Page 1

Published June 2012

(Consumer Confidence Report)

in 2011.

tests conducted

report is based on

information in this

quality report. The

drinking water

This is your annual

Town of Highland Park, Texas 214-521-4161

2011 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAID DALLAS, TX PERMIT #3927 Town of Highland Park Water Administration 4700 Drexel Drive Highland Park, TX 75205

2011 Drinking Water Quality Report Information About Water Assessments The Town of Highland Park

En Español

Water Department is responsible

Este informe contiene información

for providing safe and reliable

muy importante sobre el agua que

drinking water to all residents.

usted bebe.

Our water department maintains

comentarios sobre este informe en

the

that

español, favor de llamar al tel.

delivers treated water to your tap.

(214) 521-4161 para hablar con una

The

persona bilingüe en español.

distribution Texas

system

Commission

Environmental Quality

on

Si tiene preguntas o

For more information about your sources of water, please refer to the Source Water Assessment Viewer available at the following URL: http://gis3.tceq.state.tx.us/swav/Controller/index.jsp?wtrsrc=.

(TCEQ)

has assessed our system and determined that OUR WATER IS SAFE to drink. The analysis was made by using the data listed in the following charts.

Our Drinking Water Meets or Exceeds All Federal (EPA) Drinking Water Requirements This report is a summary of the quality of the water we provide our customers.

This report was delivered to all Highland Park Utility Customers. For more information about this

The analysis was made by using the data from the most recent U.S. Environmental

Protection

Agency

(EPA) required tests from January 1

report contact the Customer Service

through December 31, 2011 and is

Department, 214-521-4161, or write

presented in the attached pages. We

to 4700 Drexel Drive, Highland

hope this information helps you

Park, TX 75205.

become more knowledgeable about what’s in your drinking water.

Our drinking water is obtained from one surface water source, GRAPEVINE RESERVOIR via ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER. A Source Water Susceptibility Assessment for your drinking water source(s) is currently being updated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This information describes the suceptibility and types of constituents that may come into contact with your drinking water source based on human activities and natural conditions. The information contained in the assessment allows us to focus source water protection strategies.

Further details about sources and sourcewater assessments are available in Drinking Water Watch at the following URL: http://dww.tceq.texas.gov/DWW/.

Special Notice Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

All Drinking Water May Contain Contaminants This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the water system to provide safe drinking water. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Water Treatment The District is in the midst of a $33 million capital improvement project. This project will upgrade the existing 62 year old processes as well as add new membrane filtration. These ultra-filtration membranes are being added to the end of the existing treatment processes, which will result in the production of much cleaner water. As part of this project, the existing filters have been replaced with granular activated carbon filters that will remove taste and odor problems. These are problems that the District has experienced in the past due to lake turn over and algae blooms. These filters are currently in operation. All plant improvements are scheduled for completion and operation by December 2012. At that time, the District will be able to provide some of the finest, if not the finest, water quality in the region to the citizens of the Park Cities.

Public Participation Opportunites The Highland Park Town Council meets the second Monday at 8:00 a.m., and the fourth Monday at 4:00 p.m., of every month, unless otherwise set by the Council. To learn about future public meetings concerning your drinking water or to request to schedule one, call 214-521-4161 during normal business hours, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., weekdays or come by the Town Hall, 4700 Drexel Drive, Highland Park, TX 75205. The Dallas County Park Cities Municipal Utility District is governed by a five-member Board of Directors elected by citizens of the Town of Highland Park and the City of University Park. For information on water plant tours, source water protection efforts, or other questions on water quality, call 214-652-8639, or write to: Dallas County Park Cities Municipal Utility District, 1811 Regal Row, Dallas, TX 75235


About The Following The following information lists all of the federally regulated or monitored contaminants which have been found in your drinking water. The U.S. EPA requires water systems to test for up to 97 contaminants.

Secondary Constituents Many constituents (such as calcium, sodium, or iron) which are often found in drinking water, can cause taste, color, and odor problems. The taste and odor constituents are called secondary constituents and are regulated by the State of Texas, not the EPA. These constituents are not causes for health concerns. Therefore, secondaries are not required to be reported in this document but they may greatly affect the appearance and taste of your water.

Water Sources The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals, and in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water before treatment include: - Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. - Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastwater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. - Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses. - Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems. - Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Definitions Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected health risk. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) - The highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination. Treatment Technique (TT) - A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Action Level (AL) - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. NA - Not applicable. AVG - Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on the running annual average of monthly samples.

Inorganic Contaminants Year

Contaminant

Lead and Copper

Average Level

Minimum Maximum Level Level

MCL

MCLG

Unit of Measure

Source of Contaminant

5-10-2011

Fluoride

0.22

0.22

0.22

4

4

ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

7-25-2011

Nitrate

0.16

0.16

0.16

10

10

ppm

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits.

7-25-2011

Nitrite

0.02

0.02

0.02

1

1

ppm

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits.

Contaminant

Year 5-10-2011 5-10-2011

Contaminant Simazine Atrazine

Average Level

Minimum Maximum Level Level

0.33 0.64

0.33 0.64

0.33 0.64

MCLG

4 3

4 3

Unit of Measure ppb ppb

Herbicide runoff. Runoff from herbicide used on row crops.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Year

Disinfectant

2011

Chloramine Residual

Average Level

Minimum Level

Maximum Level

3.04

1.4

3.8

MRDL 4

MRDLG

Unit of Measure

<4

ppm

Source of Disinfectant Disinfectant used to control microbes.

Disinfection Byproducts Year

Contaminant

7-25-2011 7-25-2011

Haloacetic Acids Total Trihalomethanes

Average Level

Minimum Level

Maximum Level

MCL

MCLG

Unit of Measure

Violation

14.6 17.6

14.6 17.6

14.6 17.6

60 80

* *

ppb ppb

N N

Source of Contaminant

Waived or not yet sampled

Unregulated Contaminants Bromoform, chloroform, dichlorobromomethane, and dibromochloromethane are disinfection byproducts. There is no maximum contaminant level for these chemicals at the entry point to distribution.

Year

Contaminant

Average Level

Minimum Level

Maximum Level

7-25-2011

Chloroform

12.1

12.1

7-25-2011

Bromodichloromethane

4.2

4.2

ppb - parts per billion, or micrograms per

ppt - parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter ppq - parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter

Source of Constituent

2010

Lead

2.6

0

15

ppb

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

2010

Copper

0.12

0

1.3

ppm

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

(No associated adverse health effects)

Year

Constituent

Average Level

Minimum Level

Maximum Level

Secondary Limit

Unit of Measure

5-10-2011

Bicarbonate

37

37

37

NA

ppm

Corrosion of carbonate rocks such as limestone.

5-10-2011

Chloride

20.1

20.1

20.1

300

ppm

Abundant naturally occurring element; used in water purification; byproduct of oil field activity.

5-10-2011

Hardness as Ca/Mg

93.0

93.0

93.0

NA

ppm

Naturally occurring calcium and magnesium.

5-10-2011

pH

9.0

9.0

9.0

>7

units

Measure of corrosivity of water.

5-10-2011

Sodium

27.2

27.2

27.2

NA

ppm

Erosion of natural deposits; byproduct of oil field activity.

5-10-2011

Sulfate

71.4

71.4

71.4

300

ppm

Naturally occurring; common industrial byproduct; byproduct of oil field activity.

5-10-2011

Total Alkalinity as CaCO3

39.0

39.0

39.0

NA

ppm

Naturally occurring soluble mineral salts.

5-10-2011

Total Dissolved Solids

212.0

212.0

212.0

1000

ppm

Total dissolved mineral constituents in water.

Source of Constituent

Turbidity

pCi/L - picocuries per liter (a measure of

liter (Îźg/L) or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water

Unit of Measure

Byproduct of drinking water clorination. Byproduct of drinking water clorination.

Unregulated Initial Distribution System Evaluation for Disinfection Byproducts

(mg/L) or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water

Action Level

Source of Contaminant

NTU - Nephelometric Turbidity Units MFL - million fibers per liter (a measure of

ppm - parts per million, or milligrams per liter

Number of Sites Exceeding Action Level

Secondary and Other Constituents Not Regulated MCL

* MCLG - No goal for the total.

radioactivity)

The 90th Percentile

Organic Contaminants

Abbreviations asbestos)

Year

Unit of Measure

Source of Contaminant

12.1

ppb

Byproduct of drinking water clorination.

4.2

ppb

Byproduct of drinking water clorination.

Year

Contaminant

Highest Single Measurement

2011

Turbidity

0.38

Lowest Monthly % of Samples Meeting Limits 99.5

Turbidity Limits

Unit of Measure

Source of Contaminant

0.3

NTU

Soil runoff.

Turbidity has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea and associated headaches.

Total Coliform REPORTED MONTHLY TESTS FOUND NO COLIFORM BACTERIA. Fecal Coliform REPORTED MONTHLY TESTS FOUND NO FECAL COLIFORM BACTERIA.

2011 HP Water Quality Report  

2011 Highland Park Drinking Water Quality Report

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