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BUDGET DISCUSSION/ CANDIDATES NIGHT 7:00pm February 27, 2017 Hartford High School Auditorium

COMMUNITY DAY 10:00am – 2:00pm March 4, 2017 Hartford High School Gymnasium

VOTING 7:00am - 7:00pm March 7, 2017 Hartford High School Gymnasium

FLOOR MEETING 10:00am – 2:00pm April 1, 2017 Hartford High School Gymnasium


MUNICIPAL TELEPHONE DIRECTORY CALL THE:

FOR ANSWERS ABOUT: Town Administration

Town Manager’s Office – 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday (802) 295-9353/FAX (802) 295-6382

Fire Department (802) 295-3232/FAX (802) 295-5143

Fire Information (non-emergency) Ambulance Information (non-emergency)

Health Officer – 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday Health Matters

(802) 295-9353 or (802) 591-3978

Property Assessments

Listers/Assessor – 8:30a.m. -4:30p.m. Mon-Thurs; 8:00a.m.-4:00p.m. Friday (802) 295-3077

Planning & Development Department – 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday Zoning, Building Permits, Housing, (802) 295-3075 Community Development, Planning, Historic Preservation, Conservation Police Department (802) 295-9425/FAX (802) 295-5146 Public Works Department - 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday (802) 295-3622 (802) 295-9425

Police Information (non-emergency)

Water, Wastewater, Highway Emergency Nights & Weekends

Recycling/Landfill/Solid Waste Disposal - 8:00a.m.-4:00p.m. Monday-Saturday (802) 295-2673 (802) 295-5740 Parks & Recreation - 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday (802) 295-5036 (802) 295-3236 (802) 295-2863 (802) 295-2864

Recycling Permits & Regulations

Recreation Office Recreation Program Hotline Wendell A. Barwood Arena Sherman Manning Pool

Superintendent of Schools (802) 295-8600/FAX (802) 295-8602 Tax Collector - 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday (802) 295-9353 ext. 217 Finance/Tax/Treasurer’s Office - 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday (802) 295-3002 Town Clerk - 8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday (802) 295-2785

Education

Delinquent Taxes

Current Taxes

Voter Registration, Certificates Marriages & Dog Licenses, Elections

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS – FIRE, POLICE AND AMBULANCE – DIAL 9-1-1 TOWN OF HARTFORD WEB PAGE: www.hartford-vt.org


TOWN OF HARTFORD

2016 Annual Report

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Table of Contents Warning ....................................................................... 3 Selectboard Report..................................................... 7 Budget Report............................................................ 13

Health and Social Services Advance Transit ................................................... 115 Bugbee Senior Center.......................................... 115 COVER ................................................................ 116 The Family Place ................................................. 116 Good Beginnings.................................................. 117 Good Neighbor Health Clinic ............................... 117 Green Mountain RSVP......................................... 118 Headrest ............................................................... 119 Health Care and Rehabilitation Services ............. 119 Southeastern Vermont Community Action ........... 120 SPARK! ................................................................ 120 Stagecoach .......................................................... 121 Vermont Adult Learning ....................................... 121 VT Assoc. for the Blind & Visually Impaired......... 121 Vermont Center for Independent Living ............... 122 Vermont Department of Health ............................ 123 Visiting Nurse Alliance of VT & NH ...................... 123 Windsor County Partners ..................................... 124 Windsor County Update ....................................... 124 Women’s Information Services (WISE)................ 125 Financial Reports of Health & Social Svc Org.......126

Reports of Officers & Department Heads Employee Service Program ....................................... 81 Fire Department ......................................................... 81 Health Officer ............................................................. 82 Listers’ and Assessor’s Report .................................. 82 Parks & Recreation Department ................................ 83 Planning & Development Services Department ........ 85 Zoning/Building Permits..................................... 86 Public Safety Department .......................................... 87 Public Works Department .......................................... 89 Highway Division ............................................... 89 Solid Waste Division .......................................... 90 Water Division ................................................... 91 Wastewater Division .......................................... 92 Town Clerk................................................................. 93 Treasurer ................................................................... 93 Town Statistics........................................................... 94

Board, Commission & Library Reports Board of Civil Authority ..............................................96 Connecticut River Joint Committee ...........................96 Community Resilience Organization Hartford ...........96 Conservation Commission .........................................97 EC Fiber ................................................................... .98 Energy Commission.................................................. 99 Green Mountain Economic Development Corp. ...... 100 Hartford Business Revolving Loan Fund ................. 101 Historic Preservation Commission........................... 101 Historical Society ..................................................... 102 Parks & Recreation Commission ............................. 103 Planning Commission .............................................. 104 Town and School Meeting Commission .................. 105 Tree Board ............................................................... 105 Tree Warden ............................................................ 106 Two Rivers Ottaquechee Regional Commission ..... 106 Welcome Center ...................................................... 107 Zoning Board of Adjustment .................................... 108 Hartford Village Public Library ................................. 109 West Hartford Public Library & Community Ctr........ 109 Quechee Public Library ........................................... 110 Wilder Club and Public Library ................................ 111 Vermont 2-1-1 .......................................................... 111 Financial Report of Libraries ................................... 112 Cemeteries Summary Report .................................. 113

Miscellaneous Information Delinquent Real Estate Taxes ............................. 130 Schedule of Delinquent Taxes ............................. 131 Town Debt Service ................................................132 Special Revenue & Reserve Funds ..................... 136 Tax Stabilization ................................................... 138 Abstract of the Grand List .................................... 139 Description of Non-Taxable Property ................... 140 Financial Reports ................................................. 142

School Reports Warning for Town School District Meeting ........... 182 Report of the Hartford School Directors .............. 188 FY18 Proposed Budget…..………… ....................269 District Scholarship & Reserve Funds………… ... 292 School Bond Schedules………… ........................ 293 Financial Statements & Independent Auditor’s Report .............................. 301

Minutes of Town and School Meetings Results of Australian Ballot 3/1/2016. .................. 314 Annual Floor Meeting 3/26/2016 .......................... 317 Boards & Commissions ........................................ 322 Hartford School District Calendar ........................ 324

Front cover from left to right, Mrs. Dawn Pullar; Town Manager, Leo Pullar; Kayla Pullar. Photo taken by Eliza LeBrun in the Hartford Town Hall, Selectboard meeting room.

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Warning for Annual Town Meeting March 7, 2017 & April 1, 2017

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WARNING FOR

2017 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING Voting by Australian ballot is to be held on March 7, 2017 at the Hartford High School (Gymnasium). Budget Discussion Candidates Night is to be held on Monday, February 27, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. at the Hartford High School (Auditorium). The legal voters of the Town of Hartford are further notified that voter qualification, registration and absentee voting relative to said Annual Town Meeting shall be as provided in the Town Charter and chapters 43, 51, and 55 of title 17, Vermont Statutes Annotated. THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES WILL BE VOTED BY AUSTRALIAN BALLOT ON TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2017. POLLS OPEN AT 7:00 A.M. EST AND CLOSE AT 7:00 P.M. EST. 1. To elect the following Town Officers for the ensuing year: Town Moderator for one year; Selectboard Member for two years; Selectboard Member for three years; Lister for three years; Lister for three years; Lister for three years; Library Trustee for five years; Library Trustee for five years; Library Trustee for five years; Library Trustee for remaining three years of a five year term; Treasurer for three years; Trustee of Public Funds for one year; Trustee of Public Funds for two years. (By Australian ballot) 2. Shall the Town authorize total fund expenditures for operating expenses of $15,058,002 (plus any appropriations voted below and on April 1, 2017 at the Annual Floor Meeting), of which $2,559,132 shall be raised by non-tax revenues. (By Australian ballot) 3. Shall the Town appropriate a sum of Seventy-Seven Thousand Fifty ($77,050) Dollars to be paid to Advance Transit for public transportation services. (By Australian ballot) 4. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Fifteen Thousand Eight Hundred ($15,800) Dollars for the purpose of assisting various associations owning or in control of Cemeteries in said Town, to be divided as follows: Christian Street Cemetery Assoc.-Six Hundred ($600) Dollars Hartford Cemetery Assoc.-Seven Thousand Five Hundred ($7,500) Dollars Quechee Cemetery Assoc.-Three Thousand ($3,000) Dollars Mt. Olivet & St. Anthony's Cemeteries Assoc.-Three Thousand Eight Hundred ($3,800) Dollars West Hartford Cemetery Assoc.-Nine Hundred ($900) Dollars (By Australian ballot) 5. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Five Thousand ($5,000) Dollars to be paid to COVER Home Repair, Inc., for qualified home repairs. (By Australian ballot) 6. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Thousand Five Hundred ($9,500) Dollars to be paid to The Family Place, for programs for families with young children. (By Australian ballot) 7. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Five Hundred Fifty ($4,550) Dollars to be paid to Good Beginnings of the Upper Valley, for organization of volunteers to assist families with new babies. (By Australian ballot) 8. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Seven Thousand Five Hundred ($7,500) Dollars to be paid to Good Neighbor Health Clinic and The Red Logan Dental Clinic for medical and dental care. (By Australian ballot) 9. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Five Thousand ($5,000) Dollars to be paid to Hartford Historical Society for collecting, conserving and displaying the Town’s history. (By Australian ballot)

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10. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Seven Thousand ($7,000) Dollars to be paid to Headrest for information, referral and crisis intervention services. (By Australian ballot) 11. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Five ($9,995) Dollars to be paid to Health Care & Rehabilitation Services of Southeastern VT, Inc. for outpatient, mental health and substance abuse services. (By Australian ballot) 12. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Thousand ($9,000) Dollars to be paid to Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA), Inc. for reducing the hardships of poverty. (By Australian ballot ) 13. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Five Hundred ($2,500) Dollars to be paid to SPARK! Community Center for providing a center and programs for people with disabilities. (By Australian ballot) 14. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Six Thousand Eight Hundred ($6,800) Dollars to be paid to Stagecoach Transportation Services for transportation services. (By Australian ballot) 15. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Forty-One Thousand Eight Hundred Eighty Two ($41,882) Dollars to be paid to Visiting Nurse and Hospice of Vermont and New Hampshire, Inc. for home health care and hospice care. (By Australian ballot) 16. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Three Thousand Five Hundred ($3,500) Dollars to be paid to Windsor County Partners for youth mentoring partnerships. (By Australian ballot) 17. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Two Thousand ($2,000) Dollars to be paid to Women’s Information Service (WISE), Inc. for ending gender-based violence. (By Australian ballot) 18. Shall the Town of Hartford and the Hartford Town School District amend the Town Charter as summarized below: § 123A-103. Particular powers - Matters subject to regulation and ordinances. § 123A-201. Town Meeting – Provides for the call and conduct of pre-town meeting, annual town meeting and floor meeting. § 123A-202. Elected officers – Provides for the election of Town officers and their compensation. § 123A-203. Duties of elected officers – Provides for the appointment of a Town Clerk, Town Assessor and Trustees of Public Funds. § 123A-302. Duties of appointed officers; Town Manager – Enumerates the duties of the Town Manager. (By Australian ballot) 19. Shall the Selectboard be authorized to pledge the credit of the Town of Hartford through the issuance of general obligation bonds or notes in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1,926,000, for the purpose of funding the engineering and/or construction of public sidewalk, road, streetscape, water, stormwater, sanitary sewer, and South Main Street retaining wall improvements within the Hartford White River Junction Tax Increment Financing District, and for paying or reimbursing eligible related costs, advances, interfund loans and third party public infrastructure costs, and to pledge and appropriate the District’s tax increment in the amount of $1,926,000 plus allowable interest and fees for the payment of such bonds and notes and for making such payments and reimbursements? The legal voters of the Town are notified that, of the $1,800,000 of tax increment secured obligations authorized on March 4, 2014 and March 1, 2016, to date, $900,000 of the tax increment has been pledged, as evidenced by the Town’s July 1, 2014 $900,000 Tax Increment Financing District Improvement Bond. (By Australian ballot) Dated at Hartford, Vermont this 17th day of January, 2017.

Richard Grassi

Simon Dennis Alan Johnson

SELECTBOARD MEMBERS OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD

Rebecca White

Dennis Brown Mike Morris

Sandra Mariotti 5


WARNING FOR 2017 ANNUAL FLOOR MEETING The citizens of Hartford who are legal voters are hereby warned to meet at the Hartford High School Gymnasium in said Town on Saturday, April 1, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of transacting Town business not involving voting by Australian ballot. Community Day is to be held on Saturday, March 4, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Hartford High School (Gymnasium). The purpose of the Town business meeting being to decide by voice vote and/or discuss the following: 1. To receive the reports of the Town Officers. 2. To vote to collect Town General and Highway Tax and the Town School District’s Tax on real estate in two installments, the first being on or before August 18, 2017, and the second installment being on or before February 2, 2018 through the Treasurer. 3. To vote what compensation the Town will pay its Town officers from the General Fund, effective July 1, 2017 pursuant to 24 V.S.A., Section 932: Moderator $100 per annum; Board of Civil Authority $50 per diem; Lister’s $20 per hour; Treasurer $14,000 per annum; Town Clerk $67,389 per annum; Selectboard $50 per meeting, with the Chair receiving $300 additional per annum and the Vice-Chair receiving $150 additional per annum; such officials will receive mileage reimbursement in the amount equivalent to the rate authorized by the IRS when a town vehicle is not available to them. 4. To vote to approve the 2017-2018 budget if disapproved at the March 7, 2017 meeting. 5. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred Sixty Nine ($869) Dollars to be paid to Green Mountain Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) in support of senior volunteer programs.. 6. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred Ninety Nine ($999) Dollars to be paid to Vermont Adult Learning in support of adult education. 7. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred Seventy Five ($975) Dollars to be paid to Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (VABVI) in support of blind and visually impaired Vermonters. 8. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred Forty Five ($845) Dollars to be paid to Vermont Center for Independent Living in support of Vermonters with disabilities. 9. To do any other necessary and proper non-binding business. *NOTE: The Annual Town and School District Floor Meetings will both convene at 10:00a.m. EST on Saturday, April 1, 2017. The Town Meeting will immediately recess and be held following the conclusion of the School meeting. Community Day is to be held on Saturday, March 4, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Hartford High School (Gymnasium). Dated at Hartford, Vermont this 31st day of January, 2017. SELECTBOARD MEMBERS OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD Richard Grassi

Dennis Brown

Rebecca White

Alan Johnson

Sandra Mariotti

Mike Morris

Simon Dennis

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Selectboard Report

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Fellow Citizens: It is with excitement and tremendous optimism that we, the Selectboard, report to you the new administrative staff is finally in place and working hard to pave the way to a bright future for the Town of Hartford. On July 11th our new Town Manager, Leo Pullar, arrived and hit the ground running. He has far exceeded our greatest expectations and leads with outstanding organizational and managerial skills accented by his commitment to deliver excellent customer service to all residents. Mr. Pullar filled the last two vacant managerial positions with the promotion of Fire Chief Scott Cooney, a longtime member of our Fire Department and a longtime resident of the Town and the hiring of Finance Director Gail Ostrout, an experienced Financial Officer and lifelong Vermont resident. Filling these two critical positions will ensure continuity and commitment in our professional staff. This is not to infer that we don't have great challenges in front of us that require prioritization based on need, cost and staff commitment. The following paragraphs written by members of your Selectboard illustrate our commitment to address some of those challenges. Impact Fees Once again the business community has asked for review of the "Impact Fees", established by the Selectboard in November of 1989 to measure its value to the overall health of this community. These fees are dedicated to fire/EMS, libraries, recreation, water, wastewater and schools based on a set formula and methodology described in the ordinance and apply to any residential or nonresidential construction located within the Town of Hartford for which a zoning permit is required. The ordinance also allows for amendments from time to time to evaluate the "impact". We look forward to this review along with public comment especially from those most affected by any changes. Fairview Terrace The Fairview Terrace retaining wall has been failing for years. As you know, this road is an important link from downtown White River Junction to the upper end of the village. We are continuing to review initial and follow up engineering studies. We have also met with an individual who was involved in the construction of the lower portion of the wall. We have even partnered with a Civil Engineering class from Norwich University. They have visited the site and will provide a report. We will carefully review the above work and come up with a solution that is safe, affordable and sensible for citizens of the Town of Hartford, particularly those directly affected by the solution - those who reside on or near Fairview Terrace. Options range from closing the affected section of road to restoring the road to full two way vehicular traffic and a safe pedestrian walkway. We will ensure the process will be open with several opportunities for Public comment. We also understand the need to come to a solution quickly. We look forward to your input. Town Libraries The Town of Hartford financially supports four public libraries: West Hartford, Wilder, Hartford and Quechee. All residents are invited to use any of the libraries in Town. A free membership card allows residents to get access to any item from any of the library sites as all items can be easily transferred. There are public computers, Wi-Fi access, programs and assistance. The Town will continue to optimize library services for the Town and work hard to keep costs down while still providing top-notch service. We encourage you to visit any or all of these libraries to see

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and experience the great services provided by the dedicated folks who run and oversee these great facilities. Local Option Tax In an effort to raise revenue for the Town, the taxpayers authorized the Local Option Tax (LOT) be added to the Charter. This allows the Town of Hartford to levy a tax of 1% on rooms and meals/alcoholic beverages. We are still awaiting legislative approval. Once we have that, our next steps include the decision by the Selectboard on implementing the tax to begin earning revenue for the Town. The net proceeds will be deposited into a capital reserve fund until the Town is directed by vote from taxpayers on how to utilize funds. The revenue received is anticipated to be upwards of $250,000.00 per year and is planned to fill fiscal needs without asking for more monies from taxpayers. Within the next 5 years, the Town will determine how successful this program was for the Town and whether to continue. The Hartford Survey The decision to conduct a Town-wide survey was motivated by the Selectboard’s desire for guidance on setting upcoming budgets. In response to this, the Hartford Survey Committee was constituted to include Lannie Collins, F. X. Flinn, Richard Liscinski, Connie Reimer, Rebecca White and Simon Dennis. This committee’s task was to design a survey to be sent to each Hartford household and distributed throughout the Town. This happened in October and November of 2016. As a result, 931 completed surveys were collected, constituting a 17% rate of response. One piece of good news revealed by the survey is that, of those who have used the service, at least 80% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with nine of the eleven services discussed in the survey. The biggest winners were the Fire Department, EMS, and the Solid Waste Transfer Station, which each received satisfaction rates of over 90%. The full report can be found on the Town website. More Amendments to the Hartford Charter The Hartford Charter is a body of laws ratified by the voters and Vermont State Legislature which apply only to the Town of Hartford. Not every Town in Vermont has opted to have a charter but having one allows us to do some useful things such as instituting a Local Option Tax and increasing to a sevenmember Selectboard. The Fourth Hartford Charter Commission was comprised of F. X. Flinn, Scott Johnson, Eric Michaels, Russell North, Gayle Ottman, Nancy Russell, and Simon Dennis. The Commission’s Charge was to present a revised draft of the Hartford Charter for ratification by the Selectboard and School Board. By the time you read this, the Draft Charter will have been ratified by the School Board and Selectboard and it will have been discussed at several public hearings. The next step in this process will bring the Revised Charter before the voters on March 7, 2017. The Charter Commission, School Board and Selectboard recommended seven changes to the Charter. Of these seven, two are relatively more significant. The first is to change the Town Clerk from an elected position to a position appointed by the Selectboard. This was recommended to allow for greater accountability in that position and to ensure that the Town is able to secure the most qualified applicant. The second change would result in the elimination of the Floor Meeting after Voting Day. The reason for

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this change is that the main purpose of the Floor Meeting was eliminated when the Town voted this past November to decide on defeated budgets via Australian Ballot. Energy Ignoring externalities, Hartford spends around $50,000,000/year on energy. Taxes for school and municipal operations accounting for well over $1,000,000 of that. Sadly, it is doubtful that these numbers will go down in the long run. The challenge is in preventing them from increasing as rapidly as they might without sacrificing the true value energy brings to our lives. Our Town Manager is well aware of the urgency and scope of this situation. Having first-hand experience with energy staff and the value they bring, he included a full-time Energy Coordinator in his budget recommendation. Thanks to savvy budgeting, the role promises to pay for itself quickly and have a trivial effect on taxes until then. Looking out 10-20 years, conservative projections show it saving tens of millions on taxes and hundreds of millions across the community. We are thrilled to support smart investments like this so that we can continue to meet our energy needs without sacrificing the good we all do throughout our community. Cemeteries In the spring of ’16, Mr. Arthur Peale gave a talk at the Hartford Historic Preservation Committee, that as their liaison, Dennis Brown attended. His talk and pictures described and showed in great depth some of the work he was doing to repair gravestones in our Town cemeteries. Some of the damages he was repairing were caused by fallen trees, lawn mowers and other events. It was clear that something needed to be done because neglecting the trees around the cemeteries was causing lots of damage as some trees had fallen and were literally smashing some of the gravestones. He also pointed out that some of the damages to the markers were being caused by mowing machines that had struck some of the gravestones while cutting the grass. Mr. Brown took notes during that meeting and made up a Power Point presentation and later presented this to the rest of the Selectboard and Town Manager. Most board members had no idea this was happening, and were surprised to learn this. It was discovered that no one from the Town was really overseeing or in charge of the maintenance in our Town’s cemeteries, thus they have been suffering from neglect. As a result, the Selectboard supported looking further into the care of our cemeteries. Mr. Pullar, the new Town Manager, worked hard on this issue and now the Parks and Recreation Department is covering this. This will most certainly result in better awareness and care of our cemeteries. Quechee Covered Bridge Pocket Park As you all know, Tropical Storm Irene hit the Town in August of 2011, damaging many areas, to include, the Quechee Covered Bridge and adjacent properties. The bridge was rebuilt and reopened in December of 2012. During this time, the Town worked to acquire the adjacent properties through FEMA programs. In 2013, concept plans were developed to build pocket parks on these damaged, adjacent properties. A plan was picked by the Town. However, designers, engineers and staff despite having made several attempts, where unable to gain FEMA's approval to build. The staff continued to work to gain approval, with the input and assistance of several in the community, approval was finally granted in November of 2016.

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Understanding that something had to be done on theses adjacent properties, the Selectboard, in July of 2016, unanimously approved a budget of no more than $350K for design and construction of the pocket park. The $350K includes all previously budgeted monies and those grant monies received throughout the process. The staff, along with the engineering firm, is in the process of preparing final design. The project will go out for bid late this winter/early spring with the intent to complete construction this summer. In closing, we on the Selectboard want to thank you for allowing us to serve you. We are excited about the great opportunities and the challenges that lay ahead. We always welcome your help and input; we work for you. We need your involvement. When you are involved and bring your vast and diverse skills to bear, this Town can accomplish anything. One needs to look no further than the past successes of the Hartford Municipal Solid Waste Committee, the Municipal Building Advisory Committee, the Town Manager Selection Committee, the 4th Charter Commission and the Survey Committee to name a few. In all of these cases, highly skilled volunteers stepped forward to deliver a first rate product for the Town. The take home is that the Selectboard and your fellow citizens continue to be very proud of and grateful for the quality of engagement that takes place on our ad hoc and standing boards and commissions. If you notice an opportunity to serve that matches your interests and skills, remember Hartford needs you! Sincerely, Dennis Brown Simon Dennis Richard Grassi, Chair Alan Johnson Sandra Mariotti, Clerk Michael Morris Rebecca White, Vice Chair

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TOWN OF HARTFORD 2017/2018 MUNICIPAL BUDGET GENERAL FUND EXPENSES (FUND 10) PLAN YOUR WORK – WORK YOUR PLAN

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TOWN OF HARTFORD 2017/2018 MUNICIPAL BUDGET ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES (FUND 20, 30, 50, 55, 60 & 65) PLAN YOUR WORK – WORK YOUR PLAN

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Report of the Town Officers & Department Heads That Serve Hartford

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EMPLOYEE SERVICE PROGRAM

The Employee Service Program, adopted in 1978 by the Selectboard, awards employees and recognizes officials for service to the Town. Plaques and savings bonds are awarded based on the number of years a person has been employed by the Town. These awards were previously presented at an Annual Awards Banquet which was held during the month of December. However, the banquet expense was removed from the budget beginning July 1, 2009. This year an employee Holiday dinner was held in December and awards were given to the following 2016 honorees: Leonard Roberts, Police Dept. Joan Ponzoni, Public Works Dept. Michael Bedard, Fire Dept. Scott Moody, Police Dept. Christopher Haley, Public Works Dept. Richard Nott, Public Works Dept. Lori Hirshfield, Planning Dept. Earl Dyke, Public Works Dept.

35 years 30 years 30 years 25 years 25 years 20 years 20 years 20 years

Richard Menge, Public Works Dept. Alan Beebe, Fire Dept. Mitchell White, Fire Dept. Sherry West, Town Clerk’s Office Keith Morse, Fire Dept. Jeremy Delisle, Public Works Dept. Michael Boutilier, Communications Dept.

15 years 15 years 10 years 10 years 10 years 10 years 10 years

FIRE DEPARTMENT I wanted to start by recognizing Chief Steven A. Locke for his service and dedication to this community over his eight years as Fire Chief. After serving a portion of last year as the Interim Town Manager, Steve was appointed as the Fire Chief for the City of Burlington in February of 2016. We thank Steve for all his guidance and leadership over the years and wish him many years of success in his new position. The Fire Department continues to strive to provide “Excellence in Service” to all the five villages of the Town. The department responded to 1806 calls for emergency service, shifts conducted 303 building inspections, conducted 120 hours of public fire safety education and attended 1,445 hours of training during the last fiscal year (7/1/15-6/30/16). The Town received delivery of a new ambulance this year. The unit replaced a 2007 ambulance. Ambulance 1 is a 2015 Ford F450 manufactured by Osage Ambulance of Linn, MO. Unique to this purchase was the addition of a power load stretcher system. The system reduces back injuries to employees by automatically lifting the stretcher into the ambulance. A notable event occurred this year. Members of the Hartford Fire Department, Vermont Task Force 1, Massachusetts Task Force 1, Urban Search and Rescue, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and Soldiers with the National Guard participated in Vigilant Guard 2016 at Camp Ethan Allen Training Site, Jericho, Vt., in July 2016. Vigilant Guard is a national level emergency response exercise, sponsored by the National Guard and NORTHCOM, which provides National Guard units an opportunity to improve cooperation and relationships with regional civilian, military, and federal partners in preparation for emergencies and catastrophic events. Hartford has been a partner in statewide emergency response for many years now. In closing, I want to thank the Town Manager and the Selectboard for the opportunity to serve this community. Also, to the members of the fire department I thank you for what you do every day to make us a successful organization. Sincerely, Scott D. Cooney Fire Chief

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HEALTH OFFICER REPORT The Hartford Health Officer spent hundreds of hours responding to health complaints in Fiscal Year 2016. These calls mostly concern violations of the Vermont Rental Housing Health Code, and resulted in inspections for bed bugs, mold, chipping lead paint and household trash. Most of these public health concerns were resolved through voluntary compliance by the responsible parties. The Hartford Health Office was also proactive in preventing bites from animals infected with rabies. Any wild animal who is acting strangely should be reported to the Town Health Officer, the Town Animal Control Officer or the Hartford Police Department. To find out more about the provisions of the Vermont Rental Housing Health Code, tenants and landlords may refer to the “Information Handbook for Tenants & Landlords” available online: http://healthvermont.gov/regs/Rental_Housing_Code.pdf Landlords should also consider having their apartments inspected by the Town Health Officer before new tenants move in. Confirmation of compliance with the Vermont Rental Housing Health Code can help avert potential future issues related to code compliance. Mobil Home parks should also be aware of the Vermont codes. You may reach the Health Officer at (802)591-3978 or (802)295-9353. Brett Mayfield, Health Officer

LISTERS’ AND ASSESSOR’S REPORT

Over the past year, there have been a few changes to the Lister’s office. We have had our longtime Assessor, Clarissa Holmes retire and have added a new Assessor, Michelle Wilson. All three of our Listers retired this year as well! The Selectboard, in accordance with provisions in the town charter, appointed John Clerkin and Michelle Wilson as acting Listers for the remainder of the term. There are currently three positions open for election at the town meeting. We encourage anyone interested in the position to run for office. This past year there have been several downtown commercial projects completed, including one office building on Prospect St. with another set to be completed; renovation of the former American Legion; renovation of a store/apartment building on South Main St; as well as two new apartment buildings with more underway. These additions should help stabilize the Grand List. The Grand List was estimated to grow at ½ a percent, the actual growth was 1 percent. There are 6735 parcels in the grand list of which 5460 are taxable. Of those parcels there were 360 parcels adjusted, 108 Lister appeals, 6 Board of Civil Authority appeals and 2 state level appeals. One of the major actions taken this year in the Assessor’s office was to begin a town-wide reappraisal for the 2017 Grand List year, 2017-18 tax year. The last reappraisal took place in 2007, ten years ago. A lot has changed with the sales market, cost of goods and the economy. We are mandated by the state to be at ‘Fair Market’ value. In order to achieve this we need to bring our information and tools up to today’s standards. This will involve every single property in town. In order to have good results we need the property owners to help us. To achieve this we have hired the firm Vision Governmental Solutions Inc. to work with the Assessor’s office to gather, analyze and assess values to all properties in the town. This will include a review of the property card; an interior/exterior inspection; analyzation of sales data; creating new cost tables for buildings and a land schedule as well as assisting with appeals. Good information = Good Grand List. Your cooperation has been greatly appreciated. We will still be looking at (1) issued a building permit (2) your property has transferred with the past year or (3) any miscellaneous corrections that come to our attention. In mid-May, all property owners will receive a notice of all new assessments. Any questions about the changes should be directed to the Listers’ Office. The notice will include details on the grievance (appeal) process, this will include a pre-grievance period to fix any misinformation. Our website has also been a great addition. The Grand List is now available online in a searchable format as well as tax rate information, tax rate history, etc. The Revaluation News was added to keep you up to date with where we are in the process as well as other information at your fingertips! If there is anything you would like to see posted, please let us know at listers@hartford-vt.org . 82


We continue to remind taxpayers that everyone is to file the Homestead Forms annually. In order to receive a state aid credit to assist with your property taxes you must also file the IN 144 form as well. This should be done with your Income Tax Return or on-line at http://tax.vermont.gov/property-owners/homestead-declaration. If you qualify as a resident and do not file, you will not be eligible to receive a Property Tax Adjustment (State Aid Credit). Also, note that if there is any change in a business or rental use of your property, make sure to include this information with your filing. If the Homestead Value of your property does not equal the total assessment and you have no business or rental use of your property, please let us know. We welcome any questions, concerns or comments regarding assessment. Assessment information is also available through the VISION website at http://gis.vgsi.com/hartfordvt/. If for any reason you do not want your assessment information displayed on the website, you must notify us in writing. Lister John Clerkin

Assessor/Lister Michelle Wilson

PARKS AND RECREATION

I am proud to report that our Parks and Recreation is a national accredited parks and recreation department by the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA). The Town of Hartford Parks and Recreation Department is one of only three New England Towns to maintain the National Agency Accreditation. CAPRA reviews best practices of parks and recreation departments’ operations, management and service to the community. The vision of the Hartford Parks & Recreation Department is: Something for Everyone – Where the citizens of Hartford and surrounding communities recognize the vital necessity of recreation through diverse programs that reach all, regardless of age, gender, race and economic backgrounds. A department that cooperates with all community groups to bring a variety of recreation opportunities to the citizens of Hartford. The parks and facilities are maintained at the highest quality and improved on a regular basis to meet the future needs of the community. The mission of the Hartford Parks & Recreation Department is: To serve the needs of the community through quality parks and facilities and by offering lifelong learning through recreational and cultural programs. We are appreciative to all of the volunteers who have given their time and energy to our community. The Parks and Recreation Commission continue to provide guidance in the development of programs and parks. The Sherman Manning Municipal Pool reopened for the 2016 summer season. The new field house is a pleasant and refreshing facility used as our main entry to the pool and changing areas. One set back this summer to the main pool was the detection of a leak in the system. The repairs are intended to be addressed before the pool opens in 2017. Pool Public Swim Attendance Summer 2016 Pass Visits = 1480 Public Visits = 712

Hours Rented at WABA: 2015/2016 = 985.25 hours at end of season March! 2016

WABA Public Skate Attendance Winter 2015/2016 Pass Visits = 1501

Public Visits = 920

Activities at the Maxfield Outdoor Sports Complex included: -

HS Soccer, Baseball and Softball Youth Cal Ripken Baseball VT Adult Baseball League American Legion Baseball League New England College Baseball League Upper Valley Night Hawks baseball team Hartford Youth Lacrosse Club HS Rocket Club (launch rockets from site) WR Elementary School Boys Athletic Club USTA Women’s Tennis

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Adult Pickle Ball VT Recreation & Park Association Maintenance Workshop/Clinic 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament Hartford Elementary School programs Private Fun Run events US Army Reserve individual wellness training Parks and Recreation Department youth athletic programs


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Sport Basketball Baseball Softball Soccer

Numerous families and individuals who walk the path each day Scholarships Winter 2015/2016 through Fall 2016 = $2650.00

Boys 82 138 0 104

Girls 61 31 24 62

Total 143 169 24 166

Recreation Sports Enrollments: Scholarships funding amount awarded for 2015/2016 programming year equaled $2,650.00. We are pleased to have offered the following programs in 2016: Fall/Winter Special Events (family-oriented) Youth Programs 14th Annual Ice Fishing Derby 2nd & 3rd Grade Swim Basketball Camp Trunck or Treat event Creative Movement for Kids Archery Crossfit Kids Tree Identification Walks Elves Workshop Wednesday Walkers Father Daughter Dance February Break Skating February Ventures February Family Entertainment First Tee Golf Program Glory Days Festival Girls on the Mat Grandpa & Me Outdoors GMRCC Climbing Clinics Hunting Education Course Oh, Art Classes Ice Fishing Program Small Games Camp Learn to Skate Start Smart Basketball New Year's Skate Start Smart Soccer Polar Express (with the WR Rotary) Youth Basketball Red Zone 5K Youth Cheerleading Skate with Santa Youth Indoor Soccer Ski Lessons Youth Karate Snowboard Lessons Youth Open Basketball Thanksgiving Skate Youth Stick N' Puck Ultimate Frisbee Youth Soccer Valley Quest Hike Winter Break Skating

Special Events (family-oriented) Abenaki Welcome Day Archery in Motion Classes Archery One Day Classes Boston Red Sox Bus Trip Bow Hunting Safety Course Family Soccer Night - Drop In Fly Fishing School Full Moon Hiking Excursions Glory Days Grandma & Me Story Walk Hiking Outing Series Hurricane Hill 5k/10k Trail Run July 4th - Fireworks Kehoe Strong Basketball Tournament Let's Go Fishing Day Concerts in the Park - Lyman Point Concerts in the Park - Quechee Green Maxfield Tennis Courts Opening Movie in the Park –Goonies Spring Hunter Safety Course St. Patrick's Day Skate Tree Identification Walks

Spring/Summer Youth Programs April Ventures Vacation Camp Youth Baseball Fall Youth Field Hockey Fall Youth Soccer Field Hockey Camp First Tee Golf Program Geocaching for Kids Junior Tennis Camps Kids in Motion Lacrosse Lightning SC "Street Soccer" Camp Minicanes Football NFL Flag Football Quick Start Tennis Soccer Camp Youth Softball Spring Soccer K-8 Summer Ventures-Sessions Track and Field Trail Kids Video Camps Youth Karate 84

Teen Programs February Ventures CIT Middle School UVAC Fun Nights Teen Adventures Trips Town Team Basketball Adult Programs for Young and Older Adults Adult Computer Classes Adult Golf Clinic Adult Noontime Hockey Adult Open Basketball Adult Stick N' Puck Basketball Officials Clinic Computer Basics Geocaching Food for Life Courses Japanese Low Impact Martial Arts Men's Basketball League Zumba

Youth Tennis Clinics Teen Programs 7 on 7 Football April Ventures CIT Football Camp Hartford Performing Arts Camp Hitting & Fielding Clinics Middle School UVAC Fun Nights Summer Ventures CIT Training Teen Adventure Getaway Adult Programs for Young and Older Adults Adult Co-Ed Slow-Pitch Softball Adult Golf Clinics Adult Open Basketball Adult Tennis Clinics Belly Dancing Geocaching 50+ Food for Life Classes Paddling Outing Series Pickleball Demonstration UFX (Ultimate Frisbee) Wednesday Walkers


We look forward to new initiatives to continue our commitment in striving to deliver quality services and experiences to the citizens of Hartford, Vermont. Respectfully submitted, Tad Nunez, M.Ed., CPRP Director

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT Established in 1990, the Department of Planning & Development Services' mission is to provide efficient, supportive, and professional assistance and service to the Hartford community regarding planning, zoning, community development, housing, economic development, historic preservation, conservation, transportation, and energy, while preserving the character and uniqueness of Hartford. The Department accomplishes this by providing general and technical staff assistance to individuals and various commissions and community groups; reviewing and issuing building and zoning permit; analyzing and revising regulations; encouraging citizen participation; planning and designing for future development in Hartford; and providing a pro-active and supportive atmosphere which fosters growth while maintaining the character and vitality of Hartford. Staff continued to closeout grants for the purchase of nine properties through the Federal Hazard Mitigation Grant Buy-Out Program, and implement the reuse plans for the Quechee Bridge pocket parks and parking. Other major department activities included adoption of a complete rewrite of the Hartford Subdivision Regulations; reconstruction of Gates Street extension; and initiation of a parking analysis for Downtown WRJ. Work continued on design and engineering for the Sykes Mountain Avenue and Route 5 sidewalk improvement projects under five Federal and state grants; and design and engineering for improvements to Railroad Row; and semi-annual parking survey/analysis for Downtown White River Junction. The Department continued to work with other development and business related groups, such as the Green Mountain Economic Development Corporation (GMEDC), the Hartford Development Corporation, and the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce to promote, support and assist Hartford businesses. Throughout town, private development projects also continued. A review of the zoning permit approvals from July 2015 through June 2016 showed continued growth. Of the 11 new businesses that obtained permits, 8 used existing commercial space, 1 built a new building and 2 were home businesses. Of the 15 existing businesses that obtained permits, 5 made additions to existing buildings, 6 relocated to existing commercial space, and 4 built new buildings. Since not all new businesses need a zoning permit, it is likely additional businesses located in Hartford that we are unaware of, particularly those involving office space. Downtown White River Junction continued to draw new projects including the new Red Rooster Brewer; construction of a second commercial building on Prospect St.; and site plan approval for 53 units of housing and 80 room assisted living facility in Downtown; and 88 housing units on Sykes Mt Ave. Other highlights are the new Riverbank Church on Holiday Dr, an addition to the Upper Valley Aquatic Center, and a new contractor’s yard on RT 14. Highlights of Other Department Accomplishments - July 2015 to June 2016. • • • • • • • • • • •

Worked with Town departments to update the FY 2016-2021 Capital Improvement Plan. Administered Vermont Community Development Program (VCDP) grant for GMEDC to assess the! feasibility of GMEDC developing a commercial park on Sykes Mt Avenue. Administered VCDP loan for Twin Pine Housing Trust to rehabilitate/construct affordable multi-family! housing at five sites in town. Two new structures were completed. Administered VCDP grant for Railroad Row LLC to construct 17 multifamily units, of which16 are affordable! to lower income residents, in a new mixed-use building at Bridge and Main Streets in Downtown WRJ. Processed two Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) loans for residential energy improvements. $900,000 Tax Increment Financing (TIF) bond approved for downtown sewer project an upgrade Town! parking lot behind the former Legion Building. Processed one Hartford Business Revolving Loan Fund (HBRLF) for a new business in downtown WRJ. Coordinated the Town’s Green-up Day, where 364 volunteers collected 3.85 tons of trash. Submitted and received approval to be one of four VT downtown Community Energy pilot projects for! concentrated public education/ technical assistance to business and residents on energy improvements to! their properties. Completed a Bicycle/Pedestrian alternatives study for West Hartford Village and Quechee Village. Completed Historic Sites Survey. 85


• • •

Reviewed and processed 278 zoning permit applications. Reviewed and prepared reports on 24 applications for Planning Commission, and 14 applications for Zoning Board of Adjustments, and 50 Administrative Amendments to existing site plans and/or conditional use permits in lieu of public hearings, and addressed 27 Zoning Regulations violations. Worked on appeals of decisions by the Zoning Administrator, Planning Commission and Zoning Board of Adjustment.

The Department staffs the Planning Commission, Zoning Board of Adjustment, Conservation Commission, Historic Preservation Commission, Energy Commission, WRJ Design Review Committee, Hartford Business Revolving Loan Fund Committee, and Community Resilience Organization Committee. Staff also acts as the Town’s liaison to the Two Rivers-Ottauquechee Planning Commission and several local, regional and state planning, economic development, housing, historic preservation, conservation, transportation, hazard mitigation, energy and community development organizations. I would like to take this opportunity to thank department staff, Jo-Ann Ells (Zoning Administrator), Matt Osborn (Planner), and Brenda Lamphere (Administrative Assistant), and the volunteer members of our various Boards, Commissions and Committees, whose dedication and professionalism make it possible for this department to fulfill its mission and provide quality service to the Hartford community. Lori Hirshfield, Director, Department of Planning and Development Services Zoning/Building Permits Two hundred seventy-eight (278) zoning permits were issued in fiscal year 2016. Following is a summary of permits issued over the past five years by category:

Administrative Change Accessory Structure Accessory Apartment Agricultural Commercial Addition/Alteration Commercial Structure Commercial Use Deck Garage Home Occupation/Business Multi-family Dwelling Planned Development Planned Development Amd. Pool Residential Addition Subdivision Single Family Dwelling Sign Site Plan Amendment Site Work Two-Family Dwelling Total

FY 2012 37 46 13 6 13 2 3 31 19 4 0 0 0 1 46 7 9 13 11 4 1 255

FY2013 43 54 3 3 14 5 13 23 14 2 1 1 0 0 33 10 11 17 5 5 0 257

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FY2014 38 34 4 1 19 2 14 31 12 3 0 0 0 1 27 6 14 12 8 0 1 227

FY 2015 64 37 3 1 19 2 14 37 10 0 0 0 0 2 34 8 10 25 14 4 1 285

FY 2016 50 55 2 5 14 2 14 26 9 2 1 1 3 0 40 5 9 26 10 4 0 278


A zoning permit is required prior to any land development in the Town of Hartford. Land development is defined as “the division of a parcel into two or more parcels; the construction, reconstruction, conversion, structural alteration, relocation or enlargement of any building or structures; excavation in excess of 20 cubic yards of material per year or filling in excess of 200 cubic yards per year; any change in use of any building or other structure, or land, or extension of prior use.” Once a complete zoning permit application is submitted, it is reviewed and a decision is rendered within 10 business days. The State of Vermont requires a fifteen-day appeal period once an application is approved before the permit is effective and issued. Once a zoning permit is issued, work must be started within six months and be completed with within two years of the date of issue or the zoning permit will become null and void. One six-month extension to both time periods may be granted by the Planning Commission prior to the start or completion dates. You can reach the planning staff at (802) 295-3075 with any permitting questions.

Hartford Police Department & Emergency Communications Center Thank you for your interest in the Hartford Police Department & Emergency Communications Center, and taking time to review our progress as we continue to foster an atmosphere of teamwork in advancing the cause of public safety within our community. I am privileged to serve alongside the tremendous professionals who comprise the ranks of our police officers and communications specialists. Inasmuch, we opened this year with our first employee awards nomination program, which is comprised of a peer nomination process followed by a rigorous committee review and recommendation. I was pleased to recognize Communications Specialist Mary Kent as our first Employee of the Year. In addition to her eight years of outstanding service as a dispatcher and training officer with our 911 Team, Mary’s foresight, positive attitude and calm demeanor was cited by the committee as having saved the life of a choking toddler. Mary Kent, Employee of the Year Detective Kristinnah Adams was also recognized as the first Police Officer of the Year. An eight year police veteran, former patrolman and school resource officer, Kristinnah’ s most recent assignment has been as an investigator with the Windsor County Special Investigations Unit (SIU). The committee credited Kristinnah’ s intelligence, investigative tenacity, compassion and tireless commitment with an impressive closure rate of nearly eighty percent in the most difficult cases of aggravated sexual assault on a child, human trafficking, child pornography, child abuse and domestic violence. Kristinnah Adams, Police Officer of the Year

Police Officers Tom Howell and Sean Fernandes were also recognized with a Certificate of Merit for rescuing a man in diabetic shock from his wrecked vehicle after it left the roadway and became lodged against trees along a steep, overgrown riverbank. Unrelated, Police Officer Chris Aher received a Merit Award for his life saving application of CPR on a man in cardiac arrest at a local hotel. Police Officer Fred Peyton was recognized with a Commendation Award for his off-duty foot pursuit of a man suspected of a purse-snatching in a neighboring Town, which led to the suspect’s arrest and recovery of the purse. Police Officer Tom Howell also received a Chief’s Salute for his off-duty application of first aid after he witnessed a patron at a local gym sustain injuries from a fall. We also had the honor of presenting Communications Specialist Doug Smith with a Chief’s Salute at his retirement celebration this past March, which brought public safety professionals from across the region. Doug retired after serving the Vermont public safety community for thirty-nine years, having entered service as a call firefighter with the Hartford Fire Department during 1971. Before becoming a Communications Specialist, Doug also attained career firefighter status, and served as a police officer and chief dispatcher. Known for his common

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sense approach and honest, forthright communication style, Doug’s efforts were frequently praised by callers, peers, and public safety leaders alike. With the retirement of Communications Specialist Doug Smith, we welcomed Hartford native Avery Hodgdon into the emergency communications training program after an exhaustive selection process. A Hartford first, Major Leonard Roberts was nominated to attend the Southern Police Institute’s flagship program on a full scholarship from New England Chiefs of Police Association. A twelve week, academically intensive program hosted by the University of Louisville in Kentucky, Major Roberts graduated from the 135th “Administrative Officers Course” during May. Major Brad Vail received an appointment to the prestigious Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) “National Academy” for police executives. A ten week leadership development program credentialed by the University of Virginia and hosted by the FBI Training Academy on the grounds of the Marine Corps Base at Quantico, Virginia, Major Vail graduated from the 265th Session during September. During November, Police Officers Mitchel Cable and Oliver Keyser graduated from the Vermont Criminal Justice Training Council’s 102nd Basic Training Class and joined the Department’s twelve week police field training program. Earlier in the year, Officer Eric Clifford and K-9 Dozer successfully completed drug detection training during the 37th Basic Police K-9 Training School and returned to Patrol in February. Since their graduation, the duo has recovered significant quantities of heroin and other drugs, amassed numerous drug arrests, and hundreds of followers on social media. In November, Dozer was presented with custom fitted body armor from Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. sponsored by Manchester, Vermont resident Judith Douglas. We are equally grateful for the fiscal support provided by the State of Vermont Homeland Security Committee and Selectboard in funding sixteen (16) new high wattage, dual band portable radios during this fiscal year. The new radios are more adaptable to the architectural and terrain changes in Hartford’s landscape, providing reliable communications between the Communications Center and patrol officers in the field. The dual band capabilities also provide the patrol officer on the street with direct communications between fire rescue personnel and New Hampshire police operating on the VHF Band. We’re seeking funding for eight (8) additional radios to equip the remainder of the police department with this technology during the coming fiscal year. The importance of communication cannot be overstated in our profession. As such, the staff in our Emergency Communications Center entered an agreement with “VT-Alert” to provide emergency notifications for residents. A voluntary process, there is no charge for individuals wishing to enroll at www.vtalert.gov for emergency text and email notifications from emergency managers. Likewise, engaging the mental health and other community based service providers in a continuous dialogue and problem solving partnership to address the complex needs of those in crisis has been a core competency of our patrol strategy. This process has been aided considerably with the addition of Police Social Worker Whitney Hussong, a crisis specialist employed by Health Care & Rehabilitative Services (HCRS) who is embedded full time with the Police Department. In addition to coordinating services for the more complex cases, Whitney provides on scene crisis response for police & paramedics, and is active with several local collaborative efforts, including leading the Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) sponsored by the Upper Valley Public Health Council. The Hartford Police Department graduated its third CIT class during October, which included collaborative de-escalation strategies for dispatchers and police in Vermont and New Hampshire. The CIT program is based on the popular “Memphis Model” which has been recognized by the Department of Justice and is included among the recommendations in the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing Report. Hartford Police have also partnered with the Department of Justice in addressing youth safety, with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) leading training sessions at our local schools for police response to active threats during February and August. Sergeant Jason Pedro has since been certified as an instructor in both the police, and citizen response to active threats. Sergeant Pedro has worked with local businesses, private and public schools to train their staff in how to react to active threats, protecting students and integrating employee actions with first responders. Funded by the Department of Justice and the Hartford School District, all Hartford Police and nearly one hundred officers from our region are now trained in this advanced protocol that has become the national standard.

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In addition to working with the Hartford School District in the area of physical security and critical response planning, we have continued to develop our Adopt-A-School initiative. Through these efforts we strive to increase interaction between police, students and school staff through regular foot and campus patrols by uniformed police officers. Police personnel have joined students for lunch, participated in Field Day & Walk to School activities, assisted with classroom instruction and afterschool activities. I am proud of the partnership between our teachers, school administrators and police officers, and was honored to accept a formal award on their behalf from the Hartford School District Executive Board recognizing the Adopt-A-School efforts during the Board’s late October meeting. I am proud of our personnel and their many achievements amid what has been a difficult year for our profession both locally and abroad. I recognize that your trust, and that of my staff is a privilege. Please know that I remain committed to fostering a culture of continuous improvement, and advancing an atmosphere of collaboration in addressing public safety needs in a professional and responsive manner. Through honest feedback and strong partnerships between our staff, local government, the community and our allied criminal justice and public safety partners, we will realize a high quality of life and preserve our low rate of serious crime as we move forward together. Sincerely,

Phillip S. Kasten, Chief of Police Town of Hartford, Vermont

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT HIGHWAY DIVISION The highway division is responsible for the maintenance of 140 miles of paved and gravel roads and 10 miles of sidewalks. The division continues to replace and complete maintenance on culverts identified as priority culverts in the Town culvert inventory. Paving improvements were completed on the following streets: Aldrich Lane, Barrell Avenue, Costello Road, Credit Court, Depot Street, Hebard Avenue, Harvest Lane, Hillside Road, Lantern Lane, Old River Road, Ozzy Lane, Quechee Main Street (2 areas), Round House Road, Ry-Kris Lane, Sargent Street, Talbert Street! and Vermont Drive. We also completed a pilot project using a rubberized chip seal on Connecticut River Road to further extend the life of the pavement. The Town would like to thank Terry Delisle, General Foreman, for his dedicated years of service (27 years) in the Highway Division and wish him well in retirement. We also congratulate Richard Nott for his promotion to General Foreman. This year the highway division oversaw the bidding and construction engineering phase of the Route 5 turn lane for Maxfield Recreation Field complex. The turn lane is a valuable safety feature for vehicles accessing the Maxfield complex at Lesle Drive. The Highway Division also oversaw placement of the top course of pavement at the Town Hall parking lot and at the WABA access road and parking lot. Division staff completed all of the line striping for both parking lots. This winter the Town will benefit from the replacement of a tandem axle and single axle dump truck that was approved in the FY17 budget. The division purchased a 4 Ton Roller as budgeted in FY 16, to be used on gravel roads, trench compaction and compacting pavement patches. We have already seen the benefit of compacting our gravel roads as new “wash boards” have been slower in reappearing thus reducing labor and allowing staff to pursue other tasks. The Town also retired a 27 year old tractor/mower and replaced it with

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a new John Deere tractor/mower for roadside mowing per the FY 16 budget. While mowing with the new mower our mower operator was befriended by a young man that wanted to show off his new John Deere. The young man brought out his new bike that had decals and a paint just like the Town’s new tractor. Will we perhaps see this youngster joining the Town crew in 15 or 20 years? SOLID WASTE FACILITY The Town of Hartford operates the Solid Waste/Recycling Transfer Center which is situated on about 19 acres at the site of the former Town landfill at 2590 North Hartland Road. The facility also includes a Construction and Demolition (C&D) transfer facility. This Town facility is open to the five villages in the Town of Hartford and the ten towns who are members of the Greater Upper Valley Solid Waste Management District (GUVSWMD). Several towns from New Hampshire are also allowed to use the construction and demolition area. The center houses an Education Building, Recycling Building, Scale House, Hartford Household Waste Building and the Administrative Office. Staffing is provided by a supervisor, 2 full-time attendants, an administrative assistant and 2 part-time attendants. A private entity,!White River Redemption, also leases part of the recycle building and redeems State of Vermont bottles and cans. The facility hours of operation are Monday through Saturday 8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m. The Center accepts municipal solid waste (including bulky items), recycled materials including bottles, cans, metals, cardboard, paper, glass and certain plastic containers. A summary of total tonnage handled at Hartford Transfer/Recycling Center during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2016 is listed below: Total Tons Estimated Hartford Municipal Solid Waste (compacted & bulky) 1200 780 Construction & Demolition debris 1300 845 Recycled material at the center 870 565 Curbside Recycling 675 675 The following is provided as an update on the various state laws regarding solid waste: Universal Recycling (Act 148) Implementation Dates – As of July 1, 2016 leaf, yard, and clean wood debris is banned from being disposed of in landfills. Residents should be aware that solid waste haulers must offer leaf and yard debris collection. July 1, 2020 is the date that food scraps will be totally banned from the landfills. On July 1, 2017 the transfer station will begin to accept food scraps and all haulers must also offer food scrap collection by July 1, 2017. Fees will be charged for food scraps. Food scrap generators of 18 ton/year (1/3 ton/week) must divert material to any certified facility within 20 miles as of July 1, 2017. The Hartford Transfer/Recycling Center is also a no-cost collection site for the following programs for all Vermont residents: SINGLE-USE AND RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES (ACT 139) Recycling batteries in Vermont just got easier. That's right, as of January 1, 2016 old single-use, alkaline batteries (AA, AAA, 9V, D-Cell, C-Cell, button cell) can be dropped-off at the Transfer Station and more than 100 other (including retail) locations throughout Vermont. ELECTRONICS (ACT 79) The Vermont E-Cycles program provides free and convenient recycling of computers, monitors, televisions, printers and computer peripherals to residents. In 2016 the transfer station recycled 91.42 tons of electronics with 50% coming from Hartford and 50% from GUVSWMD towns. PAINT PRODUCT STEWARSHIP LEGISLATION (ACT 58) - To promote the proper management and recycling of paint, the Vermont Legislature passed Act 58 in May 2013 and the Paint Stewardship Program began on May 1, 2014. The program allows Vermont residents to bring qualifying paint products to the facility Monday through Saturday 8:00a.m. 3:30p.m. For the year ending September 30, 2016 the transfer station accepted 31.64 tons with 50% from Hartford and 50% from GUVSWMD towns. This represents more than 5000 gallons of paint and is close to 5% of the total collected throughout the state. FLUORESCENT & HID MERCURY CONTAINING BULBS (ACT 39) Fluorescent lamps that include linear and compact fluorescent bulbs and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps all contain mercury. As of July 1, 2012 these

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lamps cannot be disposed of in the trash and must be recycled. The transfer station took in 15,235 linear ft. of bulbs during the past FY. Finally we are happy to announce that the solar field installation located on top of the closed landfill went on line in January 2016. The transfer station receives lease revenue for the panels and several Town owned facilities obtain discounted power from the solar field. WATER DIVISION The Town of Hartford Water Department operates and maintains two municipal water systems that provide drinking water to approximately 75% of the residents of Hartford. The Hartford System, which serves White River Junction, Wilder, and Hartford Village, is comprised of two “gravel pack” wells with a total pump capacity of over 1,500-gallons per minute, two storage tanks totaling 2.5-million gallons of water, many miles of distribution lines ranging from ¾” to 16” in diameter, approximately 270 fire hydrants, and a water treatment facility for manganese removal. Though the water quality from the two Hartford wells is excellent, they do contain an excessive amount of manganese. Like iron and hardness, manganese is common in ground water and not considered to be a health risk. However, in excess of as little as 0.05 ppm (parts per million) manganese can be a nuisance by staining plumbing fixtures. In 2016 approximately 260-million gallons of water were processed through the Wilder Water Treatment Plant with consistent readings of between zero and 0.02 ppm of manganese in the water entering the distribution system. In addition to the manganese removal process, sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is used to maintain a chlorine residual in the distribution system. The Quechee System consists of one “gravel pack” well with a pump capacity of 550-gallons per minute, four storage tanks totaling 300,000-gallons of water, many miles of distribution lines ranging from ¾” to 8” in diameter, three booster pump stations, and approximately 80 fire hydrants. Over 54-million gallons of water was pumped from the Quechee well in 2016. The only treatment required is a small amount of sodium hypochlorite (chlorine bleach) used to maintain a chlorine residual in the distribution system. In addition to monthly bacteria samples, both systems have been tested for over 80 contaminates. Based on sample results, the water quality in both systems exceeds all state and federal standards. A crew of four personnel operates and maintains both systems. In addition to the daily routine functions, department personnel responded to over 400 service calls ranging from out of cycle meter readings to late night emergency water leak repairs. The department, with assistance from the highway department, also replaced approximately 300 feet of water main that was prone to leaking and eliminated a number of obsolete water lines.

Left to Right: Brian Raymond, Evan Eccher, Rick Kenney, Jeremy Delisle

A test well was drilled in the spring of 2016 in the vicinity of the existing Wilder well. The results of this test well provided the data for the Town to proceed forward with the installation of the production well. This project will be ongoing throughout 2016 and into 2017. The new 400,000-gallon Quechee storage tank and water main project was put out to bid in the spring of 2016. The project location included new water mains on Waterman Hill and the Quechee Hartland Rd. The low bidder was the Hartford based contractor- Nott’s Excavating, Inc. This new tank replaces an obsolete existing 30,000gallon tank and is expected to be placed in service in December 2016. Final contract work and cleanup will be performed in the spring of 2017. The increased storage volume will provide better firefighting capability as well as providing valuable system storage during high flow periods or maintenance events. This project is slated to come in under the budget approved by voters at the March 2015 town meeting. Water System Operators must be certified by the State of Vermont and are required to complete additional education and training “contact hours” to maintain their certifications. Hartford Water employees also keep current with changes in the public water sector through membership in the America Water Works Association (AWWA), New England Water Works Association (NEWWA), and the Green Mountain Water Environment Association

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(GMWEA). The department strives to provide its customers with safe, quality drinking water and unsurpassed service. Please contact the Public Works office at 295-3622 if you have any questions or comments, or if you would like to schedule a visit to our water facilities. WASTEWATER DIVISION Two Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTF) serve the Town of Hartford. The White River Junction WWTF is a 1.450 MGD (million gallons a day) permitted facility that services the Villages of Hartford, White River Junction and Wilder. The Quechee WWTF is a 0.475 MGD permitted plant and serves the Village of Quechee. The comprehensive sewer collection preventative maintenance program continued in summer and fall 2016 with the cleaning and TV inspection of wastewater collection lines in both the White River Junction and Quechee service areas. A portion of the sewer lines are cleaned using high velocity combination cleaning trucks which utilizes high pressure water and a vacuum to remove debris from the lines. A percentage of the lines flushed were TV inspected using a motorized camera to “crawl” the wastewater lines to identify potential defective sections of pipe. The five operators for the White River Junction Waste water system not only maintain the treatment facility but also maintain the ten wastewater pump stations and approximately 31 miles of wastewater collection lines, 500 manholes, and respond to emergency calls as needed. They also handle and spread all the bio-solids for the White River system and Quechee system. The White River Junction WWTF treated over 279 million gallons of wastewater during 2016 with an average daily flow of 767,000 gallons a day. In the spring of 2016 the White River Wastewater Department engaged a contractor to complete low elevation photography of the White River, Wilder and Hartford Village service area in order to develop a survey base map to be used to prepare a comprehensive map of the water, wastewater and drainage utilities. Funded largely by a State grant, this is a 2 year project that will include televising up to 50% of the wastewater mains and drainage lines. Town staff will locate any missing utilities not picked up by the flight. After the initial 2 years, this map will be utilized to update unknown locations and to add new developments. The three operators at the Quechee WWTF maintain their treatment facility and 11 pump stations, 24 leach fields, approximately 51 miles of wastewater collection lines, approximately 840 manholes and also respond to emergency calls as needed. The Quechee WWTF treated over 75 million gallons of wastewater during 2015 with an average daily flow of 206,000 gallons a day and provided additional treatment of a similar amount of wastewater through the 24 leach fields.

Left to right: Steve Brock, Tom Coates, Gordon Bennett (retired in Feb 2016)

The operators at both facilities have State of Vermont license certifications and are required to complete additional education and training “contact hours” to maintain their certifications. Hartford Wastewater employees also keep current with technology through membership in the New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA), and the Green Mountain Water Environment Association (GMWEA). Please contact the Public Works office at 295-3622 if you have any questions or comments, or if you would like to schedule a visit to our treatment facilities.

Wastewater Department Retirees: Three employees retired from the Wastewater Division. I wish to thank them for their exceptional service to the Town. • Gordon Bennett retired on February 11, 2016 from the Quechee Wastewater Division after 27 years 10! months with the Town of Hartford. Gordon was a dedicated employee and was always on the move at! the Quechee Wastewater Plant. • Richard (Alan) Mathon retired at the end of December 2015 from the wastewater division after 37 years! 11 months of service to the Town of Hartford. Alan performed his work with good humor, dignity and! respect to the public.

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George Packard retired at the end of June 2016 after 38 years 3 months of service to the Town of! Hartford. George had passion for his work and always strived to do a better job and to make those! around him better.

Respectfully submitted, Richard Menge Director of Public Works

TOWN CLERK Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Telephone: 295-2785 A Vermont Town Clerk is required by law to be the receiver and recorder of the Town’s archives and Vermont Statutes authorizes all duties and responsibilities. A Town Clerk endorses and files records relating to real estate transactions, vital statistics and Town business. The Hartford Town Clerk’s office has records of all births, deaths and marriages, which occurred in the town from 1857 to the present. Proceedings of all annual and special town meetings are recorded and filed by the Town Clerk. Other duties are as follows: issuance of dog licenses for dogs 6 months of age and older; issuance of marriage licenses and civil union licenses; issue temporary motor vehicle renewals; serves as presiding officer at all elections; handles petitions for candidates and articles on the town and school ballots; orders ballots; schedules election workers; handles absentee ballots; updates voter checklists and oversees tallying of votes. The Town Clerk serves as the Clerk of the Board of Civil Authority and Board of Abatement. The following figures are based on amounts from July 2015 – June 2016 Disbursements Receipts Pd. To VT State Treasurer for 111 Marriage Licenses @ Dog Licenses $ 8985.00 $35.00 ea. $ 4585.00 Marriage Licenses 131 sold at $45.00 5895.00 Town Clerk Fees 86,848.26 Pd. To VT State Treasurer for Restoration & Digital Imaging of Rec. 43,560.00 827 Dog Licenses @ $4.00 ea. $ 3560.00 Motor Vehicle Renewal 558.00

____________ TOTAL RECEIPTS

___________

$ 145,846.26

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS

$

8,145.00

NET INCOME FROM THE TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE: $137,701.26 I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true record of fees collected by the Town Clerk’s Office and paid to the Town Treasurer. Mary E. (Beth) Hill, Town Clerk Town Treasurer’s Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

TREASURER

Taxes are due twice a year in Hartford. The first installment is due in August and the second in February. The actual due date is set by the voters each year at Town Meeting. Payments must be received in our office by the due date; U.S. Postal Service postmark is accepted. If the payment is not received on time, unpaid taxes are subject to interest at 1% per month through April. Interest increases in May to 1 ½% per month. A penalty of 2% is charged after the February due date and an additional 2% is charged in March on any unpaid balances. These charges are established by statutes and the voters of the Town of Hartford. Town officials cannot waive the interest or penalty so it is important that the payment is sent in a timely manner. Within 20 days of the February due date the Treasurer issues a warrant against the delinquent taxpayers for the taxes remaining unpaid, to the collector of delinquent taxes. The original warrant is filed with the Town Clerk. The percentage of delinquent taxes for the last five years is as follows: DATE 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016

BILLED $29,510,621.61 $29,154,646.68 $29,368,865.87 $30,725,272.84 $31,951,067.94

DEL. PRINCIPAL $1,128,714.74 $1,480,144.23 $1,713,331.68 $1,463,557.86 $1,643,615.39

John Clerkin, Town Treasurer

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PERCENT 3.82% 5.08% 5.83% 4.76% 5.14%


TOWN STATISTICS Charted July 4, 1761 by King George III of England Town Offices, Municipal Building, White River Junction Town Fiscal Year Ends June 30th (Voted March 2, 1987 as provided by 24 VSA 1683C) Manager System Adopted September 9, 1940 VILLAGES White River Junction West Hartford Quechee

Hartford Wilder

POPULATION U.S. CENSUS 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960

4,179 4,739 4,888 4,978 5,827 6,355

1970 6,477 1980 7,963 1990 9,404 2000 10,366 2010 9,952

GRAND LIST (Municipal taxable figures) 2015 $13,300,262

2016 $13,380,713 TAX RATE

2015-2016 Residential School Town General Fund County Local Agreement rate Town Appropriation Tax Rate

1.5062 0.8881 0.0076 0.0011 0.0143 $ 2.4173

2015-2016 Non-residential

2016-2017 Residential

1.4842 0.8881 0.0076 0.0011 0.0143 $2.3953

1.5185 0.9216 0.0082 0.0020 0.0146 $2.4649

2016-2017 Non-residential 1.4990 0.9216 0.0082 0.0020 0.0146 $2.4454

AREA 29,434 Acres or 45.98 Square Miles ALTITUDE U.S. Geological Survey Bench Mark South Side Boston & Maine R.R. Bridge abutment across Connecticut River at White River Junction, 370.63 ft. ROAD MILEAGE State Highway State Aid Highway (Class 1) State Aid Highway (Class 1 Lane) State Aid Highway (Class II) Town Highways (Class III) Town Highways (Class IV) Legal Trail Total

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45.556 1.714 0.389 19.635 108.560 9.750 .070 185.674


Report of the Boards, Commissions & Libraries That Serve Hartford

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BOARDS & COMMISSIONS BOARD OF CIVIL AUTHORITY The Board of Civil Authority has a total of 23 members, which include 15 Justices of the Peace, the 7 Selectboard members, and the Town Clerk. The Board of Civil Authority has charge of the conduct of elections, maintains and updates the voter checklist, meets to consider property appraisal appeals from taxpayers who are aggrieved by a decision of the Listers, and serves as the Board of Abatement. The Annual School and Town Australian balloting was held Tuesday, March 1, 2016 from 7 AM to 7 PM in the Hanley Gym at Hartford High School. The Annual School and Town Business Meeting was held on March 29, 2014 at 10 AM in the Hanley Gym at Hartford High School. There were 6 tax appeal requests before the Board of Civil Authority in 2016 with 6 being granted and 0 being denied. Abatement hearings were held on December 14, 2016. The board heard 4 requests and granted 4 abatements and denied 0. Kevin Raleigh, Chairperson

CONNECTICUT RIVER JOINT COMMISSIONS CRJC continues its mission to preserve the visual and ecological integrity and working landscape of the Connecticut River Valley. With five local subcommittees and over 100 volunteers, it is guiding the watershed’s growth by reviewing and commenting on proposed actions, from large scale development projects including the Northern Pass, to proposed regulatory changes, such as shoreland protection rules. CRJC assisted with the installation of new wake speed signs at launches in VT and NH, and supported the Connecticut River Watershed Council with the 25th Source-to-Sea Cleanup. Along with the Conte Wildlife Refuge, CRJC is working to present educational programs about the river and clean water in the watershed. Of note, during FY2016 the CRJC actively participated in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing of the three TransCanada hydroelectric dams on the lower Connecticut by reviewing studies performed by TransCanada and communicating its concerns about project operations to FERC, particularly those related to erosion, mercury, climate change and economic impact. CRJC advocates for the establishment of a mitigation and enhancement fund for the southern reach of the river as a means to compensate for unavoidable impacts from dam operations. In this role, CRJC Commissioners met with the governors of both VT and NH to draw attention to the relicensing process and enlist their support. At the Commission annual meeting in June 2016 the following officers were elected to serve during the FY2017: Rick Walling, President (NH); Jason Rasmussen, Vice President (VT); Mary Sloat, Treasurer (NH); Steven Lembke, Secretary (VT).

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE ORGANIZATION HARTFORD (CROH) The Community Resilience Organization of Hartford (CRO Hartford) is a team of Town residents, organizations and town staff working together to strengthen the Hartford community’s ability to prepare and respond to natural and manmade disasters. CRO Hartford was established in 2015 by the Hartford Selectboard. Hartford is one of six towns in Vermont participating in a statewide CRO program. Resilience is the ability of people in communities to come together to solve problems. To become resilient involves education on every level, and relies on projects and activities which bring people together to work, interact, and get to know and trust each 96


other. Hartford has an Emergency Response Plan and a Hazard Mitigation Plan. These are important, but our success in being prepared to respond to disasters also involves being more resilient and self-sufficient as a community. During its first year, CRO Hartford has been working to get the word out about our committee’s work and creating partnerships. Coinciding with the 5th anniversary of Tropical Storm Irene, CRO Hartford sponsored a Community Resilience Week, a week of workshops and lectures on a variety of topics related to resilience. The event was well-attended and CRO Hartford plans to make this an annual event. CRO Hartford members attended a CRO retreat in Basin Harbor in 2015 and the Vermont Resilience Conference in 2016 where all involved communities shared their experiences. CROH members include Kye Cochran, Jon Bouton, Laura Simon, Simon Dennis and chair Dylan Kreis. If you have questions or comments for CROH, please contact Planner, Matt Osborn who can be reached at 295-3075 or mosborn@hartford-vt.org Meetings take place on the fourth Wednesday of the month at 4:30 p.m. in the Hartford Town Hall.

CONSERVATION COMMISSION The Hartford Conservation Commission (HCC) was established in 1990 to inventory natural resources, maintain and preserve natural areas, protect valuable wildlife habitat, monitor scenic areas and watershed areas, educate and increase awareness of conservation, and encourage recreation consistent with the preservation of the natural beauty of Hartford. The HCC also manages the 423-acre Hartford Town Forest, the Maanawaka Conservation Area and the David Chang Conservation Area. We hope you get out and enjoy these wonderful parcels and treat them with respect. Please contact us if you see maintenance or abuse issues so we can organize restoration or clean-up. FY-2016 Members of the HCC included Jon Bouton (chair), Karen Douville (vice chair), Janice Berger, Dana Hazen, Mary Hutchins and Shawn Kelley. The HCC would like to thank former members Karen Douville and Janice Berger whose terms expired in August, for their service. Tom Kahl joined in July. As of November, the HCC had two vacancies on the Commission. If you are interested in serving on the HCC, please contact Hartford Planner Matt Osborn (295-3075) or mosborn@hartford-vt.org While this report is officially for FY 2016, which ended June 30, it is current as of the submission date in September 2016. Projects on the Town Forests • FY- 2016: We recommended (and the Selectboard approved) an Act-250-related agreement to permanently! conserve ~17 acres of wetlands on the HTF to mitigate wetlands destroyed by development of the Maxfield! Sports Complex. • Our Land Management Subcommittee, composed of mountain bikers, runners, other trail users and HCC! members, continues to assess unauthorized trails and their impacts on natural resources and processes. • Geo-located evidence of HTF boundaries and contracted a computer mapping specialist who organized a! Geographic Information System project we used for making maps of the HTF with available natural! resources, boundary and trails information. • Prospective Eagle Scout Connor Chandler repaired our bullet-ridden information HTF kiosk on Reservoir! Road, repaired the bridge on Simonds Way and installed a box culvert crossing a wet area near an! intermittent stream on the Moose Brook Trail. • Thanks to the Department of Public Works for smoothing and improving drainage on the eroding sections of! the town road right of way through the HTF. Outreach and Education • Developed a brochure: “Living with Bears”. • Led a vernal pool educational walk in the Hartford Town Forest (HTF). • Led a winter outing at the HTF identifying wildlife tracks and native tree species. • Organized a Trails Day to maintain trails in the HTF.

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Led Dothan Brook School classes on a field exploration of the Wright’s Reservoir (pre-draining) and the habitats developing since the draining of the former Upper Reservoir.

Other Ongoing Projects within the HCC • Green Up Day: Town Sponsor. 364 volunteers collected 3.9 tons of waste. • Conceiving a system of trails that would link the 5 villages of Hartford. • Working with landowners interested in conserving their land. • Organized natural resource information and developing criteria for town-wide natural resource review. Participation with Town and Regional Groups • Ottauquechee River water quality sampling with the Connecticut River Watershed Council. • Participated in review of a proposed Riverwalk trail in White River Junction. • Hartford Solid Waste Committee. • Save Dewey’s Pond Committee. • Participated in the review of the Hartford Draft Subdivision Regulations. • Working on various projects with other town boards including the Planning Commission, Tree Board, Community Resilience Organization and Energy Commission.

ECFIBER Hartford is a member of ECFiber, the East Central Vermont Telecommunications District, Vermont's first Communications Union District. The District came into existence on January 1, 2016, replacing the 24-town interlocal contract Hartford approved at Town Meeting in 2008. ECFiber is still owned by its 24 member towns, and, as was true under the inter-local contract, local taxpayer funds cannot be used to subsidize the District's operations. The district must be self-sustaining and there is no recourse to taxpayers. On April 15, 2016, the District announced that it had completed a $9 million offering of Series 2016A Bonds to refinance a portion of its debt, cover 2016 capital expenditures, and complete the design and make ready for 250 miles of construction in 2017. Approximately 4 million of notes payable to investors were repaid during May 2016. Now under the leadership of CEO Carole Monroe, EC Fiber has continued its practice of raising speeds but not prices again in early 2016, by announcing that the District's tiers of service would now be set at 10/25/100/500 Mbps (versus the previous 7/20/50/100/400). The District's product offerings have been simplified in the belief it can create the most value by offering a "big pipe" to each home and letting consumers choose widely available ancillary services (such as video streaming, data backup, email, etc.) from other service providers. Future additional service offerings (such as a small package of local, over-the-air network TV channels) will be considered if they generate sufficient cash flow and do not create a large quantity of service calls and tickets. The one exception to this policy has been VOIP landline telephone service, so that customers can get both phone and internet from ECFiber. Phase 1 of ECFiber’s build out does not include member towns Hartford, Montpelier, or the Village of Woodstock. Each has multiple high speed providers. Planning for Phase 2 will commence in 2018. That said, the Jericho neighborhood may be put in the Phase 1 buildout because it is underserved and has proximity to buildout efforts in Norwich and Bethel. Hartford delegate F. X. Flinn was elected Vice Chair of the Governing Board in May 2016. Norwich’s Irv Thomae is the Chair. Hartford’s needs and opportunities are well understood by ECFiber. For additional information, visit the website, email or call the office or Hartford’s delegate to the ECFiber Governing Board. Website: www.ECFiber.net |Twitter: @ecfibernet |Office: (802) 763-2262 | Email: support@ecfiber.net Delegates: F. X. Flinn 802.369.0069 | fxflinn@gmail.com; Alan Johnson ajohnson@hartford-vt.org

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ENERGY COMMISSION The Hartford Energy Commission (HEC) was established in 2007 to promote energy conservation, energy efficiency, and the use of renewable energy resources in municipal affairs and among the Town's residents and businesses. We are primarily guided by Chapter X of the Town Master Plan. The year was marked by a number of transitions in membership and functions within the Commission. The Commission thanks Alan Johnson for his founding leadership; Luke Eastman, Gary Schaal, and Peggy Richardson for their membership and service; Becca White for being an active and effective liaison with the Selectboard; and Sarah Simonds Brock (Vital Communities) for her long term volunteer contributions to the business and planning functions of HEC. We welcome Cathy Geiger, Peggy Allen, and Erik Krauss as new members, Alan Johnson as Selectboard liaison, and Martha McDaniel as Chair. Lynn Bohi continues her long term service as clerk of the commission. Over the past year, the Energy Commission members, Town staff, and liaisons have been busy in many ways. 1. Seeking, receiving, and using grants from external sources • Accepted for participation in the Community Energy Efficiency Campaign 6-month pilot project (July 1 – December 31, 2016) to provide in-town Efficiency Vermont energy experts for consultation with Hartford businesses, residents, and schools. Funded through Efficiency Vermont and the VT Agency of Commerce and Community Development/Designated Downtown Program. • Funding from Green Mountain Power for an electric vehicle charging station in downtown White River Junction, conditioned on creating new solar power to supply it. 2. Advocating for, seeking, and hiring short-term energy consultant for Hartford • Interim Town Manager and Selectboard combined FY ’15 and FY’16 funds to enable hiring expert help for specified energy planning and implementation projects; Vermont Electric Investment Company (VEIC) chosen. 3. Conducting planning activities • Completed strategic planning process for HEC, confirming the importance of including residents’ energy efficiency in the scope of HEC activities; and will document completed projects for future reference. • With the help of our VEIC consultants, began process of developing a 5-year and longer term comprehensive energy plans for the Town. • Began responding to drafts of the regional energy plan from the Two Rivers Ottauquechee Regional Commission. • Monitored statewide Vermont energy-related developments, including the grassroots campaign concerning the possibility of instituting a Vermont tax on carbon pollution, and the passage of Act 174 (including siting of renewable energy generating projects); attended Vermont Energy and Climate Action Network annual meeting 4. Completing and implementing recommendations from Town building energy audits • Extensive energy auditing of the Bugbee Senior Center and Public Safety Building completed and discussed with Efficiency Vermont Field Representative and VEIC consultants, to plan for future implementation of the recommendations; this information will be included in Town budgeting process. 5. Beginning work on modifications to the HEC pages on the Town website so more user-friendly for residents interested in reducing their personal energy consumption. 6. Sending letter of thanks to Hunter Rieseberg for his service to the Town, and special interest in / focus on energy conservation and generation of renewable power. 7. Conveying HEC interest in collaboration with School District on matters of energy conservation. 8. Sponsoring energy information tables at Town events (Town Hall open house celebration, “Solar Show and Tell”, and Hartford Community Coalition block party). 9. Participating in development of Vital Communities’ “Weatherize Upper Valley” pilot project. 10. Exploring reducing the number of seats on HEC from 7 to 5. The Committee extends special thanks to Lori Hirshfield, Director of Planning and Development, for her expert and dedicated support and direction of HEC activities. Submitted from the Commission members and participants at the end of FY ’16: Martha McDaniel, chair Peggy Allen Alan Johnson, Selectboard liaison Erik Krauss, vice chair Cathy Geiger Karen Douville, Conservation Commission liaison Lynn Bohi, clerk 99


GREEN MOUNTAIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION On behalf of the Board of Directors of GMEDC, I would like to thank the Town of Hartford again for supporting us over the years. We continue to look for ways to help the 30 towns in our district in a manner they find responsive to their needs and consistent with their expressed goals and objectives. Our primary purpose is to increase the employment options, tax base, housing stock and overall economic vitality in our communities. We are proud that GMEDC remains a well-respected and highly effective Regional Development Corporation (RDC). Through collaboration with the 11 other RDCs across the state, the Agency of Commerce and Community Development (ACCD), our Small Business Development Center (SBDC) Business Advisor who shares our office, Two Rivers Regional Commission (TRORC) and a multitude of state and federal officials, elected representatives and their staff, we have access to a vast array of resources. Vermont remains a small state which allows us to know who to deal with in order to get something important done. Below is a sampling of our recent accomplishments and ongoing projects to illustrate the range of assignments we get involved with.

GMEDC agreed to purchase the former Twin State Fertilizer property in Bradford, an abandoned, contaminated Brownfields site adjacent to Farm Way. With funds provided by Farm Way, we took title on their behalf and with TRORC’s partnership, we obtained a $200,000 EPA grant to remediate the property. GMEDC applied for and received local permits for an expansion of the Farm Way complex. As soon as the remediation phase was complete, we sold the property to them for $1. Farm Way was then able to proceed with construction of a 20,000sf addition on a “clean site”. In less than 12 months, GMEDC eliminated an environmental hazard and transformed a blighted property into a productive asset for a thriving Vermont employer as well as the taxpayers of Bradford.

Other Brownfields projects are underway in Hartford and Newbury using Farm Way as the model. Elsewhere, GMEDC is providing guidance to other RDCs with similar assignments. We are always available to discuss participation in remediation projects for private individuals, companies and municipalities in our district. •

GMEDC recently partnered with the COHASE Chamber of Commerce and the Working Lands Group at ACCD to sponsor a public forum in Bradford, in response to the unfortunate market pressures affecting the forestry industry. Following a presentation from a panel of industry experts (forester, saw mill operator, land owner and a power plant chip purchaser) over 100 participants spent the afternoon sharing problems, future issues and possible solutions. Careful planning resulted in the event being well received and extremely productive. Our kick off forum is leading to subsequent meetings, introductions and participation well beyond GMEDC’s territory.

GMEDC assisted Maponics, a growing software company in White River Junction, with their desire to remain here in lieu of moving to New Hampshire. We helped them prepare a grant application for the Vermont Employment Growth Initiative Program (VEGI) which was successful and ultimately became a deciding factor. GMEDC provided additional VEGI support to VERMOD in Hartford, GW Plastics in Bethel and South Royalton and Britton Lumber in Fairlee following the loss of their sawmill. A new application is underway for a manufacturing business in Hartland.

Great effort is being expended by GMEDC to provide support for development of effective Work Force Education and Training curricula for high school students. The need is acute for qualified workers in all technical fields and we are sponsoring discussion on a statewide level with local, state and federal officials. Our goal is to directly benefit our three Regional Technical Centers in Randolph, Hartford and Bradford in partnership with Vermont Technical College (VTC) and prepare Vermont’s young students for well-paying careers at companies in our district. You will be made aware of our progress as we proceed and public participation is most welcome. This is an extremely important issue for all of us.

In closing I would like to respectfully ask for your support again. The fees for membership in GMEDC are based on a formula of $.50 per capita, using population estimates from the VT Department of Health and the U.S.

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Census Bureau. As of 2014, Hartford had an estimated population of 9,829, so this year’s membership would total $4,914.50. We have a most active relationship with Hartford which we value and appreciate. Thank you for your consideration. Best regards,

Robert E. Haynes, Jr. Executive Director

HARTFORD BUSINESS REVOLVING LOAN FUND (HBRLF) The Town of Hartford received a Rural Development Grant from the State of Vermont in 1985 to assist Catamount Brewery with start-up funds to locate its facility within downtown White River Junction. Under the Grant, Catamount’s repayments were earmarked to fund the Hartford Business Revolving Loan Fund (HBRLF). In 1994, an additional $300,000 was secured from a Special Purpose Grant received through the assistance of Senator Patrick Leahy. In 1986, the Town of Hartford Selectboard appointed the HBRLF Committee, who later adopted guidelines for the Fund. The current committee members are Kevin Raleigh, Chair, Dennis Driscoll, Vice Chair, Frank Klymn and Steve Geiger. Green Mountain Economic Development Corporation (GMEDC) markets and administers the Fund, works with prospective borrowers with the Vermont Small Business Development Center (VtSBDC), receives loan applications, reviews and prepares summary analyses and presents the applications to the Committee. The HBRLF Committee then reviews the applications for potential job creation and benefits to the town of Hartford, determines credit worthiness, sets loan conditions and makes recommendations to the Selectboard for their approval. Generally, loans are made available to businesses in Hartford that need capital but find it difficult to secure traditional bank financing. As of June 30, 2016 the loan amounts range from $20,000 to $100,000 for terms of 510 years. The current interest rate is 5.25%. Since loan approvals began in February 1990, HBRLF loans have been given to Hartford businesses totaling $1,402,000.00, and have been combined to total of $24,116,398.00 in financing for these businesses and their respective projects. In addition, the HBRLF has been responsible for creating 77 start-up jobs, retaining 200 jobs and creating 166 additional new jobs for existing Hartford businesses. As of June 30, 2016, the HBRLF has five loans with balances of $141,712.00, and $176,513.00 available to loan. In fiscal year 2015-2016, one loan was paid off (River City Machine), and two were charged off as noncollectable. As of 6/30/16, one new loan was approved for a start-up restaurant, with closing set for October (Piecemeal Pies). Submitted by GMEDC on behalf of HBRLF.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION The Commission assists individuals, businesses, and organizations in the preservation and appropriate reuse of historic structures within the Town. Hartford is one of fourteen Certified Local Governments (CLG) designated by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. As a CLG, Hartford is eligible for assistance and funding through the Division. Formed in February 1993, the purpose of the Commission is to: create and maintain a system to survey and inventory historic properties within Hartford; review nominations of properties that are under consideration for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places; seek and prepare applications for funding for preservation activities; advise and assist individuals, Boards, and Commissions on matters relating to the preservation of historic resources; and perform additional responsibilities as required. During the past year ending June 30, 2016, the Hartford Historic Preservation Commission has undertaken the following preservation activities: 101


• • • • • • • • • • •

Completed Phase II of the Historic Sites and Structures Survey for Hartford (Certified Local Government grant) which focused on buildings constructed between the 1920s and 1950s. Completed the Advent Meeting Grounds Historic District Nomination (Certified Local Government grant). Received Certified Local Government grant funding to undertake the update of the White River Junction Historic District Nomination which was last updated in 2002. Attended the Annual Vermont Historic Preservation/Downtown Conference in Waterbury. Participated in the nomination of the Hartford Town Hall for a Vermont historic preservation award. Participated in meetings regarding the planned renovations to the Jericho Schoolhouse. Participated in discussions regarding the Downtown Assisted Living Project. Participated in meetings and discussions regarding maintenance of historic churches in Hartford. Participated in discussions regarding maintenance of town cemeteries. Participated in discussions regarding repairs to the West Hartford Library. Participated in discussions regarding the development of a Demolition Ordinance.

The Commission consists of a maximum of five members, each of whom serves a three-year term. Members are chosen for their interest, knowledge, or professional skills in the areas of history, architecture, archaeology, historic preservation, American studies, architectural history, anthropology, planning or related subjects. The Commission continues to encourage and assist in the preservation of the unique historic and architectural features in all of the five villages and outlying areas of the Town of Hartford. Citizens are urged to suggest potential preservation projects for future consideration to the Commission or its coordinator. Commission members include Susanne Walker Abetti, Roy Black, Robin Adair Logan, Pat Stark and Chair Jonathan Schechtman. If you have questions or comments for the Commission, please contact Planner, Matt Osborn who can be reached at 295-3075 or mosborn@hartford-vt.org

HARTFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY The Hartford Historical Society, founded in 1987, is a non-profit, educational institution deriving its income from donations, a town appropriation, membership dues and a variety of fundraising events. We welcome and encourage all Hartford residents and history enthusiasts to join this flourishing volunteer organization. Our Curatorial Staff, directed by Pat Stark and Martha Knapp continues to receive artifacts, photographs, historical documents, and maps. Staff members from the Hartford Community Restorative Justice Center assist greatly with cataloging, photographing and record keeping. Our 2016 regularly-scheduled programs included “Remembering Ralph Lehman” on April 13th by John Clerkin; “History of West Hartford” by Cameron Clifford on June 8; “Arming the Union: Vermont Gunmakers and the Technology that Shaped America” by Carrie Brown, Ph.D. on September 14; and “Growing Up in Wilder” on November 9 by Roy Black. Special events this past year included our Annual Yard Sale Fundraiser that was held on July 2-3 where we raised $2,700 – our most successful yard sale to date. On July 4th, we held a very special event honoring the first recipient of the Hartford Cane, Walter O. Morancy, former Hartford Fire Chief, at the age of 96. (This event attracted many current and former members of the Fire Department, and was reported in the Valley News. Shortly thereafter, Chief Morancy passed away, so we are even more grateful to have honored him when we did.) On July 10, a presentation of Architect Louis Sheldon Newton came to the Garipay House, after being held at the South Royalton Library. And once again, the Theron Boyd Homestead in Quechee was opened to the public on July 23, bringing a large and enthusiastic crowd. August 6 brought an Ice Cream Social, sponsored by the Hartford Historical Society and Hartford Library, for neighborhood children (and adults) who played croquet, corn hole, Chinese jump rope and other games. The weekend of September 10-11 brought the “Glory Days of the Railroad” celebration in White River Junction, which featured our always-appreciated historical displays and memorabilia. And to end another very full year on a high note, on December 10, an expanded “Old Fashioned Village Christmas Celebration” was highly anticipated after the previous year’s success, partnering with the Hartford Library, the House of Seven Gables, and the Greater Hartford United Church of Christ.

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We continue to work with the Hartford School District to make sure future generations will become good stewards of our history. Martha Knapp continues to visit local schools with traveling exhibits and also entertains classes at the Garipay House throughout the year as they discover their Town’s history. The Garipay House in Hartford Village features permanent displays of items from the town's history and has a substantial research and reference center whose materials have tripled since consolidating most of the Society's collections from the Municipal Building. We are open Mon-Fri from 9 am to 1 pm (please call ahead in winter months) to make our museum available to visitors, researchers and students. A couple of new additions to items for sale in our shop include: “History of the White River Paper Company, 1881-2014” (for which its author Tammy Ladd, at the previous year’s October meeting of the League of Local Historical Societies and Museums, earned an Award of Merit for the Society, presented by ex-Governor Jim Douglas); and, a selection of delightful woven rag rugs made on our historic old barn loom by Kristy O'Meara. Monthly meetings of the Board of Directors are held at the Garipay House, and Open Houses are offered during the warmer months. Our Newsletter is published six times a year, and in color through generous donors from the community. Please be sure to check out our website, www.hartfordhistory.org, which includes our events calendar, photographs, and many interesting links including genealogy. Rotating history displays are regularly put up at the Bugbee Senior Center, the Municipal Building and the Hartford, Quechee, and Wilder Post Offices. The Genealogy Center, located upstairs in the Hartford Library, is open Mondays 1:30-3:30 pm and Thursdays 4-6 pm or by appointment. The Center is full of newspaper articles, obituaries, marriages and various things all arranged alphabetically to assist those researching their families. The Landmark Newspaper is available on microfilm. With the Hartford Historic Preservation Commission, the Oral History Program is administered and maintained through this Society. We have over 120 tapes in the collection; however there have been many citizens who died before their stories could be recorded. If you have an interest in this project, please contact the HHS or HHPC as soon as possible. As this is being written, the Hartford Historical Society is working to acquire the historic Elks Club/Pease Mansion in Hartford village, as we are literally bursting at the seams in the Garipay House. As this project continues to evolve, we will work hard to bring the Hartford Historical Society forward – and be forward-looking in our promotion of the irreplaceable remaining historical resources of this important Town in Vermont’s history. As ever, we want to welcome more and more members of the community to stop by the Garipay House, become members of this growing organization, and explore our Town’s fascinating past with us. Susanne Abetti, President and Mary Nadeau, Chair

PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION The Hartford Parks and Recreation Department is nationally accredited by the Commission for Accreditation of Parks and Recreation Agencies. The Commission consults with and advises the director of Parks and Recreation in matters affecting recreation programs; park/facility related projects, policies and finances. The Commission assists in the development of long-range planning for recreation and park needs in the community. The Commission works hard on making sure they follow the Parks and Recreation mission which is a follows: To serve the need of the community through quality parks and facilities, and by offering lifelong learning through recreational and cultural programs. In 2016 one of the main projects the Commission completed was a fact-finding mission examining the duplication of services between the Parks and Recreation Department and the School District, mainly centered on athletic facilities. The Commission considered each park and facility available in the Town of Hartford, compiled a list of athletic fields, considered which fields were used by school teams and which were used by town teams, and made recommendations to Parks and Recreation for next steps. The Parks and Recreation department continues to do great work on a tight budget. It brings in money to support the cost of a local park system that enhances all of the Town of Hartford’s villages. The Maxfield Complex is an excellent facility that has continued to grow. This summer saw the inaugural season of the Upper Valley 103


Nighthawks baseball team. In the fall, the facility was full of soccer with teams of all ages. In the spring we will see the return of baseball and lacrosse. The wide variety of activities offered to the community at Maxfield and around the Town of Hartford is a credit to the Parks and Recreation Department’s hard work and professionalism.

PLANNING COMMISSION The Hartford Planning Commission is authorized by Title 24 of the Vermont Statutes, Chapter 117 to: prepare a master plan and amendments; propose and administer the Zoning and Subdivision Regulations; undertake studies and make recommendations on land development issues; recommend codes and enforcement procedures; prepare capital budgets and programs; participate in regional planning issues; enter and examine properties; and work with other departments and agencies on planning issues. Seven Commissioners are appointed by the Selectboard to fill four-year terms. The Commission holds public hearings on all proposed subdivisions, planned developments, and zoning and master plan amendments. In addition, the Commission conducts reviews of site plans for all new or altered uses except one or two family dwellings and their related structures, home occupations, home businesses, agricultural and forestry uses and essential services. Applications increased from twenty two (22) in Fiscal Year 2015 to twenty four (24) in Fiscal Year 2016. These applications included seven (7) Subdivisions, fourteen (14) Site Plans, two (2) Planned Developments and one (1)!Planned Development Amendment. Significant applications that were approved (but may not have been constructed yet) included an 88 unit Planned Residential Development on Sykes Mountain Avenue, an 80 room Assisted Living Facility on the corner of Currier Street and Gates Street, an 11,181 sq. ft. commercial building (medical clinic and office) on Prospect Street, an 18,800 sq. ft. mixed use building on the corner of Bridge Street and North Main Street, a 2,552 sq. ft. restaurant (Dunkin’ Donuts) on North Hartland Road, a 9,491 sq. ft. addition to the Upper Valley Aquatic Center, an 8,800 sq. ft. Contractor’s Yard and Shop on Route 14, and the conversion of a 18,220 sq. ft. commercial building to a 36 unit multi-family dwelling. In Fiscal Year 2017, the Commission will work with the Regional Planning Commission on the Regional Land Use Plan, Energy Plan, and changes to the Master Plan to reflect new State energy requirements. The Commission members encourage residents to meet with them whenever they have concerns about land use issues in Hartford, as well as to attend Planning Commission meetings, hearings and workshops. Public Hearing dates and agendas are available on the Town’s website (www.hartford-vt.org) or by contacting the Hartford Department of Planning and Development Services at (802) 295-3075. Bruce Riddle; Chair, John Reid; Vice Chair, Peter Merrill; Clerk, Robin Adair Logan, Toby Dayman, Quinn Colgan, Jacques Harlow

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TOWN AND SCHOOL MEETING COMMITTEE (HTSMC) The principal goals of the HTSMC are to increase voter awareness about the town meeting process, increase the amount of information available to citizens, improve the quality of meetings, and serve the town, school district and town clerk by managing the process of drafting calendars of events, planning meeting space and setup, drafting meeting agendas, and executing tasks related to the meetings such as presentation preparation, publicity, and speaker coordination. Four meetings were held during the 2016 Town Meeting Cycle for which the HTSMC took responsibility to publicize and organize: Budget Discussion/Candidates Night on Feb 22, Community Day/Roundtable Discussion on Feb 27, and the Annual Floor Meeting on Mar 26. Press releases were prepared and sent out prior to each meeting. A poster distribution assignment list was created for 75-100 posters to be displayed in local businesses. The Recreation Department included information on the Town Meeting in its winter flyer that went home with students in all three elementary schools. Valley News transaction ads, the drive-in sign at the WRJct McDonalds and the Hartford ListServe, CATV and town website were also venues that were used in getting the word out. The town’s Constant Contact account was used to remind citizens of each meeting as well. The principal expenses are for the town wide mailing, A/V for the meetings, the Voting Day road signs, and the posters for each meeting. This year a significant amount was saved on the road signs by using decals to change the dates. Expenses have been about $5,300 each year for the past 4 years. F. X. Flinn, Chair; Bill Mann, Vice-Chair; David Briggs, Clerk 30 June 2016

TREE BOARD Mission: To plant and maintain public trees and advocate for community tree stewardship. Goals: • Partner with other state, regional and local boards, commissions, and agencies. • Keep Tree City status. • Educate general public and tree board about trees. • Foster neighborhood and village pride. • Generate income for tree planting and maintenance. Actions: • Conducted three tree identification walks at Hartford High School in March, around White River Junction in July, and at Ratcliff Park in September. • Maintained designation as a Tree City USA. • Obtained a grant to print and frame posters of the tree board logo. Sold t-shirts and posters with the logo. • Cooperated with the tree warden and Emerald Ash Borer first responders. • Maintained tree board library at the municipal building. • Planted Sycamore Tree at the West Hartford Library. • Established internet contact list to inform public of events. Thank you to Northern Nursery for their support. Meetings are every third Tuesday of the month at 6:00 pm at the municipal Building, and citizens are invited to participate. Members: Deborah Milne-Chair, Sarah Oertly-Vice Chair, Diane Romano-Secretary, Carole Haehnel-Treasurer, Clare Forseth, Karen Watson, and Tim Covell. Respectfully Submitted, Diane Romano

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TREE WARDEN When I identify myself as Hartford’s Tree Warden, the question invariably comes up, “Tree Warden, what does a Tree Warden do?” Maybe it isn’t so obvious, we see trees everywhere, they seem fine by all outward appearances, but the Tree Warden’s role is actually very clear. As Vermont’s Urban & Community Forestry program explains it: “Vermont’s picturesque town greens and tree lined streets are not accidental. These green spaces are often the result of deliberate planning, planting and care through a town’s tree warden.” Perhaps it’s also important to note that the Tree Warden’s role is concerned with trees in public spaces, not private property. For me, there are two aspects of this. One is safety and the other is value. The two are closely related. Safety, especially with big trees, is often a function of early maintenance. When a tree is young, its growth characteristics can be guided so that it achieves high value as a mature tree. The costs are “front loaded” in that a small effort early on yields major benefits later however, the obverse is also true; a little bit of neglect early on yields major liabilities later; it could be said that neglect creates a negative value. When early interventions in our public green-spaces create positive value, this leads to increased private investment. All of us benefit. In 2016, as in previous years, we (Public Works, Parks & Recreation, utility contractors and I) addressed numerous trees presenting safety concerns. In the upcoming year, I’m hoping to initiate a program addressing younger trees and new plantings through selective pruning and maintenance. The work will lower future costs and enhance our public greenways, corridors, parks and schools and—our community in general. Respectfully, James B. Goedkoop, Hartford Tree Warden

TWO RIVERS OTTAQUECHEE REGIONAL COMMISSION (TRORC) The Two Rivers-Ottauquechee Regional Commission is an association of thirty municipalities in east-central Vermont that is governed by a Board of Representatives appointed by each of our member towns. As advocates for our member towns, we seek to articulate a vision for building a thriving regional economy while enhancing the region’s quality of life. Our staff provides technical services to local, state and federal levels of government and to the Region’s citizens, non-profits, and businesses. The following are highlights from 2016: Technical Assistance In 2016, TRORC staff assisted numerous towns with revisions to municipal plans, ranging from minor updates to comprehensive, substantive overhauls. A number of our towns incorporated a new flood resiliency element that is required for all plans adopted after July 2014. Many towns have improved and clarified implementing regulations, easing permitting by making results more predictable. Collaborative efforts to improve town plans, zoning, and other ordinances demonstrate a regional commitment to foster vibrant, resilient towns and villages. Emergency Management & Preparedness Our LEPC #12 efforts with local emergency responders and town officials continue across the region. With TRORC’s help, all thirty member towns successfully completed annual updates to Local Emergency Operations Plans, which are critical components to disaster response efforts. Further, we have been working diligently with numerous TRORC towns to update Hazard Mitigation Plans, often in tandem with the remaining TS Irene property buy-outs in the region. Regional Energy Plan With funding from the Vermont Department of Public service, TRORC is drafting a Regional Energy Implementation Plan outlining a total energy pathway to implement the goals and policies of the Vermont Comprehensive Energy Plan at the regional level. The Plan sets regional targets for specific energy conservation, generation and fuel switching strategies to help the state meet 90% of energy needs from renewable sources by 2050. The Plan outlines specific strategies for conservation, energy efficiency and reduced use of fossil fuels and identifies regional energy resources and areas with potential for renewable energy projects. TRORC will work with a number of towns on Enhanced Energy Plans that meet the new state standards and recommendations.

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Transportation Transportation infrastructure and public transit services are integral components to safety and growth. We continue to work with towns on grants to enhance our roadways, inventory infrastructure, establish new park and ride locations, and make downtowns and village centers more accessible and pedestrian-friendly. We also have continued sponsoring Transportation Advisory Committee meetings and facilitating meetings with our region’s road foremen. Specifically in Hartford this year, we assisted with updating and managing the highway timesheet program for the Department of Public Works and conducted speed counts in seven locations for Fairview Terrace. TRORC assisted with two reuse projects under the Irene Buyout Program and provided grant administration for the Bridge and Main Housing Project downtown. TRORC was also able to provide a letter of support for the Transportation Alternative Grant application for enhanced funding for the Sykes Mountain Avenue roundabout projects. We are committed to serving you, and welcome opportunities to assist you in the future. Respectfully submitted, Peter G. Gregory, AICP, Executive Director William B. Emmons, III, Chairperson, Pomfret

WELCOME CENTER The White River Junction Welcome Center at Union Station operates as a State Information Center within the Agency of Administration Buildings and Services Division. There are only two Downtown Information Centers in the state – White River Junction and Montpelier. Funds to manage the Center come from a small state legislative appropriation, the Town of Hartford, and donations to the Center from visitors. Our visitors come from all over the world. The visitor count in 2015 was 20,766; in 2016, the count was 23,291 an increase of over 3,000! This is evidence that travelers seeking information are following the blue signs off the interstates or can access GPS for the Center's location. We are open every day, 10:00a.m. – 5:00p.m. offering information about state and area attractions, businesses, road conditions, maps, driving directions, events near and far, scenic byways, business displays, free WI-Fi, and, of course, the restrooms. Children enjoy our train table and daily wide screen TV movie (usually focusing on railroads). Travelers can purchase coffee, snacks, cold beverages, Vermont cheese, maple syrup, maple popcorn and maple candy as well as train-related puzzles and toys, post cards and T-shirts. Area attractions display posters promoting dated events! and! special activities while focusing on theater performances, music and dance, history of the area, recreation, galleries, shopping and restaurants. The Welcome Center/Union Station is home to the annual Hartford Polar Express. In 2016, this event brought over 3,000 passengers to Union Station for two days of excitement to usher in the Holiday Season. This event is sponsored by the White River Rotary Club with the assistance of the Town of Hartford Recreation Department. In September, the annual Glory Days of the Railroad festival is held at the same site. The expansion to a twoday event has brought more attendees and has given the downtown another opportunity to promote itself to a broader audience. In September, the Town of Hartford acquired the management contract for the Amtrak Station. This contract calls for coverage sixty minutes before train time and ninety minutes after train departure (morning and evening). The majority of that coverage is done by Chris McKinley, Phil Rentz, Carole Haehnel and Michelle Coughlin. However, Friday-Monday, Center employees do double duty by covering the Center and the Amtrak Station, morning and evening. The Agency of Transportation, owners of the property, have been very supportive of this arrangement for some time. Our most important asset is the staff – Mary Gaylord, Peter and Janet Hughes. They are loyal, dependable, knowledgeable and take their work very seriously. Visits from local businesses and organizations are always welcome. We are most appreciative of the Hartford Career and Technology's Center continued involvement in the Center. Human Resource Center students, and young adults from other area programs assist in multiple tasks including

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brochure placement, cleaning, and taking inventory. We have been associated with these programs for many years and thoroughly enjoy the young adults, students and their coaches. As you can see, the Welcome Center and Railroad Station continue to be a vital focal point for White River Junction's continuing revitalization. It is our hope that the future will bring more interest in the property and create a hub of activity. Gayle Ottmann, Manager Welcome Center

ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT The Hartford Zoning Board of Adjustment is authorized by the Vermont Planning and Development Act (Act 24 V.S.A., Chapter 117) and its bylaws, to receive, hear and render decisions on applications regarding appeals to decisions of the Zoning Administrative Officer, setback waivers and variances from area and dimensional requirements and conditional use applications as outlined in the statutes. The Zoning Board of Adjustment meets with the Planning Commission periodically to discuss zoning issues, participate in bylaw amendments and various planning activities related to zoning. Zoning permits are required prior to the initiation of land development as defined in the Hartford Zoning Regulations. The Zoning Administrative Officer forwards applications for conditional use approval, setback waivers, variances and appeals to the Zoning Board of Adjustment. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law are written based on the specific circumstances of each case and review criteria established by the statutes. Applicants and interested parties have the right to appeal adverse decisions of the Zoning Board of Adjustment to the Vermont Environmental Court. Zoning Board of Adjustment applications decreased from seventeen (17) in Fiscal Year 2015 to fourteen (14) in Fiscal Year 2016. These applications included 2 (two) Setback Waivers and twelve (12) Conditional Uses. Significant applications that were approved (but may have not begun construction) included an 11,181 sq. ft. commercial building (medical clinic and office) on Prospect Street, a 9,491 sq. ft. addition to the Upper Valley Aquatic Center, and an 8,800 sq. ft. Contractor’s Yard and Shop on Route 14. The Board is a five member quasi-judicial body. The Board members encourage residents to meet with them about land use issues in Hartford, as well as to attend Board meetings, hearings and workshops. Public Hearing dates and agendas are available on the Town’s website (www.hartford-vt.org) or by contacting the Hartford Department of Planning and Development Services at (802) 295-3075. Steve Lagasse, Chair Chris Lowe, Vice Chair Frank Gado, Clerk Alice Maleski Tom Franklin 50 40 30 20 10 0 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 Applications

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HARTFORD VILLAGE PUBLIC LIBRARY Story Hours: Tues and Thurs 10 am. Website: www.hartfordvtlibrary.org

Hours: Mon, Tues, and Thurs: 9 am to 6 pm; Wed and Fri: 12 pm to 6 pm; Sat 9 am to noon.

During fiscal year 2015-2016 there were 13,486 visits to the Hartford Library. 24,352 items circulated. This reflects an 11% increase in circulation over the previous year. The Hartford Library continues to offer an expanding collection of fiction, non-fiction, large print books, DVD’s, and audiobooks. Digital resources include Listen Up! Vermont and One Click Digital for downloadable audios and ebooks; Universal Class for online learning, and Heritage Quest and Infotrac databases. Outreach services are provided to four senior housing communities, homebound individuals, day care centers, and to the reading room at the Mahijo Yata building in downtown White River Jct. Our programs for children include two weekly story hours for preschoolers, a bi-weekly reading club for 7-12 year-olds, a summer reading program, and an annual Halloween story time party. 124 children participated in the “On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!” summer reading program in 2016, reading a total of 2,757 books. We would like to thank the Upper Valley Aquatic Center for providing swim passes as incentives for our young readers. Our adult programs over the past year included monthly financial discussions with Megan Sather, a Vermont Humanities Speakers Bureau Program, a Northern Stage workshop, a flower arranging workshop, a monthly book discussion group, and an adult summer reading program. The Hartford Historical Society’s Genealogy Resource Center is located upstairs at the Hartford Library. The Library and the Historical Society collaborated on two very successful events in 2015/2016. The “Old Fashioned Village Christmas” event in December drew over 100 people and in August we concluded the summer reading program with an ice cream social and lawn games at the Garipay House. There are plans to make these family programs annual events. Nadine Hodgdon, Librarian; Deborah Milne, Assistant Librarian; Deborah Josselyn, Library Clerk; Michelle Perkins, Reading Room Library Clerk. Trustees: Lorna Ricard, Phyllis Bettis, Mary Booth-Benton, Carole Haehnel, Lani Janisse, and Martha Knapp

WEST HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY & COMMUNITY CENTER Hours: Mon. 2pm -8pm, Tues. & Thurs. 9am6pm (closed 12-1pm), Wed. 10am-7pm (closed 12-1pm), Fri. & Sun. Closed, Sat. 10am – 1pm.

Telephone: 295-7992 Email: westhartford@vals.state.vt.us westhartfordlibraryvt@gmail.com

February 18, 2015, the West Hartford Library (WHL) officially reopened after being closed during the aftermath of Hurricane Irene and rebuilding of the library. Hours were extended in June 2015 to 33 with Sandra Cary as librarian (M 2-8, T & TH 9-12 1-6, W 10-12 1-7, S 10-1). During the 2015-16 fiscal year we organized and decorated our renewed community library with new shelving, new and used books, new computers, community room, and a welcoming atmosphere. Spring 2016, three new board members, Harry Dorman, Judy Roberts, and Jeff Moreno joined Tom Hazen and John Newton. The WHL worked hard to rebuild our patronage with 5825 attendees, an increase over 3531 from the previous full-budget year statistics of 08-09. Our circulation of books, audios, DVDs, magazines, and music totaled 5981 items. Highlights of budget year 2015-16 include a Halloween party hosted by the Friends of the WHL, varied usage of our community room during and after library hours (740), welcoming Appalachian Trail hikers, children over the age of nine getting off the bus after school and spending quality time here by themselves, summer reading programs, books, shelving and money donated by the community helping the WHL succeed despite the looming budgetary cuts of 2016-17. We at the WHL are proud of our accomplishments and celebrated our success with a West Hartford Village Party and fund-raising barbecue on August 13th with the community at large. This was a collective event organized by 109


patrons, sponsors, villagers, the Friends of WHL, the board, and the librarian. It was also a culmination of our summer reading program for adults and children with the Southern VT Natural History Museum giving a live animal presentation. We estimate that over 250 members of the community attended over the course of the day before being rained out. This October will see the Friends of the WHL hosting a Chili Cook-Off fundraiser on the 21st . This will be followed by the annual Halloween Party on the 22nd with a costume parade, trunk or treat, and a very scary hayride into the woods after dark. The WHL will continue to strive to be successful and to shine a beacon in this village of West Hartford. Come join us and be a part of the West Hartford Library & Community Center.

QUECHEE PUBLIC LIBRARY Library Hours: MWF, 10-6, T,Th, 2-7, Sat. 9-2. Telephone & Fax: 295-1232. Web page: www.quecheelibrary.org

Storytime: Wed. at 10 a.m. E-mail: quelibra@sover.net Facebook page: Facebook.com/qwlibraries

Over 40,000 items circulated this past year and over 1800 people attended 130 programs that ranged from the monthly sci fi and mystery discussions, to two Vermont Humanities Council discussion series, Fear No Labor (originating here) and Hard Look at America, to literally scores of children’s programs. Friday Folk Time is a new regular series for children aged six and above. Lego Club remains very popular as do the Friends’ holiday workshops. Our “story walks” are becoming a new tradition. Many children learn to love the library through Wednesday story times and the Tuesday summer programs for older kids. Young adults gravitate to their area downstairs. Joining the statewide courier system for interlibrary loans is proving a good decision for us as net lenders, but also particularly helpful for borrowing multiple copies of titles for our book groups. Vermont Reads grants always inspire a series of programs. Last year’s books about the Shackleton expedition led to a photography program among others. Steve Gordon’s evening at the library to discuss Let’s Talk About Death will surely lead to follow-up conversations. Hosting Howard Frank Mosher was again an honor and delight. Needleworkers gather weekly upstairs on Tuesday evenings in the cooler months, joined this year by a younger group in the children’s room. New flooring downstairs transformed the meeting/program room this past year, and another fundraising campaign is ongoing to similarly brighten the main floor by replacing its 20 year-old carpet. Public computers and wireless access at fiber optic speeds, tech advice for downloading, a community puzzle table, racks of periodicals and newspapers, and, this year, many chess sets are all values that don’t readily show in statistics but elicit a full library on many a day. Most electronic acquisitions are made through consortia membership. Stay informed of all this through our website or by emailing a request for our monthly electronic newsletters. Extended offsite service continues with drop off and pick up boxes at the Upper Valley Coop, day care visits, and monthly book discussions at the Bugbee Senior Center as well as a rotating book collection there. An ongoing booksale continues downstairs at the library year-round and expands during the Balloon Festival and fall foliage season. Friends, led by Jo Allsopp and Ann DeLoach, and scores of volunteers work inside and out of the library. All town residents and visitors are welcome to join the Quechee/Wilder Libraries community and take advantage of a wide but selective collection, including dvds, books, cds, and attraction passes, and an array of diverse programs. Library Director: Kate Schaal; Assistant Librarian: Marieke Sperry; Tech Services Librarian: Linda Labriola. Trustees: David Izzo, Merrilyn Tatarczuch-Koff, Brian Chaboyer, William Eastwood, Kathleen Hickey, James Schmidt, Katie McCarthy.

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WILDER CLUB & PUBLIC LIBRARY Hours: Tues. 10-1, Wed, Th, Fri, 2-6, Sat. 10-1 Telephone and Fax: 295-6341 Website: www.quecheelibary.com

Storytime: Tuesdays at 10 a.m. Facebook page: Facebook.com/qwlibraries Email: wilder@quecheelibrary.org

From awe-struck 8 year olds confronting dinosaur props in the main hall to electronic-devoted teens on the porch to needleworkers meeting on a wintry eve, the Wilder Club and Library once again lived up to its 19th Century benefactor’s vision of a community center. The library remains the building’s heart, efficiently open 18 hours a week with an online 24/7 presence. A “free books” shelf in the hallway, fiber optic internet with wireless access for all, and frequent building use for various groups and programs keeps the clubhouse door open far more often. These multi-uses were rewarded this year by a Vermont Cultural Facilities Grant, a Mascoma Savings Foundation Grant and Byrne Foundation grant for an air conditioning system for the hall. It will make private rentals and all programs far more appealing for summer comfort and will also add to heat efficiency in the winter. Our Vermont Reads participation again this year brought special programming; a highlight was the Vermont Humanities Council’s sponsorship of author Jennifer Armstrong’s visit to the clubhouse in April to talk of the famed Shackleton expedition. Shared Quechee/Wilder Libraries circulation statistics of over 40,000 items suggest the excellent use made by patrons of the nearly daily delivery of requested books and dvds that supplement the standing and rotating collections. From anywhere patrons can access the online catalog to browse over 50 VOKAL libraries’ titles and then make requests. Digital resources on the website include Mango for foreign language instruction, Universal Class on hundreds of topics, ListenUp and OneClick for audio and e-books. Marieke Sperry delights children with Tuesday storytimes and many holiday and summer programs, as well as a Lego Club. The Friends’ holiday ornament making workshop the first week of each December draws dozens of families. The hall continues to serve many community groups and private parties. Rental fees contribute to the ongoing maintenance and restoration of this historic building. Watch the website and Facebook, and request our monthly e-letters to stay informed. Appointments for tech advice are invited. Get to know the Wilder staff: Marieke Sperry, Pat Nowlan, and Celeste Pfeiffer. All enjoy helping patrons take full advantage of the many resources available and, by working at Quechee Library as well, often carry materials back and forth. Trustees: Peter Schaal, Gail Schaal, Larry McKinney, Andrea McKinney, Jane Sweatt, Robert Webber Administration: Quechee Library Staff

Vermont 2-1-1 is a free, confidential, information and referral program of the United Ways of Vermont. By dialing 2-1-1 from any phone in Vermont, you will receive up-to-date information and referrals on health services, human service resources, and community programs all across the state, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 2-1-1 is the number to call when you don’t know where to call! 2-1-1 helps ensure that Vermonters have expedient access to community, regional, state, and federalbased services to help them with both everyday needs and personal or family issues during difficult times. A database of over 800 agencies and organizations helps ensure matching needs to services. 2-1-1 also serves as the Public Inquiry Line for the Division of Emergency Management & Homeland Security, as well as for the School Crisis Team during a disaster or emergency incident.

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PUBLIC LIBRARIES Summary of Revenues & Expenditures*

Actual 2016-2017 HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY Revenue Town of Hartford - Budget All Other Sources Total Expenditures

QUECHEE PUBLIC LIBRARY Revenues Town of Hartford - Budget All Other Sources Total Expenditures

WEST HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY Revenues Town of Hartford - Budget All Other Sources Total Expenditures

WILDER CLUB & PUBLIC LIBRARY Revenues Town of Hartford – Budget All Other Sources Total Expenditures

Budget 2017-2018

$ 90,000 $ 1,140 $ 91,140

$ 94,000 $ 2,000 $ 96,000

$ 91,400

$ 96,000

$158,800 $ 24,910 $183,710

$155,390 $ 18,510 $188,900

$183,710

$188,900

$ 46,033 100 $ 46,133

$ 46,033 $ 100 $ 46,133

$ 46,133

$ 46,133

$ 27,200 5,487 $ 32,687

$ 28,000 $ 5,500 $ 33,500

$ 32,191

$ 33,166

* Complete financial reports available through each library.

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CEMETERIES Summaries of Receipts & Expenditures

ACTUAL 16-17

CHRISTIAN ST CEMETERY Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total

BUDGET 17-18

$

600 1,050 $ 1,650

$

$ 1,700

$ 2,000

$ 7,500 1,650 $ 9,150

$ 7,500 2,000 $ 9,500

$ 8,545

$ 9,000

MT. OLIVET & ST. ANTHONY'S CEMETERIES Receipts (or Revenues) Town of Hartford $ 3,800 All Other Sources 7,083 Total $ 10,883

$ 3,800 5,790 $ 9,590

Expenditures HARTFORD CEMETERY ASSOCIATION Receipts (or Revenues) Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

Expenditures

QUECHEE CEMETERY ASSOCIATION Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures WEST HARTFORD CEMETERY Receipts (or Revenues) Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

600 1,500 $ 2,100

$ 7,783

$10,200

$ 2,450 950 $ 3,400

$ 3,000 800 $ 3,800

$ 11,381

$ 2,500

$

$

$

900 0 900

$

900 0 900

$

900

$

900

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Report of the Health & Social Services That Serve Hartford

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HEALTH & SOCIAL SERVICES ADVANCE TRANSIT Despite continued low gas prices, new ridership records were set for Advance Transit, including within the Town of Hartford. For the twelve months ending June 30, 2016, total ridership, which includes fixed routes (blue, brown, green, orange, red), shuttles, and ADA paratransit, reached a new high of 936,047. On the fixed routes the 600,000 mark was passed for the first time, ending at 604,209. 79,938 of those trips were boarded in Hartford – this was also a new record. 3,141 trips were boarded in Hartford on the AT’s ACCESS ADA service, out of a total of 12,880 passenger trips. The remaining 318,958 trips were taken on shuttles in downtown Hanover and near DHMC. One of the biggest accomplishments this year was the introduction in March of a new smart phone application or “App.” The app can be downloaded for free for either iOS (iPhone) or android. Visit the application store for your platform and search “advancetransit.” The app was developed by engineering students from Dartmouth and it provides real time bus arrival information and interactive maps that show locations of bus stops and scheduled departures. Do you need help navigating the AT bus system? We offer travel training services to groups or individuals free of charge. Let us know if we can help you learn how to ride and travel independently. If you have a disability that prevents you from being able to use fixed route service, you may qualify for Advance Transit’s ACCESS service, which is a curb-to-curb reservations-based service provided within ¾ of a mile of the fixed routes. Visit our website or contact our office for more information. 3,141 ACCESS trips were boarded in Hartford in FY 2016. About AT: Advance Transit is a bi-state regional nonprofit public transportation system headquartered in Wilder. Services include FREE regularly scheduled fixed route bus service, ADA Complementary Paratransit service, park-and-ride shuttles, and Upper Valley Rideshare carpool matching service. Visit our website at www.advancetransit.com or call 295-1824 8-4:30 M-FRI with service questions. Be sure to visit the “Where’s My Bus” page to see real time bus arrival information. Thank you for your support, and thanks for riding Advance Transit! Van Chesnut Executive Director

Bethany Fleischman & Jim Tonkovich Hartford Representatives, AT Board of Directors

BUGBEE SENIOR CENTER-WHITE RIVER COUNCIL ON AGING The White River Council On Aging, also known as the Bugbee Senior Center, is a non-profit agency committed to providing services to older community members and their families. The Center serves residents from Hartford and surrounding towns that include Hartland, Norwich and Thetford. We provide a range of social, transportation, nutrition, enrichment and education programs and activities. All of these programs have the goal of enhancing the health and independence of our older citizens. If you would like more information about these services, I invite you to give us a call at 295-9068, or stop in to see the Center during our hours of operation which are 8:004:00, Monday through Friday. During Fiscal Year 2016, our agency provided services to 1113 Hartford residents. These include, but are not limited to the following services: Residents served meals on site: 239 Residents provided Home Delivered Meals: 94 Residents receiving newsletter: 975 Residents receiving a social service: 207 Residents participating in education/enrichment programs: 281 Residents receiving transportation: 49 All told during the last year, our agency served 11,998 meals on site, and delivered another 14,713 meals to folks unable to come to the Center.

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A majority of our services are provided to Hartford residents. Certainly the fact that we are located in White River Junction is a contributing factor in that aspect of our operation. We at the Center, including our Board of Directors are grateful to townspeople for their continuing support of our programs. We invite you to come on down and enjoy a meal and our programs. If you would like to be added to our mailing list, give us a call and we will do so. Thank you again for your support. Respectfully Submitted, Len Brown Executive Director

COVER, INC. COVER Home Repair, Inc. is a community-based, non-profit program that organizes volunteers to make urgently needed repairs for qualified, low income homeowners in the Upper Valley. The repair work and volunteers are supervised by construction professionals. A volunteer Board of Directors from throughout the Upper Valley overseas the operation of the organization. COVER has been in operation for over 18 years. Our goal is to restore hope and build community among families that are struggling with challenging housing and financial circumstances that are often at the crisis level. By organizing volunteers from the community to work jointly on these repair projects with homeowners, we find that home owner’s confidence increases significantly. In addition, the homes become dry, safe, and warm. In 2015, COVER completed approximately 80 repair projects in the Upper Valley – 11 of those projects were in Hartford. Many of these Hartford projects were replacement roofs and accessibility ramps. In addition, we performed 73 weatherization projects. In 2015, COVER spent over $73,000 on material to perform all the repair and weatherization jobs. COVER spent about 10% of this building materials budget, $7,484, specifically on Hartford projects. COVER believes that it has not only helped many homeowners be able to stay in their homes but also helped keep homes on the tax rolls and made it easier for homeowners to afford their tax bill. Please consider an appropriation of $5,000 in the 2017/18 town budget.

THE FAMILY PLACE As one of 15 Parent Child Centers in Vermont, The Family Place operates a variety of programs designed to promote strong, stable families; safe, healthy children; and active learning for young children and parents alike. Our goal is to promote positive outcomes for all young people, regardless of circumstances. Families come through our doors for many different reasons. Sometimes, it's to make connections with other families through playgroups or events. Often, it's for assistance finding or paying for child care. Sometimes, it's because someone recognizes that a child is behind in meeting developmental milestones or has special medical needs. Other parents engage with us for support in meeting education or employment goals, or to enhance their parenting skills. The Family Place partners with families to identify all the potential areas for support and connect them with the resources that are most appropriate for their circumstances and goals. We partner with local agencies and providers, working together to create a more effective fabric of support for families.

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The Family Place served approximately 389 families (902 individuals) from Hartland last year, through both on-site and home-based services. Other residents took advantage of our special events, lending library, website information, and referral services. We could not do this vital work without the support of the Hartford community and our community partners. We have seen the challenges facing families become increasingly complex. We are keenly aware of the importance of the early childhood years and the challenges to healthy outcomes for the children in our community, including the growing epidemic of substance abuse. The Family Place provides a family-friendly campus and experienced staff to welcome and assist adults and children alike. We invite you to review the work and outcomes highlighted in our 2015-2016 Annual Report, which can be found our website. For more information, please view our website at www.FamilyPlaceVT.org or call 649-3268. Thank you for your support! Nancy Bloomfield Executive Director

GOOD BEGINNINGS As Good Beginnings, Inc. celebrates its 30th year of serving Upper Valley families, our mission remains the same as it was when the founding mothers gathered to support those first young families in 1986: to serve local families with new babies by providing handson support, education and community outreach. Our programs begin when a family is referred to our staff by area hospitals, pediatricians or by the family’s contact. At that time, our program director communicates with the family to determine which program best meets their needs. Many families engage in our In-Home Volunteer Visitor Program, which matches families with a trained volunteer (often living in the same town) who visits once a week for 2-3 hours for three consecutive months to provide respite for exhausted parents at a vulnerable time in a family’s life. Some families do not request a volunteer and engage only in our Support and Education Program which provides parent educational materials, children’s books, emergency assistance, emotional support and community connections. Both programs serve to mitigate isolation and postpartum depression and enhance family safety. Over the past 30 years, though our mission has remained the same, our services have expanded. In the 2016 fiscal year, we added volunteer services to foster families; offered services to a wider geographic region; expanded our volunteer training on issues of post-partum depression; and offered wisdom and advice to other communities who are beginning services like Good Beginnings. In the Town of Hartford, Good Beginnings served 34 families through one or more of our programs, 19 of which received In-Home Volunteer Visitors for an average of 12 weeks or 27 hours/family.

GOOD NEIGHBOR HEALTH CLINIC The Good Neighbor Health Clinics (which includes the Red Logan Dental Clinic) provide free health care, dental treatment and support to Upper Valley residents. We served 1,252 people last year, 224 of whom live in Hartford. All of the clinics are staffed by volunteers and during the past year 131 medical and dental volunteers contributed 1,288 hours in patient care. This year we are celebrating our 25th anniversary and the free medical and dental clinic services provided by Good Neighbor are just as vital to Upper Valley residents today as they were when Good Neighbor was founded.

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Our programs continue to grow to meet the needs of the community. In addition to seeing people for a variety of primary health care needs the Good Neighbor Clinics recently added vaccination and denture programs. The Clinics are known for providing quality care for those in need in the Upper Valley. Red Logan dental externs from Harvard, Boston University, Tufts and the University of New England work under the supervision of area dentists to provide exams, x-rays, fillings, single crowns, extractions and root canals, while volunteer hygienists clean teeth. In addition to primary care, the Clinic offers ongoing education and treatment for those with chronic illnesses such as asthma and diabetes. Our doctors screen for substance misuse and they regularly help people access alcohol and drug treatment programs. Outreach to women who are eligible for cancer and hypertension screenings continues. In addition to seeing patients who are new to America, homeless or unemployed, the medical clinic often sees local people who have high deductible insurance plans. Those who have low incomes and high insurance costs visit the Clinic rather than postponing high cost medical visits. Please know that your support, through the town budget, has served the mission of Good Neighbor and directly benefited your neighbors!

GREEN MOUNTAIN RSVP & VOLUNTEER CENTER Green Mountain RSVP is part of the Corporation for National and Community Service- Senior Corps. It is a nation-wide program for people age 55 and older who wish to make positive impacts in the communities in which they reside. They volunteer their skills and knowledge to programs and non­ profits in the local area. At Green Mountain RSVP we view our senior population as our most valuable asset in keeping our communities strong through volunteerism. RSVP has been helping local non-profit and civic organizations by recruiting and matching volunteers to meet vital community needs. Our goal is to ensure that volunteers contribute their time and talents to programs that have a significant, positive impact on the quality of life in Windsor County. Our volunteers address community concerns that are vital for our senior population and their neighbors. They include supporting Healthy Futures and Aging in Place through food pantry support, meal delivery, and transportation. There are 8 active Bone Builder Classes in Windsor County led by 17 experienced instructors serving over 150 seniors. We have 11 volunteers in Hartford who are active in Bone Builders at Graystone Village in White River, the Hartford Community Coalition summer meals program, the food shelf at the Upper Valley Haven, and "Everybody Wins VT' at the White River Elementary School. We had a Stuff-the Bus Event on January 16th at the Co-op Food Store in White River and donated food to two Hartford Food Shelves, The Upper Valley Haven and the Valley Bible Church; that same food drive is planned for January 14th this winter. Our Graystone Village BB Group is collaborating with the SASH Coordinator in White River, Caroline Lorie, to facilitate a ''Matter of Balance "class as well. In all of Windsor County, we had 42 non-profit volunteer stations, with 95 volunteers serving a total of 7075 hours, bringing a value of $161,239 to the community. Having a coordinator in Windsor County has been beneficial as we have seen an increase of volunteers by more than 50%. RSVP will continue to build programming around support of Aging in Place and Healthy Futures in Windsor County in the up- coming year. You are always welcome to contact us in our Windsor County office at (802) 772-7859 and speak to our coordinator Corey Mitchell or reach me directly at (802) 447-1546 Thank-you for your continued support.

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HEADREST Headrest is a nonprofit organization serving the Upper Valley since 1971. The Headrest mission is: “To assist those who have or are affected by a substance use disorder, experiencing a crisis, or need support, by providing effective programs and treatment.” The Out-Patient Counseling program helps people who are facing issues with addiction to alcohol and/or drugs. Last year, Headrest provided individualized outpatient counseling to 164 people. The 24/7 Hotline program is available to anyone who has access to a telephone, day or night. There is a specific phone line for the Teen Hotline to focus on issues of particular concern to adolescents. One of the core functions of the Hotline is suicide prevention that is an issue that faces people of all ages and backgrounds. During the past year there were a total of 6,513 calls to the Hotline; 918 of those calls were related to suicide. Headrest has been a mainstay of the Upper Valley’s human services safety net for over 40 years. In September 2016, Headrest reached the milestone of 400,000 continuous hours of Hotline service to the community. The Hotline is on the front line for suicide prevention efforts and work to reduce alcohol and drug addiction. Support from the Town of Hartford is important to Headrest’s ability to offer the 24/7 Hotline to everyone in the community.

HEALTH CARE & REHABILITATION SERVICES Health Care and Rehabilitation Services of Southeastern Vermont (HCRS) requests an appropriation of $9,995 from the Town of Hartford at the 2017 Town Meeting to help defray the cost of services to its residents for the Mental Health Walk-In Clinic. In the year ending June 30, 2016, our agency provided a comprehensive range of community based services to 4,347 residents of Windsor and Windham counties. The services that are available to the residents of your community are: Adult Mental Health and Addiction Services: HCRS offers comprehensive services for adults who are experiencing mental health and/or substance abuse difficulties. Adult services include assessment, treatment including individual, group, couples, and family counseling, referral services, and limited psychiatric services. It is the philosophy of HCRS that people are resilient and therefore capable of overcoming difficult experiences and recovering from mental illness and substance abuse. HCRS is committed to building on the strengths of the individuals and families of whom we serve. Our goal is to help clients and their families achieve improved wellness, health, and quality of life while addressing their mental health and substance abuse needs. Children, Youth, and Families Program: The Children's Division provides a comprehensive system of care for youth experiencing emotional, behavioral, developmental, or substance use difficulties in their life, as well as education and support for family members. We offer many services for youth and their families including psychiatry, counseling, case management, respite and case aid services, school-based services, behavioral consultation services, summer therapeutic programs, crisis response and emergency respite services, a mental health program specifically for young children up to six years old, and an employment assistance program for youth in transition who have significant emotional disturbances. Developmental Services (DS): The DS program provides services to people with developmental disabilities and their families. Services are available to people of all ages who have been found eligible, and each person being served receives an individually written program to meet his or her needs. Children with a developmental disability are served through a collaboration with the Children's Division. Residential Services: Residential Services offers residential care from short term crisis stabilization, to intensive residential care, to therapeutic community residential services. Each program is specifically designed to offer individuals the appropriate level of care to support their personal recovery and wellness needs. The Residential continuum of care is comprised of a total of 38 beds spanning five individual programs. Emergency Services: The Emergency Services Team has a very specific mission to act quickly in critical situations. Specially trained mental health professionals are available 24 hours a day for emergencies. 119


Anyone may use this service when an emergency arises including individuals of any age, family or friends of an individual in crisis, hospitals and nursing homes, police, schools, clergy, businesses, and other community agencies. We thank the Board and the citizens of Hartford for your past support and for your continued interest in Health Care and Rehabilitation Services of Southeastern Vermont. Health Care and Rehabilitation Services (HCRS) is a comprehensive community mental health provider serving residents of Windsor and Windham counties. HCRS assists and advocates for individuals, families, and children who are living with mental illness, developmental disabilities, and substance use disorders. HCRS provides these services through outpatient mental health services, alcohol and drug treatment program, community rehabilitation and treatment program, developmental services division, and alternatives and emergency services programs. During FY16, HCRS provided 29,152 hours of services to 558 residents of the Town of Hartford. The services provided included all of HCRS' programs resulting in a wide array of supports for the residents of Hartford. Anyone with questions about HCRS services should contact George Karabakakis, Chief Executive Officer, at (802) 886-4500.

SOUTHEASTERN VERMONT COMMUNITY ACTION Southeastern Vermont Community Action is an anti-poverty, community based, nonprofit organization serving Windham and Windsor counties since 1965. Our mission is to enable people to cope with and reduce the hardships of poverty; create sustainable self-sufficiency; reduce the causes and work toward the elimination of poverty. SEVCA has a variety of programs and services to meet this end. They include: Head Start, Weatherization, Emergency Home Repair, Emergency Services/Crisis Intervention (i.e., fuel, utility, housing and food assistance), Micro-Business Development, Individual Development Accounts, Tax Preparation, Vermont Health Connect Navigation, and Thrift Stores. In the community of Hartford we have provided the following services during FY2016: Weatherization: 13 homes (22 people) were weatherized at a cost of $56,755 Emergency Heating System Replacements: 13 homes (40 people) received furnace repairs or replacements at a cost of $20,061 Tax Preparation: 60 households (89 people) received service & tax credits totaling $54,118 Thrift Store Vouchers: 197 households (398 people) rec’d goods & services valued at $11,097 Emergency Services: 162 households (365 people) received 1,276 services valued at $8,183 (including fuel, utility & housing assistance; financial counseling; nutrition education; referral to and assistance with accessing needed services) Fuel/Utility Assistance: 96 households (245 people) received 141 assists valued at $59,146 Housing & Other Assistance: 42 households (99 people) received 45 assists valued at $71,061 Jobs for Independence Program: 16 people received referrals to employment programs, valued at $11,016 Head Start: 11 families (45 people) received comprehensive early education and family support services valued at $105,376 Community support, through town funding, helps to build a strong partnership. The combination of federal, state, private, and town funds allow us to not only maintain, but to increase and improve service. We thank the residents of Hartford for their support.

SPARK! Spark!, started in 2014 and located in the old Lebanon Junior High building, is a drop-in center for ANYONE in the Upper Valley. Spark! Community Center's mission is to provide a welcoming place where the lives of all people of differing abilities are enriched through a sense of community. Our vision is to create a safe and welcoming place where adults with special needs, their families and 120


caregivers, and caring members of the Upper Valley community can come together and take part in fun and educational activities. Programming includes educational, social, and recreational activities and events on a daily basis M-F 11:00 to 5:00, and a special supper and activity every Friday night. Spark! serves about 170 people every week from more than 50 Upper Valley towns on both sides of the river. An unduplicated number of participants served annually is more than 300. Spark! collaborates with many organizations and businesses who provide volunteers, funding, and support. For more information, see our great website: www.sparkcommunitycenter.com

STAGECOACH

Thank you for your support of community transportation services. In the past year, Stagecoach's Dial-A-Ride Ride System directly provided 6,132 rides for Hartford residents either by volunteer drivers or on wheelchair accessible vehicles. Additionally, Stagecoach earned the grant funds to purchase a bus for Bugbee Senior Center, with which they provided 4,492 rides for Senior Citizens. in Hartford. Stagecoach’s Bus, Dial-a-Ride, and Partners Systems provided a total of 79,159 rides. All of Stagecoach’s transportation programs enable community members to maintain their independence, gain and keep employment and access critical healthcare services. Dial-A-Ride System –Focuses on specialized populations including elders, persons with disabilities and lowincome families/individuals who are unable to access the bus system. In Hartford, Dial-A-Ride offers direct access from home to medical treatments, social services, meal site/senior programs, pharmacies, and food shopping. Volunteer Driver Program – Stagecoach uses an extensive network of Volunteer Drivers to provide coordinated and caring rides throughout our rural service area. Volunteer Drivers are essential in providing cost effective and community driven services, and are the foundation of our Dial-A-Ride Program. Volunteer Drivers connect friends, support independence and promote healthy living. If you are interested in becoming a Stagecoach Volunteer Driver, please contact our office. Information-- Please feel free to contact us with questions or to request additional information on Stagecoach services at 802-728-3773.

VERMONT ADULT LEARNING Vermont Adult Learning programs are free, all are sponsored and funded in collaboration with the Vermont Agency of Education. We develop individualized learning plans with every student for every program. We also support degreed students to strengthen academic skills for college preparation. As part of the statewide Learning Works network, Vermont Adult Learning is the leading provider of literacy, work readiness and high school completion for people 16 years of age and over. In the last fiscal year VAL served 234 students in Windsor County with 48 graduating with their Diplomas from local high schools as part of the High School Completion Program or GED. Statewide over 4,000 Vermonters receive help each year from Vermont Adult Learning and other Learning Works partners.

VERMONT ASSOCIATION FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED More than 10,500 Vermont residents are blind or visually impaired. Since our state has an aging population, many of them are experiencing age-related vision loss. Visual impairments can make performing daily tasks, staying mobile, and enjoying leisure activities very difficult. Additionally, Vermont's rural nature makes it less likely for those with visual impairments to encounter those facing similar challenges, thus creating feelings of isolation and depression. We counter this trend by providing the tools, services, and support necessary to help blind and visually impaired Vermonters to be independent, confident, and productive.

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During Fiscal Year 2016 VABVI served 1,578 clients from all 14 counties in Vermont, including 126 adult clients and 38 students from Windsor Country. Since 1926 our nonprofit organization has diligently pursued our mission of enabling Vermonters with vision problems, whether blindness or impairment, to achieve and maintain independence. We are the only private agency in Vermont to offer a complete range of services to visually impaired residents - and at no cost to the client. Services include Rehabilitation (adapting daily living tasks to allow those with low vision to live independently); Orientation and Mobility (providing white cane and guide dog instruction, allowing individuals to navigate through their home and community independently); Assistive Technology (adaptive aids allow clients to successfully perform most activities they desire); Social Networking (improving social skills and providing a support network); and Statewide Transportation (volunteer drivers provide rides to medical appointments, grocery stores and for personal visits). VABVI has offices in Berlin, Brattleboro, Rutland, and South Burlington. Contact us at (800) 639-5861 or genera1@vabvi.org. Learn more about us at www.vabvi.org or "like" us at www.facebook.com/vabvi.org for updates.

THE VERMONT CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING Since 1979, The Vermont Center for Independent Living (VCIL) has been teaching people with disabilities and the Deaf how to gain more control over their lives and how to access tools and services to live more independently. VCIL employees (85% of whom have a disability) conduct public education, outreach, individual advocacy and systems change advocacy to help promote the full inclusion of people with disabilities into community life. Preliminary numbers for our FY’16 (10/2015-9/2016) show VCIL responded to over 2,561 requests from individuals, agencies and community groups for information, referral and assistance and program services for individuals living with a disability. VCIL Peer Advocate Counselors (PACs) provided one-on-one peer counseling to 339 individuals to help increase their independent living skills and 20 peers were served by the AgrAbility program. VCIL’s Home Access Program (HAP) assisted 195 households with information on technical assistance and/or alternative funding for modifications; 95 of these received financial assistance to make their bathrooms and/or entrances accessible. Our Sue Williams Freedom Fund (SWFF) provided 79 individuals with information on assistive technology; 35 of these individuals received funding to obtain adaptive equipment. 535 individuals had meals delivered through our Meals on Wheels (MOW) program for individuals with disabilities under the age of 60. VCIL is also now home to the Vermont Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program (VTEDP) which served 30 people and provided 23 peers with adaptive telecommunications enabling low-income Deaf, Deaf-blind, hard of hearing and individuals with disabilities to communicate by telephone. VCIL’s central office is located in downtown Montpelier and we have five branch offices in Bennington, Chittenden, Lamoille, Rutland and Windham Counties. Our Peer Advocate Counselors and services are available to people with disabilities throughout Vermont. Also new this year, our Windham county office now houses the Vermont Interpreter Referral Service (VIRS) (previously under the VT Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing) and provides statewide interpreter referral services for sign language, spoken English and CART services for assignments in medical, legal, mental health, employment, educational, civil and recreational settings. During FY ’16, 21 residents of Hartford received services from the following programs: • • • • • •

Home Access Program (HAP) (over $8,200.00 spent on home modifications) Meals on Wheels (MOW) (over $3,000.00 spent on meals for residents) Sue Williams Freedom Fund (SWFF) Peer Advocacy Counseling Program (PAC) (over $2,600.00 spent in Peer Advocate Counseling hours) Sue Williams Freedom Fund (SWFF) Information Referral and Assistance (I,R&A)

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To learn more about VCIL, please call VCIL’s toll-free I-Line at: 1-800-639-1522, or, visit our web site at www.vcil.org.

VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Your local health district office is in White River Junction at the address below. Come visit or give us a call! At the Vermont Department of Health, we are working every day for your health. With twelve district offices around the state, and state office and laboratory in Chittenden County, we deliver a wide range of public health services and support to your community. For example, in 2015 the Health Department: Supported healthy communities: Health Connections was awarded $45,000 in order to reduce the use of tobacco. Windsor County Prevention Partners (WCPP) is in their fourth year of working together to support substance abuse prevention especially underage drinking prevention and prescription drug misuse prevention. In 2015, WCPP received $130,000 from the state Partnerships for Success grant to support this work across Windsor County. Health Connections is an active participant in WCPP and this work. Provided WIC nutrition services and healthy foods to families: We served about half of all Vermont families with pregnant women and children to age five with WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children). WIC provides individualized nutrition counseling and breastfeeding support. We partner with grocery stores across the state to enable participants to use a debit-like card to access nutritious foods. The average value of foods provided is $50 per person per month. Worked to prevent and control the spread of disease: In 2015 we responded to 264 cases of infectious disease in Windsor County. In 2015, $13,916,297 of vaccine for vaccine-preventable diseases was distributed to healthcare providers statewide. Aided communities in emergency preparedness: In July of 2016, we participated in a large-scale exercise in Brattleboro to practice our procedures for distributing medicine to keep people from getting sick in case of a public health emergency. For 2016/17, $10,000 will fund training for Emergency Medical Services and the Upper Valley Medical Reserve Corps. In addition, $49,359 will support emergency preparedness capabilities at Gifford Medical Center. State of Vermont Department of Health White River Jct. District Office 118 Prospect Street, Suite 300 White River Jct., VT 05001 www.HealthVermont.gov

VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION & HOSPICE OF VT AND NH Visiting Nurse and Hospice for Vermont and New Hampshire (VNH) is a compassionate, non-profit healthcare organization committed to providing the highest quality home health and hospice services to individuals and their families. VNH provides care for people of all ages and at all stages in life, and delivers care to all, regardless of ability to pay. VNH services reduce costs associated with town programs for emergency response and elder care. With quality care provided at home, there is less need for costly hospital and emergency room trips. And with VNH support, residents can age in place rather than relocating to a state or local nursing home. Between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016, VNH made 12,389 homecare visits to 463 Hartford residents. This included approximately $400,495 in unreimbursed care to Hartford residents. Home Health Care: 6,944 home visits to 361 residents with short-term medical or physical needs. Long-Term Care: 4,154 home visits to 43 residents with chronic medical problems who need extended care in the home to avoid admission to a nursing home. Hospice Services: 938 home visits to 17 residents who were in the final stages of their lives. 123


Maternal and Child Health Services: 353 home visits to 42 residents for well baby, preventative and palliative medical care. Additionally, residents made visits to VNH wellness clinics at local senior and community centers throughout the year, receiving low- and no-cost services including blood pressure screenings, foot care, cholesterol testing, and flu shots. Hartford’s annual appropriation to VNH helps to ensure that all have access to quality care when and where it is needed most. On behalf of the people we serve, we thank you for your continued support. Sincerely,

Jeanne McLaughlin, President & CEO (1-888-300-8853)

WINDSOR COUNTY PARTNERS Windsor County Partners is in its 5th decade of building healthier communities through youth mentoring. Evidence shows that youth in quality mentoring programs such as ours are 52% less likely to skip school and 46% less likely to use drugs. As these mentored youth mature, they are 81% more likely to participate in sports than their peers without mentors and 130% more likely to hold leadership positions. Mentored youth learn life skills, provide community service and participate in cultural and athletic activities. Windsor County Partners (WCP) provides mentoring across the county. WCP creates partnerships where mentors are matched with a school-aged mentee. These mentoring partnerships then meet at least 2 hours a week a year, with many partnerships continuing on for years. Mentored children range in age from 7 – 18. Last year, WCP served and supported 28 community-based partnerships from 9 of the towns in Windsor County, including 10 in Hartford. Collectively, these partners spent over 2000 hours together. Let’s Do Lunch (LDL), our school-based program, serves youth ages 5-18 in the Springfield district, with expansion planned to other districts. LDL mentors meet with students to do crafts and play games or sports. In the most recent school year, 14 LDL partnerships spent more than 400 cumulative hours together. Financial support from Windsor County helps ensure the well-being of children and their families. For more information on our mentorships, find us on Facebook, visit our website www.windsorcountypartners.org or contact us at ProgramsWC@outlook.com 802-674-5101. WCP thanks the voters of Hartford for their support for the children of Windsor County. Jennifer Grant Executive Director

WINDSOR COUNTY UPDATE Assistant Judges Jack Anderson & Ellen Terie FY 2017--‐ 18 Budget

The Assistant Judges held the preliminary budget meeting at 5 PM on Wednesday, December 14. The final budget calls for $ 441,711 to be raised by taxes, a decrease of $7,702 from the current FY 16--‐17 budget. The new budget calls for $ 557,734 in total spending, a slight decrease of $2,656 from the current FY budget. According to the Vermont Department of Taxes, the Equalized Grand List for the entire county grew by $136,620,400. That lowered the tax assessment used by the county a small amount. The county tax rate in 2016 was .005072178; for 2017 it will be .00490418. That’s 4.9 cents per thousand dollars of assessed value. Pursuant to Title 24 Sect. 134, the County Treasurer shall issue warrants on or before March 1 requiring the tax to be paid in two installments on or before July 5 and on or before November 5 (2017).

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Courthouse Renovation Bond 2017 marks the fourth year of the $2 million bond repayment. The bond is for ten years at 2.83%. This year, the amount to be billed to the towns will be $242,324 ($200,000 principal; $42,324 interest). This billing is NOT part of the county budget, but a separate assessment. Accomplishments Over the Past Year Maintaining the two county properties – the former jail at 62 Pleasant Street and the 1855 Court House at 12 The Green – remains an important responsibility for the Assistant Judges. The courthouse is home to the Vermont Superior Court, Civil and Probate Divisions; the former jail is home to the County Sheriff and the Windsor County Offices. Last summer the county installed central air conditioning in the civil and probate offices, including the probate hearing room/jury room, on the first floor at the courthouse. Seven historic 1855 windows were rehabilitated and conserved at the courthouse. The interior storm windows performed well last winter; oil usage was cut by thousands of gallons over the heating season. At 62 Pleasant Street, the County installed a new floor in the workroom/kitchen of the Sheriff’s office, and repaired the former porch on the east west end of the building. A regular schedule of exterior painting and maintenance was carried out at both buildings.

WOMEN’S INFORMATION SERVICES WISE is the Upper Valley’s sole provider of crisis intervention services to victims of domestic and sexual violence. WISE provides a free and confidential 24 hour crisis line every day of the year, a confidential emergency shelter, and victim in-person advocacy at emergency rooms, police stations, and courthouses. WISE works with more than 1,000 victims every year for on-going safety planning, transitional housing assistance, legal aid, and provides creative support through writing groups; yoga classes; sobriety meetings; and therapeutic riding experiences. WISE leads the Upper Valley to end gender-based violence through survivorcentered advocacy. WISE’s Safe Home houses victims fleeing domestic or sexual violence and remains consistently full. This peaceful environment protects women and allows for respectful concentration on legal and logistical issues, regaining independence, and nurturing healthy parenting. WISE’s website (www.WISEuv.org) has many WISE support resources to identify intimate partner violence, increase personal safety, and to offer support to a colleague or family member experiencing domestic violence, sexual abuse, or stalking. WISE delivers its expertise – routinely training law enforcement and medical professionals to identify victims at high risk of intimate partner homicide. Utilizing Lethality Assessment screening; those identified as at risk are immediately referred to WISE. Safety is crucial for survival. In 21 communities, WISE educates through its structured K-12 curriculums, trainings to teachers, legal, medical, and law enforcement professionals, and by being a presence at farmer’s markets, hospitals, company health days and local events. WISE educators instruct on healthy relationships, media literacy, bullying, dating violence, and consent in high schools, middle schools, and most local elementary schools. Students receiving prevention education classes throughout their K-12 experience evidence greater respect at home, in friendships and in dating relationships. WISE also presents educational programs to interested community, civic, parent and faithbased groups. Supporting individuals in crisis, in confidence, and educating citizens is crucial to eliminating domestic violence and abuse. WISE remains grateful for funding; it helps assure WISE services are available to every citizen 24 hours of every day.

125


FINANCIAL REPORTS OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES Actual 2016-2017

ADVANCE TRANSIT Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

$

Budgeted 2017-2018

75,540 4,616,386 4,691,926

$ $

77,050 5,749,915 5,826,965

$ 54,805,048

$

5,339,046

$

$ $

5,000 690,000 695,000

$

695,000

$

COVER, INC. Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total

$

999 664,001 665,000

Expenditures

$

660,000

$

$

9,500 2,119,983 2,129,483

THE FAMILY PLACE Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total

$

9,500 2,042,456 2,051,956

Expenditures

$

2,051,956

$

2,129,483

$ $

4,550 142,952 147,502

$ $ $

4,550 145,000 148,000

$

147,502

$

148,000

$ $

7,500 634,776 642,276

$ $ $

7,500 643,660 651,160

$

598,821

$

650,649

$ $

869 230,719* 231,588

$ $ $

869 250,743* 251,612

$

231,588

$

251,612

$

$

$

5,000 15,000 20,576

$

5,000 25,785 30,000

$

15,650

$

29,878

GOOD BEGINNINGS, INC. Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures GOOD NEIGHBOR HEALTH CLINIC Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures GREEN MOUNTAIN RSVP Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources (*Federal Grant Revenue) Total Expenditures HARTFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

126

$


FINANCIAL REPORTS OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES Actual 2016-2017

HEADREST Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

$

Budgeted 2017-2018

$

$

7,000 754,985 846,550

$

7,000 703,776 710,776

$

691,979

$

751,444

HEALTH CARE AND REHABILITATION SERVICES Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford $ 9,995 All Other Sources 46,299,979 Total $ 46,309,974

$ 9,995 $ 47,798,243 $ 47,808,238

Expenditures

$ 47,808,238

$ 46,895,929

SOUTHEASTERN VERMONT COMMUNITY ACTION Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford $ 9,000 All Other Sources 5,159,035 Total $ 5,168,035 Expenditures SPARK! Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

$ $

9,000 5,611,500 5,620,500

$

5,166,939

$

5,620,500

$

$

$

0 128,164 128,164

$

2,500 157,784 160,484

$

145,423

$

160,484

$

STAGECOACH TRANSPORTATION SERVICES, INC. Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford $ 0 All Other Sources 2,318,701 Total $ 2,318,701

$

0 2,296,474 2,296,274

Expenditures

$

2,282,624

$

2,296,274

$

$ $

999 364,937 365,936

$

602,348

$

VERMONT ADULT LEARNING Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total

$

999 364,937 365,936

Expenditures

$

602,348

VERMONT ASSOCIATION FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford $ 975 All Other Sources 3,110,519 Total $ 3,111,494

$

975 3,320,947 3,321,922

Expenditures

$

3,274,779

$

3,176,045

127


FINANCIAL REPORTS OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES Actual 2016-2017

THE VERMONT CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford $ 845 All Other Sources 2,476,957 Total $ 2,477,802 Expenditures

$

2,456,602

VISITING NURSE ALLIANCE OF VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE, INC. Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford $ 41,882 All Other Sources 21,628,848 Total $ 21,670,730 Expenditures

Budgeted 2017-2018

$

845 2,564,499 2,565,344

$

2,565,344

$

41,882 22,532,947 22,574,829

$ 21,5591,861

$ 21,377,811

$

$ $ $

3,500 169,611 173,111

WINDSOR COUNTY PARTNERS Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total

$

3,500 118,993 122,493

Expenditures

$

122,493

$

117,111

$

$

$

2,000 1,033,459 1,035,459

2,000 877,963 879,963

$

877,855

WOMEN’S INFORMATION SERVICES Receipts/Revenues Town of Hartford All Other Sources Total Expenditures

128

903,494


Miscellaneous Financial Information

129


130

ADAMS LORI ADLER ADAM AHLERS OLIVE ANTOCACCI ROBERT BB&W ENTERPRISES LLC BARR DAVID BARRETT CRAIG B BILLINGHAM WALTER R BOISVERT SCOTT HUNT TRACY BROWER KERWIN BROWN KRISTOPHER T BROWN JENNIFER CHAUDHRY ATIYA CHADDHRY FARIHA CHAUDHRY ATIYA CHADDHRY FARIHA CHENEY IAN L COLT TORSTEN C COLT DEBORAH COOK EMMA HAZEN DYLAN COONEY GLEN P COONEY SUSAN E COPP MICHAEL COPP BEVERLY CORNERSTONE DEVELOPMENT LLC COUTERMARSH SHIRLEY E CYR LAWRENCE J DAVIS FREDERICK JR DRINKARD BETSY R RAYMOND MICHAEL DUGLISS JOHN C DUMOND DAWN LEE FARIBANKS TURN PROPERTY LLC FARRIS SHERMAN E FARRIS MARSHA L FENNESSEY JAMES W FRENCH ARTHUR R FRENCH JOHN E FUCCI LOUIS A GOODWIN ASHLEY GORDON LYNDA DARLING GAIL GRUNDY PETER J GRUNDY DEBORAH A HAMEL ROBERT HAMMOND ARTHUR HAZEN STREET HOLDINGS INC HILLIKER ANDREW C HILLIKER NANCY R HUGHES JOHN E GILBERT-HUGHES PENNY INGALLS KEITH INGALLS CHAUNTEL JILLSON DAMON WJILLSON PATRICIA L KELLY WILLIAM 7-5058 KELLY WILLIAM 7-5250 KELLY WILLIAM 7-5345 KELLY WILLIAM 12-8112-SHC-2B KELLY WILLIAM 7-8072-QHC-1A KELLY WILLIAM 12-8110-MRC-1D KELLY WILLIAM 12-8110-MRC-2A KELLY WILLIAM 13-19-3 KELLY WILLIAM 9-147 LDD LCC A VERMONT LIMITED LIABILITY LEISURE LIVING PARKS INC C/O DALE SNADER LEISURE LIVING PARKS INC C/O DALE SNADER MANDARINO JENNIFER BROWER JAMES MARTIN DANIEL MCEWAN SCOTT BRUCE SONIA MILLER WILLIAM H TRUSTEE MOLL GARY

DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAXES December 31, 2016

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 12.64 496.81 4,512.00 141.77 976.04 8,142.51 64.26 724.71 1,373.51 1,739.48 388.67 1,166.52 3,477.75 572.75 4,257.75 2,855.00 3,550.50 1,694.95 2,004.70 1,899.43 5,946.82 5,263.01 9,265.67 17,604.94 13,447.17 1,470.29 339.99 579.09 686.69 3,068.45

2016 2,112.85 2,061.05 4,498.00 64.04 589.65 3,942.17 876.68 2,803.49 6,689.03 1,366.34 1,212.09 2,086.47 2,086.47 1,882.61 5,452.92 1,014.49 22.63 1,369.26 3,729.73 300.71 2,408.60 844.48 1,180.64 1,426.32 71.29 891.30

1,576.22 446.13 3,853.56 657.33 4,886.27 3,276.50 4,074.58 2,163.03 2,300.51 2,179.94 6,824.62 2,957.05

3,521.32

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$

1,022.73 677.45

$ $

$

4,691.34 969.29

$ $

1,120.16

6,166.53

$

$

532.37 532.37

$ $

570.14 4,183.58

7,676.34

$

$ $

3,084.57

$

2015

$

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$

$

$

$

$ $

$ $

$

$

1,045.68

4,341.36 711.50 5,287.96 3,545.85 5,396.93 2,341.15 2,783.91 2,635.04 7,386.01

827.44

1,705.72

850.63

370.64

1,107.01 247.09

3,363.11 1,048.85

5,934.90

4,736.97

2014

$

$

$

$

594.29

1,891.76

608.92

5,285.72

2013

$ 2,112.83

$ 5,598.67

2012

$ 2,168.91

$ 5,403.61

2011

$ 2,430.51

2010

$ 2,445.95

2009 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Total 2,112.85 2,061.05 4,498.00 64.04 589.65 28,051.71 876.68 2,803.49 20,300.27 1,366.34 1,212.09 2,618.84 2,618.84 1,882.61 11,619.45 1,014.49 22.63 1,369.26 3,729.73 300.71 10,463.05 3,471.54 1,180.64 1,426.32 71.29 3,021.04 924.54 12.64 1,437.59 8,695.58 141.77 2,946.83 8,142.51 64.26 724.71 15,705.41 1,739.48 1,662.24 1,166.52 12,266.96 1,941.58 14,431.98 9,677.35 13,022.01 6,199.13 7,089.12 6,714.41 20,157.45 8,220.06 9,265.67 17,604.94 13,447.17 1,470.29 339.99 579.09 686.69 7,635.45


131

Beginning Balance 1/1/16 *Treasurer to Collector - 2/11/16 Accrued Interest (Feb) New Monthly Interest Collected Principal, Interest & Fees Abatement and Adjustments Ending Balance

SCHEDULE OF DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAXES December 31, 2016

MURPHY PAUL MURPHY ROBERTHMURPHY SUSAN E NAUGHTON THOMAS E & VINCENT ORNSTEIN DEBORAH L WILLETTE FRANCES PATTERSON JOHN PATTERSON LOUISE POTWIN LANDON POTWIN RENEE C ROGERS RITA ROYEA JAMES B ROYEA HARRIET H RUNNALS EDWARD 8-12 RUNNALS EDWARD 32-22 RUNNALS KENNETH S&J GREENE LLC SAWYER BETH SCHAAL TODD M SCHALL MARCY L SCHEDLER ANDREW M SEVERANCE BRYAN A SHAFER THOR P DEVINS MICHAEL J SHATNEY ROBERT SHATNEY MARY SIMPSON HEATHER E SIMS DANELLE SMITH MICHELLE L STIGUM ELISE H TSOUKNAKIS ALEXANDER TSOUKNAKIS NICHOLAS TSOUKNAKIS ALEXANDER TSOUKNAKIS NICHOLAS TSOUKNAKIS NICHOLAS KNIFFIN SARAH TSOUKNAKIS NICHOLAS TSOUKNAKIS ALEXANDER TSOUKNAKIS NICHOLAS TWIN PINES HOUSING C/O DENISE JOHNSON VALLEY JANET E 4-24 VALLEY JANET E 4-29 VALLEY JANET E 4-29-1 WATERS ROBERT WHITE SHERRI WHITMARSH CLAYTON A WILLEY EDWARD WILLIAMS GERALDINE WILSON THOMAS WOOD MARC J WOOD SUSAN WOOD MARC JOSEPH WORLD OF DISCOVERY INC

DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAXES December 31, 2016

3,638.18 554.17 3,094.87 81.04 274.24 406.97 3,562.26 507.00 346.10 28.06 3,249.75 3,273.09 3,060.54 766.97 5,752.86 1,566.90 730.77 3,717.09 2,405.05 5,970.18 8,082.98 3,194.02 1,040.30 447.66 2,153.57 5,517.19 455.93 721.78 5,584.45 247,131.77

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ 1,694,054.74 $ 16,436.25 $ 79,894.40 $ (1,511,187.33) $ (321.32) $ 278,876.74

2016

2016 4,008.12 727.65 560.00 32.68 3,339.23 6,804.32 973.10 549.34 7,210.50 4,035.68

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3,088.57 2,760.00 6,851.47 7,478.52

566.14 896.46

1,917.30 2,125.12 6,501.08

1,506.35 257.22

544.41

1,208.56

1,143.43

2014 $ 42,453.30 $ $ 7,408.05 $ 18,314.67 $ 4,157.80 $ 72,333.82

$ 18,043.29 $ (55,687.84) $ 3,771.95 $ 115,901.67

$ 74,347.82

$ $

$ $ $

$ $

$

$

$

2014

2015 $ 149,774.27

$ 1,540.21 $ 523.20 $ 828.39 $ 223.11 $ 112,584.71

$ $ $ $

4,087.95 587.69

$ $

8,167.77

$

2,537.09

1,116.73

$

$

835.08

$

2015

611.11 968.04

587.84

1,234.99

641.78

2013 $ 3,318.71 $ $ $ 830.28 $ 7,653.26 $ 622.20 $ 12,424.45

$ 14,437.45

$ $

$

$

$

2013

2012 $ 1,929.83 $ $ $ 445.56 $ 4,898.51 $ 437.60 $ 7,711.50

$ 9,723.50

2012

2011 $ 1,988.19 $ $ $ 437.16 $ 4,769.77 $ 377.40 $ 7,572.52

$ 9,583.52

2011

2010 $ 2,251.23 $ $ $ 179.28 $ $ $ 2,430.51

$ 4,440.51

2010

2009 $ 2,271.23 $ $ $ 174.72 $ $ $ 2,445.95

$ 4,454.95

2009

Total 4,008.12 3,347.94 560.00 32.68 3,339.23 6,804.32 4,533.38 549.34 15,378.27 4,035.68 1,132.25 6,175.27 554.17 3,094.87 81.04 274.24 406.97 9,156.56 1,351.91 346.10 28.06 3,249.75 3,273.09 3,060.54 766.97 5,752.86 1,566.90 730.77 8,722.96 7,290.17 19,322.73 15,561.50 3,194.02 1,040.30 447.66 2,153.57 7,057.40 2,156.38 3,414.67 5,807.56 462,620.23

Total $ 203,986.76 $ 1,694,054.74 $ 16,436.25 $ 107,412.74 $ (1,531,238.96) $ 9,045.63 $ 499,697.16

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $


132

BOND ISSUE TOWN DEBT SERVICE

TOTAL PRIN & INT

BALANCE DUE

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26 2026-27 2027-28 2028-29 2029-30 2030-31 2031-32 2032-33 2033-34

BOND ISSUES

FISCAL YEAR

1.

$636,552.29

$74,934.93 $74,934.93 $74,934.93 $411,747.50

$2,714,107.94

$636,552.29

$0.00

$0.00

JULY, 1994 RF1-023 LOAN #2 3/1/94 LOCAL CSO INTEREST/ ADMIN FEE PRINCIPAL

2.

$630,000.00

$105,000.00 $105,000.00 $105,000.00 $105,000.00 $105,000.00 $105,000.00

$1,575,000.00

$656,931.90

$26,931.90

$23,839.83 $17,660.31 $12,873.04 $8,116.54 $3,276.04 ($1,763.23) ($4,131.71) ($4,246.48) ($4,705.56) ($3,557.86) ($6,886.19) ($13,542.83)

$554,001.61

2003 DPW FACILITY BOND 8.3972% AVERAGE RATE Refinanced in July 2012 INTEREST PRINCIPAL

3.

$1,078,463.75

$56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25 $56,761.25

$1,135,225.00

PRINCIPAL

$1,430,363.04

$351,899.29

$31,444.60 $30,665.27 $29,783.76 $28,794.41 $27,648.97 $26,350.27 $24,909.67 $23,335.68 $21,668.04 $19,918.10 $18,083.00 $16,171.28 $14,092.12 $11,859.70 $9,692.55 $7,596.35 $5,468.94 $3,307.47 $1,109.11

$411,038.48

INTEREST

2012 QUECHEE COVERED BRIDGE BOND

4.

$3,655,000.00

$182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00 $182,750.00

$3,655,000.00

$5,119,028.00

$1,464,028.00

$121,562.00 $119,754.00 $117,252.00 $114,056.00 $110,165.00 $105,617.00 $100,520.00 $94,911.00 $88,809.00 $82,323.00 $75,527.00 $68,411.00 $61,020.00 $53,420.00 $45,609.00 $37,588.00 $29,412.00 $21,117.00 $12,712.00 $4,243.00

$1,566,281.13

2014 MAXFIELD SPORTS COMPLEX / WEST HARTFORD LIBRARY / POOL & PUMP HSE INTEREST PRINCIPAL

5.


133

$1,793,237.19

$126,355.23 $130,145.89 $134,050.27 $138,071.77 $142,213.93 $146,480.34 $150,874.76 $155,401.00 $160,063.03 $164,864.92 $169,810.87 $174,905.18

$2,714,107.94

PRINCIPAL

$2,161,828.17

$368,590.98

BAL DUE

TOTAL PRIN & INT

$53,797.11 $50,006.46 $46,102.08 $42,080.58 $37,938.42 $33,672.00 $29,277.60 $24,751.35 $20,089.32 $15,287.43 $10,341.48 $5,247.15

$934,505.79

INTEREST

WELL LOAN

2004 RF3-069 WILDER

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26 2026-27 2027-28 2028-29 2029-30 2030-31 2031-32 2032-33 2033-34

BOND ISSUES

FISCAL YEAR

BOND ISSUE TOWN DEBT SERVICE

$45,000.00

$15,000.00 $15,000.00 $15,000.00

$255,000.00

PRINCIPAL

$48,333.00

$3,333.00

$1,844.25 $1,115.25 $373.50

$87,922.38

INTEREST

2001 QUECHEE WATER BOND 7.8178% AVERAGE RATE

$611,632.08

$28,564.50 $29,135.79 $29,718.51 $30,312.88 $30,919.14 $31,537.52 $32,168.27 $32,811.64 $33,467.87 $34,137.23 $34,819.97 $35,516.37 $36,226.70 $36,951.23 $37,690.26 $38,444.06 $39,212.94 $39,997.20

$667,091.81

PRINCIPAL

$734,348.62

$122,716.54

$12,232.64 $11,661.35 $11,078.64 $10,484.27 $9,878.01 $9,259.63 $8,628.87 $7,985.51 $7,329.28 $6,659.92 $5,977.17 $5,280.78 $4,570.45 $3,845.91 $3,106.89 $2,353.08 $1,584.20 $799.94

$148,851.11

ADMIN FEE

AR1-006 WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS(41.02% F60, 58.98% F65) INTEREST/

$7,277,420.80

$318,618.34 $324,990.70 $331,490.52 $338,120.33 $344,882.73 $351,780.39 $358,816.00 $365,992.32 $373,312.16 $380,778.41 $388,393.97 $396,161.85 $404,085.09 $412,166.79 $420,410.13 $428,818.33 $437,394.70 $446,142.59 $455,065.45

$7,589,791.71

PRINCIPAL

$8,819,168.31

$1,541,747.51

$145,548.42 $139,176.05 $132,676.24 $126,046.42 $119,284.02 $112,386.36 $105,350.76 $98,174.44 $90,854.59 $83,388.35 $75,772.78 $68,004.90 $60,081.66 $51,999.96 $43,756.62 $35,348.42 $26,772.05 $18,024.16 $9,101.31

$1,693,543.34

ADMIN FEE

TREATMENT FACILITY LOAN INTEREST/

AR1-099 HARTFORD WASTEWATER

$225,000.00

$75,000.00 $75,000.00 $75,000.00

$1,130,000.00

PRINCIPAL

$241,665.00

$16,665.00

$9,221.25 $5,576.25 $1,867.50

$418,844.29

INTEREST

WASTEWATER BOND 8.3162% AVERAGE RATE

2001 QUECHEE


BOND ISSUE TOWN DEBT SERVICE FISCAL YEAR BOND ISSUES

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26 2026-27 2027-28 2028-29 2029-30 2030-31 2031-32 2032-33 2033-34 BALANCE DUE

TOTAL PRIN & INT

AR1-041 QUECHEE WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY LOAN INTEREST/ ADMIN FEE PRINCIPAL

2014 WENDELL A. BARWOOD ARENA RENOVATION INTEREST/ ADMIN FEE PRINCIPAL

$1,194,525.20

$5,353,389.71

$1,071,328.00

$2,500,000.00

$102,661.24 $98,166.55 $93,581.96 $88,905.69 $84,135.88 $79,270.69 $74,308.19 $69,246.43 $64,083.45 $58,817.20 $53,445.63 $47,966.63 $42,378.05 $36,677.69 $30,863.33 $24,932.68 $18,883.42 $12,713.18 $6,419.52

$224,734.51 $229,229.20 $233,813.78 $238,490.06 $243,259.86 $248,125.06 $253,087.56 $258,149.31 $263,312.30 $268,578.54 $273,950.11 $279,429.12 $285,017.70 $290,718.05 $296,532.41 $302,463.06 $308,512.32 $314,682.57 $320,976.24

$83,147.00 $81,911.00 $80,200.00 $78,014.00 $75,352.00 $72,241.00 $68,755.00 $64,919.00 $60,745.00 $56,309.00 $51,660.00 $46,792.00 $41,737.00 $36,539.00 $31,196.00 $25,710.00 $20,117.00 $14,444.00 $8,695.00 $2,903.00

$125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00

$1,087,457.41

$5,133,061.76

$1,001,386.00

$2,500,000.00

$6,220,519.17

134

$3,501,386.00


BOND ISSUE TOWN DEBT SERVICE

TOTAL ALL TOWN FUNDS INTEREST

PRINCIPAL

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26 2026-27 2027-28 2028-29 2029-30 2030-31 2031-32 2032-33 2033-34

$762,144.77 $723,772.07 $685,697.52 $647,464.86 $608,768.35 $567,237.76 $528,916.34 $493,077.13 $454,644.60 $417,828.38 $370,644.68 $315,370.36 $298,991.40 $259,621.96 $219,525.94 $178,712.88 $137,118.55 $94,830.22 $51,858.05 $11,389.00

$1,752,164.94 $1,767,393.94 $1,782,965.44 $2,382,512.54 $1,575,298.16 $1,591,945.81 $1,398,969.09 $1,416,376.77 $1,434,177.86 $1,452,381.60 $1,470,997.42 $1,490,035.02 $1,329,351.99 $1,343,858.57 $1,358,655.30 $1,373,747.95 $1,389,142.46 $1,404,844.86 $1,380,064.19 $490,500.00

BALANCE DUE

$7,827,614.82

$29,585,383.91

FISCAL YEAR BOND ISSUES

$37,412,998.73

TOTAL PRIN & INT

135


TOWN SPECIAL REVENUE, CAPITAL PROJECT, & RESERVE FUNDS CASH BALANCE AS OF JUNE 30, 2015 Capital Reserve Funds

July 1, 2015

Balance

June 30, 2016

Interest

Deposits

Withdrawals

Balance

Accounting Software Reserve Fund CSO Bond Reserve Fund Conservation & Development Digital Imaging Reserve Fund Building Energy Improvements Fund Fire & Ambulance Equip. Fund Highway Equipment Reserve Fund Highway Bridges/Culverts Fund Highway Construction Projects Fund Highway Street Lights Maintenance Fund Highway Street Lights Replacement Fund Landfill Capital Reserve Fund Municapal Building Handicap Outdoor Facility Reserve Fund Quechee Water Capital Reserve Quechee Wastewater Capital Res Fund Recreation Reserve Fund Revaluation Reserve Senior Center Capital Reserve Fund Tower Maintenance Reserve Fund Town Clerk Restoration Fund Twin Pines VCDP Water Capital Reserve Fund Wastewater Capital Reserve Fund

$6,130.59 $262,321.92 $95,640.68 $55,330.29 $13,013.84 $452,815.93 $35,986.01 $624,695.52 $276,058.47 $9,562.44 $32,479.29 $29,989.04 $86,366.51 $94,504.67 $501,118.18 $830,961.13 $64,368.51 $380,598.31 $16,530.53 $8,052.37 $133,994.28 $21,590.67 $919,509.69 $1,071,569.37

$9.21 $403.06 $144.29 $44.83 $8.37 $605.14 $76.64 $937.34 $379.86 $14.40 $50.52 $48.95 $53.96 $144.17 $771.90 $1,259.70 $96.75 $477.64 $25.68 $17.67 $146.02 $21.13 $1,389.56 $1,619.06

$0.00 $42,788.00 $3,000.00 $20,740.00 $0.00 $135,000.00 $110,000.00 $175,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $8,772.21 $18,946.00 $0.00 $10,342.00 $91,162.00 $52,156.00 $0.00 $54,000.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 $20,740.00 $0.00 $36,333.00 $40,938.00

$0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $47,749.12 $13,022.21 $185,000.00 $0.00 $44,830.66 $34,459.88 $0.00 $1,512.00 $0.00 $86,420.47 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $39,130.77 $0.00 $0.00 $68,990.60 $21,611.80 $0.00 $0.00

$6,139.80 $305,512.98 $97,784.97 $28,366.00 $0.00 $403,421.07 $146,062.65 $755,802.20 $241,978.45 $9,576.84 $39,790.02 $48,983.99 $0.00 $104,990.84 $593,052.08 $884,376.83 $64,465.26 $395,945.18 $20,556.21 $12,070.04 $85,889.70 $0.00 $957,232.25 $1,114,126.43

Total Capital Reserve Funds

$6,023,188.24

$8,745.85

$827,917.21

$543,727.51

$6,316,123.79

Landfill Fund

July 1, 2015

Balance

June 30, 2016

Interest

Deposits

Withdrawals

Balance

Landfill Closure Fund Equipment Reserve

$531,920.50 $0.00

$762.52 $14.14

$0.00 $51,464.64

$69,323.44 $0.00

$463,359.58 $51,478.78

Total Landfill Dept Res Funds

$531,920.50

$776.66

$51,464.64

$69,323.44

$514,838.36

Water Department Funds

July 1, 2015

Balance

June 30, 2016

Interest

Deposits

Withdrawals

Balance

Water Impact Fees Quechee Water Impact Fees

$122,960.06 $56,552.45

$195.93 $66.76

$13,426.65 $848.20

$67.60 $20,784.47

$136,515.04 $36,682.94

Total Water Department Res Funds

$179,512.51

$262.69

$14,274.85

$20,852.07

$173,197.98

Wastewater Department Funds

July 1, 2015

Balance

June 30, 2016

Interest

Deposits

Withdrawals

Balance

Wastewater Impact Fees Quechee Wastewater Impact Fees Quechee Wastewater System Imp. Bond

$656,649.50 $212,549.61 $83,721.80

$807.10 $201.87 $125.85

$26,951.09 $2,058.60 $0.00

$290,135.20 $170,000.00 $0.00

$394,272.49 $44,810.08 $83,847.65

Total Wastewater Dept Res Funds

$952,920.91

$1,134.82

$29,009.69

$460,135.20

$522,930.22

$11,731.44 $1,015,408.35

$1,268,828.03

$7,996,350.16

Total Special Rev, Cap Project, & Res Funds

$8,238,038.40

136


TOWN SPECIAL REVENUE, CAPITAL PROJECT, & RESERVE FUNDS CASH BALANCE AS OF JUNE 30, 2015

Special Revenue Funds

July 1, 2015

Balance

June 30, 2016

Interest

Deposits

Withdrawals

Balance

Rehabilitation Loan Fund Community Development Loan Fund Fire Impact Fund Library Impact Fund Recreation Impact Fund Police Asset Forfeiture Community Oriented Policing Fund Engine 494 Restoration Fund Quechee Gorge Project Watershed Grant WG98-02 Trees Matter Glory Days of the Railroad Dog Park

$0.00 $202,186.07 $49,356.49 $1,299.94 $68,790.87 $4,519.17 $3,002.84 $8,635.35 $422.19 $1,855.18 $4,166.50 $1,874.64 $7,485.78

$293.80 $81.40 $2.30 $95.69 $5.40 $4.18 $7.15 $0.60 $2.82 $4.29 $6.19 $11.63

$39,998.93 $19,563.41 $372.60 $12,256.20 $300.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $990.00 $13,787.82 $4,473.00

$100,765.84 $0.00 $0.00 $46,209.22 $3,504.09 $231.03 $5,759.87 $0.00 $0.00 $2,837.08 $12,367.41 $3,115.27

$0.00 $141,712.96 $69,001.30 $1,674.84 $34,933.54 $1,320.48 $2,775.99 $3,882.63 $422.79 $1,858.00 $2,323.71 $3,301.24 $8,855.14

Total Special Revenue Funds

$353,595.02

$515.45

$92,741.96

$174,789.81

$272,062.62

Capital Project Funds

July 1, 2015

Balance CSO Bond Fund DPW Garage Reserve Fund Town Office Renovation Reserve Total Capital Project Funds

June 30, 2016

Interest

Deposits

Withdrawals

Balance

$83,059.21 $52,054.90 $61,787.11

$124.85 $78.24 $92.88

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$83,184.06 $52,133.14 $61,879.99

$196,901.22

$295.97

$0.00

$0.00

$197,197.19

137


138

DATE VOTED

VETERANS (HOMESTEAD) VETERANS (NON-RESIDENT)

Owner's Name

Category

Ending Date Statute Title/Section

Full Value Before Exemption Leave column blank if not exempt from education tax.

EDUCATION GL Value Exempted NONHOMESTEAD RESIDENTIAL

Total Non-approved (#4) Local Agreements - Homestead Value: Total Non-approved (#4) Local Agreements - Non-residential Value:

$1,359,600 $378,100

$1,359,600 $378,100

Leave blank if not municipal exempt

MUNICIPAL Value Exempted

STANDARD EXEMPTION TYPES Use these codes in "Exemption Type" column: 1 - Approved VEPC 2 - Approved TIF 3 - Grandfathered 4 - Non-Approved (not grandfathered) 5 - Municipal Contract (Owner Pays Ed Tax) 6 - Statutory (enter on Page 5)

REQUIRED FROM ABOVE: Enter the sum of the value of all #4-Non-approved (non-grandfathered) local agreements for calculating a Local Agreement Rate on lines below. Non-approved (non-grandfathered) exemptions are those voted after June 30, 1997 and are part of the education grand list.

SPAN

Beginning Date

STANDARD EXEMPTIONS do not include "Special Exemptions" (ski lifts, snowmaking equipment, whey tanks, qualifed housing), nor do they include veterans exemptions, current use exemptions, or statutory/non-taxable exemptions. Separate pages are provided for these types of exemptions.

STANDARD EXEMPTIONS Include all contracts, exemptions, and stabilization agreements — both voted and state-approved

2016 Exemptions, Stabilization Agreements, and Other Reductions of Taxable Value


Hartford 2016 FINAL Grand List Form 411 - (Town code: 285) (Taxable properties only - State and Non-tax status properties are not listed below) REAL ESTATE Parcel Municipal Homestead Ed Non-Resi Ed. Total Education Category/Code Count Listed Value Listed Value Listed Value Listed Value -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Residential I R1 2,844 683,478,100 415,783,616 267,694,484 683,478,100 Residential II R2 369 145,955,000 91,209,623 54,745,377 145,955,000 Mobile Homes-U MHU 302 9,124,000 6,068,500 3,055,500 9,124,000 Mobile Homes-L MHL 104 12,351,400 8,287,200 4,064,200 12,351,400 Seasonal I S1 21 278,100 0 278,100 278,100 Seasonal II S2 2 297,400 0 297,400 297,400 Commercial C 315 180,665,200 1,205,600 179,459,600 180,665,200 Commercial Apts CA 63 26,416,300 166,300 26,250,000 26,416,300 Industrial I 7 6,549,700 0 6,549,700 6,549,700 Utilities-E UE 9 69,014,500 0 69,014,500 69,014,500 Utilities-O UO 0 0 0 0 0 Farm F 11 5,201,300 3,004,500 2,196,800 5,201,300 Other O 1,071 169,106,600 44,295,900 124,810,700 169,106,600 Woodland W 0 0 0 0 0 Miscellaneous M 338 40,561,200 3,373,000 37,188,200 40,561,200 ------ --------------------------------------------------------TOTAL LISTED REAL 5,456 1,348,998,800 573,394,239 775,604,561 1,348,998,800 P.P. Cable P.P. Equipment P.P. Inventory TOTAL LISTED P.P.

1 2,683,600 0 0 0 0 ------ --------------1 2,683,600

TOTAL LISTED VALUE EXEMPTIONS Veterans 10K Veterans >10K

61/61

Total Veterans P.P. Contracts Contract Apprv VEPC Grandfathered Non-Apprv(voted) Owner Pays Ed Tax Total Contracts FarmStab Apprv VEPC Farm Grandfathered Non-Apprv(voted) Owner Pays Ed Tax Total FarmStabContr Current Use

2,683,600

---------------

--------------2,683,600

--------------2,683,600

=============== 1,351,682,400

=============== 573,394,239

=============== 778,288,161

=============== 1,351,682,400

610,000 1,737,700 --------------2,347,700

470,000

140,000

610,000

--------------470,000

--------------140,000

--------------610,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

--------------0

--------------0

--------------0

0 0

0 0

0 0

--------------0

--------------0

--------------0

2,761,000

5,818,800

8,579,800

0

4,626,000

4,626,000

0 --------------3,231,000 675 --------------675 =============== 3,231,675 ===============

0 --------------10,584,800 3,950,550 --------------3,950,550 =============== 14,535,350 ===============

0 --------------13,815,800 3,951,225 --------------3,951,225 =============== 17,767,025 ===============

5,701,625.64

7,646,464.36

13,348,090.00

1 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0

2,683,600 0 0 0 0 --------------1/0 2,683,600 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0

0 0 0 0 --------------0/0 0

63/63

Special Exemptions

21

Partial Statutory

0/0

Sub-total Exemptions TIF 1 Exemption

2,683,600

8,579,800

0 --------------13,611,100

90

Total TIFs =============== 13,611,100 ===============

Total Exemptions TOTAL MUNICIPAL GRAND LIST TOTAL EDUCATION GRAND LIST NON-TAX

13,380,713.00

193 NON-TAX PARCELS ARE NOT INCLUDED ON THE 411 EXCEPT EDUCATION TIF BASE TOTALS

139


Owner Name

Location

ADVANCE TRANSIT INC ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH + CONF CENTER IN ALODIUM CHURCH AMERICAN LEGION HARTFORD POST 26 CHRIST REDEEMER CHURCH INC CHRISTIAN STREET CEMETERY ASSOC COVER HOME REPAIR INC FAMILY PLACE INC THE GOOD NEIGHBOR HEALTH CLINIC INC GREATER HARTFORD UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST HARTFORD CEMETERY ASSOCIATION HARTFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY HARTFORD LIBRARY INC HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF

120 BILLINGS FARM ROAD 150 ADVENT LANE 1450 ROUTE 14 #A 201 DEWITT DRIVE 1905 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 0 CHRISTIAN STREET 158 SOUTH MAIN STREET 52 OLCOTT DRIVE 70 NORTH MAIN STREET 1721 MAPLE STREET 0 MAPLE STREET 1461 MAPLE STREET 1587 MAPLE STREET 0 WOODSTOCK ROAD 0 QUECHEE HARTLAND ROAD 0 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 70 VILLAGE GREEN CIRCLE 0 VILLAGE GREEN CIRCLE 131 WILLARD ROAD 104 WATERMAN HILL ROAD 86 WATERMAN HILL ROAD 1732 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 304 DODY LANE 0 DODY LANE 142 IZZO PLACE 0 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 0 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 270 WRIGHT RESERVOIR ROAD 2590 NORTH HARTLAND ROAD 120 LESLIE DRIVE 100 ARBORETUM LANE 0 NORTH HARTLAND ROAD 0 VA CUTOFF ROAD 0 NORTH HARTLAND ROAD 0 BLAKE DRIVE 0 ROUTE 14 6025 ROUTE 14 5985 ROUTE 14 0 ROUTE 14 BOAT LAUNCH 0 ROUTE 14 37 HARPER SAVAGE LANE 5133 ROUTE 14 5099 ROUTE 14 100 RECREATION DRIVE 200 CRANBERRY LANE 2333 HARTFORD AVENUE 0 HARTFORD AVENUE 160 NORWICH AVENUE 0 RAYMOND CIRCLE 275 DEPOT STREET 0 LOCUST STREET 130 SOUTH STREET 537 PASSUMPSIC AVENUE 0 HILLRIDGE ROAD 0 HILLRIDGE ROAD 0 MAPLE STREET 0 ELMWOOD COURT 0 OLD RIVER ROAD 0 MILL ROAD 0 FERRY BOAT CROSSING 0 FERRY BOAT CROSSING 0 MILL ROAD 1120 MAPLE STREET 0 WOODSTOCK ROAD 0 HEMLOCK RIDGE DRIVE 2300 CHRISTIAN STREET 0 MAPLE STREET 37 HIGHLAND AVENUE 0 MAPLE STREET 0 HIGHLAND AVENUE 0 HARTFORD AVENUE 102 PINE STREET 64 HEBARD STREET 73 HIGHLAND AVENUE 173 AIRPORT ROAD 0 FAIRVIEW TERRACE 0 FAIRVIEW TERRACE 0 NORTH MAIN STREET 0 SOUTH MAIN STREET 0 HILLCREST TERRACE 0 NORTH MAIN STREET

Assessment $949,800 $783,900 $223,200 $273,600 488,000 $128,700 $288,000 $505,300 $334,400 $518,600 $152,300 $284,400 $366,000 $145,800 $136,100 $94,600 $41,900 $56,100 $222,400 $42,300 $42,300 $94,700 $2,781,100 $146,500 $1,199,900 $113,100 $141,700 $5,095,900 $954,400 $258,400 $5,670,700 $122,400 $27,200 $40,000 $6,800 $10,000 $51,500 $46,800 $9,400 $18,200 $86,000 $502,900 $41,000 $149,600 $253,900 $180,900 $157,300 $814,400 $50,800 $229,200 $50,800 $144,400 $74,500 $131,800 $40,000 $57,000 $52,600 $53,600 $110,700 $130,000 $32,000 $50,200 $169,500 $45,500 $149,400 $4,143,400 $130,000 $10,587,600 $123,500 $158,600 $55,200 $1,586,400 $396,800 $327,200 $1,471,500 $10,500 $61,000 $48,000 $225,200 $55,000 $50,000

140

Owner Name

Location

HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF HARTFORD TOWN OF LISTEN LISTEN INC MID VERMONT CHRISTIAN SCHOOL INC MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCES INC NEW ENGLAND CENTRAL RAILROAD INC NEW ENGLAND CENTRAL RAILROAD INC NEW ENGLAND CENTRAL RAILROAD INC NEW ENGLAND CENTRAL RAILROAD INC NORTHERN STAGE COMPANY PRAISE CHAPEL INC QUECHEE CEMETERY ASSOCIATION QUECHEE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION ST ANTHONY PARISH ST ANTHONY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH ST ANTHONY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH ST ANTHONY'S PARISH ST PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH ST PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH TUCKER CEMETERY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF WHITE RIVER UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE

262 NORTH MAIN STREET 0 NORTH MAIN STREET 0 NORTH MAIN STREET 25 THOMAS STREET 171 BRIDGE STREET 17 MAPLE STREET 12 RAILROAD ROW 167 MAPLE STREET 6 SOUTH MAIN STREET 0 SOUTH MAIN STREET 319 LATHAM WORKS LANE 0 LATHAM WORKS LANE 0 LATHAM WORKS LANE 127 LATHAM WORKS LANE 0 LATHAM WORKS LANE 0 LATHAM WORKS LANE 0 SYKES MOUNTAIN AVENUE 75 LATHAM WORKS LANE 0 HARRISON AVENUE 285 SIMONS CEMETERY ROAD 367 LAKELAND DRIVE 520 CENTER OF TOWN ROAD 0 ROUTE 14 585 ROUTE 14 0 OLD RIVER ROAD 520 CENTER OF TOWN ROAD 0 RESERVOIR ROAD 0 STONECREST AVENUE 0 BROOKMEADE CIRCLE 292 BROOKMEADE CIRCLE 0 CHRISTIAN STREET 812 VA CUTOFF ROAD 61 ALLISON RUN 0 MAPLE STREET 0 CHRISTIAN STREET 608 NORTH MAIN STREET 44 MAPLE STREET 399 WEST GILSON AVENUE 0 LAND-NORWICH BORDER 0 MILL ROAD 0 ROUND HOUSE ROAD 0 RIVERSIDE LAND 0 CONNECTICUT RIVER ROAD 76 GATES STREET 1615 MAPLE STREET 0 OLD QUECHEE ROAD 1957 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 1149 HARTFORD AVENUE 41 CHURCH STREET 0 CHURCH STREET 469 SOUTH MAIN STREET 749 HARTFORD AVENUE 747 HARTFORD AVENUE 0 ROUTE 14 106 GATES STREET 0 WOODSTOCK ROAD 0 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 0 QUECHEE MAIN STREET 764 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 0 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 0 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 0 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 0 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 5800 WOODSTOCK ROAD 5966 WOODSTOCK ROAD 0 DEWEYS MILLS ROAD 209 BALSAM LANE 207 HOLIDAY DRIVE 125 VETERANS DRIVE 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 0 APPALACHIAN TRAIL 35 HOLIDAY DRIVE

Assessment $578,100 $55,400 $40,000 $53,100 $1,433,200 $59,200 $86,100 $106,300 $77,500 $57,600 $3,308,200 $48,800 $63,400 $27,000 $37,100 $68,300 $47,000 $114,300 $37,700 $32,000 $102,100 $51,800 $34,000 $90,000 $160,400 $50,200 $53,600 $59,200 $352,000 $244,700 $56,500 $1,184,300 $171,900 $130,000 $307,200 $426,600 $844,800 $2,215,900 $164,800 $44,700 $157,100 $200,800 $115,200 $1,105,600 $563,200 $144,000 $527,700 $155,300 $1,293,500 $101,900 $98,800 $616,000 $206,200 $8,000 $512,900 $100,800 $131,800 $97,500 $413,100 $136,700 $136,200 $47,000 $201,000 $607,600 $265,200 $36,900 $2,877,900 $1,017,500 $21,663,000 $174,800 $159,100 $115,200 $121,600 $120,300 $48,800 $112,000 $167,600 $118,100 $120,800 $137,600 $130,400


Owner Name

Location

UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE UPPER VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST UPPER VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST UPPER VALLEY HAVEN INC OF VERMONT VALLEY BIBLE CHURCH OF W R JCT VALLEY BIBLE CHURCH OF W R JCT VALLEY BIBLE CHURCH OF WHITE RIVER JCT VERMONT INSTITUTE OF NATURAL SCIENCE INC VERMONT STATE COLLEGES VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VERMONT STATE OF VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS WALDORF SCHOOL INC THE WEST HARTFORD CEMETERY ASSN WEST HARTFORD CHURCH WILDER CLUB + LIBRARY WRIGHT FAMILY TOMB

195 SYKES MOUNTAIN AVENUE 195 SYKES MOUNTAIN AVENUE 4330 WOODSTOCK ROAD 4328 WOODSTOCK ROAD 713 HARTFORD AVENUE 851 FAIRVIEW TERRACE 132 LOWER HYDE PARK 106 LOWER HYDE PARK 6565 WOODSTOCK ROAD 145 BILLINGS FARM ROAD 0 QUECHEE STATE PARK 0 QUECHEE STATE PARK 0 WOODSTOCK ROAD 221 BESWICK DRIVE 0 CONNECTICUT RIVER ROAD 0 OLD RIVER ROAD 0 OLD RIVER ROAD 0 RR LINE NORTH OF STATION 0 RAILROAD ROW 82 RAILROAD ROW 100 RAILROAD ROW 0 RAILROAD ROW 0 RR LINE SOUTH OF STATION 75 HILLSIDE ROAD 0 OLD RIVER ROAD 0 WOODSTOCK ROAD 97 SOUTH MAIN STREET 80 BLUFF ROAD 0 ROUTE 14 5275 ROUTE 14 78 NORWICH AVENUE 0 VA CUTOFF ROAD

Assessment $196,600 $4,171,800 $491,000 $119,400 $1,379,800 $1,545,800 $166,500 $49,200 $1,645,500 $1,997,500 $159,100 $138,200 $154,200 $662,900 $36,400 $122,300 $154,100 $172,500 $85,500 $1,339,900 $424,200 $634,700 $163,700 $688,500 $158,700 $121,200 $366,300 $1,343,500 $106,000 $161,200 $325,900 $40,000

141

Owner Name

Location

193 Statutorily Non Taxabale Parcels

Total Exempt Value

Assessment

$113,516,100


Independent Auditor’s Report Board of Selectmen Town of Hartford 171 Bridge Street Hartford, Vermont 05001 Report on the Financial Statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities, the business-type activities, each major fund, and the aggregate remaining fund information of the Town of Hartford, Vermont, as of and for the year ended June 30, 2016, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the Town of Hartford, Vermont’s basic financial statements as listed in the Table of Contents. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in “Government Auditing Standards”, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Town of Hartford, Vermont’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Town of Hartford, Vermont’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinions. Opinions In our opinion, the financial statements referred to previously present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the governmental activities, the business-type activities, each major fund, and the aggregate remaining fund information of the Town of Hartford, Vermont, as of June 30, 2016, and the respective changes in financial position, and, where applicable, cash flows thereof for the year then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

142


Town of Hartford, Vermont

Other Matters Required Supplementary Information Management has omitted Management’s Discussion and Analysis that accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require to be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Our opinion on the basic financial statements is not affected by this missing information. Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require that the budgetary comparison for the General Fund on Schedule 1, the Schedule of Proportionate Share of the Net Pension Liability on Schedule 2, the Schedule of Contributions on Schedule 3 and the Schedule of Funding Progress on Schedule 4 be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Such information, although not a part of the basic financial statements, is required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, who considers it to be an essential part of financial reporting for placing the basic financial statements in an appropriate operational, economic, or historical context. We have applied certain limited procedures to the required supplementary information in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, which consisted of inquiries of management about the methods of preparing the information and comparing the information for consistency with management’s responses to our inquiries, the basic financial statements, and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic financial statements. We do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the information because the limited procedures do not provide us with sufficient evidence to express an opinion or provide any assurance. Other Information Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that collectively comprise the Town of Hartford, Vermont’s basic financial statements. The supplementary information on Schedules 5 through 13 is presented for purposes of additional analysis and is not a required part of the basic financial statements. These schedules have not been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, accordingly, we do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on them. Other Reporting Required by “Government Auditing Standards” In accordance with “Government Auditing Standards”, we have also issued our report dated December 28, 2016 on our consideration of the Town of Hartford, Vermont’s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with “Government Auditing Standards” in considering the Town of Hartford, Vermont’s internal control over financial reporting and compliance.

December 28, 2016 Montpelier, Vermont VT Lic. #92-000180

143


Exhibit A TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT STATEMENT OF NET POSITION JUNE 30, 2016

Governmental Activities ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Receivables (net of allowance for uncollectible accounts) Taxes receivable Accounts receivable Notes receivable Due from other governments Prepaid expenses Land held for sale Internal Balances Restricted assets Cash and cash equivalents Capital assets (net of accumulated depreciation) Land and land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Roads, bridges and sidewalks Distribution and collection systems Construction in progress

$

7,047,626 14,909

Business-type Activities

$

707,059 284,751 235,946 397,397 24,350 17,669 (2,506,722)

Total

4,808,738 -

$

11,856,364 14,909

793,547 10,120 2,506,722

707,059 1,078,298 235,946 407,517 24,350 17,669 -

305,513

-

305,513

2,224,237 14,548,364 2,971,292 17,914,977 1,564,698

493,134 13,372,080 338,496 10,126,195 106,802

2,717,371 27,920,444 3,309,788 17,914,977 10,126,195 1,671,500

45,752,066

32,555,834

78,307,900

DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES Deferred outflows of resources related to the Town's participation in VMERS

987,405

-

987,405

Total Deferred Outflows of Resources

987,405

-

987,405

578,419 207,995 400,108 48,761 1,107

134,877 38,569 98,995 95,406 -

713,296 246,564 499,103 144,167 1,107

834,446 17,062,249

851,358 13,168,844

1,685,804 30,231,093

19,133,085

14,388,049

33,521,134

82,398

-

82,398

82,398

-

82,398

26,302,445

11,408,930

37,711,375

7,979 122,401 14,480 543,138 305,513

1,126,065 -

7,979 1,248,466 14,480 543,138 305,513

8,821 27,168 83,184 108,859

5,632,790

8,821 27,168 83,184 5,741,649

Total Assets

LIABILITIES Accounts payable Accrued payroll and benefits payable Accrued compensated absences payable Accrued interest payable Unearned revenue Noncurrent liabilities Due within one year Due in more than one year Total Liabilities DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES Prepaid taxes Total Deferred Inflows of Resources NET POSITION Net investment in capital assets Restricted for: Public safety Impact fee eligible expenses Recreation and parks Community development Debt service Endowments and perpetual care Non-expendable Expendable Other purposes Unrestricted Total Net Position

$

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement.

144

27,523,988

$

18,167,785

$

45,691,773


Exhibit B TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016

Net (Expense) Revenue and Changes in Net Position

Program Revenues

Expenses Functions/Programs Primary government: Governmental activities: General government Administration Elections and vital statistics Finance Valuation Public safety Police Fire and ambulance Dispatch Public works Highways Public works administration Health and social services Recreation and parks Recreation administration Recreation programs Parks Conservation and development Cultural Interest on long-term debt

$

Total governmental activities Business-type activities: Solid waste Water Wastewater Total business-type activities Total primary government

$

1,463,228 199,871 347,769 233,148

Operating Grants and Contributions

Charges for Services

$

500 130,966 16,375 116

$

33,000 53,305

Capital Grants and Contributions

$

Governmental Activities

-

$

Business-type Activities

Total

(1,429,728) $ (68,905) (331,394) (179,727)

-

$

(1,429,728) (68,905) (331,394) (179,727)

2,655,767 2,928,647 810,832

37,180 600,336 389,330

52,352 17,307 20,175

53,467 -

(2,512,768) (2,311,004) (401,327)

-

(2,512,768) (2,311,004) (401,327)

3,618,748 153,165 312,451

5,382 4,266

264,699 -

423,812 -

(2,924,855) (153,165) (308,185)

-

(2,924,855) (153,165) (308,185)

223,080 721,703 618,657 959,165 358,173 366,665

444,166 22,959 81,488 -

22,079 5,000 399,776 -

1,538 -

(223,080) (255,458) (590,698) (476,363) (358,173) (366,665)

-

(223,080) (255,458) (590,698) (476,363) (358,173) (366,665)

15,971,069

1,733,064

867,693

478,817

(12,891,495)

-

(12,891,495)

907,299 1,261,976 3,292,563

636,117 1,380,065 2,720,552

4,524 -

-

-

(266,658) 118,089 (572,011)

(266,658) 118,089 (572,011)

5,461,838

4,736,734

4,524

-

-

(720,580)

(720,580)

(12,891,495)

(720,580)

(13,612,075)

12,497,984 16,657 216,656 474,184

7,141 (474,184)

12,497,984 23,798 216,656 -

13,205,481

(467,043)

12,738,438

21,432,907

$

6,469,798

$

872,217

$

478,817

General revenues: Property taxes Unrestricted investment earnings Other revenues Transfers Total general revenues and transfers Change in net position

313,986

Net position, July 1, 2015

(1,187,623)

27,210,002

Net position, June 30, 2016

$

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement.

145

27,523,988

(873,637)

19,355,408 $

18,167,785

46,565,410 $

45,691,773


Exhibit C TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT BALANCE SHEET GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS JUNE 30, 2016 Non-Major Governmental Funds

General Fund ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Receivables (net of allowances for uncollectible accounts) Taxes receivable Accounts receivable Notes receivable Due from other governments Due from other funds Prepaid expenses Land held for sale Restricted assets Cash and cash equivalents

$

Total Assets LIABILITIES Accounts payable Accrued payroll and benefits payable Due to other funds Unearned revenue

6,144,453 -

$

903,173 14,909

$

7,047,626 14,909

707,059 211,220 68,058 24,350 17,669

73,531 235,946 329,339 108,994

707,059 284,751 235,946 397,397 108,994 24,350 17,669

-

305,513

305,513

$

7,172,809

$

1,971,405

$

9,144,214

$

347,697 207,995 2,038,188 -

$

230,722 577,528 1,107

$

578,419 207,995 2,615,716 1,107

Total Liabilities DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES Prepaid taxes Unavailable revenues-property taxes Unavailable revenues-intergovernmental revenues Unavailable revenues-charges for services Total Deferred Inflows of Resources FUND BALANCES Non-spendable Permanent fund principal Restricted for Public safety Impact fees Community development Recreation and parks Debt service Other Assigned for General government Public safety Public works Health and social services Recreation and parks Conservation and development Cultural Unassigned, reported in: General fund Capital projects funds Special revenue funds

2,593,880

809,357

3,403,237

82,398 552,356 124,249

123,613 -

82,398 552,356 123,613 124,249

759,003

123,613

882,616

-

27,168

27,168

-

4,096 122,401 526,580 18,363 305,513 108,563

4,096 122,401 526,580 18,363 305,513 108,563

669,918 554,593 1,623,937 20,689 225,821 205,749 11,817

26,505 -

669,918 554,593 1,623,937 20,689 252,326 205,749 11,817

507,402 -

Total Fund Balances

(90,755) (9,999)

3,819,926

Total Liabilities, Deferred Inflows of Resources and Fund Balances

Total Governmental Funds

$

7,172,809

507,402 (90,755) (9,999)

1,038,435

$

4,858,361

1,971,405

Amounts reported for governmental activities in the statement of net position are different because: Capital assets used in governmental activities are not financial resources and, therefore, are not reported in the funds.

39,223,568

Other assets are not available to pay for current-period expenditures, and, therefore, are deferred in the funds.

800,218

Long-term and accrued liabilities, including bonds payable and the net pension liability, are not due or payable in the current period and, therefore, are not reported in the funds.

(18,345,564)

Deferred outflows and inflows of resources related to the Town's participation in VMERS are applicable to future periods and, therefore, are not reported in the funds. Net position of governmental activities

987,405 $

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement.

146

27,523,988


Exhibit D TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016 Non-Major Governmental Funds

General Fund REVENUES Taxes Tax penalties and interest Permits and licenses Intergovernmental revenues Charges for current services Fines and forfeits Impact fees Interest Other revenues

$

Total Revenues EXPENDITURES Current expenditures General government Administration Elections and vital statistics Finance Valuation Public safety Police Fire and ambulance Dispatch Public works Highways Public works administration Health and social services Recreation and parks Recreation administration Recreation programs Parks Conservation and development Cultural Debt service expenditures Principal Interest Capital expenditures General government Administration Public safety Police Fire and ambulance Public works Highways Recreation and parks Recreation programs Parks Conservation and development Total Expenditures Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues Over Expenditures OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Transfers in Transfers out Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) Net Change in Fund Balances

11,992,188 111,842 58,526 327,091 1,626,789 8,029 8,722 50,383

$

$

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement.

147

$

12,044,841 111,842 58,526 1,715,288 1,626,789 8,029 34,270 16,657 109,696

1,542,368

15,725,938

1,279,925 186,321 378,405 221,546

-

1,279,925 186,321 378,405 221,546

2,304,947 2,434,592 706,345

65,812 17,307 20,175

2,370,759 2,451,899 726,520

1,627,868 150,575 309,903

26,795 -

1,654,663 150,575 309,903

205,472 637,445 195,719 421,109 326,870

51,970 511,794 -

205,472 689,415 195,719 932,903 326,870

-

834,446 390,752

834,446 390,752

-

98,208

98,208

83,788 252,940

53,467 -

137,255 252,940

932,281

275,324

1,207,605

179,589 48,619 -

240,753 59,057 275,008

420,342 107,676 275,008

12,884,259

2,920,868

15,805,127

1,299,311

(1,378,500)

(79,189)

297,359 (1,455,047)

1,233,328 (160,051)

1,530,687 (1,615,098)

(1,157,688)

1,073,277

3,819,926

(84,411)

(305,223)

3,678,303

Fund Balances - June 30, 2016

52,653 1,388,197 34,270 7,935 59,313

14,183,570

141,623

Fund Balances - July 1, 2015

Total Governmental Funds

(163,600)

1,343,658 $

1,038,435

5,021,961 $

4,858,361


Exhibit E TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT RECONCILIATION OF THE STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES OF GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS TO THE STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016

Amounts reported for governmental activities in the statement of activities (Exhibit B) are different because: Net change in fund balances - total government funds (Exhibit D)

$

(163,600)

Government funds report capital outlays as expenditures. However, in the statement of activities the cost of those assets ($2,499,036) is allocated over their estimated useful lives and reported as depreciation expense ($3,066,173). This is the amount by which depreciation exceeded capital outlays in the current period.

(567,137)

The effect of moving the Outdoor Facilities business activity to a governmental activity increases governmental net position for the capital assets contributed ($2,957,462 ) less the debt ($2,375,000) less the net effect of other non-current assets and liabilities ($17,734).

564,728

The issuance of long-term debt ($0) (e.g., bonds, leases) provides current financial resources to governmental funds, while the repayment of the principal of long-term debt ($834,446) consumes the current financial resources of governmental funds. Neither transaction, however, has any effect on net position. This amount is the net effect of these differences in the treatment of long-term debt and related items.

834,446

Governmental funds report employer pension contributions as expenditures ($303,770). However, in the statement of activities, the cost of pension benefits earned net of employee contributions ($418,952) is reported as pension expense. This amount is the net effect of the differences in the treatment of pension expense.

(115,182)

Revenues in the statement of activities that do not provide current financial resources are not reported as revenues in the funds.

78,798

Some expenses reported in the statement of activities do not require the use of current financial resources and, therefore, are not reported as expenditures in governmental funds. Change in net position of governmental activities (Exhibit B)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement. 148

(318,067) $

313,986


Exhibit F TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT STATEMENT OF FUND NET POSITION PROPRIETARY FUNDS JUNE 30, 2016

Water Fund ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable (net of allowance for uncollectible accounts) Due from other governments Due from other funds

$

1,723,482

Non-Major Fund Solid Waste Fund

Wastewater Fund

$

2,521,434

$

563,822

Total

$

4,808,738

239,287 688,550

519,177 10,120 1,629,091

35,083 189,081

793,547 10,120 2,506,722

Total Current Assets

2,651,319

4,679,822

787,986

8,119,127

Noncurrent Assets Capital assets Land and land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Distribution and collection systems Construction in progress Less accumulated depreciation

34,000 280,160 331,997 11,345,831 106,802 (6,422,083)

260,125 25,961,073 571,300 12,456,163 (21,053,119)

Total Noncurrent Assets

5,676,707

18,195,542

564,458

24,436,707

Total Assets

8,328,026

22,875,364

1,352,444

32,555,834

27,985 11,971 33,682 3,935 149,020

21,259 18,781 50,331 91,471 679,338

85,633 7,817 14,982 23,000 -

134,877 38,569 98,995 95,406 23,000 828,358

226,593

861,180

131,432

1,219,205

Noncurrent Liabilities Other postemployment benefits Accrued postclosure costs - noncurrent portion Bonds and notes payable - noncurrent portion

191,366 1,402,686

369,654 10,796,703

132,435 276,000 -

693,455 276,000 12,199,389

Total Noncurrent Liabilities

1,594,052

11,166,357

408,435

13,168,844

Total Liabilities

1,820,645

12,027,537

539,867

14,388,049

4,125,001 204,665 2,177,715

6,719,501 921,400 3,206,926

564,458 248,119

11,408,960 1,126,065 5,632,760

6,507,381

$ 10,847,827

812,577

$ 18,167,785

LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Accounts payable Accrued payroll and benefits payable Accrued compensated absences payable Accrued interest payable Accrued postclosure costs - current portion Bonds and notes payable - current portion Total Current Liabilities

NET POSITION Net investment in capital assets Restricted Unrestricted Total Net Position

$

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement. 149

277,184 1,672,352 412,276 (1,797,354)

$

571,309 27,913,585 1,315,573 23,801,994 106,802 (29,272,556)


Exhibit G TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND NET POSITION PROPRIETARY FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016

Water Fund OPERATING REVENUES Charges for services Rents and other income

$

Total Operating Revenues OPERATING EXPENSES Personal services Administration expenses Utilities Contract services Postclosure care costs Franchise tax Waste generation fee Equipment operation Repairs and maintenance Materials and supplies Insurance expense Small equipment Depreciation Total Operating Expenses

Non-Major Fund Solid Waste Fund

Wastewater Fund

1,347,746 32,319

$

2,671,272 49,280

$

625,808 10,309

Total

$

4,644,826 91,908

1,380,065

2,720,552

636,117

4,736,734

559,890 24,088 101,484 34,074 7,179 37,201 39,219 14,159 4,482 389,404

875,824 30,014 242,652 243,575 47,187 29,874 79,664 43,498 1,104 1,462,505

346,790 7,085 13,439 419,837 67 6,643 3,828 3,902 11,372 8,472 9,211 816 75,837

1,782,504 61,187 357,575 697,486 67 6,643 3,828 58,268 78,447 127,355 66,868 6,402 1,927,746

1,211,180

3,055,897

907,299

5,174,376

Operating Income (Loss)

168,885

(335,345)

NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES) Intergovernmental revenues Interest income Interest expense

2,425 (50,796)

3,890 (236,666)

4,524 826 -

4,524 7,141 (287,462)

(48,371)

(232,776)

5,350

(275,797)

120,514

(568,121)

Total Nonoperating Revenues (Expenses) Income (Loss) Before Transfers TRANSFERS Transfers in

(271,182)

(437,642)

(265,832)

(713,439)

-

-

180,000

180,000

Total Transfers

-

-

180,000

180,000

Change in Net Position

120,514

(85,832)

(533,439)

Net Position - July 1, 2015 Net Position - June 30, 2016

$

(568,121)

6,386,867

11,415,948

6,507,381

$ 10,847,827

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement. 150

$

898,409

18,701,224

812,577

$ 18,167,785


Exhibit H TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS PROPRIETARY FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016

Water Fund CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from customers and users Payments for goods and services Payments for wages and benefits

$

Net cash provided (used) by operating activities CASH FLOWS FROM NONCAPITAL FINANCING ACTIVITIES Subsidies from government grants (Increase) decrease in due from other governments (Increase) decrease in due from other funds Transfers received from other funds Net cash provided (used) by noncapital financing activities CASH FLOWS FROM CAPITAL AND RELATED FINANCING ACTIVITIES Acquisition and construction of capital assets Principal paid - bonds and notes Interest paid - bonds and notes Net cash provided (used) by capital and related financing activities

Non-Major Fund Solid Waste Fund

Wastewater Fund

1,386,838 $ (526,606) (267,087)

Total

2,747,024 $ (846,759) (741,820)

611,223 $ (329,869) (458,179)

4,745,085 (1,703,234) (1,467,086)

593,145

1,158,445

(176,825)

1,574,765

(688,550) -

205,968 (1,629,091) -

4,524 4,148 (189,081) 180,000

4,524 210,116 (2,506,722) 180,000

(688,550)

(1,423,123)

(409)

(2,112,082)

(135,350) (145,176) (51,121)

(1,124,157) (248,781)

-

(135,350) (1,269,333) (299,902)

(331,647)

(1,372,938)

-

(1,704,585)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Receipt of interest and dividends

2,425

3,890

826

7,141

Net cash provided by investing activities

2,425

3,890

826

7,141

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

(424,627)

Cash and cash equivalents - July 1, 2015

2,148,109

Cash and cash equivalents - June 30, 2016

$

1,723,482

$

(1,633,726)

(176,408)

(2,234,761)

4,155,160

740,230

7,043,499

2,521,434

$

563,822

$

4,808,738

Adjustments to Reconcile Operating Income (Loss) to Net Cash Provided/(used) by Operating Activities: Operating income (loss) Depreciation (Increase) decrease in accounts receivable Increase (decrease) in accounts payable Increase (decrease) in accrued payroll and benefits payable Increase (decrease) in compensated absences payable Increase (decrease) in other post employment benefits Increase (decrease) in accrued postclosure costs Net cash provided (used) by operating activities

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this financial statement. 151

$

168,885 $ 389,404 6,773 (5,201) 4,205 3,680 25,399 -

(335,345) $ 1,462,505 26,472 (24,252) (8,012) (2,936) 40,013 -

(271,182) $ 75,837 (24,894) 49,493 (1,593) 1,136 17,378 (23,000)

(437,642) 1,927,746 8,351 20,040 (5,400) 1,880 82,790 (23,000)

$

593,145

1,158,445

(176,825) $

1,574,765

$

$


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

The Town of Hartford, Vermont, (the Town) was chartered by King George III of England on July 4, 1761. The Town adopted a governance charter in accordance with Vermont statutes on November 4, 2008, which was subsequently ratified by the State on May 7, 2012. The Town operates under a Board of Selectmen-Town Manager form of government, and provides the following services: general administration, public safety (police, fire, and ambulance), streets, health and social services, culture and recreation, planning and zoning, community development, and public improvements. Other services include utility (solid waste, water and wastewater) operations. I. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The accounting policies adopted by the Town of Hartford conform to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applicable to governmental entities. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) is the accepted standard-setting body for establishing accounting and financial reporting principles. The following is a summary of the more significant accounting policies employed in the preparation of these financial statements. A. The Financial Reporting Entity This report includes all of the activity of the Town of Hartford, Vermont. The financial reporting entity consists of the primary government; organizations for which the primary government is financially accountable; and other organizations for which the nature and significance of their relationship with the primary government are such that their exclusion would cause the reporting entity’s financial statements to be misleading or incomplete. Component units are legally separate organizations for which the elected officials of the primary government are financially accountable. The primary government is financially accountable if it appoints a voting majority of the organization’s governing body and it is able to impose its will on that organization or there is a potential for the organization to provide specific financial benefits to, or impose specific financial burdens on the primary government. The primary government is financially accountable if an organization is fiscally dependent on and there is a potential for the organization to provide specific financial benefits to, or impose specific financial burdens on the primary government regardless of whether the organization has a separately elected governing board; a governing board appointed by a higher level of government; or a jointly appointed board. Based on these criteria, there are no other entities that should be combined with the financial statements of the Town. B. Basis of Presentation The accounts of the Town are organized and operated on the basis of fund accounting. A fund is an independent fiscal and accounting entity with a separate set of self-balancing accounts which comprise its assets, deferred outflows of resources, liabilities, deferred inflows of resources, fund equity, revenues, and expenditures or expenses, as appropriate. Government resources are allocated to and accounted for in individual funds based upon the purposes for which they are spent and the means by which spending activities are controlled. The basic financial statements of the Town include both government-wide statements and fund financial statements. The focus of the government-wide statements is on reporting the operating results and financial position of the Town as a whole and present a longer-term view of the Town’s finances. The focus of the fund financial statements is on reporting on the operating results and financial position of the most significant funds of the Town and present a shorter-term view of how operations were financed and what remains available for future spending. Government-wide Statements: The statement of net position and the statement of activities display information about the primary government, the Town. These statements include the financial activities of the overall government. Eliminations have been made to minimize the double counting of activities between funds; however, interfund services provided and used are not eliminated. These statements distinguish between the governmental and business-type activities of the Town. Governmental activities generally are financed through taxes, intergovernmental revenues, and other nonexchange transactions. Business-type activities are financed in whole or in part by fees charged to external parties.

152


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

The statement of activities presents a comparison between direct expenses and program revenues for each function of the Town’s governmental activities and for each segment of the Town’s business-type activities. Direct expenses are those that are specifically associated with a program or function and, therefore, are clearly identifiable to a particular program or function. Program revenues include (a) charges paid by the recipients of goods or services offered by the programs and (b) grants and contributions that are restricted to meeting the operational or capital requirements of a particular program. Revenues that are not classified as program revenues, including all taxes, are presented as general revenues. Fund Financial Statements: The fund financial statements provide information about the Town’s funds. Separate statements for each fund category – governmental and proprietary – are presented. The emphasis of fund financial statements is on major governmental and enterprise funds, each displayed in a separate column. All remaining governmental and enterprise funds are aggregated and reported as nonmajor funds. The Town reports on the following major governmental fund: General Fund. This is the Town’s main operating fund. It accounts for all financial resources of the Town, except those accounted for in another fund. The Town reports on the following major enterprise funds: Water Fund. This funds accounts for the activities of the Town’s water supply systems. Included in this fund are the central water system and the Quechee water system. Wastewater Fund. This fund accounts for the activities of the Town’s wastewater treatment plants and collection systems. Included in this fund are the central wastewater system and the Quechee wastewater system. Proprietary funds distinguish operating revenues and expenses from nonoperating items. Operating revenues and expenses generally result from providing services and producing and delivering goods in connection with a proprietary fund’s principal ongoing operations. The principal operating revenues of the Town’s various enterprise funds are charges to customers for sales and services. Operating expenses for enterprise funds include the cost of sales and services, administrative expenses, and depreciation on capital assets. All revenues and expenses not meeting this definition are reported as nonoperating revenues and expenses. The Town reports on the following non-major governmental fund types: Special Revenue Funds. These funds account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are legally restricted to expenditures for specific purposes other than debt service or capital projects. Included in these funds are Public Safety Funds, Recreation Funds, Community Development Funds, Impact Fee Funds and Hurricane Irene Fund. Capital Project Funds – These funds account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities including those financed by debt and the Town’s Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District. Debt Service Fund. This funds accounts for the annual payments of principal and interest on general long-term debt of the Town, and for the accumulation of resources for future debt service payments on general long-term debt of the Town.

153


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Permanent Fund. This fund accounts for financial resources that are legally restricted to the extent that only earnings, and not principal, may be used for purposes that are for the benefit of the Town or its citizens. Included in this fund type is the Town Cemetery Trust Fund. The Town reports on the following non-major enterprise fund type: Solid Waste Fund. This fund accounts for the activities of the Town’s recycling center and transfer station for construction and demolition debris and municipal solid waste. The Town has no fiduciary fund types. C. Measurement Focus The accounting and financial reporting treatment applied to a fund is determined by its measurement focus. Government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements are reported using the economic resources measurement focus. This means that all assets, deferred outflows of resources, liabilities and deferred inflows of resources associated with the operation of these funds (whether current or noncurrent) are included on the balance sheet (or statement of net position). Equity (i.e., total net position) is segregated into net investment in capital assets; restricted net position; and unrestricted net position. Operating statements present increases (i.e., revenues) and decreases (i.e., expenses) in total net position. Governmental fund financial statements are reported using the current financial resources measurement focus. This means that only current assets, deferred outflows of resources, current liabilities and deferred inflows of resources are generally reported on their balance sheets. Their reported fund balances (net current position) are considered a measure of available spendable resources, and are segregated into nonspendable; restricted; committed; assigned and unassigned amounts. Operating statements of these funds present increases (i.e., revenues and other financing sources) and decreases (i.e., expenditures and other financing uses) in net current position. Accordingly, they are said to present a summary of sources and uses of available spendable resources during a period. D. Basis of Accounting Basis of accounting refers to when revenues and expenditures or expenses are recognized in the accounts and reported in the financial statements. Basis of accounting relates to the timing of the measurements made, regardless of the measurement focus applied. The government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements are reported using the accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded at the time the liabilities are incurred, regardless of when the related cash flow takes place. Nonexchange transactions, in which the Town gives (or receives) value without directly receiving (or giving) equal value in exchange, include property taxes, grants, entitlements, and donations. On the accrual basis, revenue from property taxes is recognized in the fiscal year for which the taxes are levied. Revenue from grants, entitlements, and donations is recognized in the fiscal year in which all eligibility requirements have been satisfied. Governmental funds are reported using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Under this method, revenues are recognized when measurable and available. “Measurable” means the amount of the transaction can be determined, and “available” means the amount is collectible within the current period or soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. The Town considers all revenues reported in governmental funds to be available if the revenues are collected within sixty (60) days after year-end. Expenditures are recorded when the related fund liability is incurred, except for principal and interest on general long-term debt, other postemployment benefits, certain compensated absences and other long-term liabilities which are recognized when the obligations are expected to be liquidated or are funded with expendable available financial resources. General capital asset acquisitions are reported as expenditures in governmental funds. Proceeds of general long-term debt, acquisitions under capital leases and sales of capital assets are reported as other financing sources.

154


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Property taxes, intergovernmental revenues and charges for current services associated with the current fiscal period are considered to be susceptible to accrual and so have been recognized as revenues of the current fiscal period. All other revenue items are considered to be measurable and available only when cash is received by the Town. Under the terms of grant agreements, the Town funds certain programs by a combination of specific costreimbursement grants, categorical block grants, and general revenues. Thus, when program expenses are incurred, there are both restricted and unrestricted net position available to finance the program. It is the Town’s policy to first apply cost-reimbursement grant resources to such programs, followed by general revenues. Expenditure driven grants are recognized as revenue when the qualifying expenditures have been incurred and other grant requirements have been met. E. Use of Estimates The presentation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, deferred outflows and inflows of resources and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. The most significant estimates used by the Town are the estimated useful lives used to calculate depreciation of property, plant and equipment, the estimated costs of post closure monitoring of the landfill, the estimated costs of other postemployment benefits and the net pension liability and related deferred inflows and outflows of resources. F. Assets, Liabilities, Deferred Outflows/Inflows of Resources and Equity 1. Cash The Town’s cash and cash equivalents are considered to be cash on hand, demand deposits, and short-term investments with original maturities of three months or less from the date of acquisition. 2. Investments State Statute do not restrict the types of investments the Town can make. All investments require the authorization of the Board of Selectmen. Investments in the Permanent Fund (Town Trust Fund) are valued at fair value. The investments are registered securities held by the Town or by its agent in the Town’s name. In accordance with GASB 31, “Accounting and Financial Reporting for Certain Investments,” investments with readily determinable fair values are reported at their fair values on the balance sheet. Unrealized gains and losses are included in revenue. 3. Receivables Accounts receivable are shown net of an allowance for uncollectible accounts for the estimated losses that will be incurred in the collection of the receivables. The estimated losses are based on the judgement of management and a review of the current status of existing receivables.

155


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 The Town is responsible for assessing and collecting its own property taxes, as well as taxes for the State for school purposes. Property taxes are assessed based on property valuations as of April 1 annually. Taxes are collected twice a year in August and February. During the tax year ended June 30, 2015, taxes became due and payable on August 14, 2015, and February 5, 2016. Taxes unpaid after the August due date are considered to be late, and are subject to monthly interest at 1%. Taxes unpaid after the February due date are delinquent, and are subject to an 8% penalty, and interest calculated at 1% per month for the first three months, and then 1.5% per month thereafter. Unpaid taxes become an enforceable lien on the property, and such properties are subject to tax sale by the delinquent tax collector. As of June 30, 2016, delinquent taxes receivable were $787,059, net of a $80,000 allowance for uncollectible taxes. The tax rate for 2016 is as follows:

Homestead Homestead education tax Non-residential education tax Town general fund appropriations Town restricted appropriations Windsor County tax Local agreement tax Total

Non-residential

$

1.5062 $ 0.8881 0.0143 0.0076 0.0011

1.4842 0.8881 0.0143 0.0076 0.0011

$

2.4173 $

2.3953

The first installment of property taxes for the budget period from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017, is due and payable on August 15, 2016. As of June 30, 2016, the Town had collected $82,398 of those taxes. This amount is shown as prepaid taxes at June 30, 2016, and will be recorded as revenue in August, 2017. 4. Internal Balances Activity between funds that are representative of lending/borrowing arrangements that are outstanding at the end of the fiscal year are referred to as “advances from/to other funds”. All other outstanding balances between funds are reported as “due from/to other funds.” Any residual balances outstanding between the governmental activities and business-type activities are reported in the government-wide financial statements as “internal balances”. 5. Pensions For purposes of measuring the proportionate share of the net pension liability and the related deferred outflows/inflows of resources and pension expense, information about the fiduciary net position of the Vermont Municipal Employees’ Retirement System (VMERS) plan and additions to/deductions from the VMERS’ fiduciary net position have been determined on the same basis as they are reported by VMERS. For this purpose, benefit payments (including refunds of employee contributions) are recognized when due and payable in accordance with the benefit terms. Investments are reported at fair value. 6. Inventories and Prepaid Expenses The Town does not record inventories of supplies as these amounts are not material in relation to the Town’s results of operations. Accordingly, expenditures related to inventories are reported in governmental funds when purchased. Certain payments to vendors reflect costs that are applicable to future accounting periods and are recorded as prepaid expenses.

156


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 Reported inventories and prepaid expenses of governmental funds in the fund financial statements are offset by a nonspendable fund balance as these are not in spendable form. 7. Deferred Outflows/Inflows of Resources In addition to assets, the statement of financial position will sometimes report a separate section for deferred outflows of resources. This separate financial statements element, “deferred outflows of resources”, represents a consumption of net position that applies to a future period(s) and so will not be recognized as an outflow of resources (expense/expenditures) until then. The Town has one type which arises under the accrual basis of accounting that qualifies for reporting in this category. The governmental activities report deferred outflows of resources from one source; deferred outflows related to the Town’s participation in the Vermont Municipal Employees Retirement System. These amounts are deferred and recognized as an outflow of resources in the future periods to which the outflows are related. In addition to liabilities, the statement of financial position will sometimes report a separate section for deferred inflows of resources. This separate financial statement element, “deferred inflows of resources”, represents an acquisition of net position that applies to a future period(s) and so will not be recognized as an inflow of resources (revenue) until that time. The Town has four types of items which arise under the modified accrual basis of accounting and one type which arises under the accrual basis of accounting that qualify for reporting in this category. The governmental activities reports deferred inflows of resources from one source; prepaid taxes. The governmental funds reports deferred inflows of resources from four sources; prepaid taxes, unavailable property taxes, unavailable intergovernmental revenues and unavailable charges for services. These amounts are deferred and recognized as an inflow of resources in the future periods to which the inflows are related or when the amounts become available. 8. Restricted Assets Certain assets of the debt service fund are classified as restricted assets because agreements with Vermont Special Pollution Control Revolving Fund (for CSO loans) restrict the use of those funds to payment of debt service. 9. Capital Assets Capital assets are reported at actual cost or estimated historical cost based on appraisals or deflated current replacement cost if purchased or constructed. Contributed assets are recorded at their estimated fair value at the time received. Major outlays for capital assets and improvements are capitalized as constructed. Interest incurred during the construction phase of proprietary fund capital assets is reflected in the capitalized value of the asset constructed, net of any interest earned on the invested proceeds during the same period. Interest is not capitalized during the construction phase of capital assets used in governmental activities. The cost of normal maintenance and repairs that do not add to the value of the asset or materially extend the assets’ lives are not capitalized. Capital assets reported in the government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements are depreciated in order that the cost of these assets will be charged to expenses over their estimated service lives, using the straight line method of calculating depreciation. Capitalization thresholds (the dollar values above which asset acquisitions are added to the capital asset accounts) and estimated useful lives of capital assets are as follows:

Capitalization Threshold Land Land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Roads, bridges, and sidewalks Distribution and collection systems

$

157

10,000 10,000 20,000 5,000 20,000 20,000

Estimated Service Life N/A 10-50 years 10-75 years 3-25 years 20-75 years 20-75 years


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 Capital assets are not reported in the governmental fund type financial statements. Capital outlays in these funds are recorded as expenditures in the year they are paid. 10. Compensated Absences It is the Town’s policy to permit employees to accumulate earned but unused vacation and sick time. Unused vacation time must be used within the next succeeding fiscal year, and is paid to the employee upon termination of their employment if their term of employment has exceeded six months. The accrual for unused vacation time, based on current pay rates, is recorded in the government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements, with the general fund being used to liquidate amounts recorded in the government-wide statements. A liability for unused vacation time is not reported in the governmental fund type financial statements unless they have matured. Payments for unused vacation time are recorded as expenditures in the year they are paid. No liability is reported for earned but unused sick time because it is not a vested benefit. 11. Accrued Closure/Postclosure Costs The Town operated a landfill for use by Town residents and various neighboring towns. The landfill ceased accepting solid waste as of December 31, 1992. Subsequently, the Town operated a landfill for construction and demolition debris. Phase I of this landfill ceased accepting debris for disposal as of July 31, 1998, and was closed and capped during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2000. There are no plans to open Phase II of the landfill. Currently, the Town operates a transfer station for municipal solid waste, and a grinding facility and transfer station for construction and demolition debris. State statutes require that the Town monitor the groundwater quality for thirty years after capping a landfill. Thirteen years remain of the Town’s obligation under the statutes. The Town’s engineers estimated this liability at $299,000. This liability has been recorded as an accrued expense as of June 30, 2016. A total of $463,360 has been set aside to pay this accrued liability. The amounts are based on what it would cost to perform all postclosure care now. Actual costs may vary due to changes in the cost of living, changes in technology, changes in regulations, or variances between estimated and actual amounts. 12. Other Postemployment Benefits The Town provides postemployment benefits for health insurance coverage for any employee who has attained age 55 and retires with a minimum of ten years of service (twenty years of service for employees hired after January 1, 1999). Other postemployment benefits are reported in the government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements. Governmental fund type financial statements do not include OPEB as those funds use the current financial resources measurement focus and only include current liabilities on their balance sheets. 13. Long-term Liabilities Long-term liabilities include bonds payable, notes payable, capital leases and other obligations such as compensated absences and the Town’s net pension liability. Long-term liabilities are reported in the government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements. Governmental fund financial statements do not include any long-term liabilities as those statements use the current financial resources measurement focus and only include current liabilities on their balance sheets. 14. Fund Equity Fund equity is classified based upon any restrictions that have been placed on those balances or any tentative plans management may have made for those balances. Restrictions of net position in the government-wide and proprietary fund financial statements represent amounts that cannot be appropriated or are legally restricted for a specific purpose by a grant, contract, or other binding agreement. Fund balances of governmental funds are classified as nonspendable (not in spendable form or legally required to remain intact); restricted (constraints on the use of resources are either externally imposed by creditors, grantors, or donors, or imposed by law through enabling legislation); committed (constraints on the use of resources are imposed by formal action of the voters); assigned (reflecting the Board of Selectmen’s intended use of the resources); and unassigned. The Town has established a policy to require the Board of Selectmen to approve all fund assignments and document such approvals in the board meeting minutes. 158


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

II. EXPLANATION OF DIFFERENCES BETWEEN GOVERNMENTAL FUND STATEMENTS AND GOVERNMENT-WIDE STATEMENTS Governmental fund financial statements are presented using the current financial resources measurement focus and the modified accrual basis of accounting, whereas government-wide financial statements are presented using the economic resources measurement focus and the accrual basis of accounting. These differences in the measurement focus and basis of accounting lead to differences between the governmental fund financial statements and the government-wide financial statements as follows: Long-term revenue differences arise because governmental funds report revenues only when they are considered “available”, whereas government-wide statements report revenues when they are earned. Long-term expense differences arise because governmental funds report expenditures (including interest) using the modified accrual basis of accounting, whereas government-wide statements report expenses using the accrual basis of accounting. Capital-related differences arise because governmental funds report capital outlays as current period expenditures, whereas government-wide statements report depreciation as an expense. Further, governmental funds report the proceeds from the sale of capital assets as other financing sources, whereas government-wide statements report the gain or loss from the sale of capital assets as revenue or expense. Long-term debt transaction differences arise because governmental funds report proceeds of long-term debt as other financing sources and principal payments as expenditures, whereas government-wide statements report those transactions as increases and decreases in liabilities, respectively. Pension-related differences arise because governmental funds report the current year’s required employer contributions as current period expenditures, whereas government-wide statements report those transactions as deferred outflows of resources. In addition the accrual for the Town’s proportionate share of the net pension liability is recorded in the government-wide financial statements along with the related deferred inflows and outflows of resources. III. STEWARDSHIP, COMPLIANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY A. Budgetary Information An annual budget is adopted for the General Fund. The General Fund budgetary basis of accounting utilizes generally accepted accounting principles plus assignments of fund balances. Budgets for the General Fund only include unassigned funds, and do not include activity for assigned funds or reserve funds. Special Revenue Funds and Capital Project Funds adopt project-length budgets instead of annual budgets. Budgets are not adopted for Debt Service Funds or Permanent Funds. The budget calendar begins during October with the submission of departmental budget requests to the Town Manager so that budgets may be prepared. The proposed budgets are presented to the Board of Selectmen for their review at the beginning of December. The Board holds numerous public hearings on the proposed budget, and prepares a final budget by the end of January. Budgets for Proprietary Funds are then adopted by the Board, while the budget for the General Fund is presented to the voters for consideration at the annual Town Meeting in March. The budget is prepared by fund, function and department. The Town’s department heads may make adjustments to appropriations within their department, while adjustment between departments can only be made with the approval of the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen. The legal level of budgetary control is at the department level. No formal amendments are made to the budgets that were previously adopted. The Town includes in expenditures those amounts that are treated as transfers to assigned net position, including both cash amounts transferred for future capital expenditures and those amounts that are intended to be assigned for future operating expenditures.

159


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 B. Restatement of Net Position At July 1, 2015, the Town moved the municipal arena activity from its Business-type activities to Governmental activities. This includes hockey rink rentals and fees and the related assets and debt. The activity was formerly accounted for as an enterprise fund. Beginning fiscal year 2016, it is being accounted for in the general fund along with other recreation programs. The Outdoor Facilities Fund was shown as an enterprise fund in the 2015 financial statements and had net position of $654,184. The fund is not shown as a separate fund in the 2016 financial statements as all assets and liabilities were transferred to the General Fund. This change resulted in net position being transferred to Governmental activities from Business-type activities, as follows:

Net Position Transferred: Current Assets Less Liabilities Capital Assets Less: Accumulated Depreciation Long-Term Debt Accrued Interest Other Post Employment Benefits

$

89,452 3,574,552 (617,090) (2,375,000) (10,393) (7,337)

$

654,184

In the fund financial statements, the transfer of current assets less liabilities of $89,452 is reflected as a transfer to the General Fund from the Outdoor Facilities Fund as of July 1, 2015. The remaining items transferred are not reflected in the fund statements as they are only shown in the government wide statements. IV. DETAILED NOTES ON ALL FUNDS A. Cash At year end, the Town’s carrying amount of deposits was $12,161,877, and the bank balance was $12,230,889. Of the bank balance, $521,220, was covered by federal depository insurance. Of the remaining balance, $11,578,992 was collateralized with securities held by the financial institution’s agent in the Town’s name, and $130,678 was unsecured and uncollateralized. Due to higher cash flows at certain times during the year, the amounts collateralized with securities held by the financial institution’s agent in the Town’s name were substantially higher than at year end. B. Investments Investments at June 30, 2016, consisted of various mutual fund investments in Fidelity Funds, which had a cost basis of $10,863 and a fair value of $14,909. Unrealized gains and losses, which are included in revenue, resulted in a decrease in value of $528 for the year ended June 30, 2016. Interest Rate Risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in market interest rates will adversely affect the fair value of an investment. Generally, the longer the maturity of an investment, the greater the sensitivity of its fair value to changes in market interest rates. The Town does not have any policy to limit the exposure to interest rate risk. The Town’s mutual funds are open-ended and, therefore, are also exempt from interest rate risk disclosure.

160


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 The mutual funds are publicly traded and the fair values were determined by published market prices. These values are categorized as Level 1 by GASB Statement No. 72. Credit Risk. Generally, credit risk is the risk that an issuer of an investment will not fulfill its obligation to the holder of the investment. This is measured by the assignment of a rating by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. The Town does not have any policy to limit the exposure to credit risk. The Town’s mutual funds are exempt from the credit risk disclosure. Concentration of Credit Risk. Concentration of credit risk is the risk that a large percentage of the Town’s investments are held within one security. The Town does not have any limitations on the amount that can be invested in any one issuer. There are no investments in any one issuer, other than mutual funds, that represent more than 5% of total investments. C. Accounts Receivable Accounts receivable at year end, as reported in the statement of net position, including applicable allowances for uncollectible accounts, are as follows:

Governmental Activities Ambulance accounts receivable (net of allowance of $75,443) M iscellaneous receivables Employee advances Due from developer Impact fees receivable User charges receivable (net of allowance of $29,500) -Billed -Unbilled

$

185,733 28,977 4,776 18,201 47,064

Business-type Activities

$

$

284,751

25,501 32,998

Total

$

185,733 54,478 4,776 18,201 80,062

369,512 365,536 $

793,547

369,512 365,536 $

1,078,298

D. Notes Receivable Notes receivable at year end, including the applicable allowances for uncollectible amounts, are as follows:

Notes receivable, various revolving loans, five loans outstanding, interest at 2.0% to 5.5% %, various due dates, secured by business assets and personal guarantees.

$

Note receivable, Upper Valley Housing Associates, 0% interest, monthly payments of $2,133 beginning January 1, 2034, through December 1, 2059, secured by third mortgage

214,379

640,000

Note receivable, Hartford Scattered Site LP, 0% interest, due in full March 1, 2036, secured by mortgage

21,567

Total

875,946 (640,000)

Less allowance for doubtful notes receivable $

Reported value as of June 30, 2016 161

235,946


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

E. Due from Other Governments Due from other Governments is as follows:

Governmental activities Due from Federal and State Entities

$

Business-type activities

436,228 $

Less: Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts

(38,831) $

397,397 $

$

Total

10,120

446,348

0

(38,831)

10,120

$

407,517

F. Capital assets Capital asset activity for the year ended June 30, 2016, was as follows:

Beginning Balance Governmental activities Capital assets, not being depreciated: Land Construction in progress Total capital assets, not being depreciated

$

1,338,658 $ 9,425,207 10,763,865

Increases

75,331 $ 335,215 410,546

Capital assets, being depreciated: Land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Roads, bridges and sidewalks Totals

891,304 10,409,860 7,892,464 31,994,919 51,188,547

247,463 8,047,545 1,031,572 4,532,184 13,858,764

Less accumulated depreciation for: Land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Roads, bridges and sidewalks Totals Total capital assets, being depreciated Governmental activity capital assets, net

290,303 2,684,317 5,137,003 17,007,542 25,119,165 26,069,382 36,833,247 $

38,216 1,224,724 815,741 1,604,584 3,683,265 10,175,499 10,586,045 $

$

162

Decreases

Ending Balance

- $ 8,195,724 8,195,724

1,413,989 1,564,698 2,978,687

22,557 22,557

1,138,767 18,457,405 8,901,479 36,527,103 65,024,754

22,557 22,557 8,195,724 $

328,519 3,909,041 5,930,187 18,612,126 28,779,873 36,244,881 39,223,568


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 Business-type activities Capital assets, not being depreciated: Land Construction in progress Total capital assets, not being depreciated

$

424,307 $ 339,552 763,859

Capital assets, being depreciated: Land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Distribution and collection systems Totals

147,002 31,090,818 1,400,075 23,746,681 56,384,576

Less accumulated depreciation for: Land improvements Buildings and building improvements Vehicles and equipment Distribution and collection systems Totals Total capital assets, being depreciated Business-type activity capital assets, net

70,824 13,972,007 951,261 12,967,810 27,961,902 28,422,674 29,186,533 $

$

Depreciation was charged to programs as follows: Governmental activities General government Administration Elections and vital statistics Public safety Police Fire and ambulance Dispatch Public works Highways Public works administration Health and social services Recreation and parks Recreation programs Parks Cultural Total depreciation expense Business-type activities Solid waste Water Wastewater Outdoor facilities Total depreciation expense

$

189,813 2,551 144,398 348,923 28,005 1,900,028 1,744 2,548 2,020 414,840 31,303

$

3,066,173

$

75,837 389,404 1,462,505

$

1,927,746

163

- $ 86,019 86,019

65,352 55,313 120,665

7,351 1,120,590 91,816 707,989 1,927,746 (1,807,081) (1,721,062) $

- $ 318,769 318,769

424,307 106,802 531,109

3,177,233 149,854 3,327,087

147,002 27,913,585 1,315,573 23,801,994 53,178,154

551,092 66,000 617,092 2,709,995 3,028,764 $

78,175 14,541,505 977,077 13,675,799 29,272,556 23,905,598 24,436,707


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

G. Interfund Balances and Activity Interfund balances represent advances between funds which are intended to be liquidated by the payable fund within the next fiscal year. Interfund transfers represent advances to other funds that are intended to be of a permanent nature. The composition of interfund balances at June 30, 2016 is as follows:

Due from other funds

Fund

Due to other funds

General Fund $ Public Safety Funds Recreation Funds Community Development Funds Hurricane Irene Fund Permanent Fund TIF Fund Capital Project Fund Water Fund Wastewater Fund Solid Waste Fund

0 0 0 86,277 22,717 0 0 0 688,550 1,629,091 189,081

$

2,038,188 49,609 95,252 95,516 0 93 134,197 202,861 0 0 0

Total

2,615,716

$

2,615,716

$

Interfund transfers for the year ended June 30, 2016 were as follows: Transfer From General Fund - Unassigned

General Fund - Assigned

Transfer To

Purpose

General Fund - Assigned General Fund - Assigned Debt Service Fund Solid Waste Fund Nonmajor funds - Recreation General Fund - Unassigned

Addition to capital reserves New encumbrances Bond payments and bond reserve fund Fund curbside recycling program Recreation reserves Reimbursement from capital reserves

Amount $ $

632,334 652,670 1,222,986 180,000 10,342 453,515

$

3,151,847

$

113,842 46,209

$

160,051

Total General Fund Nonmajor Governmental Funds General Fund - Unassigned General Fund - Unassigned

Reimbursement from capital project funds Impact Fees

Total Nonmajor Governmental Funds

The transfer from/to the General Fund assigned and unassigned fund balances have been netted in the basic financial statements.

164


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

H. Accrued Compensated Absences Changes in accrued compensated absences during the year were as follows:

Governmental activities

Business-type activities

Total

Beginning balance Additions (Reductions)

$

413,781 $ (13,673)

97,115 $ 1,880

510,896 (11,793)

Ending balance

$

400,108 $

98,995 $

499,103

Due within one year

$

400,108 $

98,995 $

499,103

I. Deferred Outflows of Resources Deferred outflows of resources in the Governmental Activities consists of $683,635 from changes in the Town’s proportional share of contributions related to the Town’s participation in the Vermont Municipal Employee’s Retirement System (VMERS) and $303,770 of required employer pension contributions subsequent to the measurement date. Total deferred outflows of resources in the Governmental Activities is $987,405. J. Deferred Inflows of Resources Deferred inflows of resources in the Governmental Activities consists of $82,398 of prepaid taxes. Deferred inflows of resources in the General Fund consist of $552,356 of delinquent property taxes, penalties and interest on those taxes and $124,249 in charges billed that were not collected within sixty (60) days after year end as these would not be available to liquidate current liabilities. This also includes $82,398 of prepaid property taxes. Total deferred inflows of resources in the General Fund are $759,003. Deferred inflows of resources in the Non-Major Governmental Funds consist of $123,613 of intergovernmental revenues that were not collected within sixty (60) days after year end as these would not be available to liquidate current liabilities.

165


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

K. Long-term Liabilities General Obligation Bonds. The Town issues general obligation bonds to provide resources for the acquisition and construction of major capital facilities and to refund prior issues. General obligation bonds have been issued for both general government and proprietary activities. Bonds are reported in governmental activities if the debt is expected to be repaid from general governmental revenues and in business-type activities if the debt is expected to be repaid from proprietary fund revenues. General obligation bonds are direct obligations and pledge the full faith and credit of the Town. New bonds generally are issued as 15 to 20 year bonds. Refunding bonds are issued for various terms based on the debt service of the debt refunded. Bonds issued for general government activities generally are issued with equal amounts of principal maturing each year, and bonds issued for proprietary activities generally are issued with equal annual debt service amounts payable each year. Revolving Loans. The State of Vermont offers a number of no-interest and low-interest revolving loan programs to utilize for predetermined purposes. The Town has borrowed money from the Vermont Special Pollution Control Revolving Fund for two combined sewer overflow projects, and has borrowed money from the Vermont Environmental Protection Agency Local Assistance State Revolving Fund for the construction of an additional water well in Wilder. Net Pension Liability. The net pension liability is the difference between the total pension liability (the present value of projected benefit payments to employees based on their past service) and the assets (mostly investments reported at fair value) set aside to pay current employees, retirees, and beneficiaries. The accrual for the Town’s share of the net pension liability is recorded in the government-wide financial statements. General obligation bonds and revolving loans outstanding at June 30, 2016, are as follows:

Interest/Admin Rates

Purpose Governmental Activities - Bonds DPW Building Quechee Covered Bridge Bond 2013 Municipal and Arena and Improvements 2014 Tax Increment Financing 2014 Town Hall Building Governmental Activities - Revolving Loans Combined Sewer Overflow - #2

1.87% - 4.73% 1.10% - 3.91% 0.44% - 4.64% 0.51% - 3.99% 0.51% - 3.99%

Amount

$

0.00%

420,000 964,941 5,539,500 855,000 4,655,000 486,682 12,921,123

Total governmental activities Business-type Activities - Bonds 2001 Quechee Water Bond 2001 Quechee Wastewater Bond Business-type Activities - Revolving Loans 2004 Wilder Well Loan 2012 ARI-006 Clean Water Loan (Fund 60 Portion) 2012 ARI-006 Clean Water Loan (Fund 65 Portion) 2013 Hartford W/W Treatment Facility Loan 2013 Quechee W/W Treatment Facility Loan

2.80% - 4.98% 2.80% - 4.98%

15,000 75,000

3.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%

1,536,706 227,229 326,702 6,338,012 4,509,098 13,027,747

Total business-type activities $

Total bonds and notes payable

166

25,948,870


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 Changes in all long-term liabilities (including bonds, notes, other postemployment benefits, accrued postclosure costs and net pension liability) during the year were as follows:

Beginning Balance Governmental Activities Bonds payable Revolving loans payable Other postemployment benefits Net pension liability Total Governmental Activities Long-term Liabilities Business-type Activities Bonds payable Revolving loans payable Other postemployment benefits Accrued postclosure costs Total Business-type Activities Long-term Liabilities

Additions

Ending Balance

Reductions

Due Within One Year

$

10,818,953 $ 561,617 3,044,537 181,445

2,375,000 $ 555,400 1,386,425

759,512 $ 74,935 192,236 -

12,434,441 $ 486,682 3,407,701 1,567,870

759,511 74,935 -

$

14,606,552 $

4,316,825 $

1,026,683 $

17,896,694 $

834,446

$

2,555,000 $ 14,117,080 618,002 322,000

- $ 124,095 -

2,465,000 $ 1,179,333 48,642 23,000

90,000 $ 12,937,747 693,455 299,000

90,000 738,358 23,000

$

17,612,082 $

124,095 $

3,715,975 $

14,020,202 $

851,358

The annual requirements to amortize all bonds and notes outstanding as of June 30, 2016, including interest payments, are as follows:

Governmental Activities Interest/ Principal Admin Fees

Year Ending June 30

Business-type Activities Interest/ Principal Admin Fees

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022-2026 2027-2031 2032-2036

$

834,446 $ 1,171,258 759,512 759,511 654,511 3,272,556 3,272,557 2,196,772

404,308 $ 389,995 373,230 353,916 335,121 1,358,950 790,302 160,077

828,358 $ 754,498 770,968 787,809 805,031 4,297,384 3,833,740 949,959

260,293 237,973 228,264 211,056 203,227 763,775 326,509 21,403

Total

$

12,921,123 $

4,165,899 $

13,027,747 $

2,252,500

Postemployment benefits have been liquidated in prior years by the General Fund, Solid Waste Fund, Water Fund, and Wastewater Fund. Total interest expense incurred for governmental activities was $392,519 less $25,854 interest capitalized for net expense of $366,665. Total interest expense incurred for business activities was $287,462. The Town has approved but unissued debt of $900,000 for Governmental Activities and $1,916,700 for BusinessType Activities at June 30, 2016. 167


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

L. Fund Balances GASB Statement No. 34, as amended by GASB Statement No. 54, requires fund balances reported on the governmental fund balance sheet to be classified using a hierarchy based primarily on the extent to which a government is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts in those funds can be spent. Governmental fund balances are to be classified as: nonspendable (not in spendable form or legally required to remain intact); restricted (constraints on the use of resources are either externally imposed by creditors, grantors or donors, or imposed by law through enabling legislation); committed (constraints on the use of resources are imposed by formal action of the voters); assigned (reflecting the Board of Selectmen’s intended use of the resources); and unassigned. Special revenue funds are created only to report a revenue source (or sources) that is restricted or committed to a specified purpose, and that the revenue source should constitute a substantial portion of the resources reported in that fund. Special revenue funds cannot be used to accumulate funds that are not restricted or committed. These amounts will have to be reflected in the General Fund. Amounts constrained to stabilization (rainy-day funds) will be reported as restricted or committed fund balance in the General Fund if they meet the other criteria for those classifications. However, stabilization is regarded as a specified purpose only if the circumstances or conditions that signal the need for stabilization (a) are identified in sufficient detail and (b) are not expected to occur routinely. The Town does not have any stabilization arrangements. Some governments create stabilization-like arrangements by establishing formal minimum fund balance policies. The Town does not have any minimum fund balance polices. When expenditures are incurred for purposes for which both restricted and unrestricted amounts are available, it is the Town’s policy to first consider restricted amounts to have been spent, followed by committed, assigned, and finally unassigned amounts. The purpose for each major special revenue fund, including which specific revenues and other resources are authorized to be reported in each, are described in the following section. The fund balances in the following funds are non-spendable as follows: Non-Major Funds Permanent Fund: Town Trust Funds – Restricted by Trust Agreement (Non-Expendable) Total Non-spendable Fund Balances

$27,168 $27,168

168


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

The fund balances in the following funds are restricted as follows: Non-Major Funds Capital Projects Funds: CSO Fund – Restricted by Bond Agreement TIF Fund – Restricted by Bond Agreement

$

Total Capital Projects Fund

83,184 16,558 99,742

Special Revenue Funds: Police Drug Forfeiture Fund – Restricted by Statute Police Youth Safety Fair – Restricted by Donor Agreement Engine 494 Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Dog Park Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Glory Days Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Trees Matter Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Community Development – Restricted by Grant Agreement Hurricane Irene Fund – Restricted by Grant Agreement Impact Fees Funds – Restricted by Statute

1,320 2,776 3,883 8,855 3,301 2,324 503,863 22,717 122,401

Total Special Revenue Funds

671,440

Debt Service Fund: CSO Bond Reserve Fund – Restricted by Bond Agreement

305,513

Permanent Fund: Town Trust Funds – Restricted by Trust Agreement (Expendable) Total Restricted Fund Balances

8,821 $1,085,516

The fund balances in the following funds are assigned as follows: Major Fund General Fund: Assigned to Town Clerk Record Restoration Assigned to Town Clerk Digital Imaging Assigned to Town Office Renovation Assigned to Accounting Software Assigned to Revaluation Assigned to Fire/EMS Capital Purchases Assigned to Communications Center Upgrade Assigned to Highway Equipment Expenditures Assigned to Highway Bridges and Culverts Assigned to Highway Capital Expenditures Assigned to Highway Construction Reserve Assigned to Street Light Maintenance Reserve Assigned to Street Light Replacement Reserve Assigned to Senior/Center Renovations Assigned to Recreation Capital Expenses Assigned to Conservation and Development Expenditures Assigned to Police Radios and Evidence Room Assigned to Road Winter Maintenance 169

$

85,890 41,546 61,880 6,140 449,250 403,421 12,070 50,480 755,802 146,063 133,279 9,577 39,790 20,556 64,465 97,785 28,076 17,545


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Assigned to DPW Garage Assigned to Sidewalks Assigned to Paving Assigned to WRJ Revitalization Assigned to Police Equipment Assigned to Town Portion of Conservation and Development Assigned to Wright Reservoir Assigned to West Hartford Library Assigned to Energy Commission Assigned to Health Expenditures Assigned to WABA Access Road Assigned to Quechee Park Assigned to Wallace Road Assigned to Recreation and Parks Expenditures Assigned to Fire Capital Expenditures Assigned to Other Public Safety Expenditures Assigned to General Government Expenditures Assigned to Other Public Works Expenditures

$ 52,133 134,586 158,077 77,801 56,403 15,163 4,103 11,817 15,000 133 19,923 116,374 20,000 20,956 13,479 41,144 25,212 106,605

Total General Fund

3,312,524

Non-Major Funds: Capital Projects Funds: Maxfield Sports Complex – Assigned to Design and construction of Sports Complex

16,391

Special Revenue Funds: Recreation and Parks-Assigned to Arena

10,114

Total Non-Major Funds

26,505

Total Assigned Fund Balances

$3,339,029

M. Restricted and Designated Net Position The restricted net position of the Town as of June 30, 2016 consisted of the following: Governmental Activities: TIF Fund – Restricted by Bond Agreement Hurricane Irene Fund – Restricted by Grant Agreement CSO Fund – Restricted by Bond Agreement Police Drug Forfeiture Fund – Restricted by Statute Police Youth Safety Fair – Restricted by Donor Agreement Engine 494 Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Dog Park Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Glory Days Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Trees Matter Fund – Restricted by Donor Agreement Community Development – Restricted by Grant Agreement Impact Fees Funds – Restricted by Statute CSO Bond Reserve Fund – Restricted by Bond Agreement Town Trust Funds – Restricted by Trust Agreement (Non-Expendable) Town Trust Funds – Restricted by Trust Agreement (Expendable) Total Governmental Activities

$

16,558 22,717 83,184 1,320 2,776 3,883 8,855 3,301 2,324 503,863 122,401 305,513 27,168 8,821

$1,112,684 170


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Business-type Activities: Central Water Impact Fee Fund – Restricted by Statute Quechee Water Impact Fee Fund – Restricted by Statute Central Wastewater Impact Fee Fund – Restricted by Statute Quechee Wastewater Impact Fee Fund – Restricted by Statute Total Business-type Activities Restricted Net Position

$ 146,790 57,875 704,822 216,578 $1,126,065

The negative unassigned fund balances within the Special Revenue Funds of $9,999 and Capital Project Funds of $90,755 will be restored through future grant proceeds to be received from other governments. V. OTHER INFORMATION A. Risk Management The Town is exposed to various risk of loss related to torts; theft of, damage to, and destruction of assets; errors and omissions; injuries to employees; and natural disasters. The Town maintains insurance coverage through the Vermont League of Cities and Towns Property and Casualty Intermunicipal Fund, Inc., covering each of those risks of loss. Management believes such coverage is sufficient to preclude any significant uninsured losses to the Town. Settled claims have not exceeded this coverage in any of the past three fiscal years. The Town must remain a member for a minimum of one year and may withdraw from the Fund after that time by giving sixty days notice. Fund underwriting and rate-setting policies have been established after consultation with actuaries. Fund members are subject to a supplemental assessment in the event of deficiencies. If the assets of the Fund were to be exhausted, members would be responsible for the Fund’s liabilities. The Town has elected to pay actual unemployment claims instead of enrolling in an unemployment insurance program. No liabilities have been accrued as the Town is not able to make an estimate as to any future costs. The Town paid $12,680 in unemployment claims during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016. B. Contingent Liabilities Amounts received or receivable from grant agencies are subject to audit and adjustment by grantor agencies, principally the State of Vermont or the federal government. Any disallowed claims, including amounts already collected, may constitute a liability of the applicable funds. The amount, if any, of expenditures which may be disallowed by the grantor cannot be determined at this time, although the Town expects such amounts, if any, to be immaterial. There are two claims against the Town where the Town’s insurance carrier is providing defense with a reservation of rights. The Town intends to vigorously defend these claims. The Town is unable to determine the likelihood or amount, if any, of an unfavorable outcome. C. Commitments The Town is a participant in East Central Vermont Telecommunications District (the District), doing business as EC Fiber. The revenue generated from system users is intended to pay the costs of building, financing and operating the system so no cash outlay from member towns will be required. In June, 2015, the Governor of Vermont signed legislation authorizing the formation of the District. The District is a body politic recognized by Vermont State law. The District is owned by a consortium of the same 24 municipalties, controlled by a Governing Board comprised of one delegate from each municipality.

171


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

D. Deferred Compensation Plan The Town offers its employees a deferred compensation plan for employees through the International City Manager’s Association (ICMA) Retirement Corporation in accordance with Internal Revenue Code Section 457. The plan permits employees to defer a porton of their salary until future years. This deferred compensation is not available to employees until termination, retirement, death, or unforseeable emergency. The Town has no liability for losses under the plan. All of the investments are self-directed by each participant. Under generally accepted accounting principles and federal law, the investments are held in trust for the benefit of employees. Accordingly, the Town does not report these assets on their financial statements. E. Defined Contribution Pension Plans The Town offers a 401(a) pension plan to full-time employees hired prior to April 1, 2007, who had not elected to change their plan to VMERS on that date. This plan is qualified by the Internal Revenue Service as a defined contribution pension plan for governmental organizations exempt from income tax. The plan requires a contribution of 8% of base salary per participant by the Town. The ICMA Retirement Corporation administers the plan. Covered payroll for this plan was $1,767,925. Town contributions for the year ended June 30, 2016, were $141,434. F. Vermont Municipal Employees’ Retirement System – Defined Benefit Plan Plan Description The Vermont Municipal Employees’ Retirement System (VMERS) is a cost-sharing, multiple-employer defined benefit pension plan that is administered by the State Treasurer and its Board of Trustees. It is designed for municipal and school district employees that work on a regular basis and also includes employees of museums and libraries if at least half of that institution’s operating expenses are met by municipal funds. An employee of any employer that becomes affiliated with the system may join at that time or at any time thereafter. Any employee hired subsequent to the effective participation date of their employer who meets the minimum hourly requirements is required to join the system. During the year ended June 30, 2015, the retirement system consisted of 437 participating employers. The plan was established effective July 1, 1975, and is governed by Title 24, V.S.A. Chapter 125. The general administration and responsibility for formulating administrative policy and procedures of the retirement system for its members and their beneficiaries is vested in the Board of Trustees consisting of five members. They are the State Treasurer, two employee representatives elected by the membership of the system, and two employer representatives – one elected by the governing bodies of participating employers of the system, and one selected by the Governor from a list of four nominees. The list of nominees is jointly submitted by the Vermont League of Cities and Towns and the Vermont School Boards Association. All assets are held in a single trust and are available to pay retirement benefits to all members. Benefits available to each group are based on average final compensation (AFC) and years of credible services. Pension Liabilities, Pension Expense, and Deferred Outflows of Resources and Deferred Inflows of Resources As of June 30, 2015, the measurement date selected by the State of Vermont, VMERS was funded at 87.42% and had a plan fiduciary net position of $535,903,742 and a total pension liability of $612,999,552 resulting in a net pension liability of $77,095,810. As of June 30, 2016, the Town’s proportionate share of this was 2.03366% resulting in a liability of $1,567,870. The net pension liability was measured as of June 30, 2015, and the total pension liability used to calculate the net pension liability was determined by an actuarial valuation as of that date. The Town’s proportion of the net pension liability was based on a projection of the Town’s long-term share of contributions to the pension plan relative to the projected contributions of all participating entities, actuarially determined. As of June 30, 2015, the Town’s proportion of 2.03366% was an increase of 0.4556% from its proportion measured as of June 30, 2014. For the year ended June 30, 2016, the Town recognized pension expense of $418,952. 172


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 As of June 30, 2016, the Town reported deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources from the following sources. Deferred outflows of resources Difference Between Expected and Actual Experience

$

Changes in proportional share of contributions

49,561

Deferred inflows of resources $

0

18,931

0

Difference between projected and actual earnings on pension plan investments

302,902

0

Changes in Assumptions

312,241

0

Town's required employer contributions made subsequent to the measurement date

303,770

0

$

987,405

$

0

The deferred outflows of resources resulting from the Town’s required employer contributions made subsequent to the measurement date in the amount of $303,770 will be recognized as a reduction of the net pension liability in the year ended June 30, 2017. Other amounts reported as deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources will be recognized in pension expense as follows:

Year Ending June 30 2017 2018 2019 2020

$135,583 135,583 135,583 276,886

Total

$683,635

Summary of System Provisions Membership – Full time employees of participating municipalities. The Town elected coverage under Group B and Group C provisions. Creditable Service – Service as a member plus purchased service. Average Final Compensation (AFC): Groups B and C – Average annual compensation during the highest three (3) consecutive years. Service Retirement Allowance: Eligibility: Group B – The earlier of age 62 with five (5) years of service or age 55 with thirty (30) years or service. Group C – Age 55 with five (5) years of service. Amount: Group B – 1.7% of AFC times service as a Group B member plus percentage earned as a Group A member times AFC. Group C – 2.5% of AFC times service as a Group C member plus percentage earned as a Group A or B member times AFC.

173


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016 Maximum benefit is 60% of AFC for Group B and 50% of AFC for Group C. The previous amounts include the portion of the allowance provided by member contributions. Early Retirement Allowance: Eligibility: Age 55 with five (5) years of service for Group B. Amount: Normal allowance based on service and AFC at early retirement, reduced by 6% for each year commencement precedes normal retirement age for Group B members. Vested Retirement Allowance: Eligibility: Five (5) years of service. Amount: Allowance beginning at normal retirement age based on AFC and service at termination. The AFC is to be adjusted annually by one-half of the percentage change in the Consumer Price Index, subject to the limits on “Post-Retirement Adjustments”. Disability Retirement Allowance: Eligibility: Five (5) years of service and disability as determined by Retirement Board. Amount: Immediate allowance based on AFC and service to date of disability. Death Benefit: Eligibility: Death after five (5) years of service. Amount: For Groups B and C, reduced early retirement allowance under 100% survivor option commencing immediately or, if greater, survivor(s) benefit under disability annuity computed as of date of death. Optional Benefit and Death after Retirement: For Groups B and C, lifetime allowance or actuarially equivalent 50% or 100% joint and survivor allowance with refund of contribution guarantee. Refund of Contribution: Upon termination, if the member so elects or if no other benefit is payable, the member’s accumulated contributions are refunded. Post-Retirement Adjustments: Allowance in payment for at least one year increased on each January 1 by one-half of the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index but not more than 3% for Groups B and C. Member Contributions: Group B – 4.875% effective July 1, 2015 (increased from 4.75%). Group C – 9.875% effective July 1, 2015 and 10.00% effective January 1, 2016 (increased from 9.625%). However, the Town has agreed for certain union employees, to limit their contributions to the extent the employer contribution exceeds the required percentage. Employer Contributions: Group B – 5.50% effective July 1, 2015 (increased from 5.375%). Group C – 7.125% from July 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 (increased from 6.875%) and then 7.25% effective January 1, 2016. However, the Town has agreed that for certain union employees, it will contribute at least 7%, resulting in the employee contribution less than the required percentage. Retirement Stipend: $25 per month payable at the option of the Board of Trustees. Significant Actuarial Assumptions and Methods Interest Rate: 7.95% per annum. Through July 1, 2014, a select-and-ultimate interest rate set, specified as follows. The interest rate set was restarted every year.

174


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Year 1: 6.25% Year 2: 6.75% Year 3: 7.00% Year 4: 7.50% Year 5: 7.75% Year 6: 8.25% Year 7: 8.25% Year 8: 8.25% Year 9: 8.50%

Year 10: 8.50% Year 11: 8.50% Year 12: 8.50% Year 13: 8.50% Year 14: 8.50% Year 15: 8.50% Year 16: 8.75% Year 17 and later: 9.00%

Salary Increases: 5% per year. Deaths: Active participants – 50% of the probabilities in the 1995 Buck Mortality Tables for males and females. Non-disabled retirees and terminated vested participants – The 1995 Buck Mortality Tables with no setback for males and one-year set-back for females. Disabled retirees – RP-2000 Disabled Life Tables. Beneficiaries – 1995 Buck Mortality Tables for males and females. Spouse’s Age: Husbands are assumed to be three years older than their wives. Cost-of-Living Adjustments to Benefits of Terminated Vested and Retired Participants: Assumed to occur at the rate of 1.8% per annum for Group B and C members. Actuarial Cost Method: Entry Age Normal - Level Percentage of Pay. Asset Valuation Method: Invested assets are reported at fair value. Note: For funding purposes – A smoothing method is used, under which the value of assets for actuarial purposes equals market value less a five-year phase-in of the differences between actual and assumed investment return. The value of assets for actuarial purposes may not differ from the market value of assets by more than 20%. Inflation: The separately stated assumptions for investment return, salary increases and cost of living adjustments are consistent with an expected annual inflation rate of 3.00% to 3.25% per year. Long-term Expected Rate of Return: The long-term expected rate of return on investments was determined using best-estimate ranges of expected future real rates of return (expected returns, net of investment expense and inflation) developed for each major asset class using an econometric model that forecasts a variety of economic environments and then calculates asset class returns based on functional relationships between the economic variable and the asset classes. These best estimate ranges were combined to produce forecasts of the short, intermediate, and longer term horizons by weighting the expected future nominal rates of return by the target asset allocation percentage. The various time horizons in the forecast are intended to capture more recent economic and capital market conditions as well as other plausible environments that could develop in the future over economic cycles.

175


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Best estimates of arithmetic rates of return for each major asset class included in the target asset allocation as of June 30, 2015 are summarized in the following table:

Asset Class

Target Asset Allocation

Long-term Expected Real Rate of Return

Equity Fixed Income Alternatives Multi-strategy

31.50% 33.00% 15.50% 20.00%

8.61% 1.91% 6.93% 4.88%

Nominal long-term expected rates of return for these asset classes are equal to the sum of the expected longterm real rates and the expected long-term inflation rate of 3.0%. Discount Rate: The discount rate used to measure the total pension liability was 7.95%, a decrease from 8.23% in the prior year. The projection of cash flows used to determine the discount rate assumed that contributions will continue to be made in accordance with the current funding policy. Based on these assumptions, the fiduciary net position was projected to be available to make all projected future benefit payments to current members. The assumed discount rate has been determined in accordance with the method prescribed by GASB 68. Sensitivity of the Town’s Proportionate Share of the Net Pension Liability to Changes in the Discount Rate: The following presents the Town’s proportionate share of the net pension liability calculated using the discount rate of 7.95%, as well as what the proportionate share would be if it were calculated using a discount rate that is one percent lower (6.95%) or one percent higher (8.95%). 1% Decrease (6.95%)

Discount Rate (7.95%)

1% Increase (8.95%)

$3,131,717

$1,567,870

$256,919

Additional Information Additional information regarding the State of Vermont Municipal Employees’ Retirement System, including the details of the Fiduciary Net Position, is available upon request form the State of Vermont. G. Other Postemployment Benefits Beginning in fiscal year 2009, the Town implemented Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 45, Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for Postemployment Benefits Other Than Pensions. This standard addresses how the Town should account for and report its costs related to postemployment health care benefits provided to eligible employees. Historically, the Town’s benefits were reported on a pay-asyou-go basis. GASB Statement No. 45 requires that the Town recognize the cost of this benefit during the period of employees’ active employment (while the benefits are being earned) and disclose the unfunded actuarial accrued liability in order to account for the total future of postemployment benefits and the financial impact on the Town. The Town provides postemployment benefits for health insurance coverage for any employee who has attained age 55 and retires with a minimum of ten years of service (twenty years of service for employees hired after January 1, 1999). The Town pays for health insurance costs up to age 65 and then pays for any medicare supplemental policy, in accordance with the cost-sharing arrangements that exist for regular employees. The Town currently funds these benefits on a pay-as-you-go basis.

176


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

The annual cost of other postemployment benefits (OPEB) under GASB 45 is called the annual required contribution or ARC. The Town has elected not to pre-fund OPEB liabilities. The Town is required to record the annual required contribution, an amount that is actuarially determined in accordance with the parameters of GASB Statement 45. The ARC represents a level of funding that, if paid on an ongoing basis, is projected to cover normal cost each year and amortize any unfunded actuarial liabilities over a period not to exceed thirty years. The Town’s annual OPEB cost is made up of an annual required contribution (ARC) of $738,577, interest on the net OPEB obligation of $94,798 and an adjustment to the ARC of $(161,217). The following table shows the components of the Town’s annual OPEB cost for the year.

Governmental Activities Annual OPEB Cost Contributions Made

$

548,063 $ 192,236

Increase in Net OPEB Obligation Net OPEB Obligation, Beginning of Year Transfer Between Activities Net OPEB Obligation, End of Year

$

Percentage of Annual OPEB Cost Contribution

Business-type Activities 124,095 $ 41,305

Total 672,158 233,541

355,827 3,044,537

82,790 618,002

438,617 3,662,539

7,337

(7,337)

-

3,407,701 $

693,455 $

4,101,156 34.73%

Percentage of annual OPEB cost contributions: As of June 30, 2015, the most recent actuarial valuation date, the plan was 0% funded. The actuarial accrued liability for benefits was $9,641,428 and the actuarial value of assets was $0, resulting in an unfunded actuarial accrued liability (UAAL) of $9,641,428. An actuarial valuation of an ongoing plan involves estimates of the value of reported amounts and assumptions about the probablility of occurrence of events far into the future. Examples include assumptions about future employment, mortality and the healthcare cost trend. Amounts determined regarding the funded status of the plan and the annual required contributions of the employers are subject to continual revisions as actual results are compared with past expectations and new estimates are made about the future.

Projections of benefits for financial reporting purposes are based on the substantive plan (the plan as understood by the employer and the plan members) and include the types of benefits provided at the time of each valuation and the historical pattern of sharing of benefit costs between the employer and plan members at that point. The actuarial methods and assumptions used include techniques that are designed to reduce the effects of short-term volatility in actuarial accrued liabilities and the actuarial value of assets, consistent with the long-term perspective of the calculations. In the June 30, 2015 actuarial valuation, the projected unit credit cost method was used. The actuarial assumptions include a 3.0 percent investment rate of return (discount rate) and an annual healthcare cost trend rate of 5.0 percent initially. The level dollor amortization method and a thirty year amortization period is being used. The following table shows the components of the Town’s annual OPEB cost for the previous two fiscal years.

177


TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30, 2016

Total FYE 06/30/15 Annual OPEB Cost Contributions Made

$

Increase in Net OPEB Obligation Net OPEB Obligation, Beginning of Year Net OPEB Obligation, End of Year

$

Percentage of Annual OPEB Cost Contribution

672,158 $ 169,536

Total FYE 06/30/14 544,105 175,060

502,622 3,159,917

369,045 2,790,872

3,662,539 $

3,159,917

25.22%

32.17%

H. Tax Increment Financing District The Board of Selectmen approved the establishment of a Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District on April 5, 2011 which was later approved by theVermont Economic Progress Council (VEPC) on December 8, 2011. The District includes parcels between Prospect Street and the White River Junction downtown area. The Prospect Street TIF District creation date is considered to be April 1, 2011 and the TIF District activation date is the date of the “execution of the financing” which was July 31, 2014. The TIF District will allow the Town to undertake and pay for infrastructure improvements that will allow for increased economic and community development. The Town cannot incur any new TIF District debt until each project or group or projects is approved by VEPC and then by the voters. The Town voters approved the Prospect Street TIF revenue, however, it is a general obligation of the Town if TIF District revenues are not sufficient. The Town has a signed agreement with the construction contractor guaranteeing that they will cover any costs to complete the project in excess of $900,000 and any shortfalls in TIF revenues for the first two years. The year ending June 30, 2016 is the last year of this agreement and the Town has calculated that $18,201 is due from the contractor. In future years, the Town can levy a special assessment to cover any shortfall. With a TIF District, the value of property within the District are frozen at the time the District is created. All property taxes generated by the original base continue to go to the municipal General Fund and the State Education Fund,. For twenty (20) years from first debt incursion, the municipal and education property taxes generated by any “new” development are shared with 75% going to finance TIF District infrastructure debt and 25% going to the municipal General Fund and State Education Fund. I. Subsequent Events On August 1, 2016, the Town entered into a loan agreement with the Vermont Drinking Water State Revolving Fund in the amount of $1,916,700. The loan is for water improvements and will be repaid over 20 years beginning in 2018. Interest is at 1% plus a 2% administrative fee.

178


Schedule 1 TOWN OF HARTFORD, VERMONT REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL - BUDGETARY BASIS GENERAL FUND - UNASSIGNED FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016

REVENUES Taxes Tax penalties and interest Permits and licenses Intergovernmental revenues Charges for current services Fines and forfeits Interest Other revenues

Original and Final Budgeted Amounts

Actual Amounts

$ 12,103,068 116,300 45,645 472,403 1,597,494 28,100 2,500 27,250

$ 11,992,188 111,842 58,526 327,091 1,626,789 8,029 5,422 50,383

14,392,760

14,180,270

(212,490)

2,413,007 164,768 299,257 156,604 3,600

2,197,922 167,012 356,481 199,630 6,182

215,085 (2,244) (57,224) (43,026) (2,582)

2,134,714 2,324,551 577,416

2,032,750 2,165,308 621,686

101,964 159,243 (44,270)

1,879,333 128,306 311,952

1,491,416 144,929 309,903

387,917 (16,623) 2,049

180,861 460,922 239,700 390,502 288,600

181,293 592,296 179,337 382,931 288,540

(432) (131,374) 60,363 7,571 60

89,400 268,800

83,788 252,940

5,612 15,860

1,075,000

925,569

149,431

44,100 165,000

179,589 48,619

(135,489) 116,381

13,596,393

12,808,121

788,272

912,240 (2,083,607) 375,000

637,032 (2,698,332) -

(275,208) (614,725) (375,000)

(796,367)

(2,061,300)

(1,264,933)

Total Revenues EXPENDITURES Current expenditures General government Administration Elections and vital statistics Finance Valuation Boards and commissions Public safety Police Fire and ambulance Dispatch Public works Highways Public works administration Health and social services Recreation and parks Recreation administration Recreation programs Parks Conservation and development Cultural Capital expenditures Public safety Police Fire and ambulance Public works Highways Recreation and parks Recreation programs Parks Total Expenditures OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Transfers in Transfers out Fund balance assigned Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) Net Change in Fund Balance

$

-

$

Change in Fund Balance - GAAP Basis See Disclaimer in Accompanying Independent Auditor's Report.

179

$

(689,151) $

RECONCILIATION OF CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGETARY BASIS TO CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE - GAAP BASIS Change in Fund Balance - Budgetary Basis Transfer to Assigned Fund Balance Transfer from Assigned Fund Balance Expenditures from Assigned Fund Balance Interest Income from Assigned Fund Balance

Variance with Final Budget Positive (Negative)

$

(689,151) 1,357,127 (453,515) (76,138) 3,300

$

141,623

(110,880) (4,458) 12,881 (145,312) 29,295 (20,071) 2,922 23,133

(689,151)


180


HARTFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT

2016 ANNUAL REPORT 181


WARNING FOR ANNUAL HARTFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 2017

Voting by Australian ballot is to be held on March 7, 2017 at the Hartford High School (Gymnasium). Budget Discussion/Candidates Night is to be held on Monday, February 27, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. at the Hartford High School (Auditorium).

The legal voters of the Town of Hartford are further notified that voter qualification, registration and absentee voting relative to said Annual Town Meeting shall be as provided in the Town Charter and chapters 43, 51, and 55 of title 17, Vermont Statutes Annotated. THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES WILL BE VOTED BY AUSTRALIAN BALLOT ON TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2017. POLLS OPEN AT 7:00 A.M. EST AND CLOSE AT 7:00 P.M. EST.

1. To elect School Officers for the ensuing year. (By Australian ballot).

2. Shall the voters of the School District approve the School Board to expend $37,442,476 which is the amount the School Board has determined to be necessary for the ensuing fiscal year? It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will result in education spending of $15,776.08 per equalized pupil. This projected spending per equalized pupil is 5% higher than spending for the current year. (By Australian ballot).

3.

Shall the Town of Hartford and the Hartford Town School District amend the Town Charter as summarized below: § 123A-103. Particular powers - Matters subject to regulation and ordinances. § 123A-201. Town Meeting – Provides for the call and conduct of pre-town meeting, annual town meeting and floor meeting. § 123A-202. Elected officers – Provides for the election of Town officers and their compensation. § 123A-203. Duties of elected officers – Provides for the appointment of a Town Clerk, Town Assessor and Trustees of Public Funds. §123A-302. Duties of appointed officers; Town Manager – Enumerates the duties of the Town Manager.

(By Australian ballot) 4. Shall general obligation bonds of the Hartford Town School District in an amount not to exceed one million, four hundred sixty-seven thousand dollars ($1,467,000) be issued for the purpose of financing the cost of making parking lot and roadway improvements at the Hartford High School, Hartford Middle School and Hartford Area Career and Technical Center, an estimated cost of such improvements being one million, four hundred sixty-seven thousand dollars ($1,467,000). Dated at Hartford, Vermont this 25th day of January, 2017.

182


Hartford Board of School Directors

Lori Dickerson, Chair Paula Nulty, Clerk Kevin Christie Peter Merrill Nancy Russell

183


184


Hartford School-Community Profile 2016-2017

185


Table of Contents Letter from the Hartford School District School Board .........................................188 Hartford School District Universal Ends Policy ......................................................189 Community Profile .....................................................................................................191 Total School Enrollments Number of Students Enrolled.............................................................................192 Enrollments in Special Programs.......................................................................193 School Summaries Hartford High School .........................................................................................194 Hartford Area Career and Technology Center ..................................................195 Hartford Memorial Middle School ......................................................................196 Dothan Brook School.........................................................................................197 Ottauquechee School ........................................................................................198 White River School ............................................................................................199 Resources 20-year History of Budgets, Taxes and Tax Rates ............................................201 Student and Staff Data ......................................................................................202 Reading Recovery Results ........................................................................................207 Annual School Report Cards Hartford High School .........................................................................................209 Hartford Memorial Middle School ......................................................................216 Dothan Brook School.........................................................................................224 Ottauquechee School ........................................................................................232 White River School ............................................................................................240 HHS Outcome Data SAT ...................................................................................................................248 ACT ...................................................................................................................248 AP Exams ..........................................................................................................249 Student Plans after Graduation .........................................................................249 HACTC Outcome Data Student Data......................................................................................................250 HACTC Plans after Graduation .........................................................................252 Student Climate Survey ..................................................................................... 253 Vermont Youth Risk Survey Report ..............................................................................254 Technology Report.....................................................................................................263 Extracurricular Activities ...........................................................................................264 Notices ........................................................................................................................265 2018 Financial Report ................................................................................................267

186


2016-2017 Hartford Board of School Directors

Lori Dickerson, Chair Paula Nulty, Clerk Kevin Christie Peter Merrill Nancy Russell

187


Dear Hartford School Community, It is our pleasure to again provide this introduction to our annual school report. In the following pages you will find a lot of information about our school district. Of course we include all of the financial information you need to make an informed vote at town meeting, but we also include information about all aspects of the school district. The School Board is required to oversee strategic planning, financial and budget development, policy development and liability protection for the school district. Over past years the Board has worked hard to attract and retain an excellent staff, create new programs that engage students, and provide for the tools and materials needed for skill and knowledge development. We are thrilled to see that these efforts are reflected in the achievements of our students. We are also pleased to report the completion of the Fitness Center and the second phase of the renovation to the White River School. The Fitness Center is in constant use between physical education classes at the Hartford Memorial Middle School and the High School, as well as being used for the various athletic teams’ conditioning schedules. The White River School has a refreshed interior as well as a new roof on the entire structure. We continue to review our long term facilities plan and have tried to address the smaller issues within the regular budget. The 2015-16 school year was the second year of the national Smarter Balance Assessment Consortium (SBAC) assessment, which measures student proficiency in relation to the Common Core Standards. The Common Core Standards are very challenging and they have helped us raise the expectations of our programs and curriculum, placing a greater demand on our students’ abilities to demonstrate their achievements through concrete application of skills. Our Hartford students are showing signs of progress at the elementary and middle school levels. The high school is working hard to achieve better results and we anticipate them doing so in this, the third year of the test. Hartford continues to struggle with declining enrollment, mostly at the high school level. There are less available tuition students coming from neighboring towns. Nonetheless, Hartford is working to slow the decline by attracting more students at the career and technology center and through the new prekindergarten programs. Both have seen significant increases over this past year. The budget proposal in this report is our attempt to balance providing for our educational goals while maintaining a school tax rate that we can afford. This year’s proposed budget maintains adequate funding for our programs and provides for maintenance of our buildings and a reasonable increase for all staff. Negotiations with the support staff and teacher unions are ongoing. This year we are all working to understand how changes in health insurance at both the national and state levels will impact us locally. We sincerely hope you take the time to peruse and comment on this Annual Report. The report touches on all aspects of our school district including student assessment data, student athletics, activities and clubs, staff demographic information and much more. We hope that our work in overseeing the programs and services provided in the Hartford School District is readily apparent to everyone in the community. Thank you for your interest in our school system and the support that you provide us throughout the year. Please don’t hesitate to contact any school board member or the superintendent if you have an idea that you want to share, a concern or a criticism that you would like heard or addressed. The Hartford School Board Lori Dickerson, Chair Paula Nulty, Clerk Kevin Christie Peter Merrill Nancy Russell

188


Hartford School District’s Universal End Policy In July 2009, the Hartford School board officially adopted the following “Universal End”, along with an accompanying set of specific “Ends Policies” that describes the aspirations we all have for our students while clearly stating what each graduate should know and be able to do.

The Universal End statement: Students will graduate from the Hartford School District equipped with a diverse set of knowledge and skills – achieved through a combination of classroom-based, hands-on, and peer-to-peer learning – that will provide them the foundation to excel in future endeavors. In pursuit of this Universal End, the Hartford School Board has identified the Ends Policies on which the District should focus:

Academic Excellence Students will perform at a high level in these crucial areas of academic expertise: reading skills for information and interpretation; written and verbal communication skills; problem-solving skills based on mathematical, scientific and social-scientific knowledge demonstrated through application; and skills developed through broad knowledge of the arts and humanities. Students will participate in and understand the benefits of collaborative learning.

Technology/Information Skills Students will be proficient in a variety of techniques in ways that are responsible, respectful, and enhance both academic and life skills. Students will be able to critically assess and interpret information, and to communicate that information to others using appropriate technologies.

189


Life Skills Students will demonstrate the ability to develop long-term life goals, to plan for their future, to cooperate with others, and to live independently within and adapt to an everchanging world. They will be able to identify problems and determine the resources and people necessary to help solve them. Students will demonstrate the qualities essential for succeeding within and outside of the school setting, including integrity, tolerance, selfmotivation, work ethic, intellectual curiosity, and respect for themselves and others.

Health and Well Being Students will develop personal and social skills and behaviors that will support their physical, emotional and mental well-being. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how nutrition, exercise and athletics, creative outlets, selfreflection, and personal relationships contribute to a healthy, well-adjusted and productive person.

Citizenship Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of how their actions integrate with broader society, and will participate actively and positively within their school and community. Students will demonstrate an understanding of citizenship and its essential qualities, including leadership, critical thinking, self-awareness, and respect for multiple viewpoints.

Global Awareness Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the economic, political, environmental, and cultural changes occurring on the global scale, and how these changes impact their communities.

190


Community Profile Selected Indicators (Using most recent available data)

Household Income (Median Household Income in 2015 dollars)

2014

Hartford $66,913

Vermont $65,608

Source: VT Department of Taxes: http://tax.vermont.gov/content/statistics-income-family2014-xls

Number of Children and Families Receiving Food Stamps as of 11/2015

Hartford Vermont

Children

Families

411 26,560

697 42,484

Source: Department for Children and Families

Child Abuse and Neglect: Investigations

Sept. 2014-Aug. 2015

Children Subject of Maltreatment

Hartford 15.1 per 10K

Vermont 16.6 per 10K

Source: http://www.fosteringcourtimprovement.org/vt/District/Hartford/

Percent of Students Receiving Free & Reduced Lunch

2016

Hartford 36%

Vermont 44%

Source: Vermont Agency of Education: http://education.vermont.gov/sites/aoe/files/documents/edu-nutrition-free-reduced-report2016.pdf

191


Total School Enrollments Number of Students Enrolled* 1998

2003

2008

2014

2015

2016

Pre-K-5

852

739

714

721

712

685

Grades 6-8

442

386

360

322

317

313

Grades 9-12

792

800

692

592

577

511

Career & Tech Center**

248

223

207

181

177

196

Other***

44

50

31

40

44

39

Total

2378

2198

2004

1856

1827

1744

* ** ***

Data from January of the particular year. Number HACTC students from sending schools Number reflects students in the Hartford Autism Regional Program (HARP) and Regional Alternative Program (RAP)

192


Enrollments in Special Programs Hartford School District provides individualized services and accommodations for children who are eligible for specific programs under state and federal law. Children eligible for special education require unique instruction that is outlined in an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Students eligible under Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 have a disability and require accommodations to the program or setting. Children receiving Title I services may not have a disability; however, they are performing significantly below their peers and need additional assistance. 2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

Special Education

17%

15%

19%

17%

22%

17%

504

8%

7%

8%

6%

8%

7%

Title I

6%

5%

9%

4%

5%

7%

Data includes students who tuition to Hartford Schools. Data does not include Pre-K and HACTC students.

Enrollment in Free-Reduced Meal Program (source: VT Agency of Education: http://education.vermont.gov/sites/aoe/files/documents/edu-nutrition-free-reduced-report-2016.pdf )

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2016

2015-2016

DBS OQS WRS HMMS HHS

33% 39% 47% 32% 18%

31% 35% 48% 31% 23%

34% 32% 50% 31.% 25%

32% 37% 53% 34% 24%

33% 43% 53% 28% 24%

Hartford Vermont

29% 40%

31% 41%

31% 41%

36% 43%

36% 44%

193


School Summaries Hartford High School White River Junction, VT Grade levels: 9 – 12 Student Population: 476 Average Class size: 15 Principal: Nelson Fogg Jr. Hartford High School is in the fourth year of a major restructuring effort. These modifications include the addition of an embedded advisory, a weekly all-school meeting, and H-Block. The daily 75-minute HBlock provides opportunity for academic, social, and emotional supports. Two years ago it was decided that H-Block would also provide our ninth graders with a scheduled Academic Support period four days per week. This requirement is designed to give our youngest students a supported head start in their high school career. The only program that is offered during H-Block is Band/Choir. Hartford has seen a significant increase in enrollment in these classes since moving them to this time of the day. Hartford students have access to their teachers and club advisors during H-Block; this will be increasingly important as more of our students pursue non-traditional learning opportunities as outlined in Vermont’s multiple pathways legislation. During the past four years Hartford has seen the evolution of a program called The Eye. The Eye is designed to provide Hartford’s students with the opportunity to pursue a range of educationally alternative options. Vermont’s ACT 77 legislation directs schools to provide learning through multiple pathways that must include: community-based learning, internships, dual enrolled college courses, and student-created learning opportunities. At Hartford High School these are supported by our staff in The Eye. Another element of ACT 77 is the requirement that students develop Personalized Learning Plans (PLP) that directs their learning. In 2016-2017 Hartford ninth graders are creating their PLPs through a co-taught (English teacher and School Counselor), year-long Patterns of Literature and Learning course. This close support for PLP development provides a strong foundation from which students will be able to lead their learning in the future. In addition to elements of ACT 77, Hartford students can take classes at Dartmouth College or through our PLATO on-line learning platform. Collectively these learning experiences are fundamentally changing the ways in which students acquire and use knowledge. We are also emphasizing individual student growth in the “Transferable Skills;” these skills, that all of us need to be successful in our lives, take the form of proficiencies and are embedded in every class at Hartford High School. All this adds up to a very different educational experience than the traditional high school. This array of unique learning opportunities requires significant supports. Hartford High School employs School Counselors – including a dedicated ninth grade Counselor, Special Educators, an on-site HCRS mental health clinician, a 504 Program Coordinator, School Nurse, and a Second Growth-based SAP. In addition to these human resources, Hartford provides access to computers in the library and through mobile carts. A campus-wide wireless system ensures internet connectivity, allowing students to bring their own devices. An Academic Resource Center (ARC), a limited summer school, and our on-line PLATO platform provide support to help students remain on track for graduation and opportunity to challenge themselves through programs that are not offered through a traditional classroom. The parent/student portal of Infinite Campus, Hartford’s student information system, enables regular monitoring of each student’s progress. A varied course of study, including an Honors Program, and a solid support system accomplish little on their own. Hartford’s highly- trained and enthusiastic faculty tie the whole effort together. Motivated students have at their disposal a complete educational environment that provides the necessary structure for them to achieve. While the classroom is the focal point for primary learning experiences, Hartford maintains a rich and deep tradition of extracurricular activities. A full range of these experiences, combine with rigorous, individualized, educational opportunities to broaden and deepen the physical, social, emotional, and academic development of our students.

194


Hartford Area Career and Technology Center White River Junction, VT Grade Levels: 11th & 12th with two programs available for 10th grade students Student Population: 348 Average Class Size: Level II programs=12; Level I programs=12; Non-sequential programs=2 Number of Programs: 14 Director: Doug Heavisides The Hartford Area Career and Technology Center (HACTC) serves students from Hanover, Hartford, Lebanon, Mascoma, Windsor, and Woodstock High Schools. In addition, the HACTC also serves students from Rivendell Academy, South Royalton High School, Thetford Academy, Mid-Vermont Christian School, Ledyard Charter School, and home-study students. We strive to be the educational hub that connects all the Upper Valley communities, preparing students for both post-secondary education as well as immediate employment. Students may enroll in any of the following occupational programs: ● Health Sciences ● Automotive Technology ● Building Trades ● Business Administration ● Collision Repair & Refinishing ● Computer Technology Applications ● Cosmetology ● Culinary Arts ● Design, Illustration, Media Arts ● Human Services ● Industrial Mechanics and Welding ● Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)

195


● ●

Natural Resources Career & Technology Exploration (for recommended 10th grade students only)

In addition, senior students may participate in the Cooperative-Education program. This program provides students work-based learning opportunities in an industry related to their program at the HACTC. In support of the program curriculums, the HACTC also offers a variety of Career and Technical Student Organizations that provide students opportunities to learn and demonstrate leadership skills. These organizations include the following: ● Hospitality Program - serving Culinary Arts ● Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) - serving business programs ● Future Farmers of America (FFA) - serving agricultural programs ● Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) - serving health programs ● SkillsUSA - serving all Career and Technical Education programs ● National Technology Honor Society (NTHS) - serving high achieving students

Hartford Memorial Middle School White River Junction, VT Grades: 6-8 Student Population: 287 Average Class Size: 16 Principal: Tristan Upson Assistant Principal: Heather Cleveland The Hartford Memorial Middle School is an educational community where the qualities of academic rigor are closely valued and coupled with the healthy development of emotional and physical health of adolescents. Our students’ day begins with a 20-minute advisory period designed to build community, promote social skills, establish a supportive learning environment, and help each student make a strong connection with at least one adult in the building who knows them well. Using a middle school team-teaching model, our academic program is centered on building a strong foundation in the core subject areas as well as developing students’ transferable skills. Each team covers the same academic standards and basic curriculum in their own distinctive style and blend of interdisciplinary and community place-based projects. In addition to core subjects, we also offer music, art, family consumer science, STEM, and French and Spanish. We have also implemented a daily “M Block” which is a 23-minute period of time in which students receive intervention or enrichment in reading and math based on data from the STAR testing, as well as providing time for teams to implement team-building activities. For the last five years, students have also led bi-annual portfolio presentations for their parents in which students demonstrate and reflect on their learning and progress in academic and transferable skills. We offer our students a diverse blend of programs and activities with opportunities to make new friends, while putting an emphasis on fostering respect, tolerance, community building, and school spirit. The school year is punctuated by special events such as a read-a-thon, field trips, winter carnival, author visit, open houses, concerts, social studies inquiry fair, spring musical extravaganza, and field day. In 7th and 8th grade, we offer a range of interscholastic athletics (with a no cut policy) comprised of football, soccer, field hockey, tennis, cross country, track and field, basketball, baseball, and softball. Club and specialty activities include student council, Quest-our student leadership group, photography and debate clubs, jazz band, school band, chorus, TSA - Technology Student Association, yearbook, mentor programs, and more! As a school, we strive to teach students to work together, to interact positively with each other and adults, to respect other people, and to behave as responsible members of our school and broader community.

196


Dothan Brook School White River Junction, VT

Grade Levels: Pre-Kindergarten-Grade 5 Student Population: 254 Average Class Size (K-5): 19 Number of Classes: 2 (Pre-K) & 12 (K-5) Website: DBSVT.com Facebook: Dothan Brook School Principal: Rick Dustin-Eichler The Dothan Brook School’s community of students, staff, and families is committed to providing a physically and emotionally safe learning environment, fostering academic, social, and emotional growth, and nurturing a sense of belonging in all its members. In July 2016, the Dothan Brook School was honored by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) as a Recognized ASCA Model Program (RAMP) and School of Distinction. The RAMP recognition was presented to DBS for its exemplary commitment to the delivery of a comprehensive school counseling program. Through this process, the school was selected as one of five Schools of Distinction for the entire nation. In addition, Rebecca Lallier, one of the DBS school counselors, was named as one of five finalists for the national school counselor of the year award. Dothan Brook’s Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS) program was recognized as “Exemplar” by the Vermont Agency of Education in October and received a formal commendation from the state’s secretary of education. Dothan Brook was one of two Vermont schools to receive this award for five consecutive years. The basis of this accolade stems from the innovative work that the school is undertaking with the goal of increasing every child’s ability to learn. Academically, when results from Vermont’s statewide assessment program (SBAC) were released in September, Secretary of Education Rebecca Holcombe shared that Dothan Brook had one of the highest percentages of students who receive free lunch and met or exceeded grade level standards. To support this statement, she shared the school’s 4th grade math results in which 75% of students who receive free lunch made the standard compared to 32% statewide. School-wide 64% of DBS free lunch students met or exceeded the standard in math compared to 34% state-wide. Go to the following link to learn more-www.mynbc5.com/article/what-new-vt-school-test-data-tells-us/3619148. Building on this strong foundation, Dothan Brook students have access to a wide array of resources and experiences that nurture intellectual curiosity and growth. Many of these experiences are made possible through various partnerships: DBS Parent Teacher Organization’s support of numerous fieldtrips and activities; the White River Rotary’s financial contributions to the 5th grade biography fair; Growing Change, America Reads and Big Sibs from Dartmouth College; 4th grade Shakespeare in the Classroom program in conjunction with Northern Stage; and Berlin City Auto Group’s monetary contributions to the DBS Drama Club. In addition, the school is in its fourth year of collaboration with VINS to bring deep science content into the classrooms and 3rd year working with Think3D! to increase students’ spatial reasoning and problem solving through origami. 197


Ottauquechee School Quechee, VT Grade levels: Pre-Kindergarten through grade 5 Student population: 217 Average class size: 15.5 Number of classes: 14 classrooms consisting of morning and afternoon pre-kindergarten, full-day kindergarten, and grade specific classrooms for grades 1-5 Principal: Cathy Newton This year has been a wonderful year of growth for us as we continued to work on developing a positive, collaborative, and safe environment for all learners. Teachers received the new updated Bridges mathematics program along with professional development to provide high quality math instruction. All K-2 students are being evaluated using the Primary Number and Operations Assessment to determine mathematical gaps in their understanding. Collectively we analyze the data from this assessment to make decisions about mathematics instruction. A wide variety of teaching and learning strategies and programs are used in our language arts instruction including writing for understanding, the painted essay, the five-finger paragraph, and leveled reading books. This year there has been a school wide emphasis on building knowledge and vocabulary through word study, the reading of text sets and instructional read aloud. Teachers develop and implement inquiry based science lessons and units corresponding with our science curriculum. Grades 3-5 have one to one personal learning devices (e.g. Chromebooks and Netbooks) and grades K-2 have shared devices. Each student participates in physical education class twice per week; art, music, and library once per week; 4th grade students learn to play recorder, and students in grade 5 have the opportunity to take weekly instrumental and band lessons. In addition to all-class lessons, there are small groups, large groups, and 1:1 counseling. We have a hot breakfast and lunch program, daily outdoor recess and fulltime nursing. Students participate in a DCF reading club, Student Council, Field trips to local venues (Billings Farm, Hopkins Center, Lebanon Opera House, VINS, Montshire Museum) and collaborations with the White River Partnership. After school students may join Girls on the Run, Wolves on the Prowl, Garden Club, Coding club, Baking Club our Ski and Snowboard Program, and the Hartford Afterschool Program. Our school community expects that all staff and students at the Ottauquechee School will be: Respectful, Responsible, Ready to Learn and Safe. We use PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports) which is a school-wide system that recognizes the positive contributions of students. The main goal of PBIS is to help every student at Ottauquechee School develop self-discipline to make positive choices. We have a fabulous facility that consists of well-apportioned classrooms, a spacious library, beautiful gym, a cafeteria, and dedicated rooms for music, art, special education, health and counseling. Our school also has large playing fields, playground equipment, a sledding hill, vegetable garden, and extensive nature trails.

198


White River School White River Junction, Vermont 2016-2017 Grade levels: Pre-kindergarten through grade 5 Student population: 218 Average class size: 16 (grades K-5), 13 (pre-K) Number of classes: 2 sessions of pre-K, 12 classes of K-5 (2 per grade level) Principal: Sheila Powers White River School students are valued and respected. Our staff often receives positive comments regarding how considerate, polite and curious our students are. We hear these comments from other parents, guest performers, from the managers of facilities that our students visit on field trips and from our many reading mentors that visit our school each week. We are consistently proud of our students for their compassion, care and concern for others when they help each other out at school. Our school-wide expectations and behavior plan require three things: be safe, be respectful and be responsible. White River School students demonstrate daily that they value these expectations and they meet them. Our primary goal is to maintain a positive school climate where students’ needs are met so that they can engage in learning successfully and eagerly. White River School students continue to perform well on local and statewide assessments. Our staff is allocated time to closely study the results of many assessments that we’re required to administer. As a result, we recognize that many of our students continue to struggle with vocabulary acquisition and language skills. Therefore, our teachers have researched and implemented specific programming to address this. Our students in pre-k through grade 2 are learning to encode and decode words in a systematic way through a program called Fundations. Our students in grades 3-5 learn spelling, phonics and vocabulary through word study using the Words Their Way program. Additionally, our staff meets monthly with the HSD Instructional Coach to study and implement teaching strategies to address academic vocabulary. In August, our teachers received training in the Bridges Math Program 2nd Edition. Our students and teachers are incredibly excited about the lessons in this program since they align beautifully with the Common Core State Standards and they are based on research that tells us not only what students should know and do, but how they can learn it. This coupled with Number Corner which is also used in all k-5 classrooms requires 75-90 minutes of math instruction daily, but based on the rich math dialogue when students are expressing their math thinking and strategies used, it is time well spent. The White River School is extremely fortunate to have fantastic support from organizations in our community. A few examples are: ● More than 100 mentors (reading buddies) come to WRS weekly through the Everybody Wins! VT program. ● Children’s Fund of the Upper Valley - $2500 to run fall/spring Boys’ Athletic Training Program. ● Girls on the Run - WRS staff raised funds for scholarships to support this program. ● Creative Lives After School Program - (CLASP) primarily funded by private grantors including the Byrne Foundation, The Marion Institute as well as the Bright Futures program in the State of Vermont - on average 25 WRS students daily. ● American Legion, Post 84 - partnered with staff to raise more than $1500 for the Reading Is Fundamental program. ● Resource Systems Group (RSG) provided volunteers to provide a fall/spring Coding Club experience. ● Exxon- Mobil Corporation, Energy North, Inc. - donated $500 for math and science initiatives. ● Byrne Foundation - $6,000 or the Camp Invention Science camp held last summer.

199


Here are a few examples of the White River School’s efforts to provide excellent instruction, expectations for behavior and to support our children and families: ● A highly qualified and skilled teaching staff that continues to learn and implement researched based teaching methodologies. The staff monitors students’ achievement routinely and develops targeted intervention plans to support all of our students based on individual needs. ● A dedicated and active Parent Teacher Association that provides student enrichment opportunities such as an artist in residence, school-wide trips, and family events such as family game night and movie night. ● Student-motivation and reinforcement programs, including WRS student recognition assemblies and a school-wide approach for behavior expectations. ● Related Arts programs including library, art and music/dance with students performing two concerts annually. Students attend PE classes twice weekly.

200


Resources

201


Hartford Student and Staff Data

202


203


204


205


206


Reading Recovery Reading Recovery is an early-intervention program designed to increase reading and writing success. It is based on the assumption that intensive, high-quality help during the early years of schooling is the most productive investment of resources. A trained Reading Recovery teacher works with students in daily 30-minute individual sessions. Students have successfully completed the program when they reach the average level of performance of their classmates. Students who do not successfully complete the program may have moved out the district or were referred to another program.

Percentage of Students who successfully completed a Full Program

Hartford

Vermont’s NE Regional Collaborative

2010-2011

79%

87%

2011-2012

57%

84%

2012-2013

80%

81%

2013-2014

93%

85%

2014-2015

100%

77%

2015-2016

85%

76%

Note: The above percentages reflect those students who had a full program. Source: East Central Vermont Literacy Consortium

207


Follow-up Data for Reading Recovery Students The following information reflects the reading status of our current second graders (one-year follow-up) and fifth-graders (four-year follow-up) after receiving Reading Recovery in first grade. Please note that the total number for these two subgroups is very small (25 and 28) making these percentages not statistically significant, but rather a point of reference for discussion purposes.

Twenty-five 2nd grade students who received Reading Recovery in 2013-2014 are now in the following programs:

Twenty-eight 5th grade students who received Reading Recovery in 2011-2012 are now in the following programs:

Regular education (no additional supports)

60%

36%

Title I reading or other support in reading

12%

7%

Special education for reading

8%

11%

IEP with no reading goals (in Title 1 for reading goals)

8%

7%

Moved out of the district

12%

32%

Retained

0%

7%

208


School Report Cards Under the NCLB Act, States and school districts (LEAs) are required to prepare and disseminate annual report cards. Requirements for the data elements to be reported are set forth under section 111(h) of the law. Each school report card must contain assessment information (data on our annual state test), accountability data (each school’s status in regards to school improvement) and teacher quality information. We are in the second year of administering a new state-wide assessment, the SBAC (Standards Based Assessment Consortium). This online test is administered to students in grades 3-8 and 11 in the spring of each year. It focuses on English/Language Arts and math and measures a student’s proficiency level in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The charts below compare this year’s assessment results to last year’s outcomes. It also disaggregates the data into a variety of groups. The reports cards also include data on the science New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) which have been administered in the past and will continue at least through 2017. Students in grade 4, 8 and 11 take the science NECAP and these tests measure skills and knowledge outlined in Vermont’s Grade Expectations (GEs). Both Act 60 and the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) required states to have a system that held public schools accountable for the academic achievement of their students. With the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), Vermont is in the process of building a new accountability system which will make a determination for each school indicating whether or not they have made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). AYP status establishes where a school is on a school improvement continuum. As a result of the change in state assessments, and the state’s work on a new accountability plan, schools’ Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) determinations have been frozen at 2014 levels.

Hartford High School School Report Card 2016/2017 The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act is federal legislation which was passed in 2002 with the intent of improving education for all children by holding schools responsible for results, promoting teaching methods that work and ushering in a new age of accountability. Just as your student receives a report card that tells you how they are doing in school, this law requires schools to issue a report card to the community each year. This report card contains important information including: ● How your child’s school is doing compared to state averages ● The percentage of students working at high levels of academic achievement and the percentage working at lower levels as indicated by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) ● How different groups did on the SBAC (boy and girls, students from different economic backgrounds, and students with disabilities) ● How well the school is doing in relationship to meeting Vermont’s achievement goals ● Whether or not the school has been identified as in need of improvement based on the NECAP scores for the students in that school ● If the school has been identified for needing improvement what steps the school is taking to improve ● How many teachers are highly qualified to teach the subjects for which they are responsible On Dec. 1, 2015, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which replaced NCLB. The Vermont Agency of Education is currently in the process of determining how the requirements of (ESSA) will impact schools. Some practices will remain the same while others change. During this transition, schools are required to comply with the old NCLB components of the School Report Card. For a brief overview on the differences between NCLB and ESSA, visit: http://www.ed.gov/essa?src=rn.

209


Assessment Information: Since 2005, Vermont students have been participating in the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). Beginning in the spring of 2015, Vermont transitioned to a new state assessment for grades 3-8 and grade 11, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) for English Language Arts and math. This assessment was developed by a multistate consortium supported by institutions of higher education and industry and was designed to assess students’ proficiency in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The goal of the CCSS is to prepare all students to leave high school ready for college and career. Student scores are reported at four levels of mastery of the CCSS; Level 4 (exceeded the achievement standard), Level 3 (met the achievement standard), Level 2 (nearly met the achievement standard) and Level 1 (not met the achievement standard). Vermont continues to administer the NECAP Science test in May of each year to grades 4, 8 and 11. These tests measure students’ academic knowledge and skills relative to the Vermont Grade Expectations (GEs). The requirements for the School Report Card are communicated through Federal regulation under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Those regulations mandate that we report the most recent two-year trend in each subject and grade level. However, the VT Agency of Education has not compared statewide 2014/2015 SBAC results to 2015/2016 results (two-year trend) and urges us not to do so at the district and school levels for several reasons. Prior to the SBAC, most Vermont schools had not administered any online assessments. Although the second year of administration went more smoothly across the state, it would be difficult to know if changes in scores reflected actual student achievement or variabilities in the administration of the test. While Hartford School District did analyze the scores, we are cautious about making big decisions based solely on the SBAC. The following information is a summary of the SBAC results in ELA and math as well as the NECAP results in science. Proficiency Levels: ELA & math SBAC: Level 4=exceeded the standard Level 3=met the standard Level 2=nearly met the standard Level 1=did not meet the standard

Science NECAP: 4=proficient with distinction 3=proficient 2=partially proficient 1= substantially below proficient

210


211

36

24

25

3

2

1

39

19

32

10

2016

21

17

40

21

2015

5

23

33

37

3

2

1

2015

45

31

16

8

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieve ment Level

38

34

19

7

2015

44

26

23

7

2016

Female (%)

29

19

35

16

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 11

13

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieve ment Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 11

36

33

27

3

46

36

9

9

2016

48

19

28

5

2016

Male (%)

2015

28

29

34

7

2015

Male (%)

79

0

16

5

2016

47

41

8

2

2015

81

14

5

0

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

37

34

18

9

2015

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

32

22

35

11

2016

37

30

28

6

2015

38

35

18

9

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

25

23

42

14

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

89

6

6

0

2016

87

12

0

0

2015

90

10

0

0

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

66

13

20

0

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

31

21

36

12

2016

30

37

27

6

2015

37

35

19

9

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)

19

27

39

15

2015

Non-Disabled Students (%)


212

25

45

29

3

2

1

40

42

16

1

2016

26

43

30

0

2015

31

50

16

1

2016

Female (%)

31

46

22

0

47

35

16

0

2016

Male (%)

2015

100% of the Hartford High School was tested.

0

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieve ment Level

NECAP Science: Grade 11

39

51

9

0

2015

64

20

16

0

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

25

42

32

0

2015

34

48

16

1

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

66

33

0

0

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)


213

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Reading Index (N/A for 2015)

AYP Decisions Math Index Academic Indicator (N/A for 2015) (must be met for all students) N/A YES N/A N/A YES N/A N/A N˂40 N/A YES N˂40 YES

N˂40

Participation (must be at least 95%) YES

*All other subgroups contain less than 40 students. No decision is made for subgroups less than 40.

All Students Not Free/Reduced Lunch Free/Reduced Lunch Without Disability With Disability White

Group

120 86 34 103 17 113

100 100 100 100 100 100

Participation Total Students % Tested

AYP determinations (level of school improvement) remain frozen at 2014 levels due to the fact that the Agency of Education is working on determining Vermont’s accountability measures in light of the new legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Thus, AYP decisions were not made for the past two years, but remain at levels which were determined as a result of 2013 NECAP results. For further information about Assessment Accountability, visit the Vermont Agency of Education website at: http://education.vermont.gov/data-and-reporting/schoolreports/accountability

Accountability Information: As part of NCLB, each state must determine a timeline for adequate yearly progress (AYP) towards the goal of all students reaching proficiency in reading and mathematics by 2014 as indicated on the state assessment. AYP is intended to be used as a diagnostic tool to help state departments of education determine where financial resources should be allocated. Schools not making AYP are deemed in need of improvement. As the number of years for not making AYP increases, schools move from receiving technical assistance from the state department towards more serious corrective actions mandated by the state department.


214

94.3% 86% 87.5%

86.0% 86.0%

75.9%

86.0%

86.0%

79.4%

86.0%

73.7%

86%

90.2%

78.6%

86%

86.0%

89.1%

2015 Graduation Rate (% graduated)

86%

Graduation Rate Goal (expected to be met)

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Met Graduation Rate Goal (Grad. Rate is ≥ 86%)

82.6%

89.1%

94.7%

72%

80.8%

91.8%

67.9%

77%

87.7%

2014 Graduation Rate (Previous year graduation rate)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

84.6%

N/A

N<40 (N/A)

80.5%

N/A

Graduation Rate Target (based on school previous year rate. Only applicable if goal is not met)

For more information on graduation rates visit: http://education.vermont.gov/documents/data-ayp-schools-2015

6-year Graduation Rate ● All students ● Free/Reduced Lunch ● With Disability

5-year Graduation Rate ● All students ● Free/Reduced Lunch ● With Disability

4-year Graduation Rate: ● All students ● Free/Reduced Lunch ● With Disability

HHS Graduation Rate:

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

No

N/A

N/A

NO

N/A

Met 4, 5 or 6-year Graduation Rate Target (meet target if grad. rate is ≥ its target)


Based on 2014 AYP determinations, Hartford High School (HHS) did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Reading for all students. HHS did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Math for all students. Therefore, HHS is in Year 1 of Corrective Action. In an attempt to improve outcomes for all students, HHS will take the following action steps this year: Reading:  

Implement STAR Reading Test three times per year to monitor student progress and identify student needs Modify the ninth grade English course, Patterns of Literature and Learning, to incorporate goal setting and personalized learning plan development using the STAR Reading test results as supporting data

Math:   

Implement STAR Math test three times per year to monitor student progress and identify student needs. Utilize the STAR data to target student needs to support individual and small group instruction Assess students on common unit assessments and analyze results as a math department to identify holes in instruction and common strengths and weaknesses in math program as compared to the Common Core State Standards

Hartford School District’s schools are in the following levels of improvement as determined by their 2014 AYP status: ● Year 2 of School Improvement: White River School ● Year 1 of Corrective Action: Dothan Brook School, Ottauquechee School, Hartford High School ● Year 2 of Corrective Action: Hartford Memorial Middle School

215


Teacher Quality Information: The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all public school teachers of “core” academic subjects (English language arts, math, social, studies, science, reading, art, music, foreign languages and special educators who provide primary instruction in one of these areas) meet the “highly qualified teacher” (HQT) requirements of the Act. The Vermont Agency of Education determines if a teacher is highly qualified. Classes Taught by NOT HQ Percentage of core academic classes NOT taught by teacher/total classes highly qualified teachers 4 2.72% # of Emergency credentialed Percentage of teachers teaching with emergency teachers/total teacher credentials 0 0% Number of Teachers with a Master’s Degree 40

Hartford Memorial Middle School School Report Card 2016/2017 The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act is federal legislation which was passed in 2002 with the intent of improving education for all children by holding schools responsible for results, promoting teaching methods that work and ushering in a new age of accountability. Just as your student receives a report card that tells you how they are doing in school, this law requires schools to issue a report card to the community each year. This report card contains important information including: ● How your child’s school is doing compared to state averages ● The percentage of students working at high levels of academic achievement and the percentage working at lower levels as indicated by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC). ● How different groups did on the SBAC (boy and girls, students from different economic backgrounds, and students with disabilities) ● How well the school is doing in relationship to meeting Vermont’s achievement goals ● Whether or not the school has been identified as in need of improvement based on the NECAP scores for the students in that school ● If the school has been identified for needing improvement what steps the school is taking to improve ● How many teachers are highly qualified to teach the subjects for which they are responsible

216


On Dec. 1, 2015, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which replaced NCLB. The Vermont Agency of Education is currently in the process of determining how the requirements of (ESSA) will impact schools. Some practices will remain the same while others change. During this transition, schools are required to comply with the old NCLB components of the School Report Card. For an brief overview on the differences between NCLB and ESSA, visit: http://www.ed.gov/essa?src=rn. Assessment Information: Since 2005, Vermont students have been participating in the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). Beginning in the spring of 2015, Vermont transitioned to a new state assessment for grades 3-8 and grade 11, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) for English Language Arts and math. This assessment was developed by a multistate consortium supported by institutions of higher education and industry and was designed to assess studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proficiency in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The goal of the CCSS is to prepare all students to leave high school ready for college and career. Student scores are reported at four levels of mastery of the CCSS; Level 4 (exceeded the achievement standard), Level 3 (met the achievement standard), Level 2 (nearly met the achievement standard) and Level 1 (not met the achievement standard). Vermont continues to administer the NECAP Science test in May of each year to grades 4, 8 and 11. These tests measure studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; academic knowledge and skills relative to the Vermont Grade Expectations (GEs). The requirements for the School Report Card are communicated through Federal regulation under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Those regulations mandate that we report the most recent two-year trend in each subject and grade level. However, the VT Agency of Education has not compared statewide 2014/2015 SBAC results to 2015/2016 results (two-year trend) and urges us not to do so at the district and school levels for several reasons. Prior to the SBAC, most Vermont schools had not administered any online assessments. Although the second year of administration went more smoothly across the state, it would be difficult to know if changes in scores reflected actual student achievement or variabilities in the administration of the test. While Hartford School District did analyze the scores, we are cautious about making big decisions based solely on the SBAC. The following information is a summary of the SBAC results in ELA and math as well as the NECAP results in science.

Proficiency Levels: ELA & math SBAC: Level 4=exceeded the standard Level 3=met the standard Level 2=nearly met the standard Level 1=did not meet the standard Science NECAP: 4=proficient with distinction 3=proficient 2=partially proficient 1= substantially below proficient

217


218

34

32

10

3

2

1

16

26

30

29

2016

7

21

46

23

2015

21

23

34

20

3

2

1

2015

23

38

23

14

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

19

36

29

14

2015

15

37

24

22

2016

Female (%)

9

18

29

44

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 6

21

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 6

21

33

19

26

30

38

22

8

2016

22

33

31

14

2016

Male (%)

2015

13

40

26

20

2015

Male (%)

21

25

36

18

2016

30

36

15

18

2015

39

42

15

3

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

11

50

30

8

2015

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

14

26

27

33

2016

15

33

27

23

2015

14

36

27

21

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

10

23

36

29

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

52

20

28

0

2016

70

30

0

0

2015

72

28

0

0

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

35

55

10

0

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

3

28

30

39

2016

7

35

29

26

2015

6

42

32

20

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)

4

27

40

27

2015

Non-Disabled Students (%)


219

41

27

12

3

2

1

17

24

37

21

2016

12

21

44

21

2015

18

37

24

18

3

2

1

2015

18

36

20

25

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

25

19

42

12

2015

20

30

30

18

2016

Female (%)

11

18

44

25

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 7

18

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

BAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 7

14

28

34

23

16

41

12

30

2016

21

28

32

17

2016

Male (%)

2015

12

31

39

17

2015

Male (%)

21

31

34

12

2016

36

22

27

13

2015

28

46

3

21

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

22

38

31

8

2015

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

18

20

38

25

2016

10

25

42

21

2015

13

31

28

26

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

8

21

46

24

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

44

38

16

0

2016

73

20

6

0

2015

59

41

0

0

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

53

33

13

0

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

11

20

41

25

2016

10

25

42

21

2015

10

35

24

30

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)

6

26

45

21

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


220

40

26

24

3

2

1

9

25

49

16

2016

21

28

46

3

2015

22

19

22

34

3

2

1

2015

17

21

23

37

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

50

9

21

18

2015

16

20

20

41

2016

Female (%)

14

14

52

18

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 8

7

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 8

25

30

18

25

4

33

46

14

2016

17

22

25

33

2016

Male (%)

2015

26

26

36

10

2015

Male (%)

8

41

44

5

2016

50

32

8

8

2015

23

32

20

23

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

45

20

34

0

2015

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

9

18

51

21

2016

24

16

26

32

2015

14

17

25

43

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

11

31

44

12

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

43

31

25

0

2016

66

25

8

0

2015

68

25

0

6

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

65

26

7

0

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

3

24

53

19

2016

22

22

23

31

2015

8

21

27

42

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)

7

26

53

11

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


221

24

44

31

3

2

1

21

56

23

0

2016

39

45

12

3

2015

21

54

25

0

2016

Female (%)

27

43

30

0

2015

21

58

21

0

2016

Male (%)

100% of the Hartford Memorial Middle School was tested.

1

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

NECAP Science: Grade 8

42

44

14

0

2015

33

52

5

0

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

25

43

30

2

2015

16

58

20

0

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

77

23

0

0

2015

63

38

0

0

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

13

52

33

2

2015

14

60

27

0

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)


222

Reading Index (N/A for 2015)

Participation (must be at least 95%)

Academic Indicator Number of Indicator LCB Students (% of (lower students in boundary lowest ach. of the Level of Academic reading test) Indicator) All Students N/A N/A N/A YES N/A N/A N/A Not Free/Reduced Lunch N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Free/Reduced Lunch N/A N/A N/A YES N/A N/A N/A Without Disability N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A With Disability N/A N/A N/A YES N/A N/A N/A African American N/A N/A N/A NË&#x201A;40 N/A N/A N/A White N/A N/A N/A YES N/A N/A N/A *All other subgroups contain less than 40 students. No decision is made for subgroups less than 40.

Group

AYP Decisions Math Index Academic (N/A for Indicator 2015) (N/A for 2015)

307 196 111 240 67 16 228

100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Participation Total % Students Tested

Accountability Information: As part of NCLB, each state must determine a timeline for adequate yearly progress (AYP) towards the goal of all students reaching proficiency in reading and mathematics by 2014 as indicated on the state assessment. AYP is intended to be used as a diagnostic tool to help state departments of education determine where financial resources should be allocated. Schools not making AYP are deemed in need of improvement. As the number of years for not making AYP increases, schools move from receiving technical assistance from the state department towards more serious corrective actions mandated by the state department. AYP determinations (level of school improvement) remain frozen at 2014 levels due to the fact that the Agency of Education is working on determining Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accountability measures in light of the new legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Thus, AYP decisions were not made for the past two years, but remain at levels which were determined as a result of 2013 NECAP results. For further information about Assessment Accountability, visit the Vermont Agency of Education website at: http://education.vermont.gov/data-and-reporting/schoolreports/accountability


In 2014, Hartford Memorial Middle School did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Reading for all students, free and reduced lunch, white students, and students with disabilities. Also in 2014, HMMS did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Math for all students, free and reduced lunch, white students, and students with disabilities. Therefore, Hartford Memorial Middle School has been frozen at Year 2 of corrective action since 2014. In an attempt to improve outcomes for all students, HMMS will take the following action steps this year: Reading:  Implement STAR Reading Test three times per year to monitor student progress and identify student needs  Implement M-Block, a 23 minute intervention block every other day which matches small groups of students with teachers for specific and targeted intervention based on data from STAR Reading Test Math:   

Implement STAR Math test three times per year to monitor student progress and identify student needs. Implement M-Block, a 23 minute intervention block every other day which matches small groups of students with teachers for specific and targeted intervention based on data from STAR Math Test. Assess students on common unit assessments and analyze results as a math department to identify holes in instruction and common strengths and weaknesses in math program as compared to the Common Core State Standards

Writing:  Assess students using common writing rubrics in informative and argumentative writing developed in alignment with Common Core State Standards. Hartford School District’s schools are in the following levels of improvement as determined by their AYP status: ● Year 2 of School Improvement: White River School ● Year 1 of Corrective Action: Dothan Brook School, Ottauquechee School, Hartford High School ● Year 2 of Corrective Action: Hartford Memorial Middle School

223


Teacher Quality Information: The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all public school teachers of “core” academic subjects (English language arts, math, social, studies, science, reading, art, music, foreign languages and special educators who provide primary instruction in one of these areas) meet the “highly qualified teacher” (HQT) requirements of the Act. The Vermont Agency of Education determines if a teacher is highly qualified. Classes Taught by NOT HQ teacher/total classes

Percentage of core academic classes NOT taught by highly qualified teachers 9.35% Percentage of teachers teaching with emergency credentials 0%

10 # of Emergency credentialed teachers/total teacher 0 Number of Teachers with a Master’s Degree 25

Dothan Brook School School Report Card 2016/2017 The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act is federal legislation which was passed in 2002 with the intent of improving education for all children by holding schools responsible for results, promoting teaching methods that work and ushering in a new age of accountability. Just as your student receives a report card that tells you how they are doing in school, this law requires schools to issue a report card to the community each year. This report card contains important information including: ● How your child’s school is doing compared to state averages ● The percentage of students working at high levels of academic achievement and the percentage working at lower levels as indicated by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC)

224


● ● ● ● ●

How different groups did on the SBAC (boy and girls, students from different economic backgrounds, and students with disabilities) How well the school is doing in relationship to meeting Vermont’s achievement goals Whether or not the school has been identified as in need of improvement based on the NECAP scores for the students in that school If the school has been identified for needing improvement what steps the school is taking to improve How many teachers are highly qualified to teach the subjects for which they are responsible

On Dec. 1, 2015, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which replaced NCLB. The Vermont Agency of Education is currently in the process of determining how the requirements of (ESSA) will impact schools. Some practices will remain the same while others change. During this transition, schools are required to comply with the old NCLB components of the School Report Card. For a brief overview on the differences between NCLB and ESSA, visit: http://www.ed.gov/essa?src=rn. Assessment Information: Since 2005, Vermont students have been participating in the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). Beginning in the spring of 2015, Vermont transitioned to a new state assessment for grades 3-8 and grade 11, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) for English Language Arts and math. This assessment was developed by a multistate consortium supported by institutions of higher education and industry and was designed to assess students’ proficiency in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The goal of the CCSS is to prepare all students to leave high school ready for college and career. Student scores are reported at four levels of mastery of the CCSS; Level 4 (exceeded the achievement standard), Level 3 (met the achievement standard), Level 2 (nearly met the achievement standard) and Level 1 (not met the achievement standard). Vermont continues to administer the NECAP Science test in May of each year to grades 4, 8 and 11. These tests measure students’ academic knowledge and skills relative to the Vermont Grade Expectations (GEs). The requirements for the School Report Card are communicated through Federal regulation under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Those regulations mandate that we report the most recent two-year trend in each subject and grade level. However, the VT Agency of Education has not compared statewide 2014/2015 SBAC results to 2015/2016 results (two-year trend) and urges us not to do so at the district and school levels for several reasons. Prior to the SBAC, most Vermont schools had not administered any online assessments. Although the second year of administration went more smoothly across the state, it would be difficult to know if changes in scores reflected actual student achievement or variabilities in the administration of the test. While Hartford School District did analyze the scores, we are cautious about making big decisions based solely on the SBAC. The following information is a summary of the SBAC results in ELA and math as well as the NECAP results in science. Proficiency Levels: ELA & math SBAC: Level 4=exceeded the standard Level 3=met the standard Level 2=nearly met the standard Level 1=did not meet the standard Science NECAP: 4=proficient with distinction 3=proficient 2=partially proficient 1= substantially below proficient

225


226

35

15

10

3

2

1

17

5

20

57

2016

15

7

23

53

2015

41

35

10

12

3

2

1

2015

4

Achieveme nt Level

2

8

34

54

2016

All Students (%)

23

7

23

46

2015

0

13

40

46

2016

Female (%)

13

6

26

53

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 3

38

20 15

All Students (%)

4

Achievement Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 3

7

11

42

38

20

5

15

60

2016

5

5

30

60

2016

Male (%)

2015

7

19

42

30

2015

Male (%)

26

13

26

33

2016

45

0

27

27

2015

6

13

60

20

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

27

18

27

27

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

10

0

15

75

2016

0

14

39

46

2015

0

5

15

80

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

3

14

39

42

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Non-Disabled Students (%)


227

41

19

5

3

2

1

7

19

19

54

2016

0

21

42

35

2015

19

33

38

8

3

2

1

2015

4

9

45

40

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

7

42

35

14

2015

8

8

33

50

2016

Female (%)

0

16

8

75

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 4

33

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 4

9

36

31

22

3

10

50

36

2016

10

20

23

46

2016

Male (%)

2015

9

18

40

31

2015

Male (%)

8

25

25

41

2016

8

58

16

16

2015

16

8

41

33

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

0

16

66

16

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

6

16

16

60

2016

8

29

41

20

2015

0

10

46

43

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

8

20

29

41

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


228

69

19

0

3

2

1

0

16

76

7

2016

0

14

78

7

2015

33

36

20

10

3

2

1

2015

8

22

40

28

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

0

16

41

41

2015

13

13

60

13

2016

Female (%)

0

8

75

16

2016

Female (%)

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 5

11

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

NECAP Science: Grade 4

16

22

33

27

5

30

25

40

2016

0

20

76

3

2016

Male (%)

2015

0

22

63

13

2015

Male (%)

0

16

83

0

2016

16

41

25

16

2015

16

33

33

16

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

0

25

66

8

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

0

16

73

10

2016

5

5

44

44

2015

4

17

43

34

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

0

16

70

12

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

201 5

NonDisabled Students (%)


229

16

20

23

3

2

1

5

31

22

40

2016

8

25

16

50

2015

6

40

33

20

2016

Female (%)

33

16

16

33

2015

5

25

15

55

2016

Male (%)

100% of the Dothan Brook students were assessed.

40

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 5

41

33

16

8

2015

0

58

16

25

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

11

11

16

61

2015

8

17

26

47

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)


230

Reading Index (N/A for 2015)

Participation (must be at least 95%)

Academic Indicator Number of Indicator LCB Students (% of (lower students in boundary lowest ach. of the Level of Academic reading test) Indicator) All Students N/A N/A N/A Yes N/A N/A N/A Not Free/Reduced Lunch N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Free/Reduced Lunch N/A N/A N/A N˂40 N/A N/A N/A Without Disability N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A With Disability N/A N/A N/A N˂40 N/A N/A N/A White N/A N/A N/A Yes N/A N/A N/A *All other subgroups contain less than 40 students. No decision is made for subgroups less than 40.

Group

AYP Decisions Math Index Academic (N/A for Indicator 2015) (N/A for 2015)

109 71 38 88 21 106

100 100 100 100 100 100

Participation Total % Students Tested

Accountability Information: As part of NCLB, each state must determine a timeline for adequate yearly progress (AYP) towards the goal of all students reaching proficiency in reading and mathematics by 2014 as indicated on the state assessment. AYP is intended to be used as a diagnostic tool to help state departments of education determine where financial resources should be allocated. Schools not making AYP are deemed in need of improvement. As the number of years for not making AYP increases, schools move from receiving technical assistance from the state department towards more serious corrective actions mandated by the state department. AYP determinations (level of school improvement) remain frozen at 2014 levels due to the fact that the Agency of Education is working on determining Vermont’s accountability measures in light of the new legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Thus, AYP decisions were not made for the past two years, but remain at levels which were determined as a result of 2013 NECAP results. For further information about Assessment Accountability, visit the Vermont Agency of Education website at: http://education.vermont.gov/data-and-reporting/schoolreports/accountability


Based on 2014 AYP determinations, Dothan Brook School did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Reading for the groups all students, free/reduced lunch and white. DBS did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Math for the groups all students, free/reduced lunch and white. Therefore, Dothan Brook School is in Year 1 of Corrective Action. In an attempt to improve outcomes for all students, DBS will take the following action steps this year: Reading:  Administer the Fountas and Pinnell and/or STAR assessments to students in grades kindergarten through five and utilize data to provide targeted instruction  Adopt the Wilson Language Basics Fundations program in grades pre-kindergarten through second grade adopted  Continue to update and expand the school’s leveled library Math:   

Administer the Primary Number and Observation Assessment and/or STAR assessments to students in grades kindergarten through five and use this information to provide targeted instruction Adopt the Common Core State Standards aligned Bridges Math Program and provide teachers with associated professional development Provide embedded professional development with the goal of increasing classroom based math interventions

Writing:  Increase handwriting and phonemic awareness through the adoption of the Wilson Language Basics Fundations program in grades pre-kindergarten through second  Academic support teachers provide small group and individualized writing instruction Hartford School District’s schools are in the following levels of improvement as determined by their 2014 AYP status: ● Year 2 of School Improvement: White River School ● Year 1 of Corrective Action: Dothan Brook School, Ottauquechee School, Hartford High School ● Year 2 of Corrective Action: Hartford Memorial Middle School

231


Teacher Quality Information: The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all public school teachers of “core” academic subjects (English language arts, math, social, studies, science, reading, art, music, foreign languages and special educators who provide primary instruction in one of these areas) meet the “highly qualified teacher” (HQT) requirements of the Act. The Vermont Agency of Education determines if a teacher is highly qualified. Classes Taught by NOT HQ Percentage of core academic classes NOT taught by teacher/total classes highly qualified teachers 1/17 5.88% # of Emergency credentialed Percentage of teachers teaching with emergency teachers/total teacher credentials 1/25 4% Number of Teachers with a Master’s Degree 16

Ottauquechee School School Report Card 2016/2017 The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act is federal legislation which was passed in 2002 with the intent of improving education for all children by holding schools responsible for results, promoting teaching methods that work and ushering in a new age of accountability. Just as your student receives a report card that tells you how they are doing in school, this law requires schools to issue a report card to the community each year. This report card contains important information including: ● How your child’s school is doing compared to state averages ● The percentage of students working at high levels of academic achievement and the percentage working at lower levels as indicated by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) ● How different groups did on the SBAC (boy and girls, students from different economic backgrounds, and students with disabilities) ● How well the school is doing in relationship to meeting Vermont’s achievement goals

232


● ● ●

Whether or not the school has been identified as in need of improvement based on the NECAP scores for the students in that school If the school has been identified for needing improvement what steps the school is taking to improve How many teachers are highly qualified to teach the subjects for which they are responsible

On Dec. 1, 2015, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which replaced NCLB. The Vermont Agency of Education is currently in the process of determining how the requirements of (ESSA) will impact schools. Some practices will remain the same while others change. During this transition, schools are required to comply with the old NCLB components of the School Report Card. For a brief overview on the differences between NCLB and ESSA, visit: http://www.ed.gov/essa?src=rn. Assessment Information: Since 2005, Vermont students have been participating in the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). Beginning in the spring of 2015, Vermont transitioned to a new state assessment for grades 3-8 and grade 11, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) for English Language Arts and math. This assessment was developed by a multistate consortium supported by institutions of higher education and industry and was designed to assess students’ proficiency in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The goal of the CCSS is to prepare all students to leave high school ready for college and career. Student scores are reported at four levels of mastery of the CCSS; Level 4 (exceeded the achievement standard), Level 3 (met the achievement standard), Level 2 (nearly met the achievement standard) and Level 1 (not met the achievement standard). Vermont continues to administer the NECAP Science test in May of each year to grades 4, 8 and 11. These tests measure students’ academic knowledge and skills relative to the Vermont Grade Expectations (GEs). The requirements for the School Report Card are communicated through Federal regulation under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Those regulations mandate that we report the most recent two-year trend in each subject and grade level. However, the VT Agency of Education has not compared statewide 2014/2015 SBAC results to 2015/2016 results (two-year trend) and urges us not to do so at the district and school levels for several reasons. Prior to the SBAC, most Vermont schools had not administered any online assessments. Although the second year of administration went more smoothly across the state, it would be difficult to know if changes in scores reflected actual student achievement or variabilities in the administration of the test. While Hartford School District did analyze the scores, we are cautious about making big decisions based solely on the SBAC. The following information is a summary of the SBAC results in ELA and math as well as the NECAP results in science.

Proficiency Levels: ELA & math SBAC: Level 4=exceeded the standard Level 3=met the standard Level 2=nearly met the standard Level 1=did not meet the standard Science NECAP: 4=proficient with distinction 3=proficient 2=partially proficient 1= substantially below proficient

233


234

12

34

25

3

2

1

18

25

21

34

2016

22

27

22

27

2015

15

36

30

18

3

2

1

2015

21

31

28

18

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

21

21

42

15

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Female (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 3

28

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achievem ent Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 3

14

42

28

14

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Male (%)

2015

28

42

0

28

2015

Male (%)

28

28

28

14

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

42

42

14

0

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

11

22

16

50

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

5

22

38

33

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


235

14

50

14

3

2

1

6

21

31

40

2016

0

38

15

46

2015

26

33

26

13

3

2

1

2015

9

37

25

28

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

14

14

28

42

2015

11

33

33

22

2016

Female (%)

5

27

22

44

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 4

21

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 4

12

37

37

12

7

42

14

35

2016

7

14

42

35

2016

Male (%)

2015

26

60

13

0

2015

Male (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

29

43

29

0

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


236

48

34

13

3

2

1

6

31

62

0

2016

15

23

53

7

2015

40

22

14

22

3

2

1

2015

5

29

29

35

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

13

13

13

60

2015

0

13

26

60

2016

Female (%)

5

38

55

0

2016

Female (%)

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 5

3

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

NECAP Science: Grade 4

33

16

33

16

7

21

71

0

2016

10

42

31

15

2016

Male (%)

2015

12

43

43

0

2015

Male (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

18

18

63

0

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

0

34

13

52

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantaged (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


237

25

29

14

3

2

1

20

50

8

20

2016

13

20

20

46

2015

6

46

6

40

2016

Female (%)

100% of the Ottauquechee School was tested.

29

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 5

16

41

33

8

2015

31

52

10

5

2016

Male (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

36

54

9

0

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

13

47

8

30

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilitie s (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)


238

Reading Index (N/A for 2015)

Participation (must be at least 95%)

Academic Indicator Number of Indicator LCB Students (% of (lower students in boundary lowest ach. of the Level of Academic reading test) Indicator) All Students N/A N/A N/A Yes N/A N/A N/A Not Free/Reduced Lunch N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Free/Reduced Lunch N/A N/A N/A N˂40 N/A N/A N/A Without Disability N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A With Disability N/A N/A N/A N˂40 N/A N/A N/A White N/A N/A N/A Yes N/A N/A N/A *All other subgroups contain less than 40 students. No decision is made for subgroups less than 40.

Group

AYP Decisions Math Index Academic (N/A for Indicator 2015) (N/A for 2015)

93 65 28 73 20 93

100 100 100 100 100 100

Participation Total % Students Tested

AYP determinations (level of school improvement) remain frozen at 2014 levels due to the fact that the Agency of Education is working on determining Vermont’s accountability measures in light of the new legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Thus, AYP decisions were not made for the past two years, but remain at levels which were determined as a result of 2013 NECAP results. For further information about Assessment Accountability, visit the Vermont Agency of Education website at: http://education.vermont.gov/data-and-reporting/schoolreports/accountability

Accountability Information: As part of NCLB, each state must determine a timeline for adequate yearly progress (AYP) towards the goal of all students reaching proficiency in reading and mathematics by 2014 as indicated on the state assessment. AYP is intended to be used as a diagnostic tool to help state departments of education determine where financial resources should be allocated. Schools not making AYP are deemed in need of improvement. As the number of years for not making AYP increases, schools move from receiving technical assistance from the state department towards more serious corrective actions mandated by the state department.


Based on 2014 AYP determinations, Ottauquechee School did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Reading for all students, free and reduced lunch students and white students. OQS did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Math for all students, free and reduced lunch students and white students. Therefore, Ottauquechee School is in Year 1 of Corrective Action. In an attempt to improve outcomes for all students, OQS will take the following action steps this year: Reading:  Ensure that all K-2 classroom teachers are trained in Leveled Literacy Intervention Strategies.  Increase Title I services to support struggling readers.  Implement STAR Reading Assessment in grades 3-5 to gather and analyze data on student’s reading skills and to help identify areas of academic need in order to plan specific teaching strategies.  Use the Fountas and Pinnell reading Assessment in grades K-2 to assess student’s reading skills and to help identify areas of academic need in order to plan specific teaching strategies.  Implement a new vocabulary and word study curriculum for students in grades 3-5; Words Their Way.  Fully implement Fundations in grades K-2; a phonemic awareness program.  Create and use Text Sets in grades 3-5; sets contain multiple books at different reading levels on one topic that students read to grow knowledge and vocabulary.  Use the District Instructional Coach to provide embedded professional development and instructional support to teachers throughout the year. Math:    

Implement revised math curriculum through a yearlong focus and professional development provided by outside experts as well as the District Math Coach. Ensure that all K-2 classroom teachers are trained in administering and interpreting the Primary Numbers and Operations Assessment. Provide support for teachers to meet with the District Math Coach on a regular basis to analyze data and plan instruction. Increase Title I services to support students with mathematical gaps in understanding.

Writing:  Increase opportunities for students to engage in research based instruction across content areas.  Increase vocabulary and word study instruction through Words Their Way Program in grades 3-5 and Fundations in grades K-2. Hartford School District’s schools are in the following levels of improvement as determined by their 2014 AYP status: ● Year 2 of School Improvement: White River School ● Year 1 of Corrective Action: Dothan Brook School, Ottauquechee School, Hartford High School ● Year 2 of Corrective Action: Hartford Memorial Middle School Teacher Quality Information: The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all public school teachers of “core” academic subjects (English language arts, math, social, studies, science, reading, art, music, foreign languages and special educators who provide primary instruction in one of these areas) meet the “highly qualified teacher” (HQT) requirements of the Act. The Vermont Agency of Education determines if a teacher is highly qualified. Classes Taught by NOT HQ teacher/total Percentage of core academic classes NOT classes taught by highly qualified teachers 0/18 0% # of Emergency credentialed teachers/total Percentage of teachers teaching with teacher emergency credentials 1/24 4.17% Number of Teachers with a Master’s Degree 15

239


White River School School Report Card 2016/2017 The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act is federal legislation which was passed in 2002 with the intent of improving education for all children by holding schools responsible for results, promoting teaching methods that work and ushering in a new age of accountability. Just as your student receives a report card that tells you how they are doing in school, this law requires schools to issue a report card to the community each year. This report card contains important information including: ● How your child’s school is doing compared to state averages ● The percentage of students working at high levels of academic achievement and the percentage working at lower levels as indicated by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) ● How different groups did on the SBAC (boy and girls, students from different economic backgrounds, and students with disabilities) ● How well the school is doing in relationship to meeting Vermont’s achievement goals ● Whether or not the school has been identified as in need of improvement based on the NECAP scores for the students in that school ● If the school has been identified for needing improvement what steps the school is taking to improve ● How many teachers are highly qualified to teach the subjects for which they are responsible On Dec. 1, 2015, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which replaced NCLB. The Vermont Agency of Education is currently in the process of determining how the requirements of (ESSA) will impact schools. Some practices will remain the same while others change. During this transition, schools are required to comply with the old NCLB components of the School Report Card. For a brief overview on the differences between NCLB and ESSA, visit: http://www.ed.gov/essa?src=rn. Assessment Information: Since 2005, Vermont students have been participating in the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). Beginning in the spring of 2015, Vermont transitioned to a new state assessment for grades 3-8 and grade 11, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) for English Language Arts and math. This assessment was developed by a multi-state consortium supported by institutions of higher education and industry and was designed to assess students’ proficiency in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The goal of the CCSS is to prepare all students to leave high school ready for college and career. Student scores are reported at four levels

240


of mastery of the CCSS; Level 4 (exceeded the achievement standard), Level 3 (met the achievement standard), Level 2 (nearly met the achievement standard) and Level 1 (not met the achievement standard). Vermont continues to administer the NECAP Science test in May of each year to grades 4, 8 and 11. These tests measure studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; academic knowledge and skills relative to the Vermont Grade Expectations (GEs). The requirements for the School Report Card are communicated through Federal regulation under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Those regulations mandate that we report the most recent two-year trend in each subject and grade level. However, the VT Agency of Education has not compared statewide 2014/2015 SBAC results to 2015/2016 results (two-year trend) and urges us not to do so at the district and school levels for several reasons. Prior to the SBAC, most Vermont schools had not administered any online assessments. Although the second year of administration went more smoothly across the state, it would be difficult to know if changes in scores reflected actual student achievement or variabilities in the administration of the test. While Hartford School District did analyze the scores, we are cautious about making big decisions based solely on the SBAC. The following information is a summary of the SBAC results in ELA and math as well as the NECAP results in science. Proficiency Levels: ELA & math SBAC: Level 4=exceeded the standard Level 3=met the standard Level 2=nearly met the standard Level 1=did not meet the standard Science NECAP: 4=proficient with distinction 3=proficient 2=partially proficient 1= substantially below proficient

241


242

25

28

9

3

2

1

13

31

24

31

2016

12

31

18

37

2015

31

25

21

21

3

2

1

2015

20

13

37

27

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

18

25

25

31

2015

21

7

50

21

2016

Female (%)

7

28

28

35

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 3

37

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 3

25

18

25

31

20

33

20

26

2016

20

20

26

33

2016

Male (%)

2015

6

25

31

37

2015

Male (%)

5

35

29

29

2016

40

13

20

26

2015

17

17

47

17

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

6

33

26

33

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

25

25

16

33

2016

5

29

29

35

2015

25

8

25

41

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

11

23

23

41

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students Nonw/Disabilities Disabled (%) Students (%)


243

26

33

6

3

2

1

7

14

14

62

2016

6

40

26

26

2015

40

40

3

16

3

2

1

2015

7

22

18

51

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

26

6

33

33

2015

0

30

23

46

2016

Female (%)

15

15

7

61

2016

Female (%)

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 4

33

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 4

6

0

46

46

14

14

14

57

2016

0

14

21

64

2016

Male (%)

2015

6

26

26

40

2015

Male (%)

8

33

16

41

2016

16

5

44

33

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

5

38

33

22

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

6

0

13

80

2016

16

0

33

50

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

8

25

16

50

2015

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NonDisabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonDisabled Students (%)


244

58

32

3

3

2

1

6

24

65

3

2016

6

37

50

6

2015

27

27

24

21

3

2

1

2015

3

26

26

43

2016

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

16

22

27

33

2015

0

35

28

35

2016

Female (%)

7

35

50

7

2016

Female (%)

SBAC ELA/Literacy: Grade 5

6

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

NECAP Science: Grade 4

26

26

26

20

6

13

80

0

2016

6

18

25

50

2016

Male (%)

2015

0

26

66

6

2015

Male (%)

7

38

53

0

2016

26

20

26

26

2015

5

27

33

33

2016

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

5

31

52

10

2015

Economically Disadvantage d (%)

6

12

75

6

2016

16

27

27

27

2015

0

25

16

58

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

0

33

66

0

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students w/Disabilities (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NonStudents Economically w/Disabilities Disadvantaged (%) (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Non-Disabled Students (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

Non-Disabled Students (%)


245

25

28

15

3

2

1

6

16

43

33

2016

17

23

23

35

2015

7

21

42

28

2016

Female (%)

100% of the White River School was tested.

31

2015

All Students (%)

4

Achieveme nt Level

SBAC Mathematics: Grade 5

13

33

26

26

2015

6

12

43

37

2016

Male (%)

14

21

28

35

2015

11

16

50

22

2016

Economically Disadvantaged (%)

16

33

22

27

2015

0

16

33

50

2016

NonEconomically Disadvantage d (%)

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

NR

NR

NR

NR

2015

NR

NR

NR

NR

2016

Students Nonw/Disabilities Disabled (%) Students (%)


246

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Not Free/Reduced Lunch

Free/Reduced Lunch

Without Disability

With Disability

White

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Math Index (N/A for 2015)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Academic Indicator (N/A for 2015)

Yes

NË&#x201A;40

Yes

Yes

Participation (must be at least 95%)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Number of Students

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Indicator (% of students in lowest ach. Level of reading test)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

LCB (lower boundary of the Academic Indicator)

Academic Indicator

*All other subgroups contain less than 40 students. No decision is made for subgroups less than 40.

N/A

Reading Index (N/A for 2015)

All Students

Group

AYP Decisions

97

29

68

49

48

97

Total Students

100

100

100

100

100

100

% Tested

Participation

Accountability Information: As part of NCLB, each state must determine a timeline for adequate yearly progress (AYP) towards the goal of all students reaching proficiency in reading and mathematics by 2014 as indicated on the state assessment. AYP is intended to be used as a diagnostic tool to help state departments of education determine where financial resources should be allocated. Schools not making AYP are deemed in need of improvement. As the number of years for not making AYP increases, schools move from receiving technical assistance from the state department towards more serious corrective actions mandated by the state department. AYP determinations (level of school improvement) remain frozen at 2014 levels due to the fact that the Agency of Education is working on determining Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accountability measures in light of the new legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Thus, AYP decisions were not made for the past two years, but remain at levels which were determined as a result of 2013 NECAP results. For further information about Assessment Accountability, visit the Vermont Agency of Education website at: http://education.vermont.gov/data-and-reporting/schoolreports/accountability


Based on 2014 AYP determinations, White River School did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Reading for all students, free/reduced students, white students for the 1st time. WRS did not make Adequate Yearly Progress in Math for all students, free/reduced students, white students. Therefore, White River School is in Year 2 of school improvement. In an attempt to improve outcomes for all students, WRS will take the following action steps this year:

Reading: All teaching staff meets monthly with HSD instructional coach to learn ways to teach and assess academic vocabulary and general vocabulary acquisition skills. Student in grades pre-k-grade 3 are learning systematic phonics, decoding and encoding through Fundations Reading System. This program is being used consistently and with fidelity. We’re observing very positive results. This coupled with the extensive learning that teachers are experiencing as they study academic vocabulary instruction with the HSD instructional coach will help our intermediate students in grades 3-5 maximize word study through the Words Their Way program. Math: WRS has implemented the 2nd Edition Bridges Math Program in grades k-5. This programs aligns with the Bridges Number Corner program as well as the Common Core State Standards. Our teachers are very excited about the level of math that our students are learning. Additionally, all of our paraprofessionals are meeting monthly with the HSD Math Teacher Leader to learn more about the CCSS and more importantly, to learn tools and strategies for helping our more challenged students learn math with visual models and other resources. Writing: Numerous WRS teachers are taking a course taught by Diana Leddy called Writing for Understanding: Integrating Reading, Writing and Content. This extensive course is helping teachers to understand the essential CCSS and to integrate instruction in all content areas.

Hartford School District’s schools are in the following levels of improvement as determined by their 2014 AYP status: ● Year 2 of School Improvement: White River School ● Year 1 of Corrective Action: Dothan Brook School, Ottauquechee School, Hartford High School ● Year 2 of Corrective Action: Hartford Memorial Middle School Teacher Quality Information: The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all public school teachers of “core” academic subjects (English language arts, math, social, studies, science, reading, art, music, foreign languages and special educators who provide primary instruction in one of these areas) meet the “highly qualified teacher” (HQT) requirements of the Act. The Vermont Agency of Education determines if a teacher is highly qualified. Classes Taught by NOT HQ teacher/total classes

Percentage of core academic classes NOT taught by highly qualified teachers

1/17 # of Emergency credentialed teachers/total teacher

5.88 Percentage of teachers teaching with emergency credentials

0/23

0

Number of Teachers with a Master’s Degree 22

247


SAT and ACT SAT The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the ACT are administered to juniors and seniors each year on a voluntary basis. Students typically participate in these examinations as part of college entrance requirements. All scores are senior results only. 2014 (n=105) Reading

2015 (n=67)

2016 (n=75)

Math

Writing

Reading

Math

Writing

Reading

Math

Writing

Hartford

512

519

490

510

505

500

502

507

474

State

522

525

507

523

524

507

514

515

494

National

497

513

487

495

511

484

493

505

480

n is the number of students who took the test at HHS

ACT

Hartford State National

2014 (n=30) 21.7 23.2 21.0

2015 (n=33) 21.5 23.5 21.0

n is the number of students who took the test at HHS

248

2016 (n=41) 22.8 23.4 20.9


Advanced Placement Test The Advanced Placement Program provides students with the opportunity to complete college-level course work and receive credit during high school. A student taking an AP exam receives a score of 1 to 5 for each exam. Many colleges will award credit for scores of 3 or higher.

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Number of students taking test

84

44

50

38

32

Number of test taken

103

60

72

54

60

Percent that scored 3 or higher

56%

75%

70%

67%

63%

Student Plans after Graduation: Class of 2016 4-year college or university

58%

2-year college and technical school

9%

Employment/undecided/travel

26%

Military Service

7%

Other

0%

249


Career and Technology Center 2015-16 Outcome Data The Hartford Area Career and Technology Center (HACTC) is one of 16 regional Career and Technical Centers in Vermont. The HACTC serves students from Hanover, Hartford, Lebanon, Mascoma, Woodstock, and Windsor High Schools. In addition, the HACTC also serves students from Rivendell Academy, South Royalton High School, Thetford Academy, Mid-Vermont Christian School, and homestudy programs. Independent school and adult students are also eligible to attend the HACTC on a space available basis. The Vermont Agency of Education has established performance indicators for Career and Technical Education in the State as reported below. Standard 1S1: Concentrators who met Reading Standard This standard represents those students that are concentrators attending the HACTC that met or exceeded the NECAP reading standard. HACTC State

54% 58%

Standard 1S2: Concentrators who met Math Standard This standard represents those students that are concentrators attending the HACTC that met or exceeded the NECAP math standard. HACTC State

12% 25%

Standard 2S1: Technical Skill Attainment This standard represents concentrators who the state recognized technical assessment for their program. HACTC State

62% 66%

Standard 3S1: 2015 12th Grade Graduation Rate This standard represents 12th grade graduation rate for 2014 concentrators. HACTC State

100% 97%

Standard 4S1: 2015 Cohort Graduation Rate This standard represents the cohort graduation rate for 2014 concentrators. HACTC State

96% 95%

Standard 5S1: Placement of 2015 Concentrators who had left secondary education by the following November. This standard represents those students who left secondary education in 2014 who were in postsecondary education, employed, or in the military.

250


HACTC State

100% 95%

Standard 6S1: 2015 Non-Traditional Participation This standard represents the number of non-traditional enrollment. HACTC State

16% 17%

Standard 6S2: 2015 Number of Non-Traditional Completers This standard represents the number of non-traditional completers. HACTC State

17% 16%

VTS1: Technical Skill Assessment Participation Rate This standard represents concentrators who took the state recognized technical assessment for their program. HACTC State

86% 70%

VTS2: Post-Secondary Placement This standard represents those students that were in post-secondary placement. HACTC State

53% 50%

VTS3: Percent of Concentrators Who Earned an Industry Recognized Credential This represents the number of concentrators who earned an Industry Recognized Credential. HACTC State

75% 65%

VTS4: Percent of 2014 Concentrators Who Earned Dual Enrollment Credit This standard represents the number of concentrators who earned transcripted credit. HACTC State

51% 15%

251


HACTC Plans after Graduation The chart below represents where students in the class of 2016 planned to be upon graduation. The information is based on responses from 110 completers. Completers

%Total

Post-secondary education

59

54%

Employment

31

28%

Military

7

6%

Undecided/not returned

8

7%

Gap year

5

5%

252


HACTC Student Climate Survey: 2014-15 n = 240 Staff and teachers treat me with respect

98%

I feel like I am a member of the HACTC community

98%

I feel safe in the hallways of the HACTC

99%

I feel safe and comfortable in my program

98%

Classroom and equipment are in safe, working order

98%

Staff and teachers treat each other with respect

100%

253


Staff and teachers respond to discipline problems

96%

Harassment is handled promptly

97%

My teacher welcomes my opinion

98%

My teacher is encouraging and caring

98%

My teacher challenges me to work to my potential

98%

My teacher recognizes my accomplishments

97%

My teacher promotes teamwork

95%

The HACTC achieves its mission of Respect, Engage, Learn, Work, Serve, and Grow.

97%

n= the number of HACTC students surveyed %= the percentage of responders in agreement with the statement

Vermont Youth Risk Survey Report Hartford School District In 2015, we conducted two surveys: a high school survey of students in grades 9 through 12, and a middle school survey of students in grades 6 through 8. Results in this report include high school and middle school results for Vermont and for Hartford SD All results in the 2015 high school section are for grades 9 through 12 only, and the middle school section are for grades 6 through 8 only. The middle school and high school surveys differed slightly. The shorter middle school survey included questions on fighting, bullying, suicidality, substance use, attitudes and perceptions about substance use, body image, physical activity, and youth assets. The high school survey included questions on these topics as well as self-reported height and weight, driving behaviors, other drug use, sexual behavior and orientation, and nutrition. Copies of both surveys can be found online at: http://healthvermont.gov/research/yrbs.aspx. Copies of the full state reports, highlights, and additional sub state reports can also be found here. The Vermont Department of Health would like to acknowledge the work and effort of all the schools, teachers and students who choose to participate in the Youth Risk Behavior Survey each year.

254


Personal Safety Gr. 6-8: Percent of students who have ever been in a physical fight Gr. 9-12: Percent of students who were in a physical fight on school property, past 12 months Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 48% 40% 30% 42% Grade 7 47% 43% 42% 41% Grade 8 39% 45% 47% 44% Grade 9 12% 11% 12% 10% Grade 10 15% 8% 8% 8% Grade 11 4% 7% 5% 6% Grade 12 5% 5% 5% Percent of students who were threatened or injured with a weapon on school property, past 12 months Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 7% 6% 7% 6% Grade 10 9% 6% 4% 6% Grade 11 5% 7% 4% Grade 12 4% 4% Percent of drivers who texted or e-mailed while driving a car or other vehicle, past 30 days Hartford 2103 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 12% 10% Grade 10 13% 16% 24% 15% Grade 11 29% 42% 49% 40% Grade 12 68% 56% 38% 50% Percent of students who rode with a drinking driver, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 9 21% 20% 13% Grade 10 22% 20% 18% Grade 11 21% 20% 17% Grade 12 21% 22% 21%

Vermont 2015 19% 20% 20% 19%

Percent of drivers who drove a car or other vehicle when they had been drinking alcohol, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 6% 5% Grade 10 7% 5% 4% Grade 11 8% 7% 8% Grade 12 13% 9% Percent of students who rode with a driver who had been smoking marijuana, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 13% 14% 5% 13% Grade 10 32% 21% 25% 20% Grade 11 34% 52% 16% 26% Grade 12 40% 32% 24% 29%

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Percent of drivers who drove a car or other vehicle when they had been smoking marijuana, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 10% 8% Grade 10 9% 10% 10% 10% Grade 11 19% 16% 10% 18% Grade 12 30% 23% 20% 20% Percent of students who dated in the past 12 months and were physically hurt by someone they were dating or going out with Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 7% 9% 8% 8% Grade 10 13% 8% 10% 9% Grade 11 9% 9% 9% Grade 12 9% 11% 9% Percent of students who have ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 5% 4% 5% Grade 10 7% 6% 4% 6% Grade 11 7% 7% 6% 7% Grade 12 9% 7% 6% 8% Percent of students who reported being bullied, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 30% 28% 24% Grade 7 27% 27% 22% Grade 8 27% 25% 29% Grade 9 31% 23% 34% Grade 10 29% 20% 20% Grade 11 17% 17% 22% Grade 12 12% 12% 11%

Vermont 2015 24% 25% 22% 23% 18% 16% 14%

Percent of students who reported being electronically bullied, past 12 months Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 31% 20% 21% 215 Grade 7 22% 24% 22% 26% Grade 8 33% 28% 34% 28% Grade 9 21% 18% 21% 20% Grade 10 25% 17% 20% 17% Grade 11 13% 15% 20% 16% Grade 12 9% 13% 14% 13% Percent of students who purposefully hurt themselves without wanting to die, past 12 months Hartford 2013 Vermont 2015 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 13% 18% 18% 20% Grade 10 18% 18% 26% 19% Grade 11 15% 16% 21% 17% Grade 12 7% 13% 19% 14%

256


Percent of students who attempted suicide, past 12 months Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 3% 6% Grade 7 5% 4% 9% Grade 8 8% 6% 6% Grade 9 5% 6% Grade 10 4% 5% 9% Grade 11 4% 5% 8% Grade 12 6% 4% 8%

Vermont 2015 5% 5% 8% 7% 6% 5% 5%

Alcohol and other Drug Use Percent of students who drank alcohol, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Grade 6 3% Grade 7 6% Grade 8 9% 11% Grade 9 21% 20% Grade 10 42% 28% Grade 11 33% 37% Grade 12 47% 47%

Hartford 2015 7% 7% 25% 32% 39%

Vermont 2015 3% 5% 10% 17% 26% 34% 42%

Percent of students who had five or more drinks in a row (binged), past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 6% 10% 8% Grade 10 22% 15% 12% 13% Grade 11 20% 22% 18% 19% Grade 12 32% 30% 15% 24% Percent of students who smoked cigarettes, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 1% Grade 7 2% Grade 8 4% Grade 9 6% 8% Grade 10 13% 11% 10% Grade 11 12% 16% 10% Grade 12 17% 18% 12%

Vermont 2015 1% 2% 3% 7% 9% 12% 14%

Percent of students who used smokeless tobacco such as snuff or dip, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 1% 1% Grade 7 1% 1% Grade 8 3% 3% Grade 9 6% 6% 5% Grade 10 9% 8% 5% 6% Grade 11 4% 8% 10% 8% Grade 12 6% 9% 6% 8%

257


Percent of students who smoked cigars or little cigars, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 0% Grade 7 1% Grade 8 2% Grade 9 6% 6% Grade 10 27% 10% 12% Grade 11 20% 15% 14% Grade 12 30% 22% 25%

Percent of students who have ever tried marijuana Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Grade 6 2% Grade 7 5% Grade 8 12% 10% Grade 9 23% 23% Grade 10 44% 35% Grade 11 46% 45% Grade 12 53% 52%

Hartford 2015 11% 39% 43% 55%

Percent of students who have ever used marijuana, past 30 days Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 1% Grade 7 2% Grade 8 5% Grade 9 14% 15% 7% Grade 10 30% 21% 23% Grade 11 29% 27% 16% Grade 12 43% 32% 26%

Vermont 2015 1% 1% 2% 5% 8% 12% 16%

Vermont 2015 2% 5% 11% 22% 32% 44% 49%

Vermont 2015 1% 3% 6% 13% 20% 27% 29%

Percent of students who ever misused a stimulant or prescription pain reliever Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 6% 9% 10% 8% Grade 10 13% 12% 13% 10% Grade 11 14% 15% 16% 13% Grade 12 20% 18% 17% 14%

Percent of students who ever used cocaine Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Grade 9 3% Grade 10 4% Grade 11 6% 6% Grade 12 6% 8%

258

Hartford 2015 6% 7% 6%

Vermont 2015 3% 4% 5% 7%


Percent of students who ever used inhalants Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Grade 6 6% 4% Grade 7 5% 5% Grade 8 8% 6% Grade 9 8% 7% Grade 10 6% 7% Grade 11 6% 6% Grade 12 5% 7%

Hartford 2015 9% 5%

Vermont 2015 5% 4% 6% 7% 6% 7% 5%

Percent of students who were offered, sold or given an illegal drug on school property, past 12 months Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 19% 16% 17% 15% Grade 10 32% 19% 16% 19% Grade 11 24% 20% 17% 20% Grade 12 25% 18% 18% 18%

Attitudes and Perceptions about Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use Percent of students who think people their age risk harming themselves if they smoke a pack of cigarettes a day Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 74% 70% 70% 70% Grade 7 66% 50% 72% 72% Grade 8 70% 72% 87% 72% Grade 9 64% 63% 65% 62% Grade 10 56% 63% 63% 66% Grade 11 64% 63% 66% 66% Grade 12 66% 65% 58% 66% Percent of students who think people their age risk harming themselves if they binge drink on weekends Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 57% 52% 41% 49% Grade 7 51% 51% 56% 49% Grade 8 46% 50% 49% 46% Grade 9 39% 44% 55% 42% Grade 10 37% 40% 39% 40% Grade 11 38% 37% 36% 36% Grade 12 34% 33% 40% 35% Percent of students who think people their age risk harming themselves if they smoke marijuana regularly Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 82% 71% 75% 67% Grade 7 74% 67% 68% 61% Grade 8 57% 58% 50% 51% Grade 9 43% 42% 37% 35% Grade 10 36% 32% 30% 29% Grade 11 28% 26% 29% 22% Grade 12 18% 23% 25% 21%

259


Percent of students who think it would be easy to get cigarettes Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 13% 14% 18% Grade 7 28% 24% 27% Grade 8 43% 35% 21% Grade 9 64% 49% 42% Grade 10 75% 61% 51% Grade 11 77% 70% 71% Grade 12 84% 84% 83%

Vermont 2015 18% 24% 34% 44% 55% 64% 80%

Percent of students who think it would be easy to get alcohol Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 20% 24% 25% Grade 7 37% 36% 29% Grade 8 50% 49% 45% Grade 9 71% 63% 55% Grade 10 74% 71% 62% Grade 11 82% 76% 77% Grade 12 78% 78% 76%

Vermont 2015 24% 33% 46% 60% 68% 74% 75%

Percent of students who think it would be easy to get marijuana Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 6 7% 5% Grade 7 9% 12% 15% Grade 8 30% 23% 17% Grade 9 54% 47% 46% Grade 10 70% 61% 63% Grade 11 78% 70% 73% Grade 12 76% 74% 70%

Vermont 2015 6% 12% 22% 46% 60% 69% 74%

Sexual Behavior and Orientation

Percent of students who have ever had sexual intercourse Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 9 20% 21% 11% Grade 10 42% 36% 36% Grade 11 44% 51% 52% Grade 12 59% 63% 64%

Vermont 2015 18% 33% 49% 62%

Percent of students who have ever been tested for HIV Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Grade 9 9% 7% Grade 10 14% 10% Grade 11 10% 13% Grade 12 16% 19%

Vermont 2015 7% 8% 12% 14%

260

Hartford 2015 10% 7% 14%


Percent of students who had sex at least once in the past 3 months (sexually active) Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 10% 14% 5% 12% Grade 10 36% 26% 28% 24% Grade 11 33% 40% 41% 38% Grade 12 45% 51% 50% 49% Percent of students who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual or unsure Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 8% 6% 13% Grade 10 8% 9% 12% 12% Grade 11 7% 9% 12% Grade 12 20% 10% 14% 12%

Body Image Percent of students who are overweight (85th to <95th BMI percentile) Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 9 19% 16% 10% Grade 10 14% 15% 22% Grade 11 25% 15% 15% Grade 12 15% 15% 14%

Vermont 2015 15% 14% 14% 13%

Percent of students who are obese (=>95th BMI percentile) Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 9 19% 13% 16% Grade 10 23% 13% 19% Grade 11 9% 12% 14% Grade 12 11% 12% 18%

Hartford 2015 12% 13% 12% 12%

Youth Assets Percent of students who report their grades are mostly As or Bs Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Grade 9 82% 75% 80% Grade 10 73% 78% 77% Grade 11 84% 80% 76% Grade 12 85% 84% 83%

Vermont 2015 76% 77% 80% 83%

Percent of students who agree that: in your community you feel like you matter to people Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 60% 59% 62% 60% Grade 7 57% 54% 59% 56% Grade 8 55% 51% 54% 51% Grade 9 39% 49% 56% 49% Grade 10 42% 48% 52% 48% Grade 11 50% 50% 52% 50% Grade 12 49% 53% 45% 54%

261


Percent of students who report that they will probably or definitely complete a post high school program Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 9 83% 77% 78% 75% Grade 10 82% 82% 80% 80% Grade 11 85% 84% 79% 83% Grade 12 87% 86% 80% 84%

Percent of students who agree that teachers really care about them and give them lots of encouragement Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 79% 69% 71% 69% Grade 7 68% 61% 63% 62% Grade 8 71% 58% 80% 59% Grade 9 55% 55% 66% 59% Grade 10 60% 56% 73% 57% Grade 11 66% 60% 68% 64% Grade 12 61% 65% 68% 69%

Percent of students who agree that students help decide what goes on in school Hartford 2013 Vermont 2013 Hartford 2015 Vermont 2015 Grade 6 51% 45% 49% 45% Grade 7 43% 43% 43% 44% Grade 8 47% 40% 52% 39% Grade 9 49% 50% 48% 50% Grade 10 42% 47% 50% 46% Grade 11 38% 46% 51% 46% Grade 12 45% 47% 50% 49%

262


Technology Report 2016-2017 The Hartford School District continues to make significant progress in addressing issues and meeting the goals of our 4-year technology plan. We are now a Google Suite for Education site, which affords us the use of a variety of Google programs for our use at no additional charge. Many teachers and students use a wide variety of Google tools, knowledgeably and seamlessly in their daily teaching, learning and communications. Our technology network is very stable; wireless access is ubiquitous and reliable; BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is available to all students and staff; and guests have access to Wi-Fi through generated guest passes. Our schools now have a good number and variety of technological devices to increase student learning, and students’ capacities to demonstrate their learning. A replacement plan is also in place that is guiding our purchasing and replacement decisions. The district has hired a person to manage our learning management system, to manage testing, data input and data analysis. We also have a reliable, knowledgeable Information Technology staff. Infinite Campus, our student information system and database is being used more effectively and thoroughly with several new data procedures implemented for this school year. The majority of these changes have been within the Enrollment tab. These changes streamline tuition billing, state and local assessment management and collate special population data. Also, this past year, the use of Campus Serve has been implemented. Campus Serve integrates the food service and district demographic data. The “Online Payments” are scheduled to be implemented this February. Calendars have also been created for our special tuition programs and pre-kindergarten so that attendance, enrollment, and other data can be collected accurately for these programs. Elementary courses have also been created for all subject areas. Dothan Brook grade level teams 3, 4 and 5 have begun to pilot Campus Grade book to store classroom assessment data that will calculate grade level report card standards. We continue to migrate and merge server roles. We were able to reduce the number of virtual servers in the clustered network making our physical server hardware more useful. This is important because each server is expensive to maintain and requires more electricity and wiring to run. We also continue to make additional purchases of portable devices when we can for students and staff, these devices help in the implementation of all aspects of our district mission. Using mostly Chromebooks and some Netbooks for student work improves the skills students need and use on a daily basis. Districtwide we have achieved our goal of having one device for every two students in school. Last summer we made adjustments to improve our wireless network and added a handful of access points around the district to provide better and more consistent coverage to a few remaining dead spots. The District began to take actions on improving the security of both the infrastructure network and the endpoints used by students and staff. ESET endpoint antivirus software was purchased and deployed to all school systems. We also removed an old remote connection server that was a security risk because it was publicly accessible. Lastly, we started enforcing complex password requirements on the active directory system. The district technology team is very happy with the progress our district has made in all technology areas throughout the district. We hope to continue to meet the needs in this area and expand the availability and the array of devices to our students and staff. This is no small task in today’s world, but we feel more than ever that we are prepared to do so.

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Extracurricular Activities 2015 – 2016 HHS Sports: Total number of athletes in each sport (duplicated count) Sport Baseball/Softball Bowling Basketball Lacrosse Soccer Tennis Cross Country Field Hockey Football Hockey Golf Indoor Track Track

Male participants 27 12 38 41 42 6 2 --70 23 12 9 18

Female participants 26 1 32 21 38 3 7 32 --23 3 17 22

HHS Clubs and Activities

HMMS Extracurricular Activities

Activity Total participants Anime Club 7 Band, Concert 43 Band, Jazz 23 Concert Choir 45 Creative Improvement Council 10 Debate and Speech Team 20 Festival Choirs 23 Jazz Choir 9 Math Team 18 Musical 50 Music Festival, Band 23 One-Act Play 12 Prom Committee 15 Pizzazz 48 Rock Climbing 23 STEM club 8 Student Council 46 Yearbook 10

Clubs and Activities Photography Club Debate Club Glee Club Quest Group (Leadership) TSA (Tech Student Assoc.) Student Council Yearbook VSAC Musical Jazz Band

264

Total participants 10 10 22 20 8 21 11 15 72 22

Athletics Football Field Hockey Cross Country Girls’ Soccer Boys’ Soccer Boys’ Basketball Girls’ Basketball Baseball Softball Track

38 19 8 16 30 41 24 29 13 19


Notices The Hartford School District, in compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), is required to locate and identify all school-age children with disabilities and to provide them with an appropriate public education. If you are a parent of, or know of, a child (age 0-21) who you feel may have disabilities and is not receiving an appropriate public education, please contact the Director of Special Education. The Hartford School District annually makes application for federal funds for special education programs under IDEA. The application and all related documents are available for public review and comment. Parents have the right to review all education records of their children, as guaranteed under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. For further information, contact the Director of Special Education, 64 Hebard Street, White River Jct., VT 05001, or call 802-295-8605. The Hartford School District, in compliance with Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Act 117, has in place a comprehensive instructional support system for students requiring additional assistance. These comprehensive educational services are designed to result, to the maximum extent possible, in all students succeeding in the regular classroom. Education Support Teams (EST), directed by the building principal in each school, recommend instructional strategies and resources necessary to accommodate the unique needs of students who are at risk of school failure. Parents who want more information about the EST in their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school, or who wish to make a referral, should contact the school principal. Applicants for admission and employment, students, parents, employees, sources of referral of applicants for admission and employment, members of the public, and all unions or professional organizations holding collective bargaining or professional agreements with the Hartford School District (HSD) are hereby notified that HSD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, handicap, or disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities. Any person having inquiries concerning compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, section 504, or the Americans with Disabilities Act is directed to contact the Superintendent of Schools Office for a list of principals who have been designated to coordinate the District efforts in their respective buildings to comply with these nondiscrimination laws and regulations.

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1 2 3 4 5

A

B

C

D

E

HARTFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT

FY2016 ACTUAL

FY2017 APPROVED

FY2018 PROPOSED

FY2018 INCREASE / (DECREASE)

REVENUES

The General Fund (Revenue Budget) is supported by the Vermont Education Tax General Fund Revenue Budget with (Food Service) $ 27,726,356 $ 27,759,572 $ 28,764,948 $1,005,376 The following budgets are supported by student tuition from Sending Schools Districts Hartford Area Career and Technical Center Building Trades - Deficit $ 379,642 $ 379,642

6 Hartford Area Career and Technical Center

$

3,406,032

$

3,465,802

$

3,423,184 $

(42,618)

7 Hartford Autism Regional Program

$

1,072,057

$

1,169,244

$

1,153,001 $

(16,243)

8 Hartford Regional Alternative Program

$

858,956

$

898,231

$

1,061,764 $

163,533

9 Hartford Regional Resource Program

$

1,109,593

$

1,184,713

$

1,219,590 $

34,877

10 Hartford Project Search

$

94,100

$

100,317

$

110,348 $

10,031

11 12 Federal and State Grant Revenues

$

1,652,852

$

1,370,000

$

1,330,000 $

(40,000)

Total Revenue Budget All Funds

$ 35,919,946

$ 35,947,879

HARTFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT

FY2016 ACTUAL

FY2017 APPROVED

General Fund Expenditure Budget with 18 (Food Service)

$ 27,660,365

$ 27,759,572

$ 28,764,948 $

19 Hartford Area Career and Technical Center

$

3,406,032

$

3,465,802

$

3,802,826 $

20 Hartford Autism Regional Program

$

1,073,294

$

1,169,244

$

1,153,001

$

(16,243)

21 Hartford Regional Alternative Program

$

844,409

$

898,231

$

1,061,763

$

163,532

22 Hartford Regional Resource Program

$

1,109,933

$

1,184,714

$

1,219,590

$

34,876

23 Hartford Project Search

$

94,099

$

100,317

$

110,348

$

10,031

24 25 Federal and State Grant Expenditures

$

1,652,852

$

1,370,000

$

1,330,000

$

(40,000)

13

$ 37,442,478 $

1,494,599

14 15 16

17

26

EXPENDITURES

Total Expenditure Budget All Funds

$ 35,840,984

269

$ 35,947,880

FY2018 PROPOSED

FY2018 INCREASE / (DECREASE)

$37,442,476 $

1,005,376 337,024

1,494,596


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We welcome feedback on this report. If you have any comments or suggestions, please email Noel Bryant, Assistant Superintendent at: bryantn@hartfordschools.net

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RESULTS OF AUSTRALIAN BALLOT FOR THE HARTFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT ON MARCH 1, 2016 1. To elect School Officers for the ensuing year: Town Moderator for 1 year: Roger Bloomfield 115 School Director for 3 years: Kevin Christie 2195 School Director for 2 years: Russell North 987, Nancy Russell 1421 2. Shall the voters of the School District approve the School Board to expend $35,847,564 which is the amount the School Board has determined to be necessary for the ensuing fiscal year? It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will result in education spending of $15,084.18 per equalized pupil. This projected spending per equalized pupil is 1% higher than spending for the current year. (By Australian ballot). In Favor: 1909 Opposed: 820 3. Shall the voters of the School District approve the amendments to the Town Charter to provide for the consideration of all budget adoption matters by Australian ballot? The effectiveness of this Article is conditioned upon the approval by both the Town and the Town School District. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 1871 Opposed: 693 Dated at Hartford, Vermont this 2nd day of March, 2016.

314

ATTEST: Mary E. Hill, Town Clerk


RESULTS OF AUSTRALIAN BALLOT ON MARCH 1, 2016 1.

To elect the following Town Officers for the ensuing year: Town Moderator for 1 year: Roger Bloomfield 145 Selectman for 3 years (2positions): Dennis Brown 1188, Alan Johnson 1004, Denise Johnson 882, Paul D. Keane 799, Havah Armstrong Walther 833 Selectman for 2 years (2positions): Sandy Mariotti 1994, Mike Morris 1977 Lister for 3 years: Terry Chesboro 2140 Lister for remaining 2 years of a 3 year term: 0 Library Trustee for remaining 4 years of 5 year term: 0 Library Trustee for 5 year: 0 Trustee of Public Funds for 1 years: 0 Trustee of Public Funds for 2 years: 0

2. Shall the Town appropriate a total general fund expenditure for operating expenses of $16,401,595 of which $12,628,360 shall be raised by taxes, $3,773,235 by non-tax revenues. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 1768 Opposed: 1116 3. Shall the Town appropriate a sum of Seventy-Five Thousand Five Hundred Forty ($75,540) Dollars to Advance Transit for the purpose of providing public transportation services. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2370 Opposed: 641 4. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Fifteen Thousand Two Hundred Fifty ($15,250) Dollars for the purpose of assisting various associations owning or in control of Cemeteries in said Town, to be divided as follows: Christian Street Cemetery Assoc.-Six Hundred ($600) Dollars Hartford Cemetery Assoc.-Seven Thousand Five Hundred ($7,500) Dollars Quechee Cemetery Assoc.-Two Thousand Four Hundred Fifty ($2,450) Dollars Mt. Olivet & St. Anthony's Cemeteries Assoc.-Three Thousand Eight Hundred ($3,800) Dollars West Hartford Cemetery Assoc.-Nine Hundred ($900) Dollars (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2498 Opposed: 486 5. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Thousand Five Hundred ($9,500) Dollars to be paid to The Family Place, to help support programs which benefit Hartford residents. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2438 Opposed: 537 6. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Five Hundred Fifty ($4,550) Dollars to be paid to Good Beginnings of the Upper Valley, to support the organization while providing assistance to upper valley familes. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2326 Opposed: 624 7. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Seven Thousand Five Hundred ($7,500) Dollars to help support the mission of the Good Neighbor Health Clinic and The Red Logan Dental Clinic which provide free medical care and dental care to the uninsured whose household incomes are below 200% of the federal poverty level. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2600 Opposed: 382 8. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Five Thousand ($5,000) Dollars for the purpose of helping to defray the expenses of the Hartford Historical Society in collecting, conserving and displaying the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2083 Opposed: 858 9. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Seven Thousand ($7,000) Dollars for the purpose of helping to defray the expenses of operating and maintaining Headrest's information and referral and crisis intervention services. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2240 Opposed: 682

315


10. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Five ($9,995) Dollars to help support outpatient, mental health and substance abuse services by the staff of Health Care & Rehabilitation Services of Southeastern VT, Inc. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2263 Opposed: 670 11. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Nine Thousand ($9,000) Dollars to Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA), Inc to assist Hartford in responding to the emergency needs of the community and providing all available and applicable services. (By Australian ballot ) In Favor: 2395 Opposed: 545 12. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Forty-One Thousand Eight Hundred Eighty Two ($41,882) Dollars to support the home health care and hospice care of patients in their homes by staff and volunteers of the Visiting Nurse and Hospice of Vermont and New Hampshire, Inc. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2497 Opposed: 446 13. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Three Thousand Five Hundred ($3,500) Dollars for services provided by Windsor County Partners to Hartford young people. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2051 Opposed: 837 14. Shall the Town appropriate the sum of Two Thousand ($2,000) Dollars to Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Information Service (WISE), Inc to help defray the cost of their operating budget. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 2214 Opposed: 724 15. Shall the Charter of the Town of Hartford be amended to authorize the levy of a one percent (1%) rooms and meals/alcoholic beverages tax, the net proceeds of which to be deposited in a capital reserve fund until directed otherwise by vote of the Town. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 1641 Opposed: 1309 16. Shall the Town of Hartford establish a capital repair and replacement reserve fund, to be known as the Town of Harford Capital Reserve Fund, into which there shall be deposited Town room and meals/alcoholic beverages tax net revenues until directed otherwise by vote of the Town. The effectiveness of this Article is conditioned upon the approval of Article 15. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 1711 Opposed: 1160 17. Shall the Town of Hartford and the Hartford Town School District amend the Town Charter to provide for the consideration of all budget adoption matters by Australian ballot? The effectiveness of this Article is conditioned upon the approval by both the Town and the Town School District. (By Australian ballot) In Favor: 1950 Opposed: 825 18. Shall the Selectboard be authorized to pledge the credit of the Town of Hartford through the issuance of general obligation bonds or notes in an aggregate amount not to exceed $900,000, for the purpose of funding public parking and storm water and sanitary sewer infrastructure improvements in the White River Junction Tax Increment Financing District, and for reimbursing eligible related costs, and to pledge and appropriate the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax increment in the amount of $900,000 for the payment of such bonds and notes and for making such reimbursements. (By Australian ballot) Favor: 2066 Opposed: 803 Dated at Hartford, Vermont this 2nd day of March, 2016.

316

ATTEST: Mary E. Hill, Town Clerk


MEETING MINUTES ANNUAL FLOOR MEETING MARCH 26, 2016 Present: Richard Grassi, Chair; Rebecca White, Vice-Chair; Sandra Mariotti, Clerk; Simon Dennis, Selectboard Member; Dennis Brown, Selectboard Member; Alan Johnson, Selectboard Member; Mike Morris, Selectboard Member; Leo Pullar, Future Town Manager; Mary Beth Hill, Town Clerk; Scott Cooney, Interim Fire Chief; Phillip Kasten, Police Chief; Richard Menge, Public Works Director; Everett Hammond, Assistant Public Works Director; Allyn Ricker, Highway Superintendent; Tad Nunez, Parks & Recreation Director; James Gerjevic, IT Director; Michelle Wilson, Assessor; Lori Hirshfield, Planning & Zoning Director; Randee Rule, Administrative Assistant to the Town Manager; Eliza LeBrun, Executive Assistant to the Town Manager. The citizens of Hartford who are legal voters meet at the Hartford High School (Hanley Gym) in said Town on Saturday, March 26, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of transacting Town business not involving voting by Australian ballot. I. II.

Roger Bloomfield, Town Moderator opened the Town and School Floor Meeting at 10:00am. Mr. Bloomfield led the pledge of allegiance. Richard Grassi, Selectboard Chair and Lori Dickerson, School Board of Directors Chair, presented Mr. Michael Kainen with a plaque and resolution in appreciation of his service as Town Moderator for the last 9 years. Richard Grassi, Hartford Selectboard Chair and Lori Dickerson, Hartford School Board Director Chair read the following resolution; “WHEREAS, Michael Kainen has served the Town and School District of Hartford since

March 3, 2007 and WHEREAS, his leadership and professionalism as Moderator has provided an invaluable service to the Town and School, and WHERAS, Michael Kainen during the past 9 years of service has made an extraordinary time commitment and dedication of his efforts in serving the Town of Hartford residents, and WHEREAS, Michael Kainen has chosen not to seek re-election to his office at this time, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard, School Board of Directors and the Town of Hartford acknowledge and extend our appreciation to the Kainen family for their understanding and support during the last 9 years, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard, School Board of Directors and the Town of Hartford are gratefully indebted to Michael Kainen for his commitment to our community, NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITIZENS OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD: That Michael Kainen be given a vote of appreciation for his 9 years of loyal service, and this resolution be recorded in the Town records. Michael Kainen’s service to the Hartford Community has made a difference. Dated this 26th day of March 2016.“ Mr. Grassi and Mrs. Dickerson presented him with a plaque and gavel.

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F.X. Flinn made a motion to recess the School Meeting, Peter Merrill seconded the motion. All were in favor and the motion passed. III.

The Moderator, Roger Bloomfield announced the purpose of the Town business meeting being to decide by voice vote and/or discuss the following: 1. Richard Grass made a motion to accept the reports of the Town Officers in the Town Report. Sandra Mariotti seconded the motion. All were in favor, the motion carried. 2. Sandra Mariotti made a motion to collect Town General and Highway Tax and the Town School District’s Tax on real estate in two installments, the first being on or before August 12, 2016, and the second installment being on or before February 3, 2017 through the Treasurer. Simon Dennis seconded the motion. All were in favor, the motion carried. 3. Simon Dennis made a motion to compensation the Town will pay its Town officers from the General Fund, effective July 1, 2016 pursuant to 24 V.S.A., Section 932: Moderator $100 per annum; to Board of Civil Authority $50 per diem; to Lister’s $20.00 per hour; Treasurer $14,000 per annum; Town Clerk $65,416 per annum; Board of Selectmen $50 per meeting, the Chairman receiving $300 additional per annum and the Vice-Chairman receiving $150 additional per annum; that such officials will receive mileage reimbursement in the amount equivalent to the rate authorized by the IRS when a town vehicle is not available to them. Alan Johnson seconded the motion. Mr. Flinn requested to increase the Selectboard reimbursement to $100.00 per meeting. Simon Dennis seconded the motion. Lannie Collins argued that the people who run for the Selectboard do it to make the contribution to the community, not the money. Mr. Collins offered an amendment to increase the rate of reimbursement per meeting for Selectboard Members to $75.00 per meeting, Dick Ballou seconded the motion. After discussion, Mr. Collins withdrew his amendment. 2 were in favor of Mr. Flinn’s amendment, the remainder of the assembly were against, the motion to amend the Selectboard rate of reimbursement to $100.00 per meeting failed. The moderator called the vote on Mr. Dennis’ motion. All were in favor, 1 voted against. The motion passed. 4. To vote to approve the 2016-2017 budget if disapproved at the March 1st, 2016 meeting. This item was approved by voters on March 1, 2016. 5. Alan Johnson made a motion to appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred Ninety Nine ($999) Dollars for the purpose of supporting the activities of the COVER Home Repair. Dennis Brown seconded the motion. All were in favor, the motion passed. 6. Dennis Brown made a motion to appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred Sixty Nine ($869) Dollars for the purpose of supporting the activities of the Green Mountain Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). Michael Morris seconded the motion. All were in favor, the motion passed. 7. Michael Morris made a motion to appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred Ninety Nine ($999) Dollars to support the activities of Vermont Adult Learning in its work with adults in need of basic reading, writing, math, GED, and English language skills. Richard Grassi seconded the motion. All were in favor, the motion carried. 8. Richard Grassi made a motion to appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred Seventy Five ($975) Dollars to support the mission of the Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (VABVI) in its work to help blind and visually impaired Vermonters achieve and maintain independence. Sandra Mariotti seconded the motion. All were in favor, the motion carried.

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9. Sandra Mariotti made a motion to appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred Forty Five ($845) Dollars to help support the work of the Vermont Center for Independent Living in assisting Vermonters with disabilities to live as fully, productively and independently as possible. Dennis Brown seconded the motion. Al were in favor, the motion carried. 10.

Richard Grassi made a motion to ratify the listed action: Shall the action taken at the meeting of this town of Hartford held on March 1, 2016 in spite of the fact that the position of Lister for remaining two years of a three year term was not included on the original Warning for Annual Town Meeting, and any act or action of the municipal officers or agents pursuant thereto be readopted, ratified and confirmed. Sandra Mariotti seconded the motion. All were in favor, 1 person abstained, the motion carried.

11.

To do any other necessary and proper non-binding business. Richard Grassi read the following paragraph from the 2015 Town Report: “This has been a year of transition in Hartford as we continue to recover from the Great Recession and lay the groundwork for the future. Several long-time employees either retired or departed over the past year, including the town manager, the assessor, and the finance director. A new police chief completed his first full year on the job, and we hope that, by the time you read this, a new town manager will have been named. And perhaps no better symbol of this transition year is our newly renovated town hall, which re-opened this past summer and provides a beautiful, modern, spacious, and well-lit space for town employees and citizens to conduct the town’s business”. Sandra Mariotti read the following resolution; “WHEREAS, Chuck Wooster has served as a member of the Hartford the Selectboard since March 5, 2013 and WHEREAS, his leadership and professionalism as Chair for two years has provided an invaluable service to the Town, and WHERAS, Chuck Wooster during the past 3 years of service has made an extraordinary time commitment and dedication of his efforts in serving the Town of Hartford residents, and WHEREAS, Chuck Wooster has chosen not to seek re-election to his office at this time, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard and the Town of Hartford acknowledge and extend our appreciation to the Wooster family for their understanding and support during the last 3 years, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard and the Town of Hartford are gratefully indebted to Chuck Wooster for his commitment to our community, NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITIZENS OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD: That Chuck Wooster be given a vote of appreciation for his 3 years of loyal service, and this resolution be recorded in the Town records. Chuck Wooster’s service to the Hartford Community has made a difference. Dated this 26th day of March 2016.”

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Sandra Mariotti read the following resolution; “WHEREAS, Alex DeFelice has served as a member of the Hartford Selectboard since March 2, 2010 and WHEREAS, his leadership and professionalism as Chair for two years and Vice Chair for one year has provided an invaluable service to the Town, and WHERAS, Alex DeFelice during the past 6 years of service has made an extraordinary time commitment and dedication of his efforts in serving the Town of Hartford residents, and WHEREAS, Alex DeFelice has chosen not to seek re-election to his office at this time, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard and the Town of Hartford acknowledge and extend our appreciation to the DeFelice family for their understanding and support during the last 6 years, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard and the Town of Hartford are gratefully indebted to Alex DeFelice for his commitment to our community, NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITIZENS OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD: That Alex DeFelice be given a vote of appreciation for his 6 years of loyal service, and this resolution be recorded in the Town records. Alex DeFelice’s service to the Hartford Community has made a difference. Dated this 26th day of March 2016. Sandra Mariotti presented the following resolutions; “WHEREAS, Matt Bucy has served as a member of the Hartford the Selectboard since March 5, 2013 and WHEREAS, his leadership and professionalism has provided an invaluable service to the Town, and WHERAS, Matt Bucy during the past 2 years of service has made an extraordinary time commitment and dedication of his efforts in serving the Town of Hartford residents, and WHEREAS, Matt Bucy has chosen not to seek re-election to his office at this time, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard and the Town of Hartford acknowledge and extend our appreciation to the Bucy family for their understanding and support during the last 2 years, and WHEREAS, the Selectboard and the Town of Hartford are gratefully indebted to Matt Bucy for his commitment to our community,

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NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITIZENS OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD: That Matt Bucy be given a vote of appreciation for his 2 years of loyal service, and this resolution be recorded in the Town records. Matt Bucyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s service to the Hartford Community has made a difference. Dated this 26th day of March 2016.â&#x20AC;? Lannie Collins seconded the motion to record these resolutions. All were in favor and the motion passed. Richard Grassi made a motion to record the resolution for Michael Kainen, read previously be recorded. Sandra Mariotti seconded the motion. All were in favor and the motion carried. Lannie Collins made a motion to remove the names of those individuals who have entered into a payment plan for delinquent taxes and are meeting the requirements of those plans to have their names removed from future town reports. Richard Grassi seconded the motion. 1 person voted against, the remainder of the assembly were in favor, the motion passed. A motion to adjourn was made by Richard Grassi at 10:55am, Sandra Mariotti seconded the motion. All were in favor and the motion carried.

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Boards, Commissions & Committees Community Resilience Organization of Hartford Kye (Mary H.) Cochran (2017) Dylan Kreis (2017) Chair

Term Expiration December 31st - 3 Year Term Laura Simon (2017) Selectboard Liaison: Simon Dennis

Conservation Commission Jonathan Bouton (2020) Chair C. Dana Hazen (2020) Mary Hutchins (2019) Thomas Kahl (2020)

Term Expiration August 22nd - 4 Year Term Shawn Kelley (2018) Vacancy Vacancy Selectboard Liaison: Mike Morris

Design Review Committee Michael Davidson (2017) Evan Eccher Jonathan Schectman

Term Expiration March 28th - 3 Year Term Denise Welch-May (2018) Chair Vacancy Selectboard Liaison: Mike Morris

Energy Commission Peggy Allen (2019) Lynn Bohi (2018) Clerk Cathleen Geiger (2018)

Term Expiration July 17th - 3 Year Term Erik Krauss (2019) Vice-Chair Martha McDaniel (2018) Chair Selectboard Liaison: Alan Johnson

Hartford Business Revolving Loan Fund Committee Dennis Driscoll, Jr. (2019) Steven Geiger (2018) Frank Klymn (2017)

Term Expiration March 15th - 3 Year Term Kevin Raleigh (2017) Chair Vacancy Selectboard Liaison: Richard Grassi

Hartford Tree Board Tim Covell (2019) Clare Forseth (2018) Carole Haehnel (2016) Deborah Milne (2017) Chair

Term Expiration Dec. 1st - 2&3 Year Terms Sarah Oertly (2016) Vice-Chair Diane Romano (2018) Karen Watson (2019) Selectboard Liaison: Sandra Mariotti

Historic Preservation Commission Susanne Abetti (2019) Roy Black (2018) Robin Adair Logan (2017)

Term Expiration March 15th - 3 Year Term Jonathan Schechtman (2017) Chair Pat Stark (2019) Vice-Chair Selectboard Liaison: Dennis Brown

Parks & Recreation Commission Cassedy Neal (2019) Alison Hannigan (2019) Brett Mayfield (2019) Vice-Chair Rob Stainton (2016) Chair

Term Expiration June 21st - 3 Year Term Michael Vanesse (2019) Vacancy Vacancy Selectboard Liaison: Richard Grassi

Planning Commission Robin Adiar Logan (2017) Quinn P. Colgan (2019) Tobias Dayman (2019) Jacques Harlow (2020)

Term Expiration March 15th - 4 Year Term Peter Merrill (2020) Clerk John Reid (2018) Vice-Chair Bruce Riddle (2017) Chair Selectboard Liaison: Mike Morris

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School Board (Elected) Lori Dickerson, Chair Paula Naluty, Clerk Kevin Christie

Peter Merrill Nancy Russell

Selectboard (Elected) Dennis Brown, 3 yr (2019) Simon Dennis, 3 yr (2018) Richard Grassi, 3 yr (2017) Chair Alan Johnson, 3 yr (2019)

Sandra Mariotti, 2 yr (2018) Clerk Mike Morris, 2 yr (2018) Rebecca White, 2yr (2017) Vice-Chair

Sister Cities International Committee Brett Mayfield (2019) Joan Ponzoni (2019)

Term Expiration March 23rd - 3 Year Term Havah Armstrong Walther (2019) Vacancies (2)

Town/School Meeting Committee David Briggs (2019) F.X. Flinn (2018) Bill Mann (2017)

Virginia Umland (2018) Vacancy Selectboard Liaison: Simon Dennis

West Hartford Library Trustees (Elected) Harry Dorman (2017) Thomas Hazen (2017) Chair Jeffrey Moreno (2017)

Judith Roberts (2017) Selectboard Liaison: Sandra Mariotti

Zoning Board Of Adjustment Frank Gado (2018) Clerk Thomas Franklin (2019) Stephen Lagasse (2019) Chair

Term Expiration March 15th - 3 Year Term Christopher Lowe (2019) Vice-Chair Alice Maleski (2019) Selectboard Liaison: Dennis Brown

4th Charter Commission F.X. Flinn, Town, Clerk Scott Johnson, Town Gayle Ottman, Town/School, Vice-Chair

Term Expiration March 2017 Eric Michaels/School Russell North/School Nancy Russell/School Selectboard Liaison: Simon Dennis, Chair

Justice of the Peace

Term Expiration March 2019

Kenneth Baldwin Richard Ballou Roy Black Pat Cook F. X. Flinn Donald Foster Susan Foster Daniel Fraser

Ali Hannigan Nancy Howe Hailey Kasten Gayle Ottman Kevin Raleigh Barbara Reed Joe Trottier

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This Report is dedicated to Former Selectboard Members,

Clair Lovell & John Hazen Thank you for your service and dedication to the Town of Hartford.

Clair M. Lovell February 1920 - August 2016 Selectboard Member 1991 - 1993 Quechee, VT

John H. Hazen, Jr. February 1939 - August 2016 Selectboard Member 1966 - 1978 1979 - 1993 2006 - 2011 West Hartford, VT


TOWN OF HARTFORD 171 BRIDGE STREET WHITE RIVER JCT., VT 05001

BOUND PRINTED MATERIAL

BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID White River Jct., VT 05001 Permit No. 97

2016 Hartford Town & School Annual Report  
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