, and for seniors to fill out the paperwork. Kleeman will meet with students and their parents for an introductory consultation to get acquainted, review transcripts and standardized test scores, etc. Families can then follow-up with continuous counseling for on-going guidance and support, exploring possible majors, critiquing essay responses and even maintaining contact through the student’s first year of college. Kleeman says the general rule for completing college applications is Thanksgiving because the deadlines for sending them out are usually December or January. Therefore, if you’re interested in Absolute College Counseling Solutions, contact Kristen Kleeman at kkleeman@durhamfitnessct.com or call (860) 349-2480.

By Stephanie Wilcox Town Times Mouth-watering Greek dishes can be enjoyed by driving just a short way down Route 17 into Middletown. Michael John’s Pizza Restaurant and Bar, named after the owner Gus Kostantakis’ two sons, has been open for nearly four months, and management and customers alike are happy to be there. “The menu and restaurant itself has really expanded from what it was before,” said manager Bill Fotopoulos, referring to the Pizza King restaurant under different ownership that was previously located there. “When it was Arrigoni’s Restaurant owned by the Arrigoni family, it was a great restaurant.” Operating like a family restaurant is what Fotopoulos

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says brings hungry customers to Michael John’s. “We’re all Greek,” he said. “We’re not all related, but we’re like a really tight family.” Well, it’s that and the sautéed dishes, Greek pizza and even the addition of Italian dishes to the menu that seem to draw customers. In fact, the chef, Mike Filintarakis, has been doing what he’s doing for over 30 years, so you know it’s got to be good. “The food is great,” said Fotopoulos. “We have one of the best cooks around.” Another reason folks like Michael John’s is because it serves two types of clientele; those looking for a nice family meal in the restaurant and those looking for the atmosphere of a sports bar. “It definitely brings in more people this way,” said Fotopoulos about the different clientele, adding that there are 11 plasma T.V. sets. With all that, the folks at Michael John’s clearly know how to run a great restaurant. But that’s not surprising, considering they’ve successfully operated a restaurant under the same name in Windsor Locks for the last 31 years. They hope their Middletown location is around just as long. Fotopoulos said the good news for them is that it is located on a main road (2100 South Main Street), is very visible from the street and has a big parking lot. Last but not least, the good news for hungry patrons, besides all that was mentioned above, is that it’s open seven days a week. So what are you waiting for? For more information, call (860) 346-2131.

Benefit show Help support Kenny Crompton’s fight against cancer by coming to St. Colman’s Church on Sunday, Oct. 25, from 4 to 8 p.m. for a showcase of Pampered Chef, Uppercase Living, Southern Living and more. There will be raffles, face painting for kids, lots of good friends and food and music by Jock in the Box. Tickets are $20, and $5 for those under 11 and are available at Middlefield Barber Shop on Strickland Road or call Gina at (860) 349-1888.


Town Times

Friday, October 2, 2009

23

Annual autumn art trail

The Connecticut shoreline is a fall foliage getaway, and a new world of artists and crafters are opening their private art studios and exhibiting their work during the Art Center at Killingworth’s annual autumn art trail. Start the day at the twoday outdoor arts festival nestled on the water on Clinton Landing near Andrews Memorial Town Hall, 54 East Main St. in Clinton. Here meet ceramicists, stoneworkers, quilters, knitters, jewelry designers and painters. Stop by and visit with Durham’s own Aleta Gudels-

Milne whose T h e work has public is been feainvited to tured in nukick off merous pubthe aulications intumn art cluding The trail with New York an openTimes, Traving recepel & Leisure, tion on Town & Friday, Country, Oct. 9, House & Garfrom 7 to 9 den and NaAleta Gudelski’s oil on canvas p.m. in tional Geothe Rose “Loading Dock, Essex.” graphic. R o o m , See potter Hayne Bayless Clinton Town Hall, 54 East demonstrate at Sideways Main St. The outdoor arts festival Studios in Ivoryton, a beautiful, fully-equipped working at Clinton Landing is free. potter’s studio, perched on a Tickets to visit the open stugranite cliff 75 feet over the dios are $10 for a weekend Falls River in Ivoryton. Bay- pass, free for children 12 and less has been accepted nine under. Tickets available at times into the Smithsonian the festival. To purchase in Craft Show and the Philadel- advance, call (860) 663-5593. phia Museum of Art Craft To preview exhibits, visit Show, winning top awards at w w w . a r t s c e n t e r k i l l i n g worth.org. both events.

Rockfall Foundation invites environmental grant proposals The Rockfall Foundation invites grant proposals from nonprofit organizations, towns, libraries and schools to support environmental education, conservation and planning projects in Middlesex County. The deadline for receipt of completed applications is Nov. 12, 2009 and awards will be announced in mid-February, 2010. According to Rockfall grants chairman Anthony Marino, “Grant selections often reflect Rockfall’s focus on grassroots programs, particularly those that encourage residents to spend more time outside and better understand the county’s natural resources and unique character.” Of special interest are: projects for youth that integrate activities with local, standards-based curricula; projects that encourage community growth that is in harmony

with the environment; and internship projects with measurable outcomes for college students. Priority will be given to projects that serve as models throughout Middlesex County, explains Marino. All those who are interested in submitting a proposal are invited to an informal grants informational workshop on Tuesday, Oct. 20, from 5-6 p.m. at the deKoven House Community Center. Detailed guidelines and eligibility requirements as well as a grant application can be obtained from the foundation’s website, www.rockfallfoundation.org, or by calling the Foundation’s office at (860) 347-0340. To register for the workshop, or for additional information about Rockfall grants, contact Virginia R. Rollefson, executive director, at vrr@rockfallfoundation. org or (860) 347-0340.

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ki, an oil painter, who teaches on both the secondary and college levels. She received her post-baccalaureate degree in painting from the Lyme Academy of Fine Art and has won numerous awards in juried shows throughout Connecticut. After enjoying the festival, pick up your open studio pass, and with colorful program and trail map in hand, head out to enter the private worlds of some of Connecticut’s bestknown artists. There are numerous open studios to choose from; highlights include the Durham studio of illustrator David T. Wenzel, best known for his illustration of Tolkien’s The Hobbit, one of the most successful graphic adaptations of classic literature. On Main Street in Durham is Redstone Studios. Here see the beautiful artistic maps and globes of Connie Brown and Duncan

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Town Times Sports

24

Friday, October 2, 2009

Falcon football weekend summaries for Sept. 27 A squad

Once again the Falcons A Squad started with a massive defensive effort against the Wethersfield Eagles Sunday, holding the Eagles scoreless in the first quarter. With one breakaway sweep, the Eagles were able to score a touchdown in the second quarter. With a blocked PAT kick, the score was 0-6 Eagles. The Falcons answered back quickly with an interception from Tyler Meeker that he ran in for a touchdown. A questionable flag on the play for roughing the passer caused the touchdown to be overturned. Not to be stopped, Tyler intercepted another pass from the Eagles QB and ran that back to the threeyard line. A quick QB sneak from Granger for a touchdown made the score going into halftime 6-6.

Falcons defense forced three turnovers during the

game. Amazing tackles from Granger and Collin Meeker stopped two breakaway plays for the Eagles. There were excellent defensive and offensive performances from Sean Doyle, Alex Cole and Matt Farrell. After the half, the Falcons’ defense held the Eagles to only one more touchdown. The final score was 6–12 Eagles. The A Squad cheerleaders did a great job at the game and did their best to keep the team motivated in the torrential rain. Next week the Falcons A Squad faces the Vernon Vipers at Vernon. B-Gold This day proved to be a better day for ducks than football players. In a hard driving rain, the Falcons battled the Eagles of Wethersfield on their home turf. The Falcons had a tough start, turning the ball over on their first two possessions which resulted

in two quick Eagle scores. The rain just kept coming, and both teams tried to fight through it as best they could, but it was tough to move the ball. The eventual outcome was a Falcon loss, 18-0. Next week they travel to Vernon for what they hope to be win number two. B-Maroon The Falcons lost to Rocky Hill in a tough, wet battle in the pouring rain, 26-0, and will host South Windsor next weekend. C Maroon Falcons traveled to Rocky Hill to play in very wet conditions. It was a battle of defense with the Falcons dominating the D line. One broken play led to a Rocky Hill touchdown before the half, but the extra point was stopped. The second half was again a battle of defense with the Falcons not letting a first down in the third quarter.

Led by Isaiah Nemicek, the Falcons never let Rocky Hill past their 40-yard line. Fourth quarter saw another breakaway touchdown by Rocky Hill on very wet turf; the quarterback was sacked on the extra point. The Falcons’ offense came alive with a powerful drive that led to a touchdown by Isaiah Nemecek and the entire offensive line led by Ben Murphy, Patrick Hocking, Nate McDonald, Dawson Hettrick and Jake Sapia. The ensuing onside kick was nearly recovered by the Falcons, and the next play the Falcons crushed the Rocky Hill line to force a fumble and recovery by the Falcons. With one minute left in the game, the Falcons were driving to score but wet conditions played havoc with the passing game. The clock ran out on the drive, the final score was 12-6.

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The captains were Dawson Hettrick, Ethan Doolittle, Victor Vieira and Ben Murphy. C Gold Durham Falcons C team Gold got their first win of the season against a tough Wethersfield squad. The Falcons were led by captains Andrew Gleason, Alex Boothroyd, Dylan DeGennaro and Hogan Dalhman. The game started off in the pouring rain, and holding on to the football was top priority. The Falcons scored two touchdowns in the first half, both on long runs by Owen Gonzalez. The defense played tough, only allowing six points in the first half, and came out just as strong in the second, not allowing any points. Sam Longworth, Michael Doyle, Jared Gibbons, Owen Gonzalez and Dylan DeGennaro led the defense with a handful of tackles each. Griffin Saks at quarterback led the Falcons on two scoring drives in the second half. Jared Gibbons punched in the third touchdown after a long drive down the field, and Ricky Sorensen scored the fourth. The extra point was run in by Griffin Saks. The entire Falcon team played an outstanding game! Final score: Durham-25, Wethersfield-6.

Notre Dame tag sale

Notre Dame Church on Main Street in Durham will have their monthly tag sale and flea market, rain or shine, on Saturday, June 6, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be household goods, pots and pans, dishes, craft supplies, sewing supplies, furniture, clothing ($2.50 per bag), antiques, collectibles, over a thousand books and anything and everything you might need or want. A jewelry table and 30 tag sale tables with thousands and thousands of items are set up in the air conditioned church hall. New items are coming in continuously. There are usually 40 vendors in the parking lot. Breakfast and lunch are also available in the church hall, Vendor space is $15, and is available by calling Bob Smith at (860) 349-0356.


Friday, October 2, 2009

25

Town Times

release dates: September 26-October 2

39-1 (09)

© 2009 Universal Press Syndicate from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

Fighting Wildfires

Firefighters Protect Our Lands Have you seen reports about wildfires in the news? In the last six years, firefighters in California have been battling more wildfires than ever. To learn more about these hardworking firefighters, The Mini Page talked to a fire chief in the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

photos by Wes Schultz, courtesy California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection

Upsetting the balance

Natural burning Fire is a part of the natural balance in many ecosystems. For example, in California, every part of the state used to burn an average of every 25 years. Fires help keep forests clean. They clear out the underbrush. That way, when the next fire comes, it doesn’t spread as quickly or as far. Fires are necessary to make certain seeds sprout. Without fires, many native plants won’t grow in forests and grasslands. In some areas of the wilderness, firefighters let wildfires burn. They keep a close watch to be sure the fire won’t become dangerous to people or their homes.

Firefighters try to get ahead of the fire by wetting it down and clearing out any possible fuel. By removing brush and leaves from an area, firefighters create a firebreak, or a place where they hope the fire will stop.

About 120 years ago, people started putting out forest fires. As a result, underbrush grew between the trees, creating more fuel for future fires. People began building homes and other structures closer and closer to forested areas. They planted crops in areas that might normally have acted as natural firebreaks, or places where the fire runs out of fuel. Drought, or dry, conditions, higher temperatures and high winds have also increased the risk of wildfires. Experts say the fire season is getting longer each year in California. About 25 years ago, the fire season began in mid-May. Now it begins in early April. The season is continuing longer into the fall as well.

Too great a risk There are also times when weather conditions are so dry or windy that fires would be dangerous anywhere. In these times, firefighters put out wildfires no matter where they begin.

Flames threaten a house during the Sawtooth Fire in California in 2006.

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page®. 1031332


26

Friday, October 2, 2009

Town Times

ÂŽ

39-2 (09); release dates: September 26-October 2 from The Mini Page Š 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

Fighting Wildfires In the wild, firefighters must be aware of constantly changing conditions that could increase or decrease the dangers. These include: sCHANGESINWINDDIRECTION sCHANGESINTYPESOFFUEL&OR example, changing from brush to trees, or to homes or grasslands; sTHEslope, or slant, of the land. When firefighters fight a structure fire, they can usually move about 100 feet away and be out of danger. This is not usually an option when fighting wildfires. Wildfires can jump firebreaks. Winds can blow flames into new areas. New fuel can feed the flames.

photo by Wes Schultz, courtesy California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection

Dangers of fighting wildfires

One firefighter drives a fire engine while others walk alongside, carrying the hose. Firefighters carry about 200 feet of hose on their backs. Firefighters may connect about 2,000 feet of hose altogether. One firefighter walks in front, spraying water with the nozzle.

Fighting fire directly

Fighting fire indirectly

To fight fires, firefighters take away heat, fuel or oxygen. Fires need these three things to burn. When firefighters go to a small wildfire, they attack it directly by pouring water right on the flames. Firefighters are aided by airplanes dropping flame retardant and by helicopters dropping water. Helicopters may land ahead of the fire to let out firefighters in hardto-reach areas. If a helicopter can’t safely land, firefighters may rappel (ruh-PEHL), or slide down, from the helicopter on ropes swaying in the air.

In bigger fires, firefighters might attack the fire indirectly. They use bulldozers, shovels, rakes or chainsaws to clear brush from the area in front of the fire, creating a firebreak. Sometimes, firefighters actually light a second fire between the wildfire and themselves. This gets rid of fuel before the wildfire can reach the area. The expression “fighting fire with fire� comes from this practice.

from The Mini Page Š 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

from The Mini Page Š 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

More to Explore

Firefighters

image courtesy U.S. Forest Service

The Mini Page provides ideas for Web sites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: sWWWFIRECAGOVCOMMUNICATIONS communications_justforkids.php sWWWSMOKEYBEARCOM sWWWUSFADHSGOVKIDSFLASHSHTM Help Smokey Prevent At the library: Wildfires! sh7ILDFIRESvBY3EYMOUR3IMON

Brown Bassetews TRY ’N The N d’s FIND Houn Words that remind us of firefighters are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: CALIFORNIA, TREES, BRUSH, FIREBREAK, FIRE, WIND, SAFE, FAR, PUT, OUT, HOME, FUEL, DANGEROUS, SMOKE, FLAMES, GAS, HOT, DRY, WILDLANDS, ECOSYSTEMS, SEED, BURN, HOSE, WATER. TM

I’M ALL FIRED UP TO HELP!

W F W A T E R S A

S I U H O T N M I

E K O M S B S C S D H O H R N E E R O U O E D D E Y M J L L L S D V E S A G S D N A R U B S U O R E T S Y S O C N R O F I L A

E S U S K L E E C

M E T S E D G E S

A E U H H L N R A

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini PageÂŽ.

L R P L M I A I F

F T F A R W D F E

F I R E B R E A K

1031334


Friday, October 2, 2009

27

Town Times Inquiring Photographers at the Durham Fair

As a follow-up to Kathy Meyering’s feature last issue on coming home for the Durham Fair, we asked reporter Stephanie Wilcox and freelancer Chris Coughlin to roam the fairgrounds last weekend and ask young adults “Why did you come back to the Durham Fair?” Below are their answers.

Justin Fernandes Lives in Boston, MA: “Because we didn’t have a five-year reunion.”

Lauren Smith “Friends, food, Blake Shelton.” Shawn Smith “Notre Dame grinders.”

Ashley Lasso “Friends and good food.” Tom Chiari “The Lime Rickeys.”

Lindsey YeomensDave Curley Sara Teitelbaum “Because I Lives Queens, NYC: Lives in Boston, MA: “Friends and food.” “To see The White- haven’t skipped the house Experience.” fair in 24 years.”

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Since Town Times will probably continue to get Durham Fair pictures for a few more days, if you send a photo of someone who travelled to get to the fair, we’ll be happy to print it in our Oct. 9 issue. After that, we’re done till next year!

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Town Times

28 BOE

(From page 7)

cerns, the artificial surfacing has been proven better for head injuries. Webb also made it a point to distinguish this artificial material from the “Astroturf” many remember. This material is second-generation, cutting-edge synthetics that are comprised of individual blades of artificial grass, rather than being a large green carpet. This results in much less friction, so people won’t get Astroturftype of rug burns. Andy Meiman, a member of the public, addressed the board with some independent research he had done. After

studying the success of synthetic materials at other sporting facilities, Meiman found that one reason for the regular maintenance was not just to maintain the synthetic grass, but also to maintain the rubber inlay material. Depending on its usage, patches of the rubber inlay can get compact and very hard, making it less safe. Meiman also found that some facilities reported that for the first two to three years of having the synthetic materials, they had to use a fabric softener and static guard to maintain the field. In addition to this, a number of facilities also used germicide solutions on their fields, the permanent lines the fields

Friday, October 2, 2009

eventually faded and had to be repainted. Currlin said that realistically, you will have to re-line the fields eventually, dependant on the usage. But lines for sports such as soccer or football would be more permanent, and it would be a matter of relining the fields every couple of years. Deb Golschneider asked how the maintenance staff would know when it’s time to groom the artificial surface. Webb replied that it is more of a visual thing, that it’s up to the school’s discretion and the amount of use of the field. Some schools groom every couple of weeks, and some schools groom their fields

Real Estate Page

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SU OP N. EN 12 -3

W NE ING T S I L

959610

3"

Durham - ALL THE WORK IS DONE

Durham - ADD THIS UP

Whether you’re a first time homebuyer cashing in on the $8,000 tax credit or just looking for a change of address, this move will be a simple one! EVERYTHING has been done: new roof, siding, windows, heating, central air, septic, kitchen and more! All of this and located in a great neighborhood with a big backyard. Incomparable at $252,000. 30 Edwards Rd, Rt 17 to Oak to Edwards, follow signs.

A near-new 2500 sq ft, 4 bedroom Colonial in pristine condition with spacious open floor plan, master suite with walk-in closet, big bonus room, 2 car garage, fireplace, oversized deck to indulge in amazing views and great backyard “equals” lots more value than the $387,000 price tag. 166 Maple Ave.

ICE D PR UCE D RE

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Durham - THE ANSWER To all your dreams & within your means. Check out this sun-drenched Cape in Royal Oak w/ gorgeous remodeled kitchen w/ granite & stainless appliances, first floor MBR, hdwd floors, 2 car garage, walkout lower level and a deep lot with space galore for backyard play. Only $299,900.

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1131183

The Marketing Edge

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48 Main Street Middletown, CT 06457 Office: (860) 259-1060 Cell: (860) 918-4580 huscherd@raveisre.com debbiehuscher.com

once a month. Webb also reminded the board that the turf manufacturer would make an annual visit to test the field and make any necessary repairs. Golschneider followed up her question by asking if Webb had ever seen any fields at different facilities that have needed to apply the softener and static guard products that Meiman had mentioned. Webb replied that one field did need it, but many other fields don’t. Apparently it’s hard to say definitively whether any field will need that treatment, but it is a minimal cost at most. Another board member brought up the possibility of a scoreboard, while another board member brought up the cost of lighting the tennis courts, and yet another asked why the grandstand bleachers were limited to only 1,000 seats. Webb stated that both of these issues depended entirely on funds. There are many things that CHA could do to embellish the overall facility but without increased funds, CHA is limited in what they can do. Other business Once the discussion about the proposed athletic facilities was finished, two other items were brought before the board. First, business manager Ron Melnik discussed replacing the 8,000-gallon underground oil tank at Korn

Durham Library seventh annual scarecrow event from Oct. 17 through Nov. 1. Anyone who would like to create a scarecrow to display on the library lawn can register in person or call the library. The Mystery Book Discussion Group will meet on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at 7:30 p.m. to discuss Iron Lake by William Kent Krueger. Copies of the book are available at the library. Everyone is invited to join this informal discussion. AARP driving course will be held on Thursday, Oct. 22, from 1 to 5 p.m., and on Friday, Oct. 23, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. This course is for drivers over 50 and pre-registration is required. New titles: Hothouse Orchid by Stuart Woods, Crush by Alan Jacobson, A Change

School. The top part of the tank failed a pressure test recently, and although the tank hasn’t leaked yet, it is over 20 years old and needs to be replaced. There are state grants to help reimburse the cost of replacing the oil tank, which the district is almost guaranteed to qualify for based on the age and condition of the existing oil tank. The new oil tank would be 4,000 gallons, and the tank and piping would all be double-walled to prevent leakage. The plan is to remove and dispose of the existing tank, test for soil contamination and clean the area if necessary, and install the tank. One board member questioned whether the smaller oil tank would hold enough oil for a school that is increasing in size, but Melnik stated that the smaller tank would only mean that the tank would have to be refilled an additional one or two times a year. The plan was put to a vote and was passed unanimously. Also up for discussion was a proposed Model U.N. field trip. This field trip is similar to other annual Model U.N. field trips and once funding issues were settled, the proposed field trip was passed. The next Board of Education meeting will be held on Oct. 6. Check the Town Times for more details. (Continued from page 13) in Altitude by Anita Shreve, Blood’s a Rover by James Elroy, A Separate Country by Robert Hicks, Nocturnes by Kazuo Ishiguro, Pilgrims: a Wobegon Romance by Garrison Keillor, The Greatest Show on Earth, the Evidence for Evolution by Richard Dawkins, Two Coots in a Canoe, an Unusual Story of Friendship by David E. Morine and Parallel, Growing Up with Undiagnosed Asperger’s by Time Page. Lost Symbol by Dan Brown is available in large print. Roadside Crosses by Jeffery Deaver and Crack in the Lens by Steve Hockensmith are available on CD. Book Sale: The PALS’ annual book sale will be held on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 23 and 24. The library is now accepting donations.


Town Times Obituaries

Friday, October 2, 2009

Brian E. Stender

Brian E. Stender, 52, of Grove Street, Clinton, died Thursday, Sept. 17, 2009, at the Bride Brook Health and Rehabilitation Center in Niantic. He was the husband of Kimberly Byington Stender. Born in Middletown on Oct. 13, 1956, a son of Edward Stender of Cromwell and the late Jean Cunningham Scheidel, he had been a Clinton resi-

dent for several years. He had been employed by the Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Company in Wallingford. Beside his father Edward and wife Kim, he leaves stepdaughters Megan Falck and Hannah Forster, his sister Julie Bailey of Bristol, his brother Gary Stender of MI, and step-father Ronald Scheidel of Portland. Relatives and friends are invited to a celebration of Brian’s life on Saturday, Oct. 17, at 11 a.m. at St. Mary’s Church in Portland. Inter-

ment will follow the service. Arrangements are under the direction of the Portland Memorial Funeral Home, 231 Main St. in Portland. For directions or to leave an expression of sympathy, visit www.PortlandMemorialFH.net.

Walter A. Watts Walter A. Watts, 84, of Meriden, formerly of Middlefield, Rockfall and Middletown, passed away Sept. 28, 2009, at Meriden Center. Born

29

in Middletown on Oct. 24, 1924, he was the son of the late Lilly A. Hull and Walter B. Watts. He attended Middletown schools. Besides his wife, Shirley Costello Watts, he is survived by three stepsons, Lorin, Donald and John Costello; sisters, Marian Gacioch and Lilly A. Aucaigne, both of Middletown; six grandchildren; three nieces and one nephew. He was also great uncle to five boys and two girls. Friends and relatives are

invited to attend a graveside service to be held on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2009, at 11 a.m. at Indian Hill Cemetery in Middletown. Friends may call at the John J. Ferry & Sons Funeral Home, 88 E. Main St., Meriden, on Wednesday, Sept. 30 from 5 to 8 p.m.

The family wishes to thank all the staff at Meriden Center for the loving care they provided Walter while he was there and to Dr. Tomanelli and Masonicare VNA. See jferryfh.com.

Real Estate Page 959610

tion to Vincent Ferraiolo, 17 Hickory Hill Dr., $299,000; Thomas Arcari III to Geoffrey and Pauline Webb, 14 Oak Terrace, $395,000; Michele Watson to Clay and Anne Laura Dean, 13 Hemlock Court $358,000; Jane Mauro to Seth Lerman, 223 Parmelee Hill Rd., $200,000; Michael and Carie St. Hilaire to Renee Berman, 16 Stagecoach Rd., $490,000; Andrew and Mary Jane Montz to Jennifer Hutchings, 56 Barbara La., $235,000; Craig Bradanini to Aaron Cirillo, 146 Guilford Rd., $278,000; Sharon and Michael Doyle to James Abely, Burwell Newton Drive, $10,000; Nationstar Mortgage to Emily Gumkowski and Andrew Miesse, 30 James Road East, $289,900; Robert and Catherine Barra to Robert Wawrzeniak, 186 DiNatale Drive, $413,000; David Mongillo to Denice Calabrese, 15 Mica Hill Rd., $33,000.

1131132

Durham Property Transfers

Eric and Ronda Berens to Christopher and Maria Gust, 49 Brittany Drive, $375,000; Edna Epperson to Denise Meliso, 30 Wheeler Hill Drive, $250,500; Alan Gilman Sr. to Stacie Dills, 490 Main St., $215,000; Audrey Thomas, Executrix to Elsy Negron Wrang, 109 Old Farms Road, $220,000; Stephen DelVecchio III to Kenneth Kosior, 59 Howd Rd., $316,000; Scott Fredricks to Lon Tassmer, 92 Wheeler Hill Dr., $268,000; Louis Gagliardi to Matt and Wendy Stach, 65 Barbara La., $175,000; Virgina Burka to Joseph and Kathleen Gullage, 408 Wallingford Rd., $227,000; Joseph and Lauren Camporeale to Kenneth Vallera and Laura Sprague, 27 Foot Hills Rd., $460,000; Daniel Markovits and Sarah Bilston to Amy MacQueen and Ralph DiLeone, 34 Haddam Quarter Rd., $470,000; US Bank National Associa-

Pamela Sawicki-Beaudoin Broker/Owner

860-349-5300

Lisa Golebiewski, ABR, GRI Broker/Owner

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Bridie Bradbury to our Real Estate team! Bridie Bradbury has been a licensed Real Estate Professional since 2006 and is a member of the National Association of REALTORS®, the Connecticut Association of REALTORS®, The Greater New Haven Association of REALTORS® and the Consolidated Multiple Listing Service. Prior to her career in Real Estate, Bridie worked in many areas of the Automotive Industry, starting with sales, before moving to inventory and finally management. Currently, she is working toward receiving both her CRS and GRI real estate designations. Bridie has volunteered as a past producer of multiple variety shows at Pond Hill School in Wallingford as well as being involved with the American Cancer Society Relay for Life as a Set Designer for her team’s site. Bridie resides in Wallingford with her two children. “I always strive to assess my clients needs, personalities and their desires. Whether it’s finding the right buyer for their home or finding the home of their dreams, I am always thrilled when I have found the right one! My perseverance and attention to your wishes will exceed your expectations!” ~ Bridie Bradbury. For all your Real Estate needs, call Bridie at 860-349-5300.

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30

Town Times — Friday, October 2, 2009

market

e place 877.238.1953

Build Your Own Ad @ towntimes.com

JOBS ■ TAG SALES ■ CARS ■ HOMES ■ PETS ■ RENTALS ■ ITEMS FOR SALE ■ SERVICE DIRECTORY LOST & FOUND

AUTOMOBILES

AUTOMOBILES

TRUCKS & VANS

AUTOMOBILES WANTED

AUTO PARTS

Mercury Sable Wgn 00

TAG SALES TAG SALES

MIDDLEFIELD 26 Mohican Rd. Sat Oct 3. 9:00 am to 2:00am

LOST & FOUND

FOUND- Black cat w/white underneath. Possibly female. Vic. of Claremont Ave, Wallingford for about a week. Call (203) 996-6349 FOUND- Young or small black cat with a little white on chest. Very affectionate and very cute. Area of Rose CircleLenore Drive-Old Stagecoach Meriden, Wallingford town line. Please call 203-235-5503. Free to good home if no calls. FOUND-Cell phone. Vicinity of Rec Park Southington 9/26. Battery dead. Call (860)2760405 to identify. LOST- Sat. 9/26 at Lyman Orchards, Middlefield. Sterling silver 14K gold tone bracelet w/5 square stones separated by diamonds. Lots of sentimental value. Please call (203) 630-9960

BUICK CENTURY 1998 Grandma stopped driving it. Low miles. Excellent condition. Carfax report available. $3895. (203) 530-3173

Buick LeSabre 1997 LOST- Green Amazon Parrot w/ yellow head on Wednesday, March 25 from 156 Sherman Avenue, Meriden. Responds to Kelby, speaks English & Spanish. Reward if returned. Call (203) 630-2426 LOST-English BullDog mix w/Boxer. White with brown spots. Answers to “Coto”. Vicinity of Sterling Village, Meriden. Call 813-451-9018 or 860-436-1750 LOST-Grey & black tiger. White paws & white belly. Vicinity Corner of Lincoln & South Main, Wallingford. Answers to “Francis” Family heartbroken. REWARD if found. 203-2691553 or 203-427-1458

SPECIAL NOTICES

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $2995. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $3300. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $950. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

Buick LeSabre 2004 FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $4995 Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

TRUCKS & VANS

CHEVY S10 1996 Green, Ext cab. 5 spd. W/truck liner & tool box. 105k. Can see at 117 Carter Ave Ext., Meriden, $2100. Needs brake booster, $350 repair credit. 714-738-6000 or 203-235-1957

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $1595. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

Dodge Dynasty 1991

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $1695. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

Ford Windstar 1997

DODGE 90 Pickup w/plow

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $3495 Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $2995. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

Buick 1988 Riviera

Mercury Cougar 1993

Mazda Pickup 1990

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $950. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $1780. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $495. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

AUTOMOBILES

Ford Taurus Wgn 1995

Free Towing! SNOWMOBILES AUTO PARTS

SUV’S

CHEVY S10 LS 2002- Ext. cab. 4 cyl, ABS, AM/FM/CD stereo, AC, good cond. Cruise. B.O. on Kelley Blue Book of $7,455. Call (203) 271-9860 9am to 1pm or 7pm to 9pm.

FREE HOME BIBLE STUDIES From Genesis to Revelation in the privacy of your own home. For more information, please call (860) 680-8085 www.hopesouthington.org

TRAILER HITCH fits 96-04 Pathfinder with Haynes repair manual. $75.00 203-265-1070

1-800-527-3863

Chevy Lumina 1995

FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $1450. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

The Jewish Childrens Fund FORD E150 1999 Sells for $4398. Good car. Call Kris 203-238-9411 Email carnusawanh@nathealthcare.com Negotiable. ASAP.

Buick LeSabre 1998 FALL USED CAR CLEARANCE: $3100. Can be seen at G.T. Tire 155 Colony Street, Meriden

CASH And/Or Tax deduction for your vehicle. Call

Olds Cutless Supr 1996

BMW Z3 16” Rim w/Michelin tire. 225/50ZR1692W. $100 firm. (203) 634-9336 Ford Explorer 1997 4-Door 4.0, 5speed. $600. For parts or easy fix. Runs, but needs work. Winter is coming. AWD. Call 860276-9003, leave message. Also, Sega Daytona 2 USA Arcade Driving Game w/ 50" Monitor. $28K New. Awesome shape, first $3,500 takes it! Call 860276-9003. RIMS from ‘06 Hyundai Azera. 17x7 inch multi-spoke alloy wheels in great cond. They incld center caps & lug nuts. They should fit 2006+ Azera, Sonata, Tuscon, Santa Fe, & Tiburon. $299/OBO for the entire set of 4. Note: they do not incld tires. 203-623-8434

2003 YAMAHA SX VIPER 700cc. Red & black. Runs great. Excellent condition. $5500 or best. Call (203) 6861354

! e r e h l l It's a

) 238-1953

Ads • (877 Marketplace

AUTOMOBILES WANTED

Junk cars, trucks, motorcycles. Free Pickup. Free Removal. Running or not.

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Tow n Times

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Day or Night

Marketplace Advertising Direct Line 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

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31

Friday, October 2, 2009 — Town Times FURNITURE & APPLIANCES MAGIC Chef chest freezer w/book. 2 years old. $75.00. Call (860)560-6320 MOVING! Dining Room set, hutch, table, (2) leafs, (6) chairs, $975. Portable floor model 9000btu A/C, like new, $250. Electric stove, $50. Window A/C, $50. 203-715-3923 NAVY Blue Leather Couch. Like new $90 Call (203)237-5242 anytime B4 6:00pm

NEW GE Kitchen gas stove, 30inch. $100. Whirlpool Refrigerator. $50. 5 yrs old. 18 cu. ft. (860) 582-4655 ROCKING CHAIR- Maple, solid wood with ottoman, $60. 2 burreaus. $30 each. (203) 2376807 SECTIONAL couch 4 pcs. 1-w/bed. Taupe multi - $100 Call 203-237-7174 SETOf Sturdy Wooden Bunk Beds. Good condition. $75. (203) 238-9805 SMALL Chest Freezer. Excellent condition. $75 or best offer. Call (203) 639-9545 TILE Top Table With 3 refinished chairs - $100. 24” ZENITH TV - $50 (203) 237-0153

Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators & Stoves CLEAN Will Deliver (203) 284-8986 WOOD Futon. Good condition. $75. (203) 237-6807 WOOD kitchen table 5X3 with 4 chairs. Good condition. $50. Call 203-444-2787

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE LEAPSTER L-Max with cable, backpack carry case and 4 cartridges. $40 or best offer. Excellent condition. Call (203) 235-2784 ONE ROUND Window. 24 inches. Brand new. $95. Call (203) 2352024 PICASSO VanGogh and more art books. 1952-rare Asking $40. 203-237-0912 PROFORM CROSSTRAINER $95 (203) 634-0474 SCREENED TOPSOIL, 16YD MINIMUM, DELIVERED $25 PER YD CALL 203-272-3166 TANNING BED $99 (860) 828-6433 WINEMAKING Equipment Barrels, bottles, jugs and much more. Call (860) 346-2427

WOOD, FUEL & HEATING EQUIPMENT

DAYTON oil fired warm air furnace. Used only (2) seasons, 100,000BTU, beckett burner, multi speed blower motor. Great deal $250. 860-398-1195 FIREWOOD- 16”-18” $200/cord, $110/1/2 cord. 860-613-2117 or 860-770-7057

WOODMASTER/Coalmaster stove made by Suburban. $100. Very good cond. 203-265-7297

SPORTING GOODS & HEALTH 2 BOYS’ Bikes. 1 Mongoose, 1 Magna. 20”. $5 & $15. (203) 238-4478 AB CHAIR - Brand new. $50. Call anytime. (203) 639-9772

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

1129820

CAMPER & TRAILERS STEHL tow dolly Never used. $800 Call 203-634-8389 after 5pm

PETS & LIVESTOCK 1 DWARF Hamster with cage $15. 2 w/o cage $5ea. 203-631-9373 BULLDOGS, Chihuahuas, Boxers, Boston Terrier, Yorkies, Beagle, Labs, Pit Bulls, Poms, Basset Hounds, Maltese. $150+ Call 860-930-4001 BUNNY for sale!!! Mini Lop 17 weeks old. $25 Call (860)3423522 FREE to good home. (3) doves & rabbit only with cage. Call 203-537-8795 GOFFIN Cockatoo, handsome male, 5 years old with cage. Good temperament, affectionate, very playful. $600/OBO Call 860-268-6495 Can’t keep! HORSE BOARD Wallingford. Few stalls available. Geldings only. Individual daily turn out. Self/full care. For info call (203) 294-9313

PETS & LIVESTOCK HORSE STALLS FOR RENT. 3 stalls, 12x12 each, available with pasture, Middlefield, easy access, rough board (self care). Refurbished barn. Each stall $200/mo. (860) 349-9558

LAWN & GARDEN TORO recycler lawmnmower 6.5 h.p.-21” New blade $75-(203)630-1087

DOOR Pre-hung. Approx. 38x80. Never used. No knots. $95. (203) 237-2583 leave message

OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG Puppies. AKC. Excellent dispositions. Ready October 21. Taking deposits. $700. Vet certified. 1st shots & wormed. (603) 835-8555

14 ANTIQUE chairs. Mostly mahogany/oak 75.00 203-6391002 3 PIECE Patio bistro set. $30. call (203) 237-6807 3 Year Old Refrigerator. White. $100 Call 203-440-5230 8 DRAWER Dresser with mirror, lingerie chest, cherry finish. Very good condition. $100. (203) 440-9832 COUCH, tan, clean Can deliver. $70 860-682-4435 CRIB, White, tubular metal converts to toddler bed $50.00 203-671-9297

RAGDOLL KITTENS- Blue eyed beauties, rabbit-like fur, TICA registered. SBT. Vet checked. 1st shots. Taking deposits. $550. Please call 860-329-9893 TABLE-, Kitchen table has 2 leaves, good cond. $50. Call Paul at (203) 379-6187

FISHERMAN’S Antique Wicker Folding Chair $50.00 Call 203265-5920

CONSTRUCTION EQUIP & TOOLS

HORSE Stalls Now Available in quiet, family-oriented barn bordering miles of trails in Durham. Grass ring & paddocks, quality feed & care. $350/month. (860)978-1726

PUG PUPPIES - Purebred 1st shots. Parents on premises. Very lovable. Home raised. $850. 203-213-5189

FURNITURE & APPLIANCES

FURNITURE & APPLIANCES

FRIGIDAIRE stackable washer and dryer immaculate $500; Frigidaire 8,000 BTU window air conditioner $100; Sharp 10,000 BTU stand-up air conditioner, needs hose, vent, mounting bracket $100; Lakewood portable radiator $25. Aaron (860) 681-7632. “HAIER” compact refrigerator. Excellent condition. $30. Please call 203-284-8383 KING Size Bed Complete - $50. Call Mike (203) 415-7182 LEATHER recliner-rocker green. $95. Call after 5:00 PM 203269-9830 LIVING room set-2 couches, rolling coffee table & (2) end tables. $250. Call 203-235-2859 anytime SHEETS- Twin size, eyelet trim. New. $8. Call (203) 237-8004

2 ADJACENT BURIAL PLOTS at St. Stanislaus Cemetary, Meriden. $800 each. Save $400! Call (603) 476-8299 50 CLASSIC horror DVD’s. Most of the DVDs never opened. $80. Call 203-634-9336 AMERICAN Copper Full comforter set, $45.00 203-686-1564 CHAIR Swivel rocker, green, comfy. $20. 860-628-9824 CHAIR- Folding, cloth, strong, by Blue Cross. $6. (203) 2372583 leave message CRAFTSMEN 16”Scroll saw and table. Used once. $90. Call 203-630-0841 CRYSTAL Salad Bowl with set of six serving bowls. $25. (203) 440-3919 DALE JR Budweiser #8 life sized cardboard cut out. $30. (203) 630-0708 FIREPLACE TOOLS Grate & log holder. Black & brass. $75. 203-265-2725 FOUR 1952 Abrams Color Print Art Books $40.00 Call 237-0912 FREE Hagstrom swing set. You haul away. Call 203-815-9050 for details FULL-SIZE Oak baby crib (no mattress). $30 Call 860-276-9698. HAIER Mini Refrigerator with freezer White great shape $60. 203 980-9618 KLM unibody dimension specification charts ‘80 to ‘99. Foreign domestic. $99. 860-224-7209 MAGIC TREE HOUSE BOOKS. EXCELLENT CONDITION. $15. 203-235-2784

PISTOL PERMIT CERTIFICATION. 1 Session only, $100. Group discount available! Call for next class 203-415-1144 SPORTS ILL 1973-2003. B. B. Digest 1975-2008 $50 or best offer. 203-537-0550 WEIGHT SET includes bench, bar, and 293lbs. of weights, $35. 203-265-3738.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES BEANIE Babies assorted $1.008.00 each. Call 203-237-7174 if you need any

COMPUTERS & OFFICE EQUIPMENT BROTHERS Word ProcessorWP2410 Accessories & manual. $70. (203) 634-4209

GREAT PC! HP M7360Y LOADEDw/upgrades. 3G Ram, TV Tuner, Media Center. 500 G storage - expandable w/Personal Media Drive plug & play to 750g to over 1.5 Terabyte. Multiple card input front & back USB & firewire. Much more. Moving-must sell.won't last long. $650 203-294-4651 OFFICE manager style chairblack. Never used. $35. Call 203-671-0104

ELECTRONICS RCA Wireless headset for tv pc with vol control. $20 Call 203-687-5381

WANTED TO BUY

$ ALWAYS BUYING! $ 1 item to entire estate! Call or stop by Frank’s, 18 South Orchard St. Wallingford. Mon-Sat. 9:30-4:30.

203-284-3786 ANTIQUES WANTED - 1 Item or an Estate. Estate sale service provided. Seeking: Meridenmade items, lamps, paintings. Call Todd Shamock 203-237-3025 FISHING TACKLE. Local collector looking for old or new rods, reels, lures. Highest prices paid. Call Dave anytime 860-463-4359

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT & INSTRUCTIONS 2 DRUMS 12” tom-tom, 14” floor tom. Only $75. Call 203-634-0809 PIANO - Cherrywood, Console style, Ivory keys, Story and Clark, good condition. $450 or best offer. 860-621-6649 PRIVATE MUSIC LESSONS Drums & Percussion, Trombone, Euphonium, Baritone Horn, Trumpet, Piano, Improvisation. Consultation/First Lesson Free! Exp’d & certified teacher in convenient Kensington loc. Call Bob 860-357-2638 PRIVATE MUSIC LESSONS. Many different instruments offered. Beginners to Advanced. Experienced music teachers. Call Sarah or Mark 203-235-1546 Fall openings available. UPRIGHT Barrett piano- FREE. You take away. (203) 537-0550

Voice Lessons All Ages and Levels Welcome

Piano Lessons Beginner to Intermediate De Fiore Vocal & Piano Studio Roberta (203) 630-9295

HOUSES FOR RENT MERIDEN. Small 2 BR recently remodeled home, no util, no pets, no smoking, w/d hookup. Section 8 OK. $950/mo plus 1 mo sec dep. 203-600-0988

CONDOMINIUMS FOR RENT

MERIDEN Crown Village 1 BR, 3rd flr. Heat & HW incl. $750/mo. Sec & refs. No pets. Call Andrea, Maier Property Management (203) 235-1000 MERIDEN- 1BR, sec bldg. No pets. Sec dep-credit check. $800 per month. 203-376-1259 MERIDEN- 2BR, 1 1/2 bath w/garage. $950/mo. 306 Brittania St. Call Alex 203-213-3162 or George (917) 696-2869 MERIDEN- 2BR, laundry room, 1 car gar., A/C. No pets $950/mo + dep. 203-235-9214 SOUTHINGTON Clean 2 BR, 1 Bath, Gas Heat. Close to shopping & highway. No pets. Available November 1. $800/mo plus utils & sec. 860-877-4735 WLFD 2BDRM. 1+2 baths, Pilgrims Hbr. Townhse. 1450 sq.ft. Closets! Storage! Deck! Pool, Golf, Tennis. Move In Ready! $1,400/mo. Call 203927-6745

APARTMENTS FOR RENT CHESHIRE Quiet country setting near Rte 10 (Minutes from I-691) 1 BR $850, 2 BR $950 both including h/hw. Sec & Ref. No pets. Call Debbie at 860-398-5425


32

Town Times — Friday, October 2, 2009

APARTMENTS FOR RENT DURHAM 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. No smoking, no pets. $800/ month plus utilities, security and references. Please Call 860-349-3084

APARTMENTS FOR RENT MERIDEN LG. 2BR, 1st fl 1350 SF. Lg kit. & DR, w/d hkup, off st park, back yard. 223 Camp St. $950/mo. Section 8 approved. No pets. 860-982-6585

Meriden Studio Apartments Available HOME SWEET HOMES Offers Meriden - Studio apts $650. Heat & HW incl. + sec. Avail. immed! 203-938-3789 MERIDEN - 3 & 4BR APT, 2nd flr, 1 mo. sec. + 1 mo. rent. References, no pets. Section 8 or other programs approved. (203) 464-6273 MERIDEN - 5 room, 2 Bedroom, 3rd floor, newly remodeled, off street parking, no pets, $800 plus utilities, references. 203671-9644 MERIDEN - CLEAN 1 ROOM EFFICIENCY $450. Utilities included. 2 mos security. Credit check req. No pets. Call 203-284-0597 MERIDEN 1 bdrm w/walk in closet, AC. New kitchen, appliances, carpet, tile and paint. Off st. park. Includ. Heat and HW. Laundry and pool available $750 + Sec. dep. Barberino R. E. 203-265-7534

MERIDEN 2BR, 1 bath, unfurnished. Clean, Large Off-street parking. Ready for you to move in! Free Heat! $795/month. No Pets. Betty 203-443-5548 MERIDEN 2BR, 1st lr, updated. Basement storage space. So. Colony St. Yard. No pets, separate utils, sec. $800. Call 203809-4627 MERIDEN 3 Bdrm, 2nd fl. No pets. No smoking. Available October 1. Large yard. Recently remodeled! $950/month & 1 month security. Call 203-317-0360

Meriden 3 BR Apt 1st floor, newly renovated, appliances, off st. parking. No pets. $950/mo. 203-815-8335 MERIDEN 3 BR LR, DR, Kitchen. 3rd floor. Balcony, storage. Clean. No pets. Call 203-4400751 leave message.

MERIDEN 32 Cook Ave.

Studio & 1 BR Apts. $600/Studio & $650+/1 BR New owners. Remodeled. Heat & Hot water incl. 203-886-7016 MERIDEN 3BR Off-st parking. Clean. Freshly painted. New carpet. Move-in condition. $950 +sec. (203) 237-4000

MERIDEN 3BR, 2nd fl unfurnished. Clean. 1-yr lease. On-site management. Very affordable! 31 Twiss St. $850/mo, 1st, last & sec 203-630-2719 stove & refrig. MERIDEN 3BR. 1 bath, unfurnished. 1st flr 1-yr lease. Wood St. New carpet & paint. Available now. Washer /dryer hookup. $950+ Sec. Call 203671-2672

MERIDEN EFFICIENCY Fully Furnished. BR/LR combination w/full kitchen & private bath. $575/mo. Sec. & lease req. Call 203-238-9772 WALLINGFORD-1BR, 2nd Floor. Stove, fridge, heat & HW incl. $775 + sec. Call 203-430-4373

80 East Main St. Small Studios - $450 Lg Studios $500 Property Max 203-843-8006 MERIDEN STUDIOS - $650 1BRs - $750 2BRs - $850. Free Heat & HW incl. ACs. 24 hr maintenance. Sec. guard. Laundry Rm. Off st parking. 203-630-2841

MERIDEN- 1BR, 1406 Hanover Ave. With appls, parking & laundry. No pets. 1 yr lease. 1.5 month security. $695/mo. 203265-7094 MERIDEN- 2BR, 5 Rooms. 1st floor ($895) & 3rd flr 2BR, ($775). Stove and refrig. Storage area. Yard. Off st parking, quiet. Sec req. 860-841-6455. MERIDEN- Hubbard Park- 2BR, central air/heat. 775 West Main St. $925/mo. Tony 203213-8468/ 203-296-4975 MERIDEN- Nice 1BR, 72 North First St., Apt 4. Parking, appliances, $595. Credit, references. No pets. 203-238-1890

APARTMENTS FOR RENT MERIDEN-Newly renovated, 2nd flr, 2BRs, granite counter tops. Absolutely gorgeous. Offst-parking. No pets. $950+ sec. Refs. 20 Howe St. 203-676-7512 MERIDEN-Studio apt downtonw on bus-line, $525/mo + utils. No pets. Sec & refs. Call 203-982-3042 MERIDEN-Studio apt on busline, downtown, W/W carpet. $600/mo inclds heat & elec. No pets. 203-982-3042 MERIDEN: Spacious 1 & 2BR apt. $650-$800, off st park. Section 8 approved. 110 Colony St. Leave Message 860-4260658 MIDDLEFIELD APTS FOR RENT 1BR $775/mo + utilities. 2BR $950/mo inc. heat & HW No dogs. 2 mos. sec. required. Call 860-982-3000 SOUTHINGTON 24 High Street, 1st flr, 2 BRs. Stove, refrig, w/d hookups. $875/mo plus util & sec. 203-245-2388 SOUTHINGTON LARGE 1250 sq ft 1 BR apt. C/A. Appls, lg jacuzzi, W/D hookup in bsmt. Utils not included. Near Hospital of Central CT. 860-621-2693 SOUTHINGTON/MERIDEN Extra lg 1BR apt. Avail 11/1. Southington-Meriden townline. Sliders to deck, prvt parking, appls. Exc. area. $750/mo. Refs & sec req’d. 203-232-0968 or 203-499-7894 for more details

APARTMENTS FOR RENT WALLINGFORD-2 BR, 1ST FLR Appliances included, new floors. No smoking/pets. Security, references. $850. Available now! 203-215-9077 WALLINGFORD-2BR, washer & dryer hookup, large yard, offst-parking. $875/mo+sec. Call 203-265-1192 Available Oct. 1. WALLINGFORD-48 Allen Ave, 1st flr, 4Rm, 2BR, off street parking, coin-op wshr/dryer, $875/mo, 1-1/2month security. Easy access I-91/Merrit Pkwy. Open Oct 1st. 203 430 6896 WALLINGFORD-Choate area. Spacious 2 BR, 5 rm, 2nd flr, appliances, hdwd floors, w/d hookup, garage. $1050 +util. 203-265-9871 or 203-269-9755 WALLINGFORD-Quiet country setting 1BR, 2nd flr, stove, refrig, patio. Credit, refs, sec. No pets/smoking. $700/mo +utils. 203-269-9755 WALLINGFORD. 3 BR, 2nd flr, lge rms, clean, off st parking, trash pickup, w/d hookup. Sec, credit ck. No pets. Section 8 approved. $1100. 86 Meadow St. (203) 265-5980, Lisa. WLFD- 2BR 2nd flr. Electric incl. Choate vic. Nice yard, off st parking. $800 + sec. Avail. 10/1. 203-640-6308

SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE NOW!!! Maintenance fees too high? Need Cash? Sell your unused timeshare today. No commissions or Broker Fees. Free Consultation. www.sellatimeshare.com 1-866-708-3690

2 BR - $750, $850 & $950 WLFD- NORTHRIDGE Commons, spacious 1 & 2BR units. $725 - $875 & up 203-269-5770

WALLINGFORD - 1 bedroom, 3rd floor, unique layout, close to town and Route 5, off-street parking, washer/dryer hookup, appliances, trash and water. Security and references. No smoking or pets. Available now. $700 plus utilities. Call 203-269-6391

WLFD-2 LG. 1BR apts in small complex, lg. kit, w/d in unit, A/C, off st. parking, convenient location. $900-$950 + utils. Yalesville Area. No dogs. Call Don at ERA Property World 203-272-6969

WALLINGFORD - 2 BR Large rooms, off-street parking. No dogs, 104 Meadow St. $925 including utils. 203-530-1840

WLFD-2BR, Choate area. W/D hkup. No smoking/pets. Credit check + refs. $950 + utils. Call 203-376-2007

WALLINGFORD - Near transportation, 5 rooms, 2 BR, 2nd floor, 2 family, off St. parking, no pets, $800 plus utilities, 203-284-1853 WALLINGFORD 2/3BR, $1065/mo. Available immediately. 203-265-6175 or 203-213-6175

WLFD. 1BR w/stove & refrig including heat & hw. Starting at $695. No pets. Lease, sec. JJ Bennett Realty 203-265-7101

WALLINGFORD 2BR/5Rm, 1st Floor. Renovated. Wall to wall carpet. Fully Applianced. Quiet in town locale. Utilities not incl. Credit & Ref req. Lease, sec, no pets. $875/month. Negotiable with terms. 203-435-6790 pm

WLFD. 2 BR OVERSIZED Townhouse, applianced kitchen, lots of storage & closet space, laundry room. NO PETS. $1195. Call J.J. Bennett, 203-265-7101.

Looking for the perfect new home for your Mother, Father, Aunt, Friend or Yourself?…….

You Found It! S a g e Po n d P l a c e

GARAGE & STORAGE SPACE FOR RENT WALLINGFORD - North Main St. Close to center of town. Good area. $100/month, incl. elec. Sec. dep. req’d. Available immediately. 203-269-1426. WALLINGFORD North Plains Industrial Rd. Storage/Manufacturing units. 600-3000SF. Some w/bathrooms. Call for prices. (203) 269-6023 ext 303

STORES & OFFICES FOR RENT MERIDEN: 1450 Sq. Ft. office, in modern professional building at 1501 East Main St. This well appointed building offers business tenants a great location at an affordable price, which includes all utilities, ample off street parking and convenient to 1-91 and Rt. 15. 203 281-1010 www.cucinelli.com YALESVILLE- Prime office space. 1200 sq. ft. 1st flr. Major intersection. Contact Jeff 203269-5703

COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL RENTALS

MERIDEN- Renovated Apartments Heat & Hot Water Included Secure building. Off st. parking. Call 203-886-7016 MERIDEN- Wallingford line, Large, Luxury 1 & 2BR condo. Laundry. Rent - $650 & $850 + utils, no pets. 203-245-9493 x 2. MERIDEN-177 Foster St. 2nd flr. Newly renovated 3/4BRs, W/D hkup, enc porch, mudrm, hdwd flrs, closet, storage, lg yd., offst park. $1,175. 203-634-3210 MERIDEN-1BR apts starting at $705/mo. Heat & HW incld. Sec. Dep. & credit ck req. Call Galleria RE for details 203-671-2223. MERIDEN-1BR, Large Rooms, Large Windows, Off-St-Parking. WD Hookup. Very nice. $650 /mo. 2 mos sec & credit check required. No pets. 203-284-0597 MERIDEN-1BRS-Starting @ $665 All appls & hot water incl. 1 & 1 mo. sec.. No pets. Coin op laundry. 1095 Old Colony Rd. Showings Sat’s 9-11am. 203-581-3620 MERIDEN-2 bdrm apt, own entrance, newly renovated, offst parking. No pets. $850/mo. Sec & refs req’d. 203-238-7133 MERIDEN-2, 3 & 5 BRs, starting at $750. Newly remod. Off-st parking. Convenient loc. E Side. No pets. 860-573-1182 MERIDEN-2BR apt. Nice area w/parking. Reduced! $795/mo. incl. fridge, stove & w/d hkup, coin op. w/d. Storage area. No utils, pets or smoking. 1 yr lease. Cr. check & refs. req’d. Sec & 1st mo. rent. 203-608-8348 MERIDEN-3BR duplex, $1100 Atkins St. 3BR, quiet location, $1000- Bailey Ave Middletown-2BR, $800 203-526-4338 MERIDEN-3BR, 1st flr, 2 family house, off-street parking 1 car. $730 per month 24 Garden Street 860-302-1304 or 860-621-2430 MERIDEN-Completley renovated. 3BR or 4BR apts. Dead-end st., quiet neighborhood, 1 parking. Section 8 approved. No pets. $1300-$1350. 203-715-3494 MERIDEN-Large clean 5Rm, 2BR, 2nd flr. W/D hookup, stove, refrig front porch, lge fenced backyard. Off-st parking Must See! $825/mo + sec. 860-690-5555

VACATION & SEASONAL RENTALS

WALLINGFORD-1,200 sqft bay avail in fenced in property. 20ft ceilings, 14x14 drs, bathrm, electric, heat & water. Great price! Call 203-272-4216

HOUSES FOR SALE

Nestled off the road in a quiet, wooded setting!

Brand New Beautiful 1 Bedroom Apartments in Berlin For Active Adults 55 and better

Only $950 Heat, Hot and Cold Water Included Central air! Intercom system! Fully applianced kitchens On-site laundry! with frost free refrigerator, Library with computer range with self cleaning oven, workstation! dishwasher, garbage disposal! Ample on-site parking! Community room with fireplace Picnic area with grill! and full service kitchen! 24-hr. maintenance! Secure three-story building with elevators!

Call Now!

(860) 828-3958 also accepting applications for Affordable Units Income Restriction Apply Merit Properties, Inc. Financed by CHFA HOUSES FOR SALE

MERIDEN “All the work is done”” Warm & inviting updated freshly painted Cape, including siding, roof, C/A, 200amp elec, kit, ba & furnace! New OS 2car garage & level back yard. Priced well at $219,900 WLFD $175,000 Handyman special; 2 family w/store front, possible 3 family house. Some remodeling done, separate utilities. Call Brian Miller 203-265-5618

Call Kathy or P. Lane (203) 235-3300

WALLINGFORD 5 RMs, 2 BR. WD hookup. Off st parking. No pets. Security. $900 per month. Call (203) 949-9976 WALLINGFORD- 1BR, 3rd flr, Large BR, kit., LR. No pets. Parking avail. $700/month + sec. Call Ed 203-376-0752. WALLINGFORD- 1BR, studio, kitchen. Stove & refrigerator included. Centrally located. $550. No pets. 2 mo security + refs. 203-265-0698 WALLINGFORD- So. Cherry St. 2BR, incl. all appls. AC, 10 ft ceilings. Like new - built 2 yrs ago! $1200/mo. 2 mos. sec. Call 203-464-8066

Giving You Clear answers during complex times. Call Pam Sawicki-Beaudoin Broker/Owner. 203-623-9959 Experience Makes the Difference!

YALESVILLE - 1st flr, 2BR, appls, off st. parking, no hookups, laundry room, no pets. $875. 203265-3939 Wilcox Lane.

ROOMS FOR RENT MERIDEN 1 large & 1 small. All utilities including cable. Share kitchen & bath. No drugs. Sec. 203-440-0825 or 203-623-4396

WALLINGFORD 2nd FL, 2BR 1Bath 4RM. HDWD & Tile Kit. Newly Remdl. W/D hkup. New Appl + DW. 2 off-st. Weekly Garb. $925 + util. (203) 213-6829 Avail 10/08.

HOUSES FOR SALE

NORTH CAROLINA Mountains. NEW! E-Z Finish Log Cabin Shell With Loft & Full Basement. Includes acreage. $99,900 Financing Available 828-247-9966 code 45

MERIDEN-Room available. Utilis included! $115/week. Avail immediately. 203-213-8589 MERIDEN-Room for rent. $140 per week. Includes utilities, wash/dryer. Beautiful Victorian home, nice yard. Call 203537-1772 Lisa MERIDEN. Room for rent, all util, share kit, bath & LR. Washer & dryer, off st parking. $150/week. 2 wks sec. (203) 605-8591

Giving You SOUTHINGTON $275,000. Priced to sell! Spacious 8room Raised Ranch. 4BRs, 2 baths, 2 fireplaces, 2car garage on 1/2acre. Exceptional property w/loads of curb appeal! Call Brian Miller 203-265-5618

NORTH HAVEN Meadowstone Motel- Off I-91. Sat. TV, furn’d. Daily/Wkly On Bus Line. 203-239-5333 WALLINGFORD Person to share home. $130 per week. No smoking. No drinking. 203-747-1612

MERIDEN Houses for sale, rent or lease purchase. Visit our website at www.galleriahouses.com or call 203-671-2223 Galleria Real Estate

Clear answers during complex times. Call Lisa Golebiewski, Broker/Owner. 203-631-7912 Experience Makes the Difference!

MIDDLEFIELD 1 BR Lake House on cul-de-sac with lake view and lake rights. House is in excellent condition. Inside totally redone. Large yard. Patio Deck. Large shed in back yard. Great neighborhood. Friendly & safe. Asking $260,000. Must see! Call owner (860) 604-5638

DAWN HOYDILLA BUYERS YOUR $8,000 1ST TIME Homebuyers Credit is Expiring Call Prudential’s Meriden/Wlfd TOP PRODUCER 203-589-1278 or View my successes at dawnhoydilla.pruct.com


33

Friday, October 2, 2009 — Town Times CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

Get ready to

WLFD Affordable home for sale in Wallingford. Detached 2 story condo, 1250 sqft, 3BR, 1.5 baths & 1 car gar. Avail to those persons whose income is less than or equal to $48,000. The sales price of Unit #26, 2 Sycamore Way- $183,333. For additional info contact Jay 203-294-4707

Models - All ages

WLFD- Judd Square- 2BR, ranch, newer flooring, fully applianced, spacious C/A, pets allowed. $123,500. Call Quality Realty, LLC 203-949-1904

Part-Time Teller

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Ready to WOW! customers in a fun, fast-paced environment? Then set your sights on this PartTime Teller opportunity at TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank! Open and service customer accounts, accept loan payments, cash checks and much more! To succeed, you’ll need: UĂŠ >ĂƒÂ…ĂŠÂ…>˜`Â?ˆ˜}]ĂŠĂƒ>Â?iĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠVĂ•ĂƒĂŒÂœÂ“iÀÊ service experience UĂŠi˜iĂ€>Â?ʓ>ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂƒÂŽÂˆÂ?Â?ĂƒĂŠ UĂŠÂ?iĂ?ˆLˆÂ?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂžÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŠĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽĂŠĂƒVÂ…i`Ă•Â?iĂŠ UĂŠLˆÂ?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽĂŠiĂ›i˜ˆ˜}Ăƒ]ĂŠ->ĂŒĂ•Ă€`>ĂžĂƒĂŠ >˜`ĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂƒ

1128062

MERIDEN $325,000 4 1BR units. Two of the apts are completely remod. Building has updated electric & plumbing and a new roof. Please see MLS#N291329 for more details. Call Annemarie 203-235-3300

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WLFD Back on the market and lower price! Earn big $$ when you take over this Filipino store, restaurant, deli. Great Rt. 150 location. Many established clients. $70,000. Maria 203-265-5618

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HELP WANTED

CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE

CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE TECH

MERIDEN $159,900-6rm, 2BR, 1 1/2B end unit Townhouse. FR in LL, 1car under gar, sunken LR, form DR & more. Come see and enjoy the pool and serenity! Kathy (203) 235-3300

WALLINGFORD $179,900-2BR 1.1 bath Townhouse in quiet Brentwood Village. Close to tennis courts, clubhouse or pool. Call Fred (203) 265-5618

MERIDEN Weed out your worries, downsize into this 2BR, 1 1/2 bath Townhouse in a well cared for small complex w/low maintenance fees. Freshly painted & ready to move in. $149,900. Call Sue (203) 265-5618

Richard Chevrolet has an immed. opening for an experienced, trained GM Technician. We have an extremely busy service dept w/consistent work flow. Work with state-ofthe-art equipment in an immaculate shop. We offer excellent income & benefits including 401K plan. All calls confidential. Apply to:

Jaime Gray Service Director

203-272-3000 Richard Chevrolet Cheshire DATA PROCESSING - Full Time position for Insurance Agency with benefits. Please fax resume: 203-630-1504.

EOE m/f/d/v. Pre-employment testing required.

No experience necessary 5 or 7pm Thursday, Oct 1st Holiday Inn, North Haven I-91 Exit 12 570-346-9410 ext. 551 highlite.com/haven PART TIME Office/Receptionist Call (203) 284-8989 Fax 203-269-1114 RECEPTIONIST-P/T for Baran’s Kenpo Karate. Cust. srv & retail. Mon/Wed, 3p-8:15p, Tues/Thurs,3p-7:45p, Fri 3p-7p, Sat 9am-12. Kim 203-949-9660 SALESPERSON Needed for a busy Wallingford dealership. Salary plus commission. Call (203) 284-8989 Fax 203-269-1114 TOOL MAKER with some punch press experience. Retirees welcome. Please call 860-349-9228 or fax resume to 860-349-0084

Treatment Nurse - RN

Several Part Time positions available, days - 9a-3p, evenings 5p -9p including every other weekend. 60 bed skilled nursing unit. Responsible for providing primary skin care w/ emphasis on developing, planning & assessing treatment & therapy of skin disorders & wounds of our residents in accordance w/ standards of nursing practice & regulations. Recent wound care experience a plus- Excellent rate / partial benefits. Elim Park Baptist Home, 140 Cook Hill Road, Cheshire, CT or email CWalker@elimpark.org. Apply in person M-F 8a- 7p or weekends 10a - 3p. EOE, A/A, D/F, M/F.

Wallingford Public Schools

1131264

CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT in need of an organized, detailed person to oversee payroll, standard journal entries, bank reconciliations, sales tax filings, etc. Exc salary & benefits! Fax resume to 203-234-1907 www.yale.com/iti Industrial Trucks Inc. 69 Dodge Ave, North Haven AUTO PARTS COUNTERPERSONParts exp. required for busy NAPA store. Potential to earn over 40K, profit sharing and health benefits. Call Don at 203272-3704 weekdays, A.M. only.

IMMEDIATE Openings! Pickers/Packers Assemblers Production Workers Forklift Operators Shipping/Receiving InfiniStaff 860-223-5100 LEGAL SECRETARY Min 5 yrs litigation exp for New Haven Area ins. defense firm. Comp. salary, med/dental. ctlegaljobs@cox.net

MIDDLE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

HELP WANTED CALL CENTER Growing Wallingford call center looking for friendly & enthusiastic customer service reps to answer phones for inbound sales. Second shift. Must be able to work a weekend shift. Bi-lingual a plus. Please call 203-284-6040 Ext 1970. CUSTOMER SERVICE

NO EXPERIENCE NO PROBLEM Entry level customer service reps are now being accepted for interviews. Accepted applicants to begin immediately. Benefits avail, flexible hrs, paid vacations. Full corporate training provided.

Call today! Positions are being filled rapidly

860-329-0316

HELP WANTED DRIVER - Class A. Hazmat, medical, 401k. Apply at TuxisOhrs, 80 Britannia St, Meriden.

James H. Moran Middle School Start Date: January 4, 2010. Intermediate administrator’s certification and experience as a teacher and administrator at the middle school level required. Regionally competitive salary & benefits package.

20-30 motivated individuals for full & PT work. Must be 18 & able to start right away. No exp nec. WILL TRAIN!

For application packet, please contact: Jan Guarino-Rhone Director of Human Resources (203) 949-6510 jguarino-rhone@ wallingford.k12.ct.us

$475-700/week base pay Call today for an interview

Deadline: October 19, 2009

GENERAL HELP

★NEEDED AT ONCE★

860-329-0318 HVAC LICENSED Installer/Service Tech Immediate opening. Residential. Minimum B/D/S license req. Excellent wages, benefits. Billy Carlson Heating & AC, LLC (860) 621-0556 OIL Delivery Driver-Seasonal PT. CDL with hazmat. Clean driving record. 203-379-0193

CAREER TRAINING & SCHOOLS ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. Medical, Business, Paralegal, Computers, Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 800-4880386 www.CenturaOnline.com


34

Town Times — Friday, October 2, 2009 Become part of the magic at

MEDICAL CAREERS

Logistics and Operations

Wednesday Sept. 30 between 1-5 p.m.

Job Fair Opportunities For Success

CNA/HHA -

Macy’s Logistics & Operations, 475 Knotter Drive, Cheshire CT 203-271-5303

NEW ENGLAND HOME CARE is seeking CNAs and Home Health Aides with a minimum of 6 months experience for a pediatric group home in Meriden. Previous experience in a group home with physically and emotionally challenged children preferred. All shifts available.

or apply any Monday - Friday, between 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. A good job is in store Macy’s offers competitive salary and fun environment that captures the spirit of logistics and retail operations.

800-286-6300 ext. 3902 or fax your resume to the HR Department 860-613-3777 or email to: employment@newenglandhomecare.com E/E/O/C/M/F/V/D

Now hiring for the following:

Ȼ Seasonal warehouse employment We Offer:

Drug Screen/Criminal Background Check Required

4 day / 10 hour schedules & 3 day / 12 hour schedules

Visit us on the web at NewEnglandHomeCare.com

Part time - Saturday and Sunday

1130010

Saturday and Sunday schedules qualify you for a shift differential.

GRADING, Drainage, Foundations, Trucking, Retaining Walls, Pavers, Water/Sewer/Septic. Lic. #1682. Cariati Developers, Inc. 203-238-9846 MC/Visa Accepted

IF YOU MENTION THIS AD We clean Estates, house, office, attic, cellar, gar, yd. Spring C/U. 860-575-8218/203-535-9817 DEBRIS removal of any kind. Demolition sheds, pools, etc. Quick, courteous srv. All calls returned. Ins. #0620397. Office 203-235-7723/Cell 860-558-5430

ATTORNEYS

Warehouse staff earn an hourly incentive up to $2.30 per hour!

Baylor RN, Floating Supervisor Sat/Sun, 7a-7p & Mon, 3p-11p 32 hours (paid for 48 hrs) - Full Benefits Applicants must be 18 yrs old, submit to pre-employment drug testing and a criminal background check.

RN Supervisor 32 hrs, 3pm-11pm

You can also apply online at www.macysJOBS.com

Free Float - No Weekends - Full Benefits Macy’s is an Equal Opportunity Employer, committed to a diverse and inclusive environment.

CAREER TRAINING & SCHOOLS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!! Fast, Affordable, Accredited. FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-532-6546 ext 96 www.continentalacademy.com

NOW HIRING PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD This newspaper makes every effort to avoid errors in advertisements. Each ad is carefully checked and proofread, but when you handle thousands of ads, mistakes do slip through. We ask therefore, that you check your ad on the FIRST day of publication. If you find an error, report it to the

SCHOOL BUS/VAN DRIVERS PART-TIME WILL TRAIN FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT Apply online at:

www.durhamschoolservices.com Or in Person at: 990 Northrup Rd, Wallingford, CT 418 Short Beach Rd, East Haven, CT 866-496-2726

IMMEDIATELY by calling

203-238-1953

Miller Memorial Community, Meriden's choice for excellence in senior residential healthcare services, is seeking compassionate, energetic, qualified RN's, to join our professional team. MMCI offers very competitive wages and benefits (including pension plan and non-contributory health and dental for employee, life, and disability insurances). Drug testing and criminal background check required. Applicants must be Connecticut licensed. If you are willing to go the extra mile for your patients and are truly interested in person-centered care, please apply to:

Personnel Manager Miller Memorial Community, Inc. 360 Broad St., Meriden, CT 06450 Fax 203.630.3714 or email: hfparisi@emmci.org EOE

Durham School Services Is a Nationwide Leader in Student Transportation HOME HEALTH AIDE COORDINATOR 1129821

Marketplace

Meriden FT Entry Level Position 9AM-5PM Mon-Fri. Bilingual Preferred. Fax Resume Attn: Alison Kogut (203) 599-6071 Or Apply Online: www.utopiahomecare.com

Looking for a friend? Find litters of critters in Marketplace.

before 5pm Mon-Fri We regret that we will not be responsible for more than ONE incorrect insertion and only for that portion of the ad that may have been rendered valueless by such an error.

EXCAVATING

Earn up to $12.00 per hour based on experience. Must have a current CT CNA certificate. To schedule an appointment to apply, please call:

Macy’s Discounts Your budget will go further with a Macy’s discount… treat yourself, or buy a special gift for a friend or family.

Ȼ Ȼ Ȼ Ȼ

ATTIC & BASEMENTS CLEANED

It's all here!

Please call for corrections at 203-317-2308 - after 5 pm call 203-317-2282 Ad#:TOWN TIMES LOGO Pub:PERM Date:07/21/07 Day:SAT Size:6X2 Cust:TOWN TIMES Last Edited By:EALLISON on 7/20/07 12:20 PM. Salesperson: Tag Line: Color Info: TOWN TIMES LOGO - Composite

Bankruptcy Free Consultation Keep home, auto, 401k, etc. STOP FORECLOSURES IRS & “Repos” Atty F.W. Lewis 439 Main St, Yalesville 203-265-2829 “Debt Relief Agency” We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code

CARPENTRY

Home Doctor Tiny repairs-Major renovations Custom Carpentry, plumbing, elec, painting. 42 yrs exp. 203-639-8389 CT #573358

HOMETECH Carpentry, repairs. No job too small or large. Member BBB.

203-235-8180 CT Reg #564042 REPAIRS done by carpenters free estimate to windows, doors, roofing, siding, hatchways, and cellar leaks. Complete home improvements, additions, finish Bsmnt, dormers, porches & decks 203-238-1449 #578107 www.marceljcharpentier.com

DRIVEWAYS

MIDSTATE PAVING DRIVEWAYS BUILT TO LAST Reasonable rates. CT Reg 575852 203-238-1708

DUMPSTERS Roll-Off Dumpsters 15 yard roll-off - $350 20 yard roll-off - $450 Empire Construction, LLC 203-537-0360 www.EmpireLLC.biz

ELECTRICAL SERVICE

Offers complete excavation services, drainage, underground utilities. 50+ yrs exp. 203-237-5409 CT Reg #503554

K & A ENTERPRISES Water & sewer lines, inground tank removal, drainage, grading, additions, pavers. Insured. Reg# 571435 203-379-0193

FENCING UNITED FENCE Co. All types of fencing. Lic’d & ins’d. Free est. CT Reg 603790. (203) 634-1113 CORNERSTONE FENCE & Ornamental Gates. All types of fence. Res/Comm. AFA Cert. Ins’d. Call John Uvino 203-237-GATE CT Reg #601060

GARAGE DOORS

A2Z GARAGE DOOR SERVICE Installation & Repairs CT #600415 203-235-9865

GUTTERS

GUTTERS DON’T WORK IF THEY’RE DIRTY For gutter cleaning, call Kevin at (203) 440-3279 Fully insured. CT Reg. #569127.

HANDYPERSONS A-1 HANDYMAN PLUS CT Reg #606277. GIVE us a call, we do it ALL. Free est. 203-631-1325

Shamock Roofing All types of remod. 30+ yrs exp. No $$ Down. CT Reg 523804. Ins

203-237-4124 an LLC co. Neighborhood Handyman, LLC. Specializing in smaller jobs. Indoor/outdoor. CT Reg #611858 Matt 860-877-2549

HEATING & COOLING DON’T Sweat It this Summer! Call Duane Plumbing, heating & cooling. Quality work. Major credit cards. Low rates. 203-379-8944 #400335-S1

HOME IMPROVEMENTS T.E.C. Electrical Svc LLC

Tow n Times Marketplace Ads • (877) 238-1953

All Phases of Electrical Work 24 hr. Emergency Service

SMALL JOBS WELCOME

203-237-2122

O’CONNOR ROOFING 203-639-0231 Lic. & ins. Free est. Work performed by owner. CT Reg #602521


35

Friday, October 2, 2009 — Town Times

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

LANDSCAPING

WE WEED GARDENS Norm the Gardener’s 3-man crew is only $65/hr. CT Reg#571339 (203) 265-1460

LAWN & GARDEN

PAVING

ROOFING

FALL clean-ups. No job to big or small. Please call 203-630-2152

Roofs R Us Family run 42yrs. EPDM, Siding, seamless gutters, roof repairs. We Beat Any Quote! 203-639-8389 CT #573358

MASONRY JACK Biafore, LLC Masonry Chimneys, brick, block, stone walls, patios. In business over 50 yrs. CT# 623849 (203) 537-3572

WINDOWS, doors, decks, siding, rubber or shingle roof, kitchen & baths remodeled. CT Reg#0619909. 203-715-2301 T&E Construction & Remodel Additions, bsmts, kit. & bath, decks, roofing, siding, masonry. All types of remodeling. 203-272-4308 Ct Reg #0565380

HOUSE CLEANING HOUSECLEANING SERVICE with a passion. Fully insured. 860-828-1338 or 860-796-5222 20 years exp. Efficient, reliable, references. Try Me, You Won’t Be Sorry. 860-796-0097 POLISH LADY with good cleaning exp. looking for more houses to clean. Refs. available. Call (860) 869-0876

JUNK REMOVAL

PETE IN THE PICKUP JUNK REMOVAL. 203-886-5110 JUNK REMOVAL & MORE! We clean Estates, house, office, attic, cellar, gar, yd. Spring C/U. 860-575-8218/203-535-9817 10% off if you mention this ad

KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING

C&M CONSTRUCTION To ensure a quality job at a fair price. Call 203-630-6459 CT Reg #608488

MOWING Clean-ups, Hedge Trimming & more. New clients always welcome. Comm /Res. Free est. Walter 203-619-2877

HEDGE TRIMMING No Hedge/shrub too big, small or tall. Fully Ins. Free estimates. Quality Landscaping, LLC. WWW.QLSLLC.COM Jim 203-537-2588 or 860-349-2118

Quality Landscaping, LLC Property & Lawn Maintenance, landscaping, stone work. WWW.QLSLLC.COM CT Reg #620306 Jim 203-537-2588 or 860-349-2118 WESTFORT FARM Screened top soil mixed with compost. Picked up or delivered.

JIMMY’S MASONRY Stonewalls, steps, patios, chimneys, all types. Lic. & Ins’d. 25 yrs exp. Call for free est. 860-2744893 CT. Reg. #604498

GARY Wodatch Landscape Svs. Hedge/tree trim., trimming over grown properties. Est 1985. All calls returned. Lic ins. #0620397. Office 203-235-7723 or Cell 860-558-5430

HEDGES RICK’S AFFORDABLE Fall Clean-ups, brush/tree removal, curbside vac truck, tree & pricker removal. 11 yrs exp. 203-530-4447.

Driveways/parking lots/ concrete. Free estimates. 50+yrs exp. 203-237-5409 CT Reg #503554

Veneer (Brick, Stone, Block), Concrete, Stucco, Steps/Stairs, Repair. Free est. 203-982-3087 or 203-755-9469 CT Reg #577098 SAMMY Masonry-Since 1977. Concrete, stone, chimney, stucco. All masonry. CT 574337. Ins. 203-757-8029 or 203-206-4481 S & H MASONRY LLC Stonewall, steps, chimney, concrete, retaining walls, pavers, walkways, patio Free est. Lic/Ins. #607639. Cell-203-376-0355

MIRKEL PAINTING Int./Ext. Popcorn ceilings. Interiors from $125 Exteriors from $899 CT Reg #569864. Ed 203-824-0446 HALLMARK PAINTING Pressure Washing. Int/Ext Res & Comm. Fully Insured. CT REG HIC #0560720. 203-269-3369

Fahey Plumbing & Heating Quality ● Clean/Neat ● Honest! A guaranteed job at a good price! Days, Nights, Wknds - Same Price

Shamock Roofing 203-237-4124 an LLC co O’CONNOR ROOFING

D & G PAVING Over 25yrs exp. Paving, seal coating, concrete work. CT Reg#0577005. 203-237-6058 OMEGA - All paving, seal coating, hot tar crack filling. 10% off. Free est. All work guranteed #0624631. 860-294-1184

203-639-0231 Lic. & ins. Free est. Work performed by owner. CT Reg #602521

C&M CONSTRUCTION To ensure a quality job at a fair price. Call 203-630-6459 CT Reg #608488

KEELING’S - Lamp repair, Lighting consulting, stained glass repairs; fixtures; & panels, handpainted lighting. (860) 349-0916 www.keelinglamps.com

SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

Chainsaw Leaf Blower Snow Blower Mowers

ALL TYPES REPAIRED

Call Ahead Pick up or Drop off

203-272-0747 Remove unwanted fungus, algae streaks, moss from your homes roof today. Fully lic’d & ins. POWERWASHING SERVICE Res, Com. Quality work done. Gutters cleaned at time of power wash. CT Reg#0619909. 203-715-2301

8-5 Mon-Sat 1372 Peck Lane, Cheshire

Empire Construction, LLC

Roofing, siding, windows, decks, gutters & remodeling.

Your Professional Roofer New Roofs, Reroofs, Tearoffs We fix leaks too! 203-269-3559 CT Reg#565514 www.EmpireLLC.biz

FIDERIO & SONS Siding, roofing, windows, decks, sunrms, additions. 203-237-0350. CT Reg. #516790 QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS LLC ‘WE DO EVERYTHING!” Ct Reg# 572776 (203) 671-7415 SAMMY Construction Quality Work. Carpentry, repairs, siding, roofs & more! 203-757-8029 or 203-206-4481 CT# 619246

SNOW PLOWING

Commercial Plowing Parking lots, condos, industrial. Loader/Salt. www.qlsllc.com Quality Landscaping, LLC. Jim 203-537-2588 or 860-349-2118

203-294-9889 www.ICEFIGHTERS.org

● ● ● ●

POWER WASHING

ROOFING

SERVICES OFFERED

ROOF CLEANING

203-235-1383

IS Spring cleaning on the outside. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Kevin 203-440-3279 FALL SPECIAL Power Wash any single story ranch for $199. Call Off The Wall (203) 265-4242

OMEGA ROOFING - Shingles, flat roofs, new & repair. $299 Leak Special! All work guaranteed. Free Estimates. CT Reg #0624631. 860-294-1184

Fully license/insured. CT Reg# 577319

DON’T Flush money down the drain, call Duane Plumbing, heating. Quality work, low rates Major credit cards accptd. 203379-8944 lic. #283401 P1

All types of remod. 30+ yrs exp. No $$ Down. CT Reg 523804. Ins

PAVING

Roofing, siding, windows, decks, gutters & remodeling. ★★★★★★★★

POWER WASHING PAINTING/ WALLPAPERING

★★★★★★★★

203-639-0032

PLUMBING

AMERICAN MASONRY

203-237-7129 203-530-7041 JT’S LANDSCAPING, LLC Fall cleanups and snow plowing! Book by Oct. 31 & save 15% on all your landscape needs! Comm/Resid. Top quality work. Lic & fully ins. 203-213-6528 CT Reg #616311

Gonzalez Construction

ROOFING

SIDING

Gonzalez Construction 203-639-0032 Fully licensed/insured. CT Reg.# 577319

FIDERIO & SONS Siding, roofing, windows, decks, sunrooms, additions.

203-237-0350 CT Reg. #516790

SNOW PLOWING

RICK’S AFFORDABLE Commercial snow plowing and sanding. Call (203) 630-2642

Expert De-Icers Commerical Specialists. Nicholas J Murano LLC, Member: Snow and Ice Management Assn

TOP SOIL SAND & FILL BEAUTIFUL FARM FRESH Screened Top Soil. Fill, Sand & Stone. Picked up or delivered. No minimum. Cariati Developers, Inc. 860-681-3991 HAZELWOOD EXCAVATING Dry farm screened topsoil and colored mulch.

203-269-0135 WESTFORT FARM Screened top soil mixed with compost. Picked up or delivered.

203-237-7129 203-530-7041 SCREENED TOP SOIL Dark, organic material. $22/yard. Also, backhoe/bulldozer work. Ct Reg. #563704 (203) 699-8883

TREE SERVICES

LAVIGNE’S TREE SERVICE IN BUSINESS 28 YRS. Tree removal. Stump grinding. Crane Srv. Free Est. Fully insured. 203-294-1775 GARY WODATCH LLC Tree Removal, All calls returned Reg #0620397. Quick courteous service. Office 203-235-7723 or Cell 860-558-5430

PRICKER REMOVAL RICK’S AFFORDABLE Spring clean-ups, hedge trim, brush, tree, pricker & underbrush removal. No job too big or small. 11 yrs exp. 203-5304447. YARDLEY TREE SERVICE.com Fair, reasonable. Free estimates. Reg. Insured. FIREWOOD 203-440-0402 or 860-595-4159

visit us online at

www.TownTimes.com www.Town Times.com Stay in touch with Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall


36

Friday, October 2, 2009

Town Times

Estate Sale 3 Bedroom Ranch on almost an acre of land. Located between Peckham Field Park and Recreation area (500 yds), Powder Ridge Ski Area (1000 yds), Lyman’s Orchards (1000 yds), and two Golf Courses (600 yds & 1mile). Handyman special. $225,000. Call Berardino Realtors 349-0344 for more information.

has set us apart as Durham and Middlefield’s Real Estate brokerage provider of choice!

Lots Available! 1.56 Acres $135,000 4.42 Acres $175,000 4.89 Acres $189,500 2.45 Acres $250,000 6.05 Acres $350,000 14.91 Acres $375,000 Call Berardino Realtors 349-0344.

At Berardino Company we know our job isn’t merely putting people in homes, it’s surpassing even the highest expectations of our customers Berardino Realtors a goal we meet every day. www.berardino.com

DURHAM

MIDDLEFIELD

DURHAM

New Listing!

Beautiful Ranch close to golf course, park, and highways. Featuring a huge remodeled kitchen w/stainless steel appliances & island, large living room w/FP and hardwood floors throughout. Perfect starter home or for those looking to downsize. $229,900. Call Berardino Realtors 349-0344 for a private showing.

DURHAM

R E D N U

Ideal Location Ideal village location from which the farmer’s market, village shops, schools, library, parks, churches, and fair are all just a short healthy walk. Home offers 2 fireplaces, spacious kitchen, hardwood floors, views and large rooms. $205,000. Call Berardino Realtors 349-0344 for more information!

Our innovative and creative approaches to marketing on behalf of our clients

T I S O P E D

DURHAM

DURHAM

MIDDLEFIELD MIDDLEFIELD

Ezra Camp Circa 1776 All original features remain in pristine condition. 6 rooms on first floor with 5 fireplaces. Modern kitchen with large windows offering beautiful views of water garden, stone path & formal gardens surrounding the home. Only $489,900! We highly recommend viewing this fine property exclusively represented by Berardino Realtors, please contact agent 349-0344

1131126

A Family Tradition of Outstanding Service For Over 100 Years !

Without Compromise Truly the finest Durham home offered under 700k. Thoughtfully designed flr. plan & brilliantly executed workmanship combined to satisfy those content w/ only the very best. An inviting great rm. space delights as it opens to the kit. & outdoor patio. This one owner residence has been meticulously & lovingly maintained. This fine home is situated comfortably on almost 2 acres surrounded by Durham’s renown countryside. Call Berardino Realtors 349-0344 today for a private showing.

Indoor Swimming Pool Over 6700 sq. ft. of glorious finished space dominating 10 private acres with an abundance of diverse wildlife. This important residence offers a rich and full lifestyle to the proud homeowner. Indoor swimming pool, steam room, and sauna for a healthy lifestyle. $750,000. For a private showing, call Berardino Realtors 349-0344.

Short Sale! Beautiful, 10 room East side home on 2.6 private acre site located at entrance to state forest! This home features 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, and 2-car garage. An outstanding value at $420,000, we highly recommend viewing! For a private showing, or more information, please contact agent at 349-0344.

To put our proven talents to work for you, call Berardino Company at (860) 349-0344 or visit us at 40 Main Street, Durham. (Next to Dunkin’ Donuts)

Durham & Middlefield’s Premier Real Estate Company


10-2-2009TownTimes  

Volume 16, Issue 25 Serving Durham, Middlefield and Rockfall Friday, October 2, 2009 Business Briefs...............22 Calendar.................

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