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Sussex Region Sussex • Smith’s Creek • Apohaqui • St. Martin’s • Norton

Community Wellness Profile

2011


Production of this Community Wellness Profile has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada and the New Brunswick Department of Wellness, Culture and Sport.


Table of Contents

COMMUNITY WELLNESS PROFILES (2011) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Research Profile Data Sets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

DEMOGRAPHICS Demographics: At a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Demographics: Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Demographics: Age Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Demographics: Gender Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Demographics: Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Demographics: Education with a Certificate, Diploma or Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Demographics: Household Income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Demographics: Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

HEATH STATUS Health Status: At a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Health Status: Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Health Status: Chronic Diseases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Health Status: Body Mass Index (BMI) Adult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Health Status: Body Mass Index (BMI) Youth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

HEALTHY EATING Healthy Eating: At a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Healthy Eating: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Healthy Eating: Vegetable and Fruit Consumption (Adult). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Healthy Eating: Vegetable and Fruit Consumption (Youth) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Healthy Eating: Breakfast (Youth). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Healthy Eating: Youth Consumption of Sweetened, Non-Nutritious Beverages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Healthy Eating: Household Food Insecurity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25


Table of Contents

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Physical Activity: At a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Activity: Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Activity: Top 7 Physical Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Activity: Youth Energy Expenditures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Activity: Youth Energy Expenditure, by Gender. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Activity: Youth Screen Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Activity: Participation in After School Physical Activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26 28 30 31 32 33 34

Physical Activity: Parents’ Physical Activity Level. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Physical Activity: Parent Support for Physical Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

MENTAL FITNESS Mental Fitness: At a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Mental Fitness: Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Mental Fitness: Youth Mental Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Mental Fitness: Youth Prosocial Aspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Mental Fitness: Youth School Connectedness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Mental Fitness: Youth Smoking Susceptibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Mental Fitness: Levels of Self-Perceived Stress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Mental Fitness: Levels of Self-Perceived Stress, by Gender. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

TOBACCO-FREE LIVING Tobacco-Free Living: At a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tobacco-Free Living: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tobacco-Free Living: Youth Exposure to Tobacco Smoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tobacco-Free Living: Youth Smoking Patterns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

iv

48 49 50 51


COMMUNITY WELLNESS PROFILES (2011) Introduction The Healthy Eating Physical Activity Coalition of New Brunswick (HEPAC) is pleased to engage and support wellness networks in their efforts to positively impact the healthy eating habits and physical activity levels of New Brunswickers, including vulnerable populations. HEPAC is helping wellness networks to access evidence-based resources, tools, and better practices, and to take advantage of networking opportunities which support healthy eating and physical activity. This Community Wellness Profile provides you with a snapshot of the wellness status of your community. Your profile outlines the demographics, health status, and levels of physical activity, healthy eating, tobacco use, and mental fitness in your own community. Provincial and national data are also provided, so you can see how your community fits within the bigger picture.

Wellness networks are formal or informal groups of people who share a vision and come together to address an area of concern around wellness in

Using this profile, you can work with your partners and stakeholders to identify their own community or region. the wellness priorities for your community. Your HEPAC Wellness Coordinator can help you with understanding and interpreting the data. The data contained in your profile will be renewed every 3-4 years to allow you to use this as a tool for monitoring and evaluation.

HEPAC VISION HEPAC’s vision is for all New Brunswickers to lead a healthy lifestyle.

HEPAC MISSION HEPAC’s mission is to collectively lead the province in the promotion of healthy eating and physical activity.

HEPAC STEERING COMMITTEE Membership 2011 The HEPAC Steering Committee provides strategic direction for the coalition and its members and is composed of seven non-government organizations and five provincial government departments. • • • • • • • •

Dietitians of Canada (Co-chair) Canadian Cancer Society NB Heart and Stroke Foundation of NB Recreation New Brunswick University of New Brunswick /Université de Moncton NB Physical Education Society J.D. Irving Ltd. New Brunswick Departments of Wellness, Culture, and Sport (Co-chair), Education, Health, Local Government, and Social Development • Horizon Health Network (ex officio) • Réseau de santé Vitalité (ex officio)

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Research Profile Data Sets Data sources used for Community Wellness Profiles include: •

New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey, 2007-2008

Statistics Canada, Census Electronic Profile, 2006

New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010 This data set describes health attitudes and behaviours of Anglophone and Francophone students around physical activity, healthy eating, tobacco-free living, and mental fitness. Surveys are repeated every three years and, following each survey, participating schools receive their own results in the form of feedback reports. The reports help schools identify where to take action in partnership with students, parents and communities. The surveys and knowledge mobilization are funded through the provincial Wellness Strategy (Department of Wellness, Culture and Sport) with the cooperation of the Department of Education. The survey is administered and analyzed by the Health and Education Research Group (UNB and U de M). Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey, 2007-2008 The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) is a cross sectional survey that collects information related to health status, health care utilization and health determinants for the Canadian population. The survey is administered by Statistics Canada with the support of Health Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information. The New Brunswick Department of Health provided support regarding access to the Canadian Community Health Survey data, and analysis of the data for your community. Statistics Canada, Census Electronic Profile, 2006 The Canada 2006 census provides a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. The New Brunswick Department of Finance provided assistance with extracting the data for your community. Community Postal Codes HEPAC representatives and wellness leaders within your community have identified which postal code(s) best represent your population and geographic region. In smaller communities additional surrounding postal codes were included to provide a large enough sample size for the data. The data contained in your profile is extracted from the following postal codes:

Sussex Region

Sussex • Smith’s Creek • Apohaqui • St. Martin’s • Norton E4E, E4G, E5P, E5R, E5T

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HEPAC MISSION

HEPAC’s mission is to collectively lead the province in the promotion of healthy eating and physical activity.

3


SUSSEX REGION

Demographics

SUSSEX REGION

DEMOGRAPHICS: AGE DISTRIBUTION TABLE 1.0 AGE CATEGORY 12−17 years 18−34 years 35−54 years 55 plus years Total

%

%

%

9 27 35 29 100

9 23 35 32 100

8 20 37 35 100

%

%

%

49 51 100

49 51 100

38 62 100

%

%

29 71 100

30 70 100

DEMOGRAPHICS: GENDER DISTRIBUTION TABLE 1.1 GENDER DISTRIBUTION Male Female Total

DEMOGRAPHICS: EDUCATION TABLE 1.2 HIGHEST EDUCATION LEVEL COMPLETED % No certificate, diploma or degree 15 Certificate, diploma or degree Total

85 100

DEMOGRAPHICS: EDUCATION (HIGHEST CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DEGREE ATTAINED) Table 1.3 RESPONDENTS WITH A CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DEGREE High school certificate or equivalent Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma College, or other non-university certificate or diploma University certificate, diploma or degree Total

%

%

%

28 15 24 33 100

37 15 25 23 100

43 17 24 16 100

%

%

%

15 21 19 15 30 100

18 26 21 15 20 100

21 26 20 17 16 100

DEMOGRAPHICS: HOUSEHOLD INCOME TABLE 1.4 HOUSEHOLD INCOME Less than $19,999 $20,000-$39,999 $40,000-$59,999 $60,000-$79,999 Greater than $80,000 Total DEMOGRAPHICS: LANGUAGE TABLE 1.5 LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME English French Other Total

4

%

%

%

57 22 21 100

69 29 2 100

99 0 1 100


Demographics

SUSSEX REGION

Demographics: Introduction Demographic information gives you insight into possible causes of the health issues in your community, and helps you to plan your communications strategies. For example:

Age Distribution

A community with a large proportion of young people will need different communications strategies than one with a majority of seniors.

Gender Distribution

Usually this data is fairly even but if you have a community that is unbalanced in male or female population, then again, you would have to adjust your communications strategies accordingly.

Education

Household Income Language

The demographic data on pages 8 and 9 shows a clear picture of the education level of your population. In general, it is a good idea to aim for a reading level of no higher than grade 8. Depending on the makeup of your community you may want to aim higher or lower than that. Education is also an important determinant of health, meaning that health improves as education levels improve. If education levels are low in your community, working to address that can help you achieve your wellness goals. Income is one of the strongest social determinants of health. On a population level, as income increases, health outcomes generally are better. If household incomes are low in your community, then any activities you plan will need to provide barrier-free access to ensure good participation. Obviously it is essential to consider your community’s language profile when planning your communication strategy!

5


SUSSEX REGION Demographics: Age Distribution

Q

What is your age? TABLE 1.0 DEMOGRAPHICS AGE DISTRIBUTION AGE CATEGORY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

12−17 years

8

9

18−34 years

20

23

35−54 years

37

35

55 plus years

35

32

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 1.0 DEMOGRAPHICS AGE DISTRIBUTION 100

75

50

25

0

8

9

12−17 years

20

37

23

18−34 years

35

35−54 years

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

6

35

32

55 plus years


Demographics

SUSSEX REGION Demographics: Gender Distribution

Q

What is your gender? TABLE 1.1 DEMOGRAPHICS GENDER DISTRIBUTION GENDER CATEGORY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Male

38

49

Female

62

51

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 1.1 DEMOGRAPHICS GENDER DISTRIBUTION 100

75

50

25

0

62

49

38

Male

51

Female

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

7


SUSSEX REGION Demographics: Education

Q

What is your highest education level completed? TABLE 1.2 DEMOGRAPHICS HIGHEST EDUCATION LEVEL COMPLETED EDUCATION

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

No certificate, diploma or degree

30

29

Certificate, diploma or degree

70

71

Total

100

100 Statistics Canada, 2006 Census Electronic Profile

FIGURE 1.2 DEMOGRAPHICS HIGHEST EDUCATION LEVEL COMPLETED 100

75

50

70

71

25

30 0

29

No certificate, diploma or degree

Certificate, diploma or degree

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

8


Demographics

SUSSEX REGION Demographics: Education

Q

What is your highest certificate, diploma or degree attained? TABLE 1.3 DEMOGRAPHICS HIGHEST EDUCATION LEVEL COMPLETED WITH A CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DEGREE SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

High school certificate or equivalent

43

37

Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma

17

15

College, or other non-university certificate or diploma

24

25

University certificate, diploma or degree

16

23

100

100

RESPONDENTS WITH CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DEGREE

Total

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census Electronic Profile

FIGURE 1.3 DEMOGRAPHICS

HIGHEST EDUCATION LEVEL COMPLETED WITH A CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DEGREE 100

75

50

25

43

37 17

24

15

25

16

23

0

High school certificate or equivalent

Apprenticeship or trades certificate or Sussex Region % diploma

College, or other non university New Brunswick % certificate or diploma

9

University certificate, diploma or degree


SUSSEX REGION Demographics: Household Income

Q

What is your total household income? TABLE 1.4 DEMOGRAPHICS HOUSEHOLD INCOMES HOUSEHOLD INCOMES

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Less than $19,999

21

18

$20,000-$39,999

26

26

$40,000-$59,999

20

21

$60,000-$79,999

17

15

Greater than $80,000

16

20

Total

100

100 Statistics Canada, 2006 Census Electronic Profile

FIGURE 1.4 DEMOGRAPHICS HOUSEHOLD INCOMES 100

75

50

25

21

18

26

26

21

20

17

15

16

20

0

Less than $19,999

$20,000-$39,999

$40,000-$59,999

$60,000-$79,999 Greater than $80,000

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

10


Demographics

SUSSEX REGION Demographics: Language

Q

What is the language spoken most often at home? TABLE 1.5 DEMOGRAPHICS LANGUAGE SPOKEN MOST OFTEN AT HOME LANGUAGE SPOKEN

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

English

99

69

French

0

29

Other

1

2

Total

100

100 Statistics Canada, 2006 Census Electronic Profile

FIGURE 1.5 DEMOGRAPHICS 100

LANGUAGE SPOKEN MOST OFTEN AT HOME

99

75

69

50

29 25

0

English

2

1

0 French

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

11

Other


SUSSEX REGION

Health Status

SUSSEX REGION

HEALTH STATUS: CHRONIC DISEASES TABLE 2.0 CHRONIC DISEASES

%

%

%

High Blood Pressure Arthritis

18 17 8 7 7 5

22 22 9 9 8 7

21 24 10 13 6 7

%

%

%

3 47 34 17 100

1 39 38 22 100

1 40 39 20 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A N/A

7 70 12 11 100

8 66 17 9 100

Asthma Diabetes Cancer Heart Disease

HEALTH STATUS: BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) ADULT TABLE 2.1 BMI FOR INDIVIDUALS 18 YEARS AND OLDER Underweight Healthy Weight Overweight Obese Total

HEALTH STATUS: BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) YOUTH TABLE 2.2 BMI FOR YOUTH 12-17 YEARS Underweight Healthy Weight Overweight Obese Total

12


Health Status

SUSSEX REGION

Health Status: Introduction Chronic Diseases

How can a community change the incidence of a chronic disease? Conditions in the environment influence and shape people’s behavior and indirectly affect a person’s risk of a chronic disease. Social and economic conditions such as poverty and employment; environmental conditions such as air pollution; cultural conditions such as norms and values; and also things like housing, access to services, etc. (1) Taking action on any of these items at the community level can help to improve the incidence of chronic disease. Chronic disease can also be impacted by changes at the individual level. Chronic diseases share several common risk factors. While some, such as our age, sex, and our genetic make-up, cannot be changed, many behavioral risk factors and conditions can be modified. At least 80% of premature heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and 40% of cancers could be prevented through healthy diet, regular physical activity and avoidance of tobacco products. (1) The modifiable risk factors for the chronic diseases reported on in your Wellness Profile are described below. As you can see many risk factors are the same: •

Diabetes – Overweight, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure (2)

Heart Disease – Overweight, physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, stress (3), and issues unique to women such as pregnancy, birth control pills, menopause (4)

High Blood Pressure – Overweight, physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, high cholesterol, diabetes, anger, anxiety, smoking, stress, depression (5)

Arthritis – Overweight, joint injury, infection, occupation (6)

Asthma – High exposure of susceptible children to airborne allergens (pets, house dust mites, cockroaches, mould) in the first years of life, exposure to tobacco, including before birth (in utero) (7)

Cancer – Exposure to tobacco smoke, unhealthy eating, overweight, physical inactivity, ultraviolet rays from the sun and from indoor tanning beds (8)

References: 1. Chronic Diseases: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/risk_factors-facteurs_risque-eng.php or www.cdpac.ca 2. Diabetes: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/diabetes-diabete/index-eng.php 3. Heart Disease: http://www.heartandstroke.on.ca/site/c.pvI3IeNWJwE/b.3581671/k.F14C/Heart_Disease Prevention_of_Risk_Factors.htm 4. Heart Disease in Women: http://www.heartandstroke.on.ca/site/c.pvI3IeNWJwE/b.3581757/k.DA04/Heart Disease Women_and_heart_disease_and_stroke.htm 5. High Blood Pressure: http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/c.ikIQLcMWJtE/b.3751067/k.E3AA/Heart disease Get_your_blood_pressure_under_control.htm 6. Arthritis: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/musculo/arthritis-arthrite-eng.php 7. Asthma: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/crd-mrc/asthma-asthme-eng.php 8. Cancer: http://www.cancer.ca/Canada-wide/Prevention/What%20is%20a%20risk%20factor.aspx?sc_lang=en

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Body Mass Index

BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) is a ratio of weight and height that helps to determine whether a person is at a healthy or unhealthy weight. You can calculate BMI using this formula: BMI = weight in kilograms ÷ (height in meters) 2 The result is a number which describes whether the person is underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese (1): •

BMI 18.5 or under = underweight

BMI between 18.5 to 24.9 = normal weight

BMI between 25.0 and 29.9 = overweight

BMI over 30.0 = obese

BMI is used to see if an individual is a high or low risk of developing health problems. Measuring waist circumference is another way of predicting an individual’s health problem. (2) From a health standpoint there is no one ideal weight for anybody. There is a range of weights that can be healthy. Risks of overweight include high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, type-2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke and some cancers. Obese Canadians are four times as likely to have diabetes, more than 3 times as likely to have high blood pressure and more than two times more likely to have heart disease than those with a healthy weight. References: 1. Health Canada: Canadian Guidelines for Body Weight Classification in Adults http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/weights-poids/guide-ld-adult/qa-qr-pubeng.php 2. Heart & Stroke Foundation: Healthy Waists: http://www.heartandstroke.nb.ca/site/c.kpIPKZOyFkG/b.4012215/k.8688/Healthy_Waists.htm?src=home

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Health Status

SUSSEX REGION Health Status: Chronic Diseases

Q

What chronic diseases do you have? TABLE 2.0 HEALTH STATUS PROPORTION OF POPULATION WITH CHRONIC DISEASES CHRONIC DISEASES

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

High Blood Pressure

21

22

Arthritis

24

22

Asthma

10

9

Diabetes

13

9

Cancer

6

8

Heart Disease

7

7 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 2.0 HEALTH STATUS

PROPORTION OF POPULATION WITH CHRONIC DISEASES 100

75

50

25

21 0

22

High Blood Pressure

24

22

Arthritis

10

13

9

Asthma

9

Diabetes

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

15

8

6 Cancer

7

7

Heart Disease


SUSSEX REGION Health Status: Body Mass Index (BMI) Adult

  BMI is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. BMI is calculated as weight in kilograms divided by meters squared.

Q

What is your present height and weight? TABLE 2.1 HEALTH STATUS BMI FOR INDIVIDUALS 18 YEARS AND OLDER BODY MASS INDEX

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Underweight

1

1

Healthy Weight

40

39

Overweight

39

38

Obese

20

22

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 2.1 HEALTH STATUS

BMI FOR INDIVIDUALS 18 YEARS AND OLDER 100

75

50

40

39

39

38

0

22

20

25

1

1

Underweight

Healthy Weight

Overweight

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

16

Obese


Health Status

SUSSEX REGION Health Status: Body Mass Index (BMI) Youth

  BMI is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. BMI is calculated as weight in kilograms divided by meters squared.

Q

What is your present height and weight? TABLE 2.2 HEALTH STATUS BMI FOR YOUTH 12-17 YEARS BODY MASS INDEX

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Underweight

8

7

Healthy Weight

66

70

Overweight

17

12

Obese

9

11

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 2.2 HEALTH STATUS BMI FOR YOUTH 12-17 YEARS 100

75

66

70

50

25

17 8

0

7

Underweight

Healthy Weight

12

Overweight

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

17

11

9 Obese


SUSSEX REGION

Healthy Eating

SUSSEX REGION

HEALTHY EATING: VEGETABLE AND FRUIT CONSUMPTION (ADULT) TABLE 3.0 DAILY VEGETABLE & FRUIT CONSUMPTION Less than 5 per day More than 5 per day Total

%

%

%

57 43 100

62 38 100

64 36 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A

76 24 100

81 19 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

11 15 13 20 41 100

12 21 11 18 38 100

HEALTHY EATING: VEGETABLE AND FRUIT CONSUMPTION (YOUTH) TABLE 3.1 TIMES PER DAY Less than 5 times per day More than 5 times per day Total HEALTHY EATING: BREAKFAST (YOUTH) TABLE 3.2 TIMES EATING BREAKFAST Never 1-2 times 3-4 times 5-6 times 7 plus times Total

HEALTHY EATING: YOUTH CONSUMPTION OF SWEETENED, NON-NUTRITIOUS BEVERAGES TABLE 3.3 CONSUMPTION OF SWEETENED, NON-NUTRITIOUS BEVERAGES PER DAY None 1 or two times 3 or more times

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A

35 41 24 100

31 42 27 100

%

%

%

93 5 2 100

92 6 2 100

89 8 3 100

Total HEALTHY EATING: HOUSEHOLD FOOD INSECURITY TABLE 3.4 HOUSEHOLD FOOD INSECURITY Food Secure Moderately Food Insecure Severely Food Insecure Total 18


Healthy Eating

SUSSEX REGION

Healthy Eating: Introduction Vegetable and Fruit Consumption

People need different amounts of vegetables and fruits, depending on their age and gender. To see the exact number of servings required for a specific age group or gender visit www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/foodguide-aliment/basics-base/quantit-eng.php. For most people, the requirement is between 5 and 8 servings per day. A serving of vegetables and fruit is equal to ½ cup of fresh, frozen or canned vegetables, 1 cup of green leafy vegetables, or 1 whole fresh fruit or vegetable. (1) Because of difficulties in accurately describing a “serving” to people who are completing a survey, both the Canadian Community Health Survey and the New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey ask about the number of “times” a person eats a certain food during the day, rather than the number of “servings”. The number of “times” per day is not meaningless, though. For example, research has demonstrated that young people who consume vegetables and fruit less than 5 times per day are significantly more likely to be overweight or obese than were those who ate fruit and vegetables more frequently. (2) We also know that low consumption of vegetables and fruit are connected to higher rates of cancers, heart disease and other chronic diseases. (3)

References 1. Canada’s Food Guide: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index-eng.php 2. Margot Shields. August 2006. Statistics Canada: Health Reports, Vol. 17, No. 3 http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/diabetes-diabete/index-eng.php 3. ON Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance. Evidence Informed Messages Healthy Eating http://www.ocdpa.on.ca/OCDPA/docs/OCDPA_EM_HealthyEating_Full_Package. pdf

Breakfast Consumption

If eaten regularly, breakfast provides approximately 25 per cent of daily nutrition needs. Starting the day with a healthy breakfast is important for many reasons: • Breakfast improves students’ memory, problem-solving skills and creative ability. (1) • Breakfast is essential to creating readiness for children to learn each day. (2) • Breakfast consumption has been associated with lower likelihood of being overweight. (3)

References 1. Health Canada. (2007). Reaching for the Top: A Report by the Advisor for healthy Children and Youth http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/alt_formats/hpb-dgps/pdf/childenfant/2007-advisor-conseillere/advisor-conseillere-eng.pdf 2. Rampersaud GC, Pereira MA, Girard BL, Adams J, Metzl JD. Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight, and academic performance in children and adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc 2005; 105(5):743-60; quiz 761-2. 3. Song WO, Chun OK, Obayashi S, et al. 2005. Is consumption of breakfast associated with body mass index in US adults? Journal of the American Dietetic Association; 105(9): 1373-82.

19


Consumption of Sweetened, Non-Nutritious Beverages

Although obesity has many causes, food choices play a very important role. If a person consistently eats excessive calories, they will gain weight. A substantial proportion of Canadians’ daily calories come not from what they eat, but from what they drink. This is particularly true for children. Non-nutritious sweetened beverages such as pop, sports drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks, fruit beverages, etc. have been linked with excess weight gain and with some chronic diseases. (1) These beverages provide virtually no nutrients, they set up the expectation that all beverages should be sweet, and when people, especially children and youth, drink these beverages regularly they tend to displace other healthy beverages such as water and milk.

References Brownell K, Frieden T. 2009. Ounces of Prevention – The Public Policy Case for Taxes on Sugar Sweetened Beverages. New England Journal of Medicine 360:18 http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp0902392

Household Food Insecurity

Food security is commonly understood to exist in a household when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient safe and nutritious food for an active and healthy life. Food insecurity occurs when food quality and/or quantity are compromised, typically because of a lack of financial resources. (1) Recognized as an important public health issue in Canada, household food insecurity has been associated with a range of poor physical, mental health outcomes such as poor/fair health, multiple chronic conditions, obesity, distress and depression. (1) Within a community, food security exists when all community residents obtain a safe, personally acceptable, nutritious diet through a sustainable food system that maximizes healthy choices, community self-reliance and equal access for everyone. (2) Working towards greater food security for your whole community can include: • Strengthening the food system by working to create greater links between farmers and consumers, advocating for sustainable agriculture • Enhancing food skills (growing, shopping, cooking, preserving, etc.) among children, youth and adults • Enhance the dignity and joy of growing, preparing, and eating food.

References 1. Statistics Canada Definitions http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-221-x/2010001/def/def2-eng.htm 2. Dietitians of Canada Position Paper on Community Food Insecurity (2007) http://www.dietitians.ca/Dietitians-View/Community-Food-Security.aspx

20


Healthy Eating

SUSSEX REGION Healthy Eating: Vegetable and Fruit Consumption (Adult)

Q

What is your daily vegetable & fruit consumption? TABLE 3.0 HEALTHY EATING PROPORTION OF ADULTS CONSUMING AT LEAST 5 VEGETABLES & FRUIT PER DAY

DAILY VEGETABLE & FRUIT CONSUMPTION

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Less than 5 per day

64

62

More than 5 per day

36

38

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 3.0 HEALTHY EATING PROPORTION OF ADULTS CONSUMING AT LEAST 5 VEGETABLES & FRUIT PER DAY 100

75

50

64

62

25

38

36 0

Less than 5 per day

More than 5 per day

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

21


SUSSEX REGION Healthy Eating: Vegetable and Fruit Consumption (Youth)

Q

Yesterday, how many times did you eat vegetable & fruit? TABLE 3.1 HEALTHY EATING NUMBER OF TIMES PER DAY YOUTH EAT VEGETABLE & FRUIT TIMES PER DAY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Less than 5 times per day

81

76

More than 5 times per day

19

24

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 3.1 HEALTHY EATING NUMBER OF TIMES PER DAY YOUTH EAT VEGETABLE & FRUIT 100

75

50

81

76

25

19 0

Less than 5 times per day

24

More than 5 times per day

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

22


Healthy Eating

SUSSEX REGION Healthy Eating: Breakfast (Youth)

Q

During the last school week, how many times did you eat breakfast? TABLE 3.2 HEALTHY EATING PROPORTION OF YOUTH EATING BREAKFAST TIMES EATING BREAKFAST

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Never

12

11

1-2 times

21

15

3-4 times

11

13

5-6 times

18

20

7 plus times

38

41

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2008-2009

FIGURE 3.2 HEALTHY EATING PROPORTION OF YOUTH EATING BREAKFAST 100

75

50

25

0

38 12

11 Never

21

15

1-2 times

13

11

3-4 times

18

23

20

5-6 times

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

41

7 plus times


SUSSEX REGION Healthy Eating: Youth Consumption of Sweetened, Non-Nutritious Beverages

Q

Yesterday, how many times did you consume sweetened, non-nutritious beverages? TABLE 3.3 HEALTHY EATING YOUTH CONSUMPTION OF SWEETENED, NON-NUTRITIOUS BEVERAGES

CONSUMPTION OF SWEETENED, NONNUTRITIOUS BEVERAGES PER DAY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

None

31

35

1 or two times

42

41

3 or more times

27

24

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2008-2009

FIGURE 3.3 HEALTHY EATING YOUTH CONSUMPTION OF SWEETENED, NON-NUTRITIOUS BEVERAGES 100

75

50

25

35

31 0

None

42

41

1 or two times

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

24

27

24

3 or more times


Healthy Eating

SUSSEX REGION Healthy Eating: Household Food Insecurity Food security in a household means that there is access to sufficient food for an active, safe, and healthy life. Food insecurity occurs when food quality or quantity are compromised. Food insecurity is usually associated with limited financial resources.

Q

Which of the following statements best describes the food eaten in your household in the past 12 months? 1. 2. 3. 4.

You and other household members always had enough of the kinds of food you wanted to eat. You and other household members had enough to eat, but not always the kinds of food you wanted. Sometimes you and other household members did not have enough to eat. Often you and other household members didn’t have enough to eat. TABLE 3.4 HEALTHY EATING PROPORTION OF HOUSEHOLDS WHO ARE FOOD INSECURE

HOUSEHOLD FOOD INSECURITY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Food Secure

89

92

Moderately Food Insecure

8

6

Severely Food Insecure

3

2

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 3.4 HEALTHY EATING PROPORTION OF HOUSEHOLDS WHO ARE FOOD INSECURE 100

92

89 75

50

25

8 0

Food Secure

6

Moderately Food Insecure

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 25

3

2

Severely Food Insecure


SUSSEX REGION

Physical Activity

SUSSEX REGION

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: TOP 7 PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES TABLE 4.0 TOP 7 PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

%

%

%

Walking

69 46 33 16 21 18 20

69 51 31 18 17 14 15

83 68 32 13 33 12 9

%

%

%

N/A N/A

40 60 100

43 57 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A

33 67 100 48 52 100

39 61 100 47 53 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A

40 60 100

41 59 100

Gardening/Yard Work Home Exercises Popular/Social Dance Swimming Running/Jogging Bicycling

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE TABLE 4.1 YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE At least 90 minutes per day Less than 90 minutes per day Total PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE, BY GENDER TABLE 4.2 YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE At least 90 minutes per day (FEMALE) Less than 90 minutes per day (FEMALE) Total At least 90 minutes per day (MALE) Less than 90 minutes per day (MALE)

N/A N/A

Total PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: YOUTH SCREEN TIME Table 4.3 MEAN HOURS PER DAY 0-2 hours More than 2 hours Total

26


SUSSEX REGION

Physical Activity

SUSSEX REGION

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: PARTICIPATION IN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TABLE 4.4 YOUTH PARTICIPATION IN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Yes No No, none offered

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A

37 55 8 100

38 55 7 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

18 24 26 16 15 1 100

14 20 31 16 18 1 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A N/A

47 38 9 5 99

55 36 5 5 101

Total PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: PARENTS’ PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL TABLE 4.5 TIMES PER WEEK 0 times 1-2 times 3-5 times 6-7 times I am unsure No parent/guardian Total PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: PARENT SUPPORT FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TABLE 4.6 LEVEL OF SUPPORT PROVIDED BY PARENT/GUARDIAN Very Supportive Supportive Unsupportive Very Unsupportive Total

*

*

* All numbers are in percents (%). Estimates may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding.

27


SUSSEX REGION

Physical Activity: Introduction Top Seven Physical Activities

Knowing what physical activities are popular in your area can help you to design programs that will appeal to your community.

Youth Energy Expenditure

Currently, Canada’s Physical Activity Guides for Children and Youth recommend that young Canadians build up their activity levels every month until they are doing at least 90 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity each day. (1) Benefits of increased exercise include: better health, improved fitness, better posture and balance, better self-esteem, weight control, stronger muscles and bones, feeling more energetic, relaxation and reduced stress, continued independent living in later life. The required minutes don’t have to be all at once: 10 minute intervals can add up! Easy indicators that help an individual know if they are in the right range for health benefits are: feeling warmer, increases in breathing rate, feeling like the body is stretching. Activities that do not create these changes are considered very light effort and will not give health benefits (i.e dusting, strolling).

References: 1. Canada’s Physical Activity Guides for Children and Youth http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/pag-gap/cy-ej/index-eng.php

Additional Resources • Active Healthy Kids Canada http://www.activehealthykids.ca • Participaction http://www.participaction.com/en-us/Home.aspx

Youth Screen Time

Screen time includes television, videos, computers, etc. Sitting in front of a screen – no matter what type – is a completely sedentary activity, so remember that less is best! Limit daily screen time to less than 1 to 2 hours a day (not counting work time or school work). Monitoring screen time is important for adults as well as children.

Additional Resources: • Screen time among Canadian Adults: A profile http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/82-003-x2008002-eng.pdf (scroll to page 33 • How to promote good television habits www.caringforkids.cps.ca

Participation in Physical Activity After School Hours

The after school hours includes any time outside of the traditional school day and are often the times of the day when youth are the most inclined to adopt sedentary habits such as too much screen time, and eating unhealthy foods. Making high quality experiences available to all children and youth during the after school hours is a worthy goal. They need a variety of opportunities to be active, pro-social and engaged in fun activities while building positive relationships.

28


When it comes to the after school hours, many community partners have a role to play: families, recreation professionals, public health nurses working in the Healthy Learners in Schools Program, Physical Education mentors and teachers, youth clubs, daycares, schools, program providers and non profit organizations to name a few. Using the resources you have available in your community and determining what is needed is a great start.

Physical Activity

Participation in Physical Activity After School Hours (cont’d) Additional Resources:

• The After-School Hours Working Group is an alliance of both government and non-government organizations who have come together to support a focus on AfterSchool Hours in New Brunswick. If you would like to be apprised of the progress that is being made, please contact joyce.despres@gnb.ca to have your name put on a communication list to receive updates.

Parents’ Physical Activity Level

It’s not just children who need physical activity. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide (1) currently recommends that adults build up to 60 minutes of light to moderate physical activity every day. Older adults need 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity on most days. How does the parents’ physical activity level affect the children? (2) • •

• •

Children learn so much from the people around them – they model behaviours both healthy and unhealthy. Regular moderate to vigorous physical activity needs to be part of daily life and parents play a huge role in modeling and encouraging this style of living for their family. Generally, when the parents of a child are active, the child is more active. Parents need to take the lead, turn off the TV, video system and computer – get outside and be physically active … your children are learning! Generally, physically active youth are more likely to report that they have active parents.(3)

References: 1. Canada’s Physical Activity Guides for Children and Youth http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/pag-gap/cy-ej/index-eng.php 2. CFLRI (Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute) Kids CAN PLAY 2008 series CFLRI (Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute) Kids CAN PLAY 2008 series New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey http://www.unbf.ca/education/herg/documents/HERGSocialRelationship.EN.pdf 3. Participaction http://www.participaction.com/en-us/Home.aspx

Parent Support for Physical Activity

How does the parents’ support help the child? Support for physical activity involves everything from encouraging active living both through what we say and what we do. Seeking out and providing appropriate physical activity opportunities, helping children get to physical activity opportunities, cheering them on during opportunities and participating ourselves are all helpful in increasing activity levels in our children. Physical activity that is part of daily life is the most sustainable – walking or biking to school, playing in the yard or park or just taking care of some local errands. It all adds up to a healthier life through increased activity patterns that become habit.

Additional Resources: • CFLRI (Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute) - Impact of Parental Attitudes on Children’s Physical Activity http://www.cflri.ca/eng/research_file/ documents/ResearchFile_February_FinalENG.pdf

29


SUSSEX REGION Physical Activity: Top 7 Physical Activities

Q

What type of exercise have you performed in the past 3 months? TABLE 4.0 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF POPULATION PARTICIPATING IN TOP 7 PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES TOP 7 PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Walking

83

69

Gardening/Yard Work

68

51

Home Exercises

32

31

Popular/Social Dance

13

18

Swimming

33

17

Running/Jogging

12

14

Bicycling

9

15 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 4.0 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF POPULATION PARTICIPATING IN TOP 7 PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

83

Walking

69 68

Gardening/Yard Work

51 32 31

Home Exercises

13 18

Popular/Social Dance

33

Swimming

17 12 14 9 15

Running/Jogging Bicycling 0

25

50

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 30

75

100


Physical Activity

SUSSEX REGION Physical Activity: Youth Energy Expenditure

Q

Do you spend at least 90 minutes per day being active? TABLE 4.1 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

At least 90 minutes per day

43

40

Less than 90 minutes per day

57

60

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 4.1 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE 100

75

50

25

0

43

57

60

40

At least 90 minutes per day

Less than 90 minutes per day

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

31


SUSSEX Physical Activity: Youth Energy Expenditure, by Gender

Q

Do you spend at least 90 minutes per day being active? TABLE 4.2 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY YOUTH EXPENDITURE RANGE BY GENDER YOUTH ENERGY EXPENDITURE

FEMALE %

MALE %

At least 90 minutes per day

39

47

Less than 90 minutes per day

61

53

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 4.2 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY YOUTH EXPENDITURE RANGE BY GENDER 100

75

50

25

0

61 39

53

47

At least 90 minutes per day

Less than 90 minutes per day

Female %

Male %

32


Physical Activity

SUSSEX REGION Physical Activity: Youth Screen Time

Q

How much time did you spend watching TV/movies, playing video/ computer games, surfing the internet, instant messaging or talking on the phone in the last 7 days? TABLE 4.3 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY YOUTH SCREEN TIME MEAN HOURS PER DAY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

0-2 hours

41

40

More than 2 hours

59

60

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 4.3 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY YOUTH SCREEN TIME 100

75

50

25

0

60

59 41

40

0-2 hours

More than 2 hours

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

33


SUSSEX REGION Physical Activity: Participation in After School Physical Activity

Q

Do you participate in after school physical activity organized by your school? TABLE 4.4 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF YOUTH PARTICIPATING IN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ORGANIZED BY SCHOOL

YOUTH PARTICIPATION IN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Yes

38

37

No

55

55

No, none offered

7

8

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 4.4 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF YOUTH PARTICIPATING IN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ORGANIZED BY SCHOOL 100

75

55

55

50

38

37

25

7 0

Yes

No

No, none offered

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

34

8


Physical Activity

SUSSEX REGION Physical Activity: Parents’ Physical Activity Level

Q

In the last 7 days, how many times were your parents or guardians physically active? TABLE 4.5 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF PARENTS OR GUARDIAN WHO WERE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE FOR AT LEAST 30-60 MINUTES IN THE LAST 7 DAYS (AS REPORTED BY THEIR CHILD) TIMES PER WEEK

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

0 times

14

18

1-2 times

20

24

3-5 times

31

26

6-7 times

16

16

I am unsure

18

15

No parent/guardian

1

1

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 4.5 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF PARENTS OR GUARDIAN WHO WERE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE FOR AT LEAST 30-60 MINUTES IN THE LAST 7 DAYS (AS REPORTED BY THEIR CHILD) 100

75

50

25

0

14

18

20

24

31

26 16

16

18

15 1

0 times

1-2 times

3-5 times

6-7 times

I am unsure

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 35

1

No parent/guardian


SUSSEX REGION Physical Activity: Parent Support for Physical Activity

Q

How much do your parents or guardians support you in being physically active? TABLE 4.6 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN WHO SUPPORT YOUTH IN BEING PHYSICALLY ACTIVE

LEVEL OF SUPPORT PROVIDED BY PARENT/ GUARDIAN

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Very Supportive

55

47

Supportive

36

38

Unsupportive

5

9

Very Unsupportive

5

5

101 *

Total

99 * New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

* All numbers are in percents (%). Estimates may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding.

FIGURE 4.6 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROPORTION OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN WHO SUPPORT YOUTH IN BEING PHYSICALLY ACTIVE 100

75

55 50

47 36

38

25

5 0

Very Supportive

Supportive

9

Unsupportive

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

36

5

5

Very Unsupportive


37


SUSSEX REGION

Mental Health

SUSSEX REGION

MENTAL FITNESS: YOUTH MENTAL FITNESS TABLE 5.0 YOUTH LEVEL OF MENTAL FITNESS Low Mental Fitness Medium Mental Fitness High Mental Fitness

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A

14 70 17 101

14 70 16 100

Total

*

MENTAL FITNESS: YOUTH PROSOCIAL ASPECTS TABLE 5.1 LEVEL OF YOUTH PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOUR Low Prosocial High Prosocial

%

%

%

N/A N/A

27 73 100

27 73 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A

17 83 100

17 83 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A

73 27 100

72 28 100

Total MENTAL FITNESS: YOUTH SCHOOL CONNECTEDNESS TABLE 5.2 LEVEL OF YOUTH SCHOOL CONNECTEDNESS Less Connected to School Connected to School Total MENTAL FITNESS: YOUTH SMOKING SUSCEPTIBILITY TABLE 5.3 LEVEL OF SUSCEPTIBILITY Not Susceptible Susceptible Total

* All numbers are in percents (%). Estimates may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding.

38


SUSSEX REGION

Mental Health

SUSSEX REGION

MENTAL FITNESS: LEVELS OF SELF-PERCEIVED STRESS (ADULTS) TABLE 5.4 STRESS LEVELS Not At All Stressful Not Very Stressful A Bit Stressful Quite a Bit Stressful Extremely Stressful Total

%

%

%

12 24 42 19 4 100

15 24 42 16 3 100

8 26 46 14 6 100

MENTAL FITNESS: LEVELS OF SELF-PERCEIVED STRESS (ADULTS), BY GENDER TABLE 5.5 STRESS LEVELS Not At All Stressful (FEMALE) Not Very Stressful (FEMALE) A Bit Stressful (FEMALE) Quite a Bit Stressful (FEMALE) Extremely Stressful (FEMALE) Total Not At All Stressful (MALE) Not Very Stressful (MALE) A Bit Stressful (MALE) Quite a Bit Stressful (MALE) Extremely Stressful (MALE) Total

39

%

%

%

10 24 42 20 4 100 13 24 41 19 3 100

12 25 44 16 3 100 18 23 40 16 3 100

6 28 45 12 9 100 11 22 47 19 1 100


SUSSEX REGION

Mental Fitness: Introduction Mental Fitness

Mental fitness refers to a personal sense of psychological wellness. People are more likely to be mentally fit when their needs for recognition (competency), choices (autonomy) and belonging (relatedness) are met. Having a high level of mental fitness means having a positive sense of how you feel, think and act that improves your ability to enjoy life. It also implies the ability to efficiently cope with life’s challenges, effectively using your skills and resources to restore and sustain a state of balance. (1) People with high levels of mental fitness also demonstrate: (2) • higher levels of pro-social attitudes • lower levels of difficult (oppositional) behaviours • lower levels of susceptibility to risky behaviours like smoking • higher probability of engaging in physical activity • lower incidence of overweight and obesity In working with the community you can help to build higher levels of mental fitness by: (3) • Empowering people to collaborate with others in the development of their own solutions for specific problems • Encouraging the expression of thoughts and feelings in a non-judgemental manner • Providing opportunities for people to identify and use their strengths • Emphasizing fairness and social inclusion in activities • Reaching out and involving groups or individuals who do not feel part of the community • Focusing on developing positive working relationships

References: 1. New Brunswick Wellness Strategy http://www.gnb.ca/0131/pdf/w/Live%20well,%20be%20well.%20New%20Brunswick’s%20Wellness%20Strategy%2020092013.pdf 2. New Brunswick Student Wellness Sur vey 2006-2007 survey Grade 6-12 – Mental Fitness Fact Sheet http://www.unbf.ca/education/herg/documents/ HERGMentalFitnessEN1.pdf 3. New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey 2007-2008 survey Grade K-5 – Mental Fitness Fact Sheet http://www.unbf.ca/education/herg/pdf/MentalFitness_E.pdf

Youth Prosocial Aspects

Students with higher levels of mental fitness tend to report more pro-social behaviours such as helping people, sharing things without being asked, and volunteering within their school or community. (1)

References: 1. NB Student Wellness Survey 2006-2007 survey Grade 6-12 – Mental Fitness Fact Sheet http://www.unbf.ca/education/herg/documents/HERGMentalFitnessEN1. pdf

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Connections to school and relationships with teachers are important protective factors in the lives of children and youth. A sense of school connectedness can support students in making healthy choices. Students who feel an attachment to their school, and who consider their teachers to be supportive, are less likely to engage in unhealthy or high-risk behaviours. (1) A high level of school connectedness felt by at-risk youth in BC reduces the odds that they will attempt suicide, have substance use problems, or behave violently. (2) Positive outcomes are also increased: vulnerable youth who feel connected are more likely to report good or excellent health, do well in school, and want to continue with school past grade 12.

References: 1. NB Student Wellness Survey 2007-2008 survey Grade K-5 – Social Influences and Environments Fact Sheet http://www.unbf.ca/education/herg/pdf/ SocialInfluences_E.pdf 2. Here to Help – Mental Health and Substance Abuse Information www.heretohelp.bc.ca/publications/schools/alt/1

Youth Smoking Susceptibility

Rates of tobacco use among youth have declined in recent years, however there is still a significant portion of non-smoking students who have low-confidence in their ability to remain smoke-free in the future, and are thus at high risk (i.e. susceptible) to begin smoking. Recent research suggests that susceptibility is associated with physical inactivity, overweight and concerns about weight which provides new insight for tailoring and targeting future tobacco control and/or physical activity programming to youth populations. (1) Youth with higher levels of mental fitness show a lower susceptibility to smoking and other risky behaviours. (1)

References: 1. Leatherdale, Wong, Manske, Colditz. 2008. Susceptibility to smoking and its association with physical activity, BMI and weight concerns among youth. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 10 (3), 499-505.

Levels of Self-Perceived Stress

Researchers are still studying the link between stress and heart disease. So far we know that people under stress will sometimes have higher blood pressure and cholesterol and a higher chance of developing blood clots. Someone under stress is also likely to smoke more, eat too much or skip physical activity. (1)

References: 1. Public Health Agency of Canada – How Can I Reduce My Stress Level? www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/cvd-mcv/reduce_stress-reduire_stress-eng.php

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Tobacco Free Living

Youth School Connectedness


SUSSEX REGION Mental Fitness: Youth Mental Fitness The level of Youth Mental Fitness is a composite index created from the New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey. The level of mental fitness is based on a low to high scale. The results were scaled on a 10-point scale such that a score of 10 represented a high level of mental fitness. Students that scored above a 6.5 on the 10-point scale were considered to have a high level of mental fitness. TABLE 5.0 MENTAL FITNESS YOUTH LEVEL OF MENTAL FITNESS LEVEL OF MENTAL FITNESS

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Low Mental Fitness

14

14

Medium Mental Fitness

70

70

High Mental Fitness

16

17

Total

100

101 * New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

* All numbers are in percents (%). Estimates may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding.

FIGURE 5.0 MENTAL FITNESS YOUTH LEVEL OF MENTAL FITNESS 100

75

50

70

70

25

14 0

16

14

Low Mental Fitness

Medium Mental Fitness

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 42

17

High Mental Fitness


Tobacco Free Living

SUSSEX REGION Mental Fitness: Youth Prosocial Aspects The level of Youth Prosocial Behaviour is a composite index created from the New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey. Students were presented with five statements, (e.g. “I often do favours for people without being asked”). The results were scaled on a 10-point scale such that a score of 10 represented a high level of prosocial behaviour. Students that scored above a 6.5 on the 10-point scale were considered to have a high level of prosocial behaviour.

TABLE 5.1 MENTAL FITNESS PROPORTION OF YOUTH WHO IDENTIFY THEIR BEHAVIOUR AS PROSOCIAL LEVEL OF YOUTH PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Low Prosocial

27

27

High Prosocial

73

73

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 5.1 MENTAL FITNESS PROPORTION OF YOUTH WHO IDENTIFY THEIR BEHAVIOUR AS PROSOCIAL 100

75

50

73

73

25

27 0

27 Low Prosocial

High Prosocial

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 43


SUSSEX REGION Mental Fitness: Youth School Connectedness The level of Youth School Connectedness is a composite index created from the New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey. Students were presented with six statements (e.g. “I feel I am part of my school”). The results were scaled on a 10-point scale such that a score of 10 represented a high level of school connectedness. Students that scored above a 6.5 on the 10-point scale were considered to have a high level of school connectedness.

TABLE 5.2 MENTAL FITNESS PROPORTION OF YOUTH WHO FEEL A SENSE OF CONNECTION TO THEIR SCHOOL LEVEL OF YOUTH SCHOOL CONNECTEDNESS

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Less Connected to School

17

17

Connected to School

83

83

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 5.2 MENTAL FITNESS PROPORTION OF YOUTH WHO FEEL A SENSE OF CONNECTION TO THEIR SCHOOL 100

75

50

83

83

25

17 0

17

Less Connected to School

Connected to School

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

44


Tobacco Free Living

SUSSEX REGION Mental Fitness: Youth Smoking Susceptibility The level of Youth Smoking Susceptibility is a composite index created from the New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey. Students with higher levels of mental fitness are less susceptible to risky behaviours like smoking. Students who indicated they had never smoked were identified as either susceptible or not susceptible based on their responses to the following three questions. 1. Do you think in the future you might try smoking cigarettes? 2. If one of your best friends was to offer you a cigarette would you smoke it? 3. At any time during the next year do you think you will smoke a cigarette? TABLE 5.3 MENTAL FITNESS PROPORTION OF SUSCEPTIBILITY AMONG YOUTH WHO HAVE NEVER TRIED SMOKING LEVEL OF SUSCEPTIBILITY

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Not Susceptible

72

73

Susceptible

28

27

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 5.3 MENTAL FITNESS PROPORTION OF SUSCEPTIBILITY AMONG YOUTH WHO HAVE NEVER TRIED SMOKING 100

75

50

73

72 25

28 0

Not Susceptible

27 Susceptible

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 45


SUSSEX REGION Mental Fitness: Levels of Self-Perceived Stress (Adults)

Q

Thinking about the amount of stress in your life, what would you say that most days are? TABLE 5.4 MENTAL FITNESS LEVELS OF SELF-PERCEIVED STRESS STRESS LEVELS

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Not At All Stressful

8

15

Not Very Stressful

26

24

A Bit Stressful

46

42

Quite a Bit Stressful

14

16

Extremely Stressful

6

3

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 5.4 MENTAL FITNESS LEVELS OF SELF-PERCEIVED STRESS 100

75

46

50

26

25

42

24

15

14

8 0

Not At All Stressful

16 6

Not Very Stressful

A Bit Stressful

Quite a Bit Stressful Extremely Stressful

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

46

3


Tobacco Free Living

SUSSEX Mental Fitness: Levels of Self-Perceived Stress (Adults), by Gender

Q

Thinking about the amount of stress in your life, what would you say that most days are? TABLE 5.5 MENTAL FITNESS LEVELS OF SELF-PERCEIVED STRESS, BY GENDER STRESS LEVELS

FEMALE %

MALE %

Not At All Stressful

6

11

Not Very Stressful

28

22

A Bit Stressful

45

47

Quite a Bit Stressful

12

19

Extremely Stressful

9

1

Total

100

100 Source: Statistics Canada, CCHS 2007-2008

FIGURE 5.5 MENTAL FITNESS LEVELS OF SELF-PERCEIVED STRESS, BY GENDER 100

75

28 25

6 0

47

45

50

22 12

11

Not At All Stressful

19 9 1

Not Very Stressful

A Bit Stressful

Female %

Quite a Bit Stressful Extremely Stressful

Male %

47


SUSSEX REGION

Tobacco Free Living

SUSSEX REGION

TOBACCO FREE LIVING: YOUTH EXPOSURE TO TOBACCO SMOKE TABLE 6.0 NUMBER OF DAYS 0 days 1 or 2 days 3 or 4 days 5 or 6 days All 7 days

%

%

%

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

68 16 6 3 7 100

64 17 9 3 7 100

%

%

%

N/A N/A

88 12 100

86 14 100

Total TOBACCO FREE LIVING: YOUTH SMOKING PATTERN TABLE 6.1 SMOKED IN PAST 30 DAYS Have not smoked Have smoked Total

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Tobacco Free Living: Introduction Youth Exposure to Tobacco Smoke

Tobacco Free Living

SUSSEX REGION

Tobacco use remains a significant cause of premature disease, disability and death. It costs New Brunswick $338 million each year in direct and indirect costs. (1) Much progress has been made over the past ten years in reducing prevalence of tobacco use in New Brunswick, a downward trend which has been reflected across the country. However, data points to continued and new areas of concern including exposure of children to tobacco smoke in homes and in cars. (1) The greater the number of smokers inside the home the more likely a youth is to smoke. Youth who have ever smoked inside their home are also more likely to be daily smokers. (2) At least 8% of New Brunswick children (0-11 years of age) are regularly exposed to tobacco smoke, ranking in the top three nation-wide. (3)

References: 1. New Brunswick Wellness Strategy http://www.gnb.ca/0131/pdf/w/Live%20well,%20be%20well.%20New%20Brunswick’s%20Wellness%20Strategy%202009-2013.pdf 2. Health Canada – Youth Smoking Survey 2002. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/pubs/tobac-tabac/yss-etj-2002/chap5-eng.php 3. Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey 2007 http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/research-recherche/stat/_ctums-esutc_2008/ann-histo-eng.php (table 7)

Additional Resources: • Make your home and car smoke free: a guide to protecting your family from second-hand smoke http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/pubs/tobac-tabac/second-guide/index-

eng.php • Tobacco Free Sport http://www.sportnb.com/en/programs/tobaccofreesport.aspx

Youth Smoking Patterns

Tobacco use among young people continues to be a concern. While there have been gradual reductions, the rate of smoking has remained essentially unchanged since 2006. Using tobacco at an early age has been associated with other risk behaviours, including problem alcohol and substance use. (1) Youth with higher levels of mental fitness are less likely to report smoking in the 30 days before the survey.

References: 1. New Brunswick Wellness Strategy http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/alt_formats/hpb-dgps/pdf/child-enfant/2007-advisor-conseillere/advisor-conseillere-eng.pdf

Additional Resources: • Tobacco Free Schools www.tobaccofreeschools.ca • Quit4Life www.quit4life.ca • Tobacco Free Schools http://www.jcsh-cces.ca/

49


SUSSEX REGION Tobacco Free Living: Youth Exposure to Tobacco Smoke

Q

During the past 7 days, on how many days did you ride in a car with someone who was smoking cigarettes? TABLE 6.0 TOBACCO FREE LIVING PROPORTION OF YOUTH EXPOSURE TO TOBACCO SMOKE WHILE IN A VEHICLE NUMBER OF DAYS

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

0 days

64

68

1 or 2 days

17

16

3 or 4 days

9

6

5 or 6 days

3

3

All 7 days

7

7

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 6.0 TOBACCO FREE LIVING PROPORTION OF YOUTH EXPOSURE TO TOBACCO SMOKE WHILE IN A VEHICLE 100

75

68

64 50

25

17

16 9

0

0 days

1 or 2 days

6

3 or 4 days

3

5 or 6 days

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region % 50

3

7

7

All 7 days


Tobacco Free Living

SUSSEX REGION Tobacco Free Living: Youth Smoking Pattern

Q

If you have tried smoking, did you smoke in the past 30 days? TABLE 6.1 TOBACCO FREE LIVING AMONG YOUTH WHO HAVE EVER SMOKED, PROPORTION WHO HAVE SMOKED IN PAST 30 DAYS SMOKED IN PAST 30 DAYS

SUSSEX REGION %

NEW BRUNSWICK %

Have not smoked

86

88

Have smoked

14

12

Total

100

100 New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey, Grade 6-12, 2009-2010

FIGURE 6.1 TOBACCO FREE LIVING AMONG YOUTH WHO HAVE EVER SMOKED, PROPORTION WHO HAVE SMOKED IN PAST 30 DAYS 100

75

50

88

86 25

14 0

Have not smoked

12 Have smoked

New Brunswick %

Sussex Region %

51


CREDITS The majority of the photos used in this document were retrieved from the Government of New Brunswick Communications New Brunswick-Images of New Brunswick at the following web address: http://www1.gnb.ca/cnb/ imagebank Photos Cover: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, Brian Atkinson,Year 1997, image # 1457 ii: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, 2007, image # 5857 vii: Jackie Morehouse & Terry Kelly 4: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, Brian Atkinson, image # 4098 12: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, Brian Atkinson, image # 4265 18-19: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, GĂŠrard Sirois, Year 1999, image # 2852 26-27: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, Brian Atkinson, images # 4722 37: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, Brian Atkinson,Year 2006, image # 5648 38-39: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, J.-F. Bergeron, Year 1996, image # 4355 48: CNB-Images of New Brunswick, Brian Atkinson, image # 4970

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Sussex Wellness Profile  

Outlines the demographics, health status, and levels of physical activity, healthy eating, tobacco use, and mental fitness in the SUssex Are...

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