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Access to Affordability

provides eligible residents with services and discounts, such as: FREE

50%

discounts on:

DO YOU QUALIFY? BA N F F

AC CESS

• A 6-month local Roam public transit pass • • • •

• Banff Access is for residents struggling with affordability • It’s  based on income, using the Banff Affordability Measure. See if you are eligible at banff.ca/access Complete the application form at banff.ca/access and bring it to Community Services at Banff Town Hall, along with a Statement of Return from last year’s tax assessment or your last 3 pay stubs

HOW TO APPLY WHY?

Community Classes • Town of Banff After School Care Town of Banff Summer Fun Camps Roam regional transit 10 ride and return trip passes Drop-in fees for public skating and skate rentals

• B  anff ’s median income is below the province and affordability is a challenge • Banff values a strong, healthy and caring community • Initiatives to reduce household expenses can improve economic self-sufficiency for individuals and families

FIND OUT MORE

Read the 2014 Social Assessment and the Economic Prosperity Strategy for details, available on banff.ca

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Try It

SPORTS SERIES

TRY A NEW SPORT OR ACTIVITY Sessions in tennis, badminton, skating, speed skating, volleyball and broomball have attracted over 200 enthusiasts so far

IS IT FOR ME?

Yes. Everyone—children, youth, young adults, adults, older adults, new immigrants, long-time residents, even visitors have tried a new sport through Try It. Meet new friends, learn a new activity and have fun.

WHERE DO I SIGN UP?

No need. It’s free. Just come on out. Find the schedule on banff.ca/events

LOOK FOR

• snowshoeing • lacrosse • table tennis

• pickleball • baseball • basketball

• cricket • rugby • running • curling • skateboarding • skating New sports are posted regularly

Thanks to the financial support of Makadiff Sports, the Town of Banff is able to offer the Try It series at no cost.

FIND OUT MORE

View the recreation programs and services master plan on banff.ca. Developed with extensive community consultation and adopted by council in 2015, the master plan maps out priorities and strategies designed to meet the needs and expectations of a naturally active and vibrant community. Coming this fall – the inaugural Town of Banff community guide containing all the fall and winter recreation programs and classes. Watch for it.

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Skates

SKATEBOARD PARK REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

ESTIMATED PROJECT TIMELINE February – March 2016

April - October 2016

Initial Community Consultation

Technical Site Analysis Park Design Grant Writing & Fundraising

STEP 1

STEP 2

Purpose: To consult with local stakeholders to gather initial information and recruit steering committee members.

Purpose: To design a midsized, all ages, all abilities skateboard park at the Banff Recreation Grounds.

November 2016 – January 2017

April 2017 – July 2017

Approval of Design Project Tendered

Construction

STEP 3

Purpose: Sign-off by Town and steering committee on final design. Formal approval to start construction April 2017.

August 2017 Park Opens

STEP 4

STEP 5

Purpose: To construct a kick-ass, mid-size skateboard facility at the Banff Recreation Grounds.

Purpose: To celebrate the efforts of the Banff skateboarding community.

Process: Open House / Mini-Workshop.

Process: Town to complete site analysis and contract park designer; Town and steering committee to work with designer on park layout and design; fundraising target established and potential grants identified.

Process: Review of final design details by Town and steering committee.Tendering of project.

Process: Construction of park contracted.

Process: Mayor, council and community ollies, nollies and drops in to official opening.

Outcome: Recommendations from skatepark users for consideration during formal design process; Steering committee with broad community representation.

Outcome: Skateboard facility designed to meet the needs of park users including skateboarders, scooters, in-line and BMX.

Outcome: A unique skateboard park design.

Outcome: A kick-ass new skateboard park for residents and visitors.

Outcome: A kick-ass official opening event.

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ADDRESSING CONGESTION

IN 2015, THE TOWN: • Partnered with stakeholders • Increased and expanded communications • Doubled transit frequency • Increased parking enforcement • Increased weekend traffic monitoring • Optimized traffic signal timings • Activated green override when required • Provided free transit from Tunnel Mountain campground • Promoted active modes • Added traffic cams and linked to numerous websites for viewing • Worked with shuttle providers

HOW YOU HELP: We rely on residents and visitors to help minimize congestion: - You chose to walk, bike or Roam around Banff - More visitors use Roam Public Transit - Stakeholders monitor regular update emails on volume data and advise visitors - You follow our increased communication through social media - You check conditions before you go, on our traffic webcams (now among the top views on banff.ca)

Number of days northbound delays exceeded 15 minutes decreased

HOW IT IS WORKING 29 (2015)

▼43%

Number of days over 24,000 VPD* increased 15 (2014)

▲ 93%

14 (2014)

8 (2015) *During July and August, both entrances, both directions

visit banff.ca/transportationplan 100%


feed the bin  ecycling your food waste R benefits everyone. Especially Mother Nature.

Sort and recycle your food waste. Here’s how:

2

1 Scrape your plates and deposit your food waste into your household food waste bin. You don’t need to line the bin with plastic. If you do, use COMPOSTABLE plastic only.  Biodegradable is not compostable. Make sure you use compostable bags  Compostable bins are now available at Home Hardware (order online).

3  our good deed is done. From here Town of Banff Y empties all the residential food waste bins and brings the load to the Town’s N-Viro recycling plant, next to the wastewater treatment plant. Here it’s turned into a soil amendment, which is then sold for sod cultivation and land reclamation. The revenues generated from the sale of Banff N-Rich pay for the costs of installing the N-Viro system, reducing the burden on the taxpayer.

Deposit your bin of food scraps in the neighbourhood food waste bins. Only food waste in these bins.

 If a load is contaminated by someone dumping something other than food waste in the food waste bin — including plastics (biodegradable plastic is not accepted), paper, cardboard, metal, crockery or trailer hitches, the entire load is landfilled, which costs the taxpayer, the town and the environment.

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Cease the Grease GREASE AND GARBAGE DON’T GO HERE: Hot water and soap do not wash away fats, oils and grease—they solidify and clog your drains. Backups are messy and expensive to fix.

KEEP THESE ITEMS OUT OF YOUR SINKS, DRAINS OR TOILETS: Fats: butter, margarine, shortening, etc. Oils: salad dressing, cooking oil (including deep frying), olive oil, sauces, lard, marinades, etc. Grease: chicken, hamburger, bacon, etc. Food: leftover grains, meat, vegetables, etc. TIPS FOR HOME • Scrape dishes before washing. DISPOSAL OF • Use paper towels to wipe down cooking utensils and cookware before washing. Toss that paper towel into the garbage or food recycling bin. FATS, OILS & • Pour fats, oils and grease liquid in a container, such as a tin can or milk carton and place into your freezer. After it freezes dispose of it in the garbage. It is not GREASE: recyclable. • Use the food recycling bin to dispose of other foods.

PROPER DISPOSAL METHODS GARBAGE BIN Cage lining (e.g. newsprint) Cigarette butts Cotton swabs Clothing Dental floss Disposable diapers Feminine hygiene products

Lotions and perfumes Paper towels Shop towels Wipes – baby & cleaning Wipes – flushable

HAZARDOUS WASTE Fertilizer Floor & furniture polish Hot tub chemicals Fuel, motor oil, lubricants & antifreeze Nail polish

Paint, stripper, turpentine Pesticides & herbicides Solvents, glue

BAG & DISPOSE IN GARBAGE BIN YARD WASTE DROP-OFF

Wood Shavings FOOD RECYCLE

Food/Leftovers

Cat litter RETURN UNUSED TO PHARMACIST

Pharmaceuticals/medicines

Hazardous waste and yard waste is accepted year round at the Town of Banff Transfer Site at 120 Hawk Ave.

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Harnessing the Sun THE TOWN OF BANFF SOLAR INCENTIVE PROGRAM — SUPPORTING YOU TO GO SOLAR The program offers cost-based compensation to new solar photovoltaic energy producers, providing price certainty and long-term contracts that help finance renewable energy investments. Quarterly payments will be made by the Town, based on system production. Last year 47 applied and 14 residents and businesses took advantage of the 2015 initiative to install solar panels on their rooftops. Their solar PV system will save them an average of $500 a year. Together, Banff is already harnessing 10 times more solar power than the average Alberta output of 1.28 watts per person.

HOW IT WORKS Homeowners, condo associations, and commercial property owners can enter the lottery. Apply online at banff.ca/solar • 2016 incentive supported systems must be installed by year end •  Approximately 7 year support to payback investment •  Solar PV System can be installed on shared roofs (ex. condominiums)

2015 INSTALL PHOTOS

333 Muskrat St - Private Residence

SHARED SOLAR CONCEPT Shared solar projects allow customers to buy or lease a portion of a shared solar system. 100 Eagle Crescent - Commercial

339 Marten St. - Staff Housing

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Heritage Corporation

PROTECTING, PRESERVING AND PROMOTING BANFF’S BUILT HISTORY

Parks Canada Administration Building, Cascade Gardens

504 Buffalo St. Recognized Historical Resource (undesignated)

As part of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage Site, Banff strives to protect and preserve the Town’s built and natural heritage. In 1996, Council established a municipally owned not-for-profit Heritage Corporation. The Town of Banff Heritage Corporation is able to receive endowments, property grants, and other forms of donations from the public, businesses, other levels of government, or agencies such as the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation.

2016 HERITAGE PROJECTS 1. Update to the Banff Registry of Historical Resources Though it does not offer legal protection of resources, the Registry is the sole means for awarding conservation incentives. Since the last update over 15 years ago, there’s been a shift in our understanding of modern architecture. The 2016 update will include significant examples of modern built heritage. Information will be shared on banff.ca/heritage 2. Develop a Banff Heritage Overlay District Today, neighbourhood development is regulated through 34 distinct Land Use Districts. Land Use Districts limit the size and scale of new development. This report will: • review locations where an Overlay District is necessary to strengthen and preserve local heritage •  use the existing heritage database to identify areas where a heritage overlay is required to preserve built heritage

Number of days over 24,000 VPD* 3. Commemorate Intangible and Cultural Heritage increased

Heritage is more than artifacts and buildings. It also means stories and perceptions that tell the story of people’s interaction with the land, including First Nations. This year, the Heritage Corporation will seek your feedback and that from regional heritage experts on local sites or stories of significant cultural value.

▲ 93%

visit banff.ca/heritage 100%


Healthy Neighbourhood Design

The Banff Community Plan, adopted in 2008, established the vision and goals of the community, developed by the community. It envisions a flourishing, socially diverse Banff, where high standards in architecture and in landscape, environmental and urban design reinforce our sense of place. Objectives include: • monitoring and adjusting residential density to ensure community needs are being met

•  ensuring new housing developments provide community amenities, public spaces and parks

•  reviewing guidelines for infill housing DENSITY DONE WELL ACHIEVES THIS.

GREAT COMMUNITY DESIGN CREATES LIVABILITY. LIVABILITY CREATES VALUE • In quality of life for residents • In attracting investment and reinvestment by the private sector •  In maintaining and enhancing the destination’s global appeal

•  In reducing costs for transportation, public health and social well being •  In remaining competitive in the international tourism marketplace

THE MAGIC OF DENSITY DONE WELL • Offers more affordable housing choices – through economies of scale • Builds vitality, diversity, and enhances safety in neighbourhoods • Allows more cost effective public transit

• Reduces energy use in buildings – by reducing the ecological footprint • Allows you and your family to be more active – neighbourhoods are walkable and transit is near • Improves public health – by

increasing activity, increasing social well being • Offers more green design options – such as improved water management, protection and enhancement of natural systems and more efficient building heating systems

DENSITY DONE WELL: 1. LAND USE AND MOVEMENT ALIGNED 2. CONSISTENTLY HIGH DESIGN QUALITY 3. AMENITIES AND DIVERSITY MAKE NEIGHBOURHOODS MORE ENJOYABLE

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Re-Visualizing

WHERE’S THE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE? (image taken in 2012) It’s time to update the air photography of Banff. This year, the Town will gather both ‘oblique’ and ‘ortho’ images.

WHAT IS AN OBLIQUE IMAGE? • Images are captured of each location: one from above and one from the north, south, east and west. • Ortho images are the top down views, oblique are views from an angle. • Oblique imagery allows users to visit every property and visualise the relationship with the surrounding area. • Oblique images provide more detail, a better understanding of height, and a more familiar view. HOW WILL IT BE USED?

Most of the Town’s services will benefit from these new images. They will:

WHAT IS THE COST?

$17,000 to acquire the imagery, plus a yearly software license fee.

WHEN WILL THIS HAPPEN?

Full installation of the imagery should be completed in October 2016.

FIND OUT MORE

Visit banff.ca/maps to learn about our GIS services and banffmaps.ca for a library of maps and apps, including real time snow management and street sweeping.

• • • •

Reduce need for site visits • Enhance the planning environment Allow engineering measurements from our desks Provide accurate environmental monitoring Assist with emergency planning and response

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Join Council for a Roundtable Review

Sit down with members of council and the town planners for an informal discussion about key town planning challenges. The roundtables will be informative, inspiring, lively and collaborative.

PLAN TO ATTEND IF YOU’RE: • interested in the future of your neighbourhood and community • interested in economic prosperity of neighbourhoods • interested in investment and reinvestment in the community THURSDAY

APRIL

28

6:30 TO 8:30 PM

CREATING A COMMUNITY OF CHOICE | FROM PASSIONATE DEMANDS TO PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS Discuss the practice of planning and public policy making in the face of real-world constraints with regard to political and administrative processes in Banff, legislative complexity, and time. Please join us at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

MAY

BUILDOUT BY DESIGN | PLACE-MAKING AND TRANSFORMING NEIGHBOURHOODS

6:30 TO 8:30 PM

Discuss transformation of urban landscapes in Banff, the influence of architecture, and aesthetics on community and civic life. Please join us at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

THURSDAY

26

THURSDAY

JUNE

23

6:30 TO 8:30 PM

THE CHANGING FACE OF BANFF | ROADMAP FOR THE FUTURE Discuss nature, health and the built environment. Successful integration of nature and the built environment is a hallmark of sustainability. Sometimes it occurs without effort or provocation, while other times it results from projects or plans. In both instances, the natural and artificial merge, morph and redefine urban reality going forward. Please join us at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

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ADDRESSING CONGESTION LONG TERM

Key findings from 2015 actions:

• The road system is at capacity when vehicle volume exceeds approx. 24,000 vpd* • Exceeded 24,000 vpd* 29 days in 2015, up from 15 days in 2014 and 9 in 2013 • Entrance counts up 6% in July and August from 2015 to 1.5 million vpd* • Short-term actions become less effective past 24,000 vpd* • Projected growth in visitation & Calgary population required long-term solutions *vpd—vehicles per day, both entrances, both directions – used to indicate volume

Goal

• To plan transportation needs to accommodate increased visitation

2016 Initiatives Study the options of: Move more vehicles: new road infrastructure and/or widen existing roads, etc.

Move people with: intercept lots and increased bus transit, gondola transit, etc.

Assess each option: • Environmental footprint • Greenhouse gas emissions

• P3 (public-private partnership) opportunities • Capital cost

• Operating cost • Capacity and scalability

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VEHICLE VOLUMES ARE UP

VEHICLE DELAYS ARE DOWN (both entrances/both directions) • Northbound delays greater than 30 minutes were t 75% from four days to one day

• Average vpd s 6% o From 22,653 to 24,099 • Max vpd count s 8% o From 30,677 to 33,096 • 47% of days in July/August over threshold of 24,000 Entrance Vehicle Counts

▲ 6%

From 1.4 Million To 1.5 Million

▲18% From 136,680 to 161,887 riders

• Sulphur Mountain Route s 29% with doubled frequency • Roam ridership increase is 3X greater than entrance count increase • Tunnel Mountain campground ridership is s 99% From 4,443 to 8,862 • Brewster shuttle carried 16,319 riders

▼43%

From 14 to 8 days

July / August 2014 vs 2015

Roam Ridership

MODE SHIFT TO TRANSIT

Northbound delay days greater than 15 minutes

• S outhbound delays greater than 15 minutes remained the same at four days

Vehicles parked downtown

▼10%

From 4990 to 4476 vehicles per day

PARKING IMPROVED

• Stall shortfall decreased from 80 stalls to one stall • August average occupancy is down from 66% to 60% •  Shift to underutilized stalls o Bear Street parkade average occupancy is s 8% o Bear Street 200 block lot average occupancy is t 3%

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Trails Master Plan Why a Master Plan? Public consultation showed trails are the most popular recreation amenity in Banff, for both active transportation uses and for pleasure. The Trails Master Plan was adopted by council in 2015 and contains 70 actions over four years, and beyond.

Goals

• • •  • 

Encourage active commuting, particularly during summer months Improve connectivity, particularly to key destinations Improve visitor experience Formalize trail use regulations, trail type classifications, and designated uses

2015 Banff Avenue Greenway Trial The Banff Legacy Trail eastbound attracts over 40,000 cyclists in July and August leaving from Banff. To enhance the cycling experience, especially for families, and connect to this valuable amenity from downtown Banff, the Town trialed a temporary greenway along Banff Avenue from the end of August to the end of October. The goal was to test configurations and obtain feedback. For 2016, council directed administration to return with different configurations, and the costs of building a permanent cycle path.

2016 Projects: • Add 50 new downtown bike parking racks • Install stair side ramps

Bike parking

• Develop new routes from downtown to Bow River

• Present options to council on Banff Avenue cycle path

Map of new trails to river

Stair ramp

Greenway

visit banff.ca/trails 100%


Trails Master Plan

What trail lighting might look like (Banff Centre campus, low level, capped bollards)

LIGHTING THE WAY Banff ’s trails are typically not lit. The Trails Master Plan recommended consideration of lighting Priority 1 trails to improve safety and to extend their use. Lighting trails, however, impacts the night sky of the national park, increases operational and energy costs and consumes more electricity, expanding our footprint.

WHAT DO YOU THINK? SHOULD WE LIGHT OUR MAIN TRAILS? PLEASE TAKE OUR QUICK SURVEY.

POINTS TO CONSIDER: • A  street lighting policy establishes standards for roads, the same does not exist for trails • D  uring the Trails Master Plan, the community identified “lack of lighting” as a significant barrier to increased trail use • D  ays are shorter than 10 hours for 30% of the year and many residents’ workdays start and end during dark hours

visit banff.ca/trails 100%

Connect 2016  

Information presented at the Town of Banff's Connect 2016 open house on major projects

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