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Town&Gown JULY 2012

magazine

Summer fun


MSU’s Wakeboarding team member, Zack Jordan, does a strong back flip from wake-towake. See page 54 for story. Photo by Robert Underwood A Product of Horizon of Mississippi P.O. Box 3893 | Mississippi State, MS 39762 www.townandgownmag.com

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staff

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Don Norman | publisher sdnpublisher@bellsouth.net

Leilani Salter | editor leilani@townandgownmag.com

Claire Massey | editorial assistant claire@townandgownmag.com

Jessica Bailey | acct. exec. jessica@ townandgownmag.com

Ann Ashton Jones | acct. exec. annashton@ townandgownmag.com

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writers

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Shea Allen Justin Fritscher Emily Jones Joe Lee Claire Massey Susan O’Bryan Hellen Polk Kate Salter Milton Whatley

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ph o t o g r aph e r s

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Jessica Bailey Ashley Covin Divian Conner Laura Daniels Claire Massey Debbie Montgomery Leilani Salter Hannah Tibbetts

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pa g e d e s i g n

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Claire Massey Leilani Salter

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advertising design

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Chris McMillen Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 3893, Miss. State, MS, 39762, or call 662-323-1642.


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Retreat from life’s storms 10 60

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BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

ow does one mentally and emotionally deal with unthinkable tragedies such as the loss of a loved one or a long-term relationship? Susan McAllister had to ask herself that question twice two years ago following the death of her youngest son and the breakup of her long-term marriage. She found herself spending more and more quiet hours at her retreat in the Browning Creek development, located nine miles southeast of Starkville. The two-story, 1,800 square-foot “home-away-from-home” features four bedrooms, three baths and a great room/kitchen combo which generously accommodates an aggregation of friends and family. While dealing with her grief, Susan used the retreat as her refuge. It was a place to read, reflect, and renew her spirit which was buoyed by the simplicity and serenity of country living. “I built the house in the spring of 2009, and moved in on Memorial Day weekend. My nephew, Cory Anthony of Starkville, was my builder which made it very easy to have the ideas in my head and in pictures come to life,” Susan said. “I grew up in West Point and attended Mississippi State University and always wanted a place near my family. I also wanted my sons and future grandchildren to have a place to come and relax and be close to their cousins and grandparents.”  Susan is regional manager for the Jackson law firm of Adams and Reese. She devotes her weekdays to the demanding position, then escapes to Starkville to spend long, leisurely weekends. She often leaves after work on Friday and doesn’t return until Monday morning, refreshed and ready to take on the world. townandgownmag.com

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BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

ow does one mentally and emotionally deal with unthinkable tragedies such as the loss of a loved one or a long-term relationship? Susan McAllister had to ask herself that question twice two years ago following the death of her youngest son and the breakup of her long-term marriage. She found herself spending more and more quiet hours at her retreat in the Browning Creek development, located nine miles southeast of Starkville. The two-story, 1,800 square-foot “home-away-from-home” features four bedrooms, three baths and a great room/kitchen combo which generously accommodates an aggregation of friends and family. While dealing with her grief, Susan used the retreat as her refuge. It was a place to read, reflect, and renew her spirit which was buoyed by the simplicity and serenity of country living. “I built the house in the spring of 2009, and moved in on Memorial Day weekend. My nephew, Cory Anthony of Starkville, was my builder which made it very easy to have the ideas in my head and in pictures come to life,” Susan said. “I grew up in West Point and attended Mississippi State University and always wanted a place near my family. I also wanted my sons and future grandchildren to have a place to come and relax and be close to their cousins and grandparents.”  Susan is regional manager for the Jackson law firm of Adams and Reese. She devotes her weekdays to the demanding position, then escapes to Starkville to spend long, leisurely weekends. She often leaves after work on Friday and doesn’t return until Monday morning, refreshed and ready to take on the world. townandgownmag.com

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Susan designed the interior of the home and chose the furnishings, including many antique linens, while combing through antique stores.

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Susan chose a red, white and blue theme for her retreat with antique patchwork quilts and vintage linens to punctuate the period Americana theme.

Susan designed the interior of the second home, and handpicked all the furnishings and accoutrements while combing through antique stores in Jackson, Atlanta and places in between. “I enjoyed every minute of picking out the smallest details for the house and making it uniquely my own,” she said. “I have always loved American country antiques and knew I wanted a vintage feel for the cabin.” A red, white and blue theme naturally followed. Antique patchwork quilts, vintage linens and toys from her childhood punctuate the period Americana theme. In December of 2010, as she was planning the finishing touches for the interior of the retreat, the unimaginable happened. Her youngest son, Wynn, was killed in an automobile accident just outside Starkville. “Wynn had been living at the retreat since completing culinary school and accepting a position with Aramark, MSU’s food and beverage provider. He was engaged to be martownandgownmag.com

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On the Fourth of July, the family can be found on one of the home’s three screened porches, cranking up the ice cream maker.

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The red, white and blue theme is visable throughout the home.

ried and had plans to eventually settle in the New Orleans area to be a part of that great culinary culture.” Two days after Christmas, Wynn was heading to Jackson to visit his mother. He took an unfamiliar shortcut and as he turned onto old Highway 25 South, he was struck broadside by a north-bound vehicle. All this happened as Susan was going through the breakup of her marriage. Suddenly, the retreat took on a whole different role in her life. A place designed for entertaining and kicking up her heels suddenly became a refuge from life’s storms. “To this day, I’ve changed nothing in Wynn’s room and there is a lingering scent of baked bread and culinary spices which gives me a peaceful feeling,” said Susan. “There is nothing better than awakening to the sound of rain beating down on the tin roof, or reading a book lying on the swinging bed on the upstairs screen porch,” she said. “There is a beautiful lake where you can fish from the pier or just take a five-mile hike around the entire lake. One of my nephews (Drew Anthony) and his family recently built their permanent home at Browning Creek and it is very nice to have them so close.” Susan’s parents, Robert and Arcola Elliott of West Point, are close by to offer moral support, and the retreat has become the family’s favorite gathering spot, especially on holidays and on MSU ballgame weekends. Her surviving son, Sam, lives in Birmingham and he and his fiancé are frequent guests. The Fourth of July often finds the family gathered on one of the home’s three screened porches, cranking up the ice cream maker. Most of her neighbors at Browning Creek are also absentee owners who return to attend sporting events for their beloved Mississippi State Bulldogs. Those special events have become an excuse for an impromptu reunion of kindred souls and a pleasant way to build new memories. n townandgownmag.com

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Glory

Going to 16

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEILANI SALTER


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Roomy porches on both the front and back of the house, provide the perfect spot for casual dinners and choice seats to watch the wildlife roam freely.

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BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

ummertime soirees in Mississippi usually include watermelon, homemade ice cream and listening to cricket concerts at dusk. For the Magnolia Social Club it means it’s time to “Go to Glory.” Not literally mind you. Glory is an historic home located at the fringes of Oktibbeha County. Tucked deep into the backwoods, it is second home to Pequita and Jack Denson. It serves as their escape from suburban living, and a place to piddle and putter to their hearts’ content. But once a year, Glory gets all dressed up for members of the social club, formerly know as the Magnolia Garden Club. “We have been going to Glory each year for each of the 21 years since we acquired Glory,” said Pequita. “But we began meeting monthly about 20 years before that when we were still the Magnolia Garden Club. That seemed like it was too much work, so we changed the name to the Magnolia Social Club.” Meanwhile, its members have gone from raising toddlers, to

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welcoming their great grandchildren. The social club has no particular agenda other than being an enjoyable means of keeping their friendships strong. The Densons purchased the home and approximately 70 acres in 1981. “We were determined not to modernize or update it in any way that required hard labor,” said Pequita. Other than indoor plumbing and a few other post-Civil War amenities, the house hasn’t changed much in a century and a half. “We don’t know much about the history of Glory, but Jack met an elderly lady years ago who had grown up on the land adjacent to ‘Glory.’ All she could tell him was that it was built during the ‘Wawah.’” Jack assumed that she meant the “Wawah Between the States,” and the architecture bears that out. It is constructed completely of square nails and hewn pine. Roomy porches on both the front and back of the house, provide the perfect spot for casual dinners and choice seats to watch the wildlife roam freely.


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“This is a place to go on the weekends for long lazy walks through the woods or a little fishing in the pond out back. The charm is the informality that makes you want to kick off your shoes,” Pequita said. “We don’t know how it came to be called ‘Glory’ but there was a sign over the front door identifying it as such when we bought it. We thought it was the perfect name because it’s a glorious place to be.” Everything about the place says “sit a spell and have a glass of iced tea – sweet, please.” The screen door slammed continually as the 20 members of the social club arrived bearing all kinds of Southern delicacies. Recipes were exchanged and, mysteriously, no two dishes were the same which the hostess said is usually the case. No roll was called and no business transacted. It was just a special time for very old friends to stay in touch. A sampling of some of the recipes exchanged includes:

r amenities, the house and a few other post Civil Wa Other than indoor plumbing and a half. tury hasn’t changed much in a cen

Photo courtesy of verybestbaking.com

Bettye Wilson’s Mississippi Cornbread Salad 1 (16 oz.) package corn bread mix 10 slices bacon 1 pkg. ranch dressing mix 1 1/2 c. sour cream 1 1/2 c. mayonnaise 2 (15 oz.) cans pinto beans, drained 3 tomatoes, chopped 1 c. chopped green bell pepper 1 c. chopped green onion 2 c. shredded cheddar cheese 2 (11 oz.) cans whole kernel corn, drained Prepare corn bread according to package directions. Cool, crumble, and set aside. Put bacon in a large deep skillet. Cook over medium-high head until evenly brown. Drain, crumble and set aside. Whisk together the dressing mix, sour cream, and mayonnaise. Crumble half the corn bread in the bottom of a large serving dish. Top with half the beans. Layer the beans with half of the tomatoes, green bell pepper, and green onions. Sprinkle with half the cheese, corn, bacon, and the salad dressing mixture. Repeat layers. Cover and chill at least two hours before serving. 20

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Photo courtesy of hpj.com

Florence Meadow’s Southwest Chicken and Rice Bake 1 rotisserie chicken, deboned and chopped 1 1/2 c. instant rice, uncooked 1 (16 oz.) jar mild picante sauce 1 can (11 oz.) corn and peppers 2 cans (10 oz.) red enchilada sauce 1 (15 oz.) can black beans, drained and rinsed 1 (8 oz.) pkg. shredded mexican style cheese Sour cream and crushed tortilla chips crushed (optional) Combine all but last two ingredients in large bowl, reserving one cup shredded cheese. Pour into a 9x13-inch pan which has been sprayed with cooking spray. Top with reserved cheese and bake 20 minutes in a 400 degree oven until cheese is melted and bubbly. n


Glory is a second home for Pequita and Jack Denson. Tucked deep into the backwoods, it serves as their escape from suburban living.

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The Neshoba County Fair is home to the only licensed horse track in Mississippi. The harness races are a favorite for spectators and can be enjoyed Sunday through Friday.

Red dirt and hospitality

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BY JOE LEE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

housands of people throughout Mississippi and the surrounding states drop what they’re doing each July and pour into Philadelphia for the Neshoba County Fair – it’s as much of a priority for them as Christmas and Thanksgiving. Taking place this year from Friday, July 27 through Saturday, August 3, the Fair is a major attraction in a region known for its blistering summers. So what makes it so special, given the intense heat, dust and parking difficulties? “It’s the only remaining campground fair in the country,” said District 44 State Rep. Scott Bounds, a native Philadelphian who has been on the Fair’s board of directors for 16 years and served as the program chairman for over a decade. “I’ve known people who came and stayed for the first time, got a taste of it, and now come back every year,” Bounds said. “If you haven’t been, you’ll run into someone you know and get invited to a fair cabin. It gets into your blood. And it’s only a short distance from the Golden Triangle and definitely worth the drive.” “For folks like me who grew up in Philadelphia but now live out of town, it’s great to get back home and have a chance to catch up with friends and neighbors,” said William Bassett of Madison.

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His paternal grandparents, Thurman and Hazel Bassett of Philadelphia, built their fair cabin in 1956. “It’s a close-knit community.” “We didn’t have a cabin, but my parents took all six of us girls every day of every year,” said Regina Fowler, a Philadelphia native who lives with her family in Byram. “I can remember being there as far back as age 4 or 5, riding rides and playing games. “I’d go with my friends as a teenager. They had dance bands on the midway, and it was the only place for us to dance. We’d spend the night with friends whose families had cabins. Everybody at school looked forward to the fair all year. When school got out, we’d see everyone again a few weeks later at the Fair.” Stuart Lee grew up in Starkville and moved to Philadelphia in 1993. He co-owns a cabin but described his first fair experience, which came the following year, as difficult. “I’d met people through my job, and they all said to come out to the fair and gave me cabin numbers,” Lee said. “We went, and our daughter was nine months old at that point, and it was very hot and dusty and we couldn’t find anyone’s cabins and we didn’t know anyone and went on home.


Annual family photos are a must at the Fair but with children who just want to have fun, it can be like herding cats. Tom and Ginger DeWeese try to gather nine children, 12 grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Photo by Leilani Salter

There are also livestock shows conducted by the Neshoba County Extension Service, homegrown produce and handiwork on display at Exhibit Hall, and educational booths where kids can learn plenty of Neshoba County history. You can even take part in the annual Heart O’ Dixie triathlon the morning of Saturday, July 28. It begins at Lake Tiak-O’Khata in Louisville, ends at the Neshoba County Fairgrounds, and includes a half-mile swim, a bike ride of 27.5 miles, and a sevenmile run. “We want to bring in good quality entertainment and expose as many folks to the traditions as possible and keep them coming back,” Bounds said. “But the fair is deeply rooted in agricultural exhibits, and we want to grow but want folks to know what it was founded on.” “Wear comfortable shoes. You can never tell what you might step in,” Bassett said. “There’s lots of dirt, sawdust and even some livestock around. Plus, you’ll do quite a bit of walking trying to get a glimpse of all of the action while you’re there. “Stop by a cabin and introduce yourself to someone. You’ll probably get invited to come and sit on their porch to enjoy a cool drink and something to eat while you rest.” n             For a complete listing of all Neshoba County Fair activities, speeches, live entertainment and ticket information, visit neshobacountyfair.org.

“But we went back a few years later, had a really good time, and eventually bought a cabin with another family. Until you’ve appreciated the Fair from a cabin perspective, you don’t have a true perspective. It’s all about the socializing.” There’s always top-quality musical entertainment, and this year’s lineup includes Blackberry Suite on July 31, Jake Owen on August 1, and Jerrod Niemann on August 2. Million-selling headliner Trace Adkins will play at the Fair for the third time on Friday, August 3. The 10-minute political speeches draw large crowds every year and have brought the likes of Ronald Reagan, Walter Mondale, and John Glenn to Neshoba County. Reagan was the first presidential candidate to speak there and did so while campaigning in 1980. Third District U.S. Rep. Gregg Harper, R-Pearl, has fond memories of the talk he gave four years ago. “Sidney and I will always remember the sea of supporters wearing our campaign t-shirts who led us to Founders Square in the summer of 2008 after I won the GOP nomination,” said Harper, a resident of Rankin County. “Sidney’s tears and our supporters’ cheers brought a spark of genuine energy to my first Fair speech.” There’s truly something for everyone at what fair lovers think of as Mississippi’s Giant House Party. Horse racing takes place each afternoon from Sunday through Friday. The flea market and crafts show in Founders Square will feature exhibitors from all over the southeast. There are over 20 rides on the midway for children and The women of Groovy Garden stir up fun every year. This year’s Fair includes a wedadults and delicious fair food. The Miss Neshoba County Pageant ding. Pictured are: Janet Perry, Philadelphia; Perry Powell, Madison; Tammy Hood, is set for Monday, July 29 at 8 p.m. Starkville; Christy Cater, Starkville; and Lee Perry Powell, Madison. townandgownmag.com

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{Eat Drink

Barbara McLaurin of Starkville has been a regular of the Neshoba County Fair for 52 years. Her family gathers at their cabin in Happy Hollow.

Fine Fair Food & great memories 24

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BY KATE SALTER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

radition is a highly valued concept for Mississippians, something that is strongly exemplified by the annual Neshoba County Fair. Dubbed “Mississippi’s Giant House Party,” the Fair will bring in thousands of attendees beginning July 27 and continuing through August 3 at the Fairgrounds, located just south of Philadelphia on Highway 21. The Fair consistently attracts visitors not just from Neshoba County, but from all over Mississippi and the United States – and Starkville is no exception. Starkville residents Barbara McLaurin and Lane Connerley are seasoned Fairgoers, and both women agree that the Fair owes much of its fun, fame and pageantry to the presence of good food. The 2012 Fair will mark McLaurin’s 52nd year of attendance. McLaurin, who grew up in Philadelphia but has lived in

Starkville for 40 years, began going to the Fair in the 1950s. “That was a time when Fair furniture…was moved to the Fairgrounds from town every year and moved back to town after the Fair,” she said. “It was also a time before indoor plumbing was common in cabins.” In 1960, and in a brief 10 days, McLaurin’s parents, Doris and Glenn Perry, built a cabin in Happy Hollow, a lively and close-knit neighborhood near the historic heart of the Fairgrounds, Founder’s Square. But McLaurin and her parents – like many others - were part of a much larger Fair family. “I grew up the oldest of five children with grandparents and many aunts, uncles, and cousins around as well,” McLaurin said. “There are at least 15 other cabins at the Fair owned by my extended family; three of those


are also located in Happy Hollow. Besides my husband Mac, our son Prentiss, and our daughter-in-law Joanna, we share the cabin with my siblings and their families. At full capacity, with family only, we are sleeping 15 people.” With such a large number of family and friends to entertain, McLaurin concentrates heavily on what she and her guests will eat during the week. “Planning food is a big part of our getting ready for the Fair,” she said. In addition, the Fair allows McLaurin and the other cooks in her family to recreate traditional family recipes. “There are numerous foods that have appeared on our menus for many years. We also include those that Mom prepared for so many Fairs. My siblings and I each have certain dishes that we like to prepare,” she said. McLaurin also has a few time saving strategies to make preparation easier. “We freeze as much as possible beforehand so that reheating frozen casseroles, cooking seasonal vegetables and slicing loads of tomatoes make up the bulk of what is put on our dinner table there,” she said. Serious care must be put into having food on hand during the Fair because, according the McLaurin, convenient access to nearby Philadelphia is not a strong suit of the Fair. “Meticulous planning is needed because it’s seven miles from Philadelphia and maybe loads of traffic into town if you forget something. “We order our Fair cakes months ahead from a wonderful baker in Philadelphia, which is a big help with food preparation,” McLaurin said. “The cakes come frozen and we remove one from the freezer as needed.” McLaurin’s family enjoys a menu consisting of traditional summer American fare to Italian favorite. “We grill hamburgers on the first Friday night and serve baked beans, chips and lots of trimmings. On Saturday, which may be a day with lots of company, we have my sister’s lasagna, with salad, bread and watermelon or…cake for dessert. Wednesday and Thursday are bigger company days with extra friends and family joining us for meals. We usually serve Mediterranean Chicken Spaghetti on Thursday with my mother’s Company Casserole and Strawberry Salad, roast turkey, roast beef, Spinach Madeleine, squash casserole, butterbeans, broccoli salad, pickled peaches, sliced tomatoes and other dishes. While our cabin is small, we do have two full-sized refrigerators and a chest freezer. Items such as tomatoes, peaches, plums, watermelon or fried chicken from town are brought in daily as needed Mac is always willing to run into town to pick up any extras we need.” For Tuesday night, we prepare something Italian for the annual Roman Hollow-ay,’” McLaurin said. “It’s a time when the Happy Hollow neighbors get together, many in togas and some hilarious makeshift Italian attire, to share food and fellowship. There is everything from Eggplant Parmesan to pizza on the makeshift buffet table in the sawdust.”

ia Gasa, and Julianna Ellen Tichnell, Gloria Gasa, Lyd Pictured are McLaurin’s nieces, ” “Roman Hollow-ay. Gasa, at Happy Hollow’s annual

Pictured in a 1983 photo showing four generations of Barbara McLaurin’s family are: Olin Beery, Lois Beery holding great-grandson, Prentiss McLaurin III, Glenn Perry, Doris Perry, Barbara McLaurin, Janet Tichnell, P.C. “Mac” McLaurin, and Del Tichnell.

But as high of a priority as food is with the McLaurin crew, the family makes sure to fit in time for exercise. “Being surrounded with all the wonderful Fair cooking, we try to make it a point to get in a daily walk while there,” she said. “Sometimes we walk the racetrack.” A popular spot for most health-conscious Fairgoers to complete their fitness routines, the racetrack is most easily recognized as a popular place to watch horse races. The races, which take place Sunday through Friday during the Fair, feature standard bred harness horses, thoroughbred and quarter horses. But even when the horses are commandeering use of the track, the family finds alternative routes. “Other times we walk down the country road outside the Fairgrounds for a change of scenery,” McLaurin said. As the week winds down and food stores dwindle, McLaurin’s family celebrates what McLaurin’s sister calls “YOYO Day,” an acronym for “You are On Your Own.” McLaurin said, “No one in the cabin is under age 15 now, so this works well. One can microwave leftovers, make a tomato sandwich or go to the midway and get a corn dog and a funnel cake. By this time we are already making plans for next year’s Fair and noting any changes in menus we will make for our annual time together next summer.” Like McLaurin, Connerley is another Starkville transplant from Philadelphia. “I am from Philadelphia and have been living in Starkville since I moved here as a freshman at MSU almost nine years ago,” Connerley said. But despite the move from Neshoba County, the Fair has remained a high priority in the lives of Connerley and her family. “The Neshoba County Fair is one of my family’s most important traditions,” Connerley said. “I attended my first fair when I was seven months old, and I have not missed one since then. This July I will attend my 28th fair. Connerley is a part of a long line of Fairgoers. “My father and grandfather, both Neshoba County natives, have attended the Fair throughout their lives.” Connerley’s family purchased their current cabin spot in 1981. They have since torn down that cabin and rebuilt. One of Connerley’s favorite parts of attending the Fair now, as an adult, is having the chance to relive her childhood on the grounds through the excitement of her small daughter. “One of the best parts about being a lifetime fairgoer is that I now get to take my own little girl who is 2 1/2 and experience the Fair through her eyes,” Connerley said. townandgownmag.com

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Lane Connerley’s father and grandfather are Neshoba County natives. Pictured are Robert Connerley, Ellington Connerley, Lane Connerley, Susan Jackson, Willie Jackson, O.D. Jackson, LeAnna Jackson, Emerson Jackson, Bryant Jackson and Reagan Jackson.

Another big part of Connerley’s time at the Fair every year is the food. “We definitely eat well for a week, and no one goes hungry,” Connerley said. “Southern food is definitely aplenty during the Fair.” Along with her family, Connerley braves what can sometimes be almost unbearably hot late summer temperatures by dining al fresco. “One of my favorite parts of our meals is that we eat every meal outside on our front porch – yes, outside in Mis-

Spinach Madeleine

Hashbrown Potato Casserole

2 (10 oz.) pkg. frozen chopped spinach 4 Tbsp. butter 2 Tbsp. chopped green onion 2 Tbsp. flour 1/2 c. fat-free evaporated milk 1/2 c. reserved vegetable liquor 1/2 tsp. black pepper 3/4 tsp. celery salt 3/4 tsp. garlic salt 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 6 oz. MSU Jalapeno Cheese Spread* Buttered bread crumbs (optional)

2 lbs. frozen hash browns, Southern style (thawed) 1 stick melted butter 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1 can cream of chicken soup 1 pt. sour cream 1/2 c. chopped onions 10 oz. shredded cheddar cheese

Cook spinach according to package directions. Drain and reserve liquor. Melt butter in pan over low heat. Add onion and cook until soft. Blend in flour; stir until smooth but not brown. Add milk and vegetable liquor slowly, stirring constantly to avoid lumps. Cook until smooth and thick. Stir in seasonings. Add cheese, which has been cut into small pieces; stir until melted. Combine with cooked spinach. This may be served immediately or put into a 2-quart casserole and topped with buttered bread crumbs. Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes. Flavor improves if casserole is refrigerated overnight. *If you cannot get MSU Jalapeno cheese spread, you can substitute Velveeta Mexican mild cheese. -Barbara McLaurin 26

sissippi in July,” she said. “We love it so much that we really don’t notice the heat. Not much, anyway.” Sitting out in the heat is worth a bit of discomfort for Connerley because she relishes in the The Fair’s overall ambiance. “The Fair has such a wonderful atmosphere,” she said. “We don’t want to miss a second of it by being indoors.” Connerley said she also enjoys meeting new people over a meal. “Another unique part of meal times is that we never know who might be there. We love having friends, family and even the unun expected visitor share a meal with us,” she said. “It is not at all unun usual for my dad to walk in the cabin 10 minutes before mealtime and tell my mom that he ran into a few people at Founders Square that he invited to lunch.” The menu at Connerley’s cabin mirrors that of McLaurin’s and of many other cabins, with a couple of main dishes featured along with numerous sides. But at her cabin, Connerley particularly apap preciates the inclusion of fresh produce. “The real treat during the fair is all of the fresh vegetables from the garden,” she said. Although the Fair provides many activities that may separate Connerley from her family throughout the days at the Fair, she loves that food eventually draw everyone back home to their cabin. “No matter what everyone has going on during the day, whether it’s horse races, politics, riding rides on the midway or playing cards with friends, we always gather back together at meal times to enjoy time with each other. There is really nowhere I would rather be during that special week of the year than at the Neshoba County Fair. Both Connerley and McLaurin have shared some of their favorite Fair recipes. n

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Strawberry Pretzel Salad 2 c. crushed pretzels 3/4 c. butter, melted 3 Tbsp. sugar 1 (8 oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 1 c. sugar 1 (8 oz.) container Cool Whip, thawed 2 (3 oz.) pkg. strawberry flavored gelatin 2 c. boiling water 2 (10 oz.) pkg. frozen strawberries Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Mix crushed pretzels, melted butter and 3 tablespoons sugar; mix well and press mixture into the bottom of a 9x13 inch baking dish. Bake 8-10 minutes, until set. Set aside to cool. In a large mixing bowl cream together cream cheese and 1 cup sugar. Fold in Cool Whip. Spread mixture onto cooled crust. Dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Stir in frozen strawberries and allow to set briefly. Pour and spread over cream cheese layer. Refrigerate until set. -Barbara McLaurin

TOPPING: 1 c. crushed corn flakes 3 Tbsp. melted butter Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix all ingredients. Arrange in baking dish, 9x13 inches. Sprinkle with corn flakes. Top with butter. Bake for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. -Lane Connerley

Mom’s Frozen Strawberry Salad 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 10 oz. frozen strawberries, chopped 15 oz. can crushed pineapple, drained 8 oz. frozen whipped topping, thawed 2 bananas (diced) - optional Mix all ingredients, freeze in a 9x13-inch pan and serve. -Lane Connerley


They call it OKTOC

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BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

hey call it Oktoc. Population, debatable, but it’s estimated to be home to several hundred folks and at least 2,000 head of cattle. Add a cornfield or two, and you have the quintessential “Little Town on the Prairie.” A Native American word meaning “prairie,” Oktoc is a tightly knit community which is experiencing a growth spurt thanks to the development of Browning Creek subdivision. The residential community is attracting new families who are welcomed into the Oktoc Community Club with open arms. No elitist society here. At the core of this unincorporated village is an ancient church, as picturesque as it is old, and an adjacent one-room schoolhouse. Six generations of Oktoc residents have been educated and nurtured by the Vernon Presbyterian Church which was established prior to the Civil War. The school operated until the 1930s. The landmarks were constructed at the corner of Oktoc and Robinson Road, one of the oldest roads in the state of Mississippi. The dirt path served as a military route between Columbus and Jackson as early as 1820. It was the logical spot to erect what would become the heart and soul of a community that was home to some of the state’s largest dairies, farms and ranches. The advent of the automobile is blamed for the demise of the church and school as residents were drawn to the larger institutions in Starkville. But Oktoc residents weren’t about to let their gathering spot go. “The school building was placed on logs and pulled by mules to connect with the church to give more space for activities of what would become known as the Oktoc Community Club,” said Florence Oakley Box, who grew up in Oktoc and never left. She said the facility is lovingly maintained by its members, many of whom are fifth or sixth generation Oktoc-ites.

“The club hasn’t missed a monthly potluck supper since its inception in 1927, qualifying it as the oldest community club in the state.” “You can’t find roots that run any deeper,” said Anna Marie Rasberry whose family has lived in Oktoc for almost 100 years. “A few times the meeting days had to be moved due to bad weather (ice storm) or a funeral – but we haven’t missed a month in those 85 years.” Most of the residents are “kin” acknowledged Jack Rhoades, president of the club. His mother, Frances White Rhoades Nowell, age 90, recently married Warren Oakley, age 89. The double Purple Heart recipient is a retired Oktoc dairyman whose family name is indelibly linked with Oktoc. But then, so is Frances’ family. At age 15, a young Warren had his first date with Frances whose family lived a stone’s throw from the club. They had grown up playing at the monthly potluck dinners. As they reached adolescence, square dances were a favorite activity, along with the occasional movie which was generated by a gas-powered projector, recalled Oakley. The couple wouldn’t date again for seven decades. “We got together three years ago at a class reunion,” said Warren who had been widowed the same month as Frances. “She suggested we get together and within days we married.” Needless to say, the Oktoc Community Club’s second Friday potluck is their favorite place to be. Her son, Jack, observed that he “used to be kin to half the community through his mother’s family (Whites), and his step–father was kin to the other half (Oakleys). Now I’m kin to just about everybody in Oktoc,” he figures. Since its inception, Oktoc Community Club meetings have consisted of a potluck supper on the second Friday of each month. It is always followed by an educational program and maybe a little singing or square dancing. townandgownmag.com

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Warren and Frances Oakley grew up playing at the Oktoc potluck suppers. They dated when they were 15 but wouldn’t date again for seven decades. They married three years ago.

“My grandfather, Adrian Blocker, was in charge of having a funny story to tell at the meetings – and my father, Fred Blocker, tries to continue that legacy. One funny story by one leads to another recollection by someone else,” said Anna Marie Rasberry. Friendships have been paramount in Oktoc, then and now, and helping others is a way of life. “One farmer would get behind, or that farmer would be ill, and other farmers would come and get the crops in and take care of that farmer in that time of stress,” said Preston Self whose family has lived on the land for decades. The “Oktoc Country Store,” held in the fall each year, has been a northeast Mississippi attraction for 42 years. The men spend days preparing Brunswick Stew which is sold by the gallon or the bowl. The women conduct a bake sale with proceeds from both activities used for upkeep of the club and grounds. There are hayrides for the children, “Grandma’s Attic” with flea market finds, live music and a farmer’s market. Other community club activities include favorites such as the June Dairy Month “Parade of Homemade Ice Cream” recipes (at right), a July barbeque and the annual Christmas party. “The annual July barbeque was, and still is, a time when family members return to Oktoc,” said Rasberry. “In earlier days, the men of the club would gather and cook whatever meat was available – cow, goat, pig, whatever. In more recent years, meat has been purchased already cooked – but that doesn’t diminish the good times that the annual event bestows on community members and guests.” “From the meetings, we learned a lot about group dynamics and Robert’s Rules of Order,” she said. “We learned to perform and speak in public. We learned about cooperation and doing things in an orderly fashion. And everything we learned was done in a fun, loving environment of the extended family of Oktoc.” Oktoc residents figure their numbers will increase even more as folks move out of the cities and into the country, seeking a simpler life. And that’s just fine with members of the Oktoc Community Club. n

Hellen Polk’s Butterfinger Ice Cream 2 cans sweetened condensed milk 1/2 gal. chocolate milk 6 regular size butterfingers, crushed 12 oz. Cool Whip Combine all ingredients and pour into a one-gallon ice cream freezer. Freeze according to freezer instructions. May be served right after freezing. Any leftover ice cream should be placed in a container and stored in the regular freezer.

Carolyn Bryan’s Fruit Ice Cream Juice of 3 lemons Juice of 3 oranges 3 bananas 3 c. sugar 2 pt. half and half milk Finish out gallon with regular milk Combine all ingredients and pour into gallon freezer. Bananas can be substitutes with peaches, strawberries or any other fruit. Just use three of each. Freeze and serve.

Carol Mobley’s Vanilla Ice Cream 2 cans sweetened condensed milk 1 pt. whipping cream 1 gal. milk 2 tsp. vanilla flavoring Mix condensed milk and cream, add milk and vanilla, If desired, one quart of fruit may be added before adding milk. Freeze and serve. Oktoc ladies dished up a variety of wonderful homemade ice cream flavors. Pictured are Carol Mobley, Betty Lynn Hunt, Carolyn Bryan, and Jane Herrington. 28

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See more homemade ice cream recipes and other cool treats on the following pages.


Homemade Ice Cream Strawberry Ice Cream 1 can sweetened condensed milk 2 L strawberry drink Finely chopped frozen strawberries Mix and freeze. Makes a slushy ice cream. -Leilani Salter

Vanilla Ice Cream

  4 well-beaten eggs 2 1/2 c. sugar  2 Tbsp. vanilla 1 can evaporated milk Dash of salt   Mix above together and put in ice cream freezer container. Fill to fill line with whole milk. Freeze and serve. Makes 1 gallon.   NOTES: Uses uncooked eggs. If using skim milk, omit the salt. -Debra Fairbrother

No Eggs Vanilla Ice Cream 2 cans sweetened condensed milk 1 can evaporated milk 3/4 c. sugar 1 tsp. vanilla Milk Mix first 4 ingredients and add milk to fill ice cream freezer. Makes 1 gallon. -Leilani Salter

Lemon Icebox Pie Ice Cream 6 to 8 lemons 4 c. half-and-half 2 (14 oz.) cans sweetened condensed milk 1 1/2 c. coarsely crushed graham crackers Grate zest from lemons to equal 2 tablespoos. Cut lemons in half; squeeze juice from lemons to make 1 cup. Whisk together half-and-half, sweetened condensed milk, and lemon juice. Pour mixture into electric ice cream maker and freeze. Stir in graham cracker crumbs and lemon zest. Transfer to airtight container and freeze for 2 hours before serving. -Lisa McNeece

Chocolate Ice Cream 1/2 gal. chocolate milk 8 oz. chocolate syrup 1 can sweetened condensed milk Milk Combine first 3 ingredients and add milk to fill freezer. -Leilani Salter

Orange Sherbet 2 L orange soda 1 can sweetened condensed milk Optional: small can crushed pineapple Mix and pour into freezer. -Celia Hillhouse

Bubby’s Treat 1 (6oz) frozen lemonade 1(6oz) frozen orange juice 1 Lg. can of pineapple juice or concentrate 6-8 ripe bananas 6 c. water 2 c. sugar Ginger Ale  Partially thaw frozen juices. Bring sugar and water to boil. Add all ingredients but Ginger Ale and mix well. If juices are not thawed put it all into a blender. Cover and freeze. Let thaw to slushy stage or you can freeze in smaller portions and mix in the blender with ginger ale to your taste. Add frozen strawberries and a little coconut milk if desired. -Beverly Slaughter

Peppermint Ice Cream 1 can sweetened condensed milk 2 c. heavy cream 1 c. 1% milk 1/2 tsp. peppermint extract 4 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 c. crushed peppermint candies Combine all ingredients except the crushed peppermint candies in a large bowl and whisk until well combined. Pour into ice cream maker. Minutes before churning is complete, add the crushed candies to the ice cream maker. Turn ice cream out into a freezer container and freeze until hard. (Makes 2 quarts.) -Celia Hillhouse

Nana Beck’s Ice Cream 1 can sweetened condensed milk 3 small cans Pet milk 2 c. sugar 4 eggs 1 tsp. vanilla   Mix all ingredients and pour into ice cream freezer. Add milk to fill line.  -Tina Scholtes

Grandma Partlow’s Lemon Sherbet

  1 c. lemon juice (best if you squeeze juice from real lemons) 3 c. sugar 3 qt. milk   Mix juice and sugar.  Stir constantly while slowly adding milk (if added too rapidly, mixture will have a curdled appearance, which is unsightly, but will not affect the quality of the sherbet). Put in ice cream freezer container. Freeze and serve. Makes 1 gallon. -Debra Fairbrother townandgownmag.com

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Chill Out!

PHOTOGRAPHS BY DIVIAN CONNER

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Pop Tart Ice Cream Sandwiches 2 Pop Tarts of your choice Ice cream Sprinkles Allow ice cream to become soft and spread on poptarts. Use a butter knife once you make the “sandwich� to remove excess ice cream and roll in sprinkles. Wrap in clear plastic wrap tightly and freeze until ready to serve. These are pretty big ice cream sandwiches so one sandwich can make 2 servings when sliced in half. -Divian Conner Photography by Divian Conners

Cake Batter Milkshakes 1 c. of cake mix 4 c. of milk 4 - 5 scoops of ice cream Various garnishes/toppings Pour in milk, add in cake mix. Mix well with handmixer or in blender. Once mixed, add in ice cream. Mix once again until it is all soupy, or the thickness preferred. Serve it right away or place in the freezer for about 15 minutes for an extra chilled treat. For pineapple upside down milkshakes, add in less milk and add a bit of pineapple juice. Garnish with pineapple slice and cherry. Try variations until you find something you love. Add a bit of peanut butter and top with a peanut butter cup. Add whipped cream, chocolate sprinkles and mini chocolate bar. To add a bit of flair to the glasses, coat with frosting of choice and dip the glass into sprinkles. ( Rubbing corn syrup around the rim of the glass can be used in place of frosting. ) Imagine the possibilities you can create with your family making this easy frosty treat! -Divian Conner

Photography by Divian Conners

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Orange Push-Up Smoothie 1 can orange juice concentrate, slightly thawed 1 c. milk (half and half, cream, nut milk, soy milk) 1/2 c. sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract 2 c. ice Combine all ingredients, except ice, in a large blender or VitaMix and blend until smooth and creamy, taking care the sugar has dissolved and is well incorporated. If desired, add a splash more water or more milk. Add the ice and blend until smooth. -Tina Scholtes

Photography courtesy of pinterest.com

Pink Lemonade Freezer Pies (No-Bake) 2 graham cracker crusts 1 (12 oz.) can pink lemonade concentrate, thawed to liquid 1 (14 oz.) can sweetened condensed milk 1 (8 oz.) container Cool Whip, thawed to room temperature In a large mixing bowl, combine pink lemonade concentrate, sweetened condensed milk, and stir. Add the Cool Whip and stir until mixed well. Pour the mixture into the pie crusts. Top the mixture with the remaining cracker crumbs by sprinkling over the top. Place pies in freezer for at least 4 hours before slicing and serving. Store extra dessert in the freezer. -Leilani Salter

Photography courtesy of sweetlittledetail.wordpress.com

Oreo Ice Cream Pie 1 pkg. Oreos 1 stick butter 1/2 gal. vanilla ice cream Chocolate syrup Cool Whip The first layer is the crushed Oreos mixed with a stick of melted butter or margarine. Crush one large package of Oreos and press into 11x13 buttered dish reserving about 1/2 of crumbs. Press in layer of 1/2 gallon of vanilla ice cream that has been slightly softened for easier handling. Squeeze or drizzle chocolate syrup in a thin layer. Top with a layer of Cool Whip and sprinkle on reserved crumbs. Cover with foil and freeze. Set out a few minutes prior to cutting in squares to serve. -Mitsy Bailey 32

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Photography courtesy of brownsugarbakeshop.blogspot.com


Jungle Juice 1 smaller container of dry Crystal Light mix (comes in a 3-pack) 1 (2 liter) Sprite or Diet Sprite 1 (46 oz.) can unsweetened pineapple juice Mix and chill in the freezer until slushy. Add frozen pineapple chunks instead of ice. -Leilani Salter

Spring Mist 1 c. sugar or Splenda 1 envelope unsweetened “Berry Blue” Kool-aid 7 c. water 1 (6 oz.) can frozen lemonade concentrate 1 (46 oz.) can unsweetened pineapple juice 1 (2 liter) Sprite or Diet Sprite

For the Kids! Ice Cream in a Bag

  1 Tbsp. sugar 1/2 c. milk or half & half (1/2 c. of milk makes 1 scoop of ice cream) 1/4 tsp. vanilla 6 Tbsp. rock salt 1 pint-size plastic food storage bag (e.g. Ziploc) 1 gallon-size plastic food storage bag Ice cubes   Fill the large bag half full of ice, add the rock salt. Seal the bag. Put milk, vanilla and sugar in the small bag. Seal the bag. Place the small bag inside the large bag, seal it again carefully. Shake until the mixture is ice cream, which takes about 5 minutes. Wipe off the top of the small bag, then open it carefully.

Mix and chill in the freezer until slushy.

-Debra Fairbrother -Leilani Salter

Rachel Marquez’s Frozen Dessert One package frozen fruit 1/2 c. vanilla yogurt 1/4 c. sugar Mix in food processor (but not to the point it gets liquid like a smoothie). Freeze in a tupperware container with a lid. Ready to serve in a couple of hours. Will keep for several days. It freezes really hard, so let it sit out for a few minutes before you scoop it. -Angie Carnathan

Peanut Buster Dessert 1 lb. Oreo cookies, crushed 1/2 c. butter, softened 1/2 gal. French vanilla ice cream SAUCE: 1 (13 oz.) can evaporated milk 1/2 c. butter 2 squares semi-sweet chocolate TOPPING: Spanish peanuts Whipped cream In a bowl, mix crushed cookies and softened butter together. Pat into two 9x13 inch baking pans. Chill. Soften and spread ice cream on crust and refreeze. SAUCE DIRECTIONS: In a heavy saucepan, cook evaporated milk, butter and chocolate squares until melted and mixture thickens, about 45 minutes. Cool. Spread over ice cream and sprinkle with peanuts and refreeze. Serve with whipped topping.  -Barbara Foste

Ice Cream in a Can

  1 pt. of half and half 1/3 c. sugar 4 Tbsp. favorite instant pudding mix 10 c. ice 1 1/2 c. rock salt (kosher or sea salt can also be used) 3 lb. coffee can, emptied and rinsed 1 lb. coffee can, emptied and rinsed Duct tape   In a medium bowl, combine half and half, sugar and pudding mix with a whisk until thoroughly mixed. Place 1 pound coffee can inside the 3 pound coffee can and pour ice cream mixture into smaller can. Cover the smaller can with its corresponding lid and seal with duct tape. Surround the smaller can with ice and salt by layering 5 cups of ice with 3/4 cup of salt. Use duct tape to seal the 3 pound can with its corresponding lid and start rolling. Have the kids face each other and roll the can back and forth on its side for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, open the cans, remove the smaller can and check the ice cream. The mixture on the sides of the smaller can will set up faster than the center. Use a rubber spatula to quickly scrape down the sides and give the ice cream one stir. Reseal the lid on the smaller can with duct tape and set it aside. Quickly dump the melted ice water from the large can and place the smaller can into the larger can again. Surround the smaller can with remaining ice and salt by repeating step. Once that is done, put the lid on the larger can and seal with duct tape again. Ask the kids to roll the large can for 10 minutes more. Once they’re done, open the cans again and serve the ice cream. TIPS: Use your favorite flavor of pudding to change the flavor. After the first 10 minutes of rolling around the can, mix in some nuts or chocolate chips to enhance the flavor. If the kids get tired of rolling the can around for 10 minutes, use this shortcut: Stir the mixture and set it in the freezer for about an hour to allow the rest of it to harden. -Debra Fairbrother townandgownmag.com

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West Point businessman Frank Portera and “Boss” are getting ready for a party for about 200 friends, the caring people from across the Golden Triangle who answered his appeal for help in establishing a “no kill” shelter for abandoned animals. 

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Steve Futral says even the biggest dogs that come to West Point/Clay County Animal Shelter just want to be loved.

Animal party

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BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

ust when you think you hear those Fourth of July “bombs bursting in air,” you realize you’re wrong. It’s really the steady heartbeat of West Point businessman Frank Porttera era and friends whose kindness and compassion is showered upon the smallest of God’s creatures. All over the country, the holiday is a time for cookouts and picnics, and Portera uses it as an excuse to throw a party for about 200 friends each year. They are caring people from across the Golden Triangle who answered his appeal for help in establishing a “no kill” shelter for abandoned animals. “These are people who either dug down deep in their pockets or donated their time to volunteer at the West Point/Clay County Animal Shelter,” said Portera, chairman of the board of the shelter and its chief fundraiser. “The county couldn’t afford to fund the facility, it was up to the citizens to step up and establish the shelter on their own.” Two years ago, Portera and his committee of animal lovers raised enough money to purchase a building and five acres, once a part of the former Bryan Foods complex. It houses the small animal operation, and is staffed by a director, four or five part-time employees along with enthusiastic volunteers. They work tirelessly through the social media and Mississippi State University’s Homeward Bound project to place the pets in good homes.

Homeward Bound was started by MSU’s College of Veterinary College through its Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare Program. The program transfers pets from no-kill animal shelters to northern states where adoptable animals are not as plentiful. “All the animals are spayed or neutered and receive the necessary inoculations,” said Portera. “For the price of a mere $25, families can adopt a pet. We’re not trying to make money here; we just want to find good homes for the animals.” The barbeque at his 100-acre farm in the Tibbee community is a sort of a “thank you” to the donors and volunteers. Guests haul in their folding chairs and potluck side dishes, while Portera fills the grill with burgers, ribs and hot dogs. At dark, the fireworks will light the sky. Across the lake, a dozen horses, all rescued from certain death, graze peacefully under the Mississippi sunshine. They have been nursed back to health and are thriving with their tails switching merrily in the breeze. “Most of the animals came here starving and injured after being abandoned by their owners,” said Portera. “Now look at them!” “Frank has always had a soft spot for animals, even as a child,” said his sister, Marie Portera, of Starkville. “He was always bringing home stray pets and I guess he’s just doing it on a larger scale.” townandgownmag.com

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The Portera farm has generally been a beautiful secret. It serves as a sort of rehabilitation center for large abandoned animals, while the Tibbee Road facility is for small animals. Portera said it takes about $125,000 to operate the shelter which is raised through personal appeals and fundraisers throughout the year.  “We’re pretty stretched out right now, and need all the help we can get,” he said. Anyone who wants to make a tax-deductable contribution may send it to: The West Point/Clay County Animal Shelter, 1212 Old Tibbee Road, West Point, Miss.  39773. While barbeque is always the main attraction, area cooks pull out their best side dish recipes to add to the smorgasbord. Marie Portera’s trifle was a big hit and disappeared almost instantly. “This is super easy,” said Marie.  “I had bought the trifle bowl at an after Christmas close-out sale and was looking for something to make in it. This will definitely be a keeper.” n

Gracie Vickers is one of the many volunteers that donate their time to help care for the animals.

Steve Futral says all the animals at the shelter are walked daily by volunteers and can enjoy a play yard complete with wading pools.

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Easy Kiwi and Strawberry Trifle

  1 large angel food cake, broken into chunks 1 (32 oz.) strawberry yogurt, halved 1 (16 oz.) Cool Whip topping, halved 1 pt. fresh strawberries, cored and cut into slices 4-6 kiwis, peeled and cut into slices In a trifle bowl layer: chunks of angel food cake, yogurt, whipped topping, strawberry and kiwi slices. Repeat at least once, ending with strawberry and kiwi slices as garnish. Chill for about 2 hours before serving.

 

Annie’s Frye’s Western Baked Beans Deborah Myers’ Wavy Flag Cake ICING: 1 stick butter 1/2 c. shortening 1 lb. confectioners sugar 1-1/2 tsp. vanilla Enough milk to make it spreadable. After baking four separate cakes (caramel, coconut, yellow and red valvet) in her “wavy” cake pan which she purchased from Wilton, Deborah puts them side by side to form a rectangle. Mix shortening, butter and sugar until well mixed, then gradually adds sugar. Color the icing with food coloring and apply stars and stripes with a frosting applicator.

3 cans pork and beans 1 can dark red kidney beans 1 can light red kidney beans 1 can hot rotel tomatoes 1 small jar picante sauce 1 c. ketchup 1/4 c. mustard 2 tsp. worchestershire sauce 2 tsp. rice vinegar 1 c. dark brown sugar (or more, to taste) 1 medium onion, minced 6 pieces bacon, cut up Mix ingredients. Cook until bubbly and almost thick. Let set for 30 or 45 minutes before serving. Green or jalapeno peppers can be added. Cook for a couple of hours. n townandgownmag.com

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Sweet Summertime

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5 1: Courtesy of Vietri.com. Find at local merchants. 2: Vietri bowl, saucer, plate and glasses and Vessels pottery. Giggleswick 3: Casa Mia dinnerware and Confetti cocktail glass. Thyme 4: Gail Pittman bowl and plate, Vietri plate, Vessels pottery and Mikasa glasses. Giggleswick 5: Porcelain De limoges dinnerware set. Thyme 6: Casa Mia dinnerware, Arte Italica centerpiece with dried hydrangeas. Thyme 7: Jars pitcher, saucer and mug, Vietri plate and charger, Tag glass and Vessels pottery. Giggleswick

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Showering Baby Wiseman May 6, 2012 Hosted by: Rhonda Keenum and Leilani Salter Lindsey and Mayor Parker Wiseman will welcome a baby girl later this month

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

Bonnie Wiseman, Lindsey Wiseman, Amy Smith

Sally Olivi, Nell Smith, Lindsey Wiseman, Amy Smith, Sue Allen Tate

Amanda Edwards, Melanie Mitchell

Nina Peele, Janette Self

Donna Rupp, Hope Dumas, Ashley Covin, Michelle Jones, Lindsey Wiseman, Amy Tuck, Natalie Langston

Ashleigh Murdock, Lindsey Wiseman, Jackie Hudson, Lauren Lang townandgownmag.com

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Torie Keenum, photographer

Amy Yates, Lindsey Wiseman, Rebecca Tabb

Lindsey Wiseman, Jane Read, Amy Smith

Linda Southward, Kelly Szczepanski, Bonnie Wiseman

Carole Davis, Carrie Copeland, Patsy Stuart

Jane Anna Harris, Donna Rupp, Natalie Langston

Jenny Sherman, Sue Allen Tate

Ellen Boles, Paula Mabry, Barb Adkins

Leah Kemp, Pie Mallory 42

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Hope Dumas, Ashley Covin, Michelle Jones

Patrica Ruby, Ann Bailey, Georgia Lindley

Rhonda Keenum, Lindsey Wiseman, Leilani Salter

Carole Ann Doughty, Carrie Beth Randall


Claire’s Style Update K

eeping a stylish chic appearance is the essential part of knowing you are still glamorous when your a maturing woman. It can be a daunting task for women transitioning into their ‘40s to ‘50s to wear the trends for the summer without being too revealing and unflattering. I can give you a hang-10 look to be “Resort Ready” at any age. 1. A high-waisted swimsuit bottom can accent the smallest part of the waist and still cover certain areas of the body. Be flirtatious with a wide-brimmed hat and strappy sandals with gold accent. 2. Local boutiques offers swim attire seen on Rihanna and Leann Rimes. Add a lengthy short, considering your body type, and a denim button-up with bright wedges for a young vibe. 3. This next outfit can be worn at any age with its long loose

shorts and chiffon floral top, it has the right amount of fabric needed to be age-appropriate. 4. I love a pair of trousers for any occasion and paired with a dazzling shirt or a stripped black and white tee it can be dressed up or dressed down in seconds. Sizzle with more vibrant colors by pairing a yellow woven belt and suede shoes. The bag is simple but compliments perfectly. 5. Mustard yellow has become a nude for my closet and leopard isn’t just for the winter any more. Ballet flats and a stunning cream summer blazer are just the touch to these gorg pleated pants. 6. Topping off the trip, the pleat is an essential to have this season – pick the right length for your body type and age. Add an old-school sleeveless coral top and the perfect canvas lace-up shoe to keep a young feel to the mix. n

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Claire Massey

Claire Massey is Town and Gown Magazine’s Editorial Assistant. She has a fashion blog TurKoiz (tur-koiz.blogspot. com), is a featured stylist for stylesays. com and a Mississippi State University Fashion Board alumni.

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Shop local merchants for similar items. townandgownmag.com

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3Lollia Perfumed Shower Gel Aspen Bay

5Victoria & Albert & Celia Birtwell Garden Tools Aspen Bay

Mudpie Cover-Up4 Giggleswick

5Vera Bradley Beach Bag & Towels Giggleswick

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6Kalilou Decor and Wooden Rustic Frame The Purple Elephant

3Farmhouse Fresh Goods The Purple Elephant

Colorful Wooden 4 Frames and Wall Art Nebbletts

3Rock Flower Paper Napkins The University Florist

3Rock Flower Paper Trays The University Florist

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Celebrate with style

PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAURA DANIELS HAIR BY SALON 28 MAKEUP BY VITALITY

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Bethany Loden, Parker Bullock, Amanda Weigle, Kherria Brown, Sam Butler, Matthew King and Natalia Tamer model summer styles from Sisters, Reeds, Deep South Pout and LA Green Boutique.


Amanda Weigle models a hot pink blouse with teal accents and pocket from Reeds.

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Left: Sam Butler models a white vintage tee, a zig-zag pattern tuxedo-style vest and denim shorts from Reeds. Below: Bethany Loden model an orange blouse with tie and collar from Reeds.

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Left: Matthew King models a white linen button-up shirt from Reeds. Below: Kherria Brown models a longsleeve navy and white mini-check shirt and khakis from Reeds.

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Left: Natalia Tamer models a turquoise swimsuit, a denim button up and blue ruffled chiffon shorts from LA Green Boutique. Below: Parker Bullock models a Southern Point red and white checked button-up shirt and dark khakis from Reeds.

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Sam Butler models a white vintage tee and a zig-zag pattern tuxedo-style vest from Reeds.

Matthew King models a linen white button up and khaki linen pants from Reeds.

Lilly Bella Designs by Aubrey James ajames0130@gmail.com

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U.S. Grant Association president Frank J. Williams, left, and Mississippi State University President Mark E. Keenum were the first official visitors at the newly designated U.S. Grant Presidential Library at MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library on May 18.

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From left, U.S. Grant Association executive director Dr. John Marszalek, Miss. State University President Mark Keenum, Grant Association president Judge Frank Williams, and MSU Dean of Libraries Frances Coleman unveil a plaque denoting the establishment of the U.S. Grant Presidential Library at MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library. MSU is now one of five universities in the U.S. to host a presidential library, joining the University of Texas (Lyndon Johnson), University of Michigan (Gerald Ford), Texas A&M (George H.W. Bush), and Southern Methodist University (George W. Bush).

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STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY SID SALTER

ississippi State University has been chosen to host a presidential library – one of only five universities in the nation to house such an institution. Ulysses S. Grant Association President Frank J. Williams announced the decision of the organization’s board of directors to designate the Ulysses S. Grant Collection at MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library as the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library during the association’s annual meeting May 18-20 at MSU as part of the organization’s 50th anniversary observance. MSU President Mark E. Keenum recently received a letter from Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero of the National Archives congratulating the university on the presidential library designation. “We are extremely grateful to the Ulysses S. Grant Association for entrusting Mississippi State University with the long-term responsibility for managing and showcasing this treasure trove of vital American history,” said Keenum. “Our university feels a deep bond with this organization and a shared vision for what a marvelous resource this collection is and what it can and will become.” Highlights of the USGA’s 50th anniversary meeting at MSU included the dedication and ribbon cutting for the new Ulysses S. Grant Exhibit Area on the first floor of MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library and the presentation of the USGA’s prestigious John Y. Simon Award. The Simon Award honors the late scholar and longtime USGA executive director by recognizing significant achievement in advancing “historical knowledge about General-President Ulysses S. Grant.” MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library – since 2008 the repository of correspondence, photographs, books, memorabilia, and document copies related to the military career and presidency of America’s 18th president, Ulysses S. Grant – welcomed for the third time in the past four years the association’s members and directors for dinners, special presentations, business meetings, and historical tours in Starkville and Columbus. The second public event was held May 19 at the Starkville Community Theatre on Grierson’s Raid and featured MSU University Archivist Michael B. Ballard, Starkville Police Chief David Lindley, MSU history professor emeritus Bill Parrish, and Dr. John Marszalek.

The Grant Presidential Collection consists of some 15,000 linear feet of document copies, research notes, artifacts, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia and includes information on Grant’s childhood from his birth in 1822, his later military career, Civil War triumphs, tenure as commanding general after the war, presidency, and his post-White House years until his death in 1885. There are also 4,000 published monographs on various aspects of Grant’s life and times. Grant is more renowned for a military career in which he rose through the officer ranks to ultimately lead all Union forces during the 1861-65 conflict. He was architect of the 1863 Vicksburg campaign, among others, that effectively split the Confederacy and is considered a key battle in the war. Through a 2008 agreement with the Ulysses S. Grant Association, the MSU Libraries became the official host of the Grant papers, and Civil War scholar John F. Marszalek, an MSU Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History, was named executive director and managing editor of the association. Marszalek continued a 46-year-old project begun by the late John Y. Simon, another nationally renowned scholar who died in 2008. Marszalek said MSU now becomes one of only a few U.S. institutions to house a collection of presidential papers. “Mississippi State is now the premier source of materials for research about a seminal figure in the nation’s history,” Marszalek said. “This is a remarkable accomplishment for our institution.” The Grant Collection joins those of former U.S Sen. John C. Stennis, former U.S. Rep. Sonny Montgomery and other more contemporary political figures in the library’s Congressional and Political Research Center. “We are very grateful for the support of MSU President Mark Keenum, who embraced the historical importance of the collection and works tirelessly to provide the resources necessary to showcase this collection at the university,” said Frances N. Coleman, dean of libraries. “These papers have a significant place in our nation’s history and it is a profound honor for our library to have responsibility for them.” n For more information about the Ulysses S. Grant Collection at Mississippi State University Libraries, visit http://library. msstate.edu/USGrant/ or contact Dr. John Marszalek at 662325-4552. townandgownmag.com

| july 2012

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MSU water sports teams

making a splash

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT UNDERWOOD

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Austin Henderson performs a back flip during finals week on the Tombigbee River outside of Columbus.


Missississippi State University Bass Club. Photo by Shane Harrington

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BY JOE LEE

ou can almost feel the electricity when ESPN is in town to broadcast an SEC football matchup on a Saturday night at Davis-Wade Stadium. Thousands of fans make a weekend of it in Starkville and provide a sizable jolt to the local Starkville economy that merchants count on. At the other end of the collegiate athletic spectrum are the club sports, which are completely student-run and funded. But the love of those sports and camaraderie among the coaches and team members – many of whom will be lifelong friends – is just as strong as it is within the confines of any field house or locker room. Examples include the Mississippi State University’s Bass Club and the MSU Wakeboard and Ski Club, both of which are non-profit programs. “I have been fishing as long as I can remember,” said MSU Bass Club president Shane Howington. “My dad and granddad got me started when I could barely hold a rod and reel in my hand. My granddad fished the BassMasters Top 100 and Top 150 trails for many years, and that’s where I became passionate for tournament fishing.”

Howington, a native of Hokes Bluff, Ala., is majoring in agriculture information science. His teammate, David Faulk, is the club vice-president and is from North Little Rock, Ark. “My dad introduced me to fishing at a young age and gave me that first spark,” Faulk said. “This spark started a flame that still burns today. I was blessed to grow up in Arkansas with its many lakes, and also at my home there’s a large creek that held many bass. It was my own practice field where I could experiment and learn different techniques.” There’s no SEC television contract associated with the Bass Club or any other student-operated sport. So the students are getting real-world experience as they attempt to raise donations and make it possible to compete with other schools. It also takes enterprising students such as Enrique Martinez, who has successfully created the MSU Wake Board and Ski Club (two different sports). Born in Mexico City and raised in Los Angeles, Martinez moved to Mississippi to attend St. Stanislaus College in Bay St. Louis and is now a senior at MSU, majoring in international business with a minor in foreign language. townandgownmag.com

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Stephen Roberson performs a kick flip on a Bi-Level Wake Skate. Photo by Robert Underwood. 56

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“I was always interested in board sports such as surfing and snowboarding while living in California,” Martinez said. “While attending St. Stanislaus I met a group of friends that loved to wakeboard and showed me the ropes of the sport. “When I came to Mississippi State I went skiing and wake boarding with friends as much as I could. I thought to myself that it would be awesome if we could compete in the world of collegiate water sports and make a name for MSU while doing something we love.” Martinez contacted Dr. Brenda Cavenaugh, a research professor at MSU’s Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision. What intrigued Martinez about her is Cavenaugh’s skiing background: she began water skiing on a small county lake in Jonesboro, Ark. in the 1970s and is a nationally ranked water skier in her 60-65 age category. She lives along the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway and skis there several times a week almost year-round – her goal is to be the oldest competitor at the USA Water Ski Nationals. “Enrique found out about my water skiing interests and called to ask if I would sponsor the club,” Cavenaugh said. “As faculty sponsor, I sign paperwork when the club has meetings on campus. I have a good supply of water ski equipment and have loaned various club members slalom and trick skis.” Martinez said Cavenaugh agreed to become the faculty advisor without hesitation. A constitution of by-laws was written up, and the club was official once MSU signed off on it. “Our wake boarding team finished our first season at the Collegiate National Wakeboard Championship on May 31. We’ll be back in action in August,” Martinez said. “Our teams practice on the Tombigbee throughout the year. The seasons start in the fall. We have about two or three tournaments for each sport and continue in the spring with another three events. Shane Howington and Chesley Heatherly place 3rd in the 2011 Southern Collegiate Event at Lake Gunterville. Photo by Shane Harrington.

Enrique Martinez performs a Butter Slide on the crest of the wake. Photo by Robert Underwood.

“We have about 15 riders that compete in Wakeboarding events and 13 that compete in ski competitions. In wakeboard events there are three divisions: men’s, women’s, and wake skating. In the men’s and women’s divisions, riders have one run each and the goal is to throw the best and most tricks in your run. If you fall two times, your run is over and the next person goes. “In wake skating, it’s the same concept, but you get three falls instead of two. Ski riders can compete in slalom, trick, or ski jumping. In slalom skiing, riders go through a course trying to get the most buoys as possible. For trick skiing, riders use a short ski and do spin and invert tricks to score points during a 20-second run. In ski jumping, the goal is to ride over a five-foot-jump and fly as far as you can. But to score a distance, you have to land and ride away.”  Perhaps the most important thing Martinez did was to find a veteran coach with an impressive background in skiing. “I grew up on the water in Columbus,” said MSU wakeboarding and ski head coach John Burris. “My father taught me at a very young age. When I was 11, I asked my dad if I could take part in a tournament and had some success. That was when I realized skiing was going to take the place of Little League and everything else. We played baseball and flag football, but I liked being able to ski by myself, or do it with my dad. We were at the river every weekend. Burris, who graduated from West Point High School, was awarded a ski scholarship at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette in 1998. He spent three summers at Bennett’s Water Ski School in Zachary, La. (outside Baton Rouge), where he coached and further developed his skills. townandgownmag.com

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Mark Lee and Eli Frierson showcase their catch of the day. Photo by Shane Harrington.

Hayes Hewlett performs a wake-to-wake jump. Photo by Robert Underwood. 58

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“I was on the U.S. Water Ski Team in 2002 and used the funding I got from the U.S. Olympic Committee to go to Cory Pickos Water Ski and Wake Board School. I was there from 2002-2005, which provided national as well as international recognition. I was coaching international teams as well as refining my own skills.” Burris broke his neck in a water ski injury in 2005. Although it didn’t end his career, he said he realized a lot of things during his recovery period. “While I was healing, my wife and I got married. My dreams of pursuing a career as a water skier ended there,” Burris said. “There’s not a lot of money in professional water skiing. There isn’t a tour every weekend like NASCAR. You might have a pro event this month in Michigan, and a pro event in Japan next month. “I got hooked up with MSU through Brenda Cavenaugh, who I’ve known since I was a teenager. I advise the teams on the competition end on a volunteer basis. After I got hurt, the sport became more about fun. I’m not competing as much, but I enjoy it more and am skiing better than I ever have. I’m having great fun with the MSU team. “The hardest thing is working around classes,” Burris said. “One person might have a four o’clock class, and you may have three guys who are through at noon for the day and are ready to ski. We don’t have a team boat or a team site. Getting the opportunity to have quality practices – and getting everyone together – is the biggest challenge.” Club sports, including the water variety may not make the athletes household names, but they learn certain life lessons along the way.” “The players split the gas. They make road trips in Dad’s Suburban,” Burris said. “This is a not-for-profit team, so there are things you can’t do in terms of sales, and they’re trying to get donations for a sport very few people know about in a bad economy. I tell Enrique, “Ask everybody for help. Tell them we’re getting t-shirts printed, and we’ll put their logo on our shirt in exchange for their donation.’ The entry fee in a national tournament might be $500 or $1,000. “The camaraderie, though, is tremendous. They travel together, practice together, and become the best of friends. And you build relationships with your rivals even though you’re competing with those teams. It’s fun because it’s something most college kids don’t do. n


U.S. Grant Association president Frank J. Williams, left, and Mississippi State University President Mark E. Keenum were the first official visitors at the newly designated U.S. Grant Presidential Library at MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library on May 18.

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Inspiration, Inventor, Innovator b BY BRANDI VAN ORMER

efore their education is complete, most veterinary students will have encountered the textbook Lumb and Jones’ Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Considered the definitive reference book on the subject, Lumb and Jones’ was originally printed in 1973 and is now in a multi-author fourth edition. Coauthoring such an influential text might certainly be considered a milestone in anyone’s career, but for Dr. E. Wynn Jones, it was just one of a long series of interesting steps that took him from Shropshire, England, all the way to Starkville, Miss. (by way of New York and Okla.). Jones has been a part of the MSU-CVM faculty since 1975, serving initially as a consultant, then as vice-dean, interim dean, and several other interim college positions. Those who know him know that he’s been involved in a little bit of everything during his time here. Even now, as a professor emeritus, instead of taking his ease in retirement, Jones finds time to facilitate research projects with pharmaceutical companies. The variety of roles he has held at the CVM, as well as the wide scope of projects he has been and continues to be involved in, is part of a pattern established in his long and varied career. A self-proclaimed “dabbler,” Jones began his professional journey as a new veterinarian in England at age 21, at the close of World War II. His initial plan was to settle into a mixed veterinary practice near Windsor, but there was nothing so sedate in his future. Instead, an offer by his professor of surgery led to a house residency in surgery at the London College, which in turn led to a fellowship from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, and a concurrent graduate fellowship from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. When Cornell accepted him, he had very little time to travel to New York, and very little time to prepare himself for such a transition. A trans-Atlantic flight delivered him to LaGuardia airport three weeks after he received word from Cornell; his luggage followed via boat. Upon arriving in America, Jones remembers being struck by the few brick homes and chimney stacks. Initially enrolled as a master’s student in veterinary surgery, he quickly found that he wasn’t satisfied with his course of study and switched to a Ph.D. program. “I suspect that, considering the few specific requirements, they had probably never had a Ph.D. student in veterinary surgery be-

Dr. E. Wynn Jones has been a part of the MSU-CVM faculty since 1975, serving initially as a consultant, then as vice-dean and interim dean. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MSU CVM

fore,” Jones said. Independent study, he found, was a good fit: “I was fortunate enough that I had few strict course requirements and could do what I chose.” During his time at Cornell, Jones acquired his Ph.D., along with a reading knowledge of German, to complement the French and Latin he already knew. He found one other important thing there: a lovely graduate student in nutrition who became his wife. “It was her great mistake,” he laughs, “to be tempted into a blind date with a poor Englishman who still had no luggage and very little money.” Jones and his bride soon made their way back across the pond, where he went into veterinary practice near Windsor. Soon after, he accepted an invitation from Bristol’s new veterinary college to become its first surgical clinician. For nearly four years, the Joneses enjoyed a comfortable, settled life in southern England, but by 1954, another change was coming.

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xxx xxx xxx xxx

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STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY SID SALTER

ississippi State University has been chosen to host a presidential library – one of only five universities in the nation to house such an institution. Ulysses S. Grant Association President Frank J. Williams announced the decision of the organization’s board of directors to designate the Ulysses S. Grant Collection at MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library as the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library during the association’s annual meeting May 18-20 at MSU as part of the organization’s 50th anniversary observance. MSU President Mark E. Keenum recently received a letter from Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero of the National Archives congratulating the university on the presidential library designation. “We are extremely grateful to the Ulysses S. Grant Association for entrusting Mississippi State University with the long-term responsibility for managing and showcasing this treasure trove of vital American history,” said Keenum. “Our university feels a deep bond with this organization and a shared vision for what a marvelous resource this collection is and what it can and will become.” Highlights of the USGA’s 50th anniversary meeting at MSU included the dedication and ribbon cutting for the new Ulysses S. Grant Exhibit Area on the first floor of MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library and the presentation of the USGA’s prestigious John Y. Simon Award. The Simon Award honors the late scholar and longtime USGA executive director by recognizing significant achievement in advancing “historical knowledge about General-President Ulysses S. Grant.” MSU’s Mitchell Memorial Library – since 2008 the repository of correspondence, photographs, books, memorabilia, and document copies related to the military career and presidency of America’s 18th president, Ulysses S. Grant – welcomed for the third time in the past four years the association’s members and directors for dinners, special presentations, business meetings, and historical tours in Starkville and Columbus. The second public event was held May 19 at the Starkville Community Theatre on Grierson’s Raid and featured MSU University Archivist Michael B. Ballard, Starkville Police Chief David Lindley, MSU history professor emeritus Bill Parrish, and Dr. John Marszalek. The Grant Presidential Collection consists of some 15,000 lin-

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ear feet of document copies, research notes, artifacts, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia and includes information on Grant’s childhood from his birth in 1822, his later military career, Civil War triumphs, tenure as commanding general after the war, presidency, and his post-White House years until his death in 1885. There are also 4,000 published monographs on various aspects of Grant’s life and times. Grant is more renowned for a military career in which he rose through the officer ranks to ultimately lead all Union forces during the 1861-65 conflict. He was architect of the 1863 Vicksburg campaign, among others, that effectively split the Confederacy and is considered a key battle in the war. Through a 2008 agreement with the Ulysses S. Grant Association, the MSU Libraries became the official host of the Grant papers, and Civil War scholar John F. Marszalek, an MSU Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History, was named executive director and managing editor of the association. Marszalek continued a 46-year-old project begun by the late John Y. Simon, another nationally renowned scholar who died in 2008. Marszalek said MSU now becomes one of only a few U.S. institutions to house a collection of presidential papers. “Mississippi State is now the premier source of materials for research about a seminal figure in the nation’s history,” Marszalek said. “This is a remarkable accomplishment for our institution.” The Grant Collection joins those of former U.S Sen. John C. Stennis, former U.S. Rep. Sonny Montgomery and other more contemporary political figures in the library’s Congressional and Political Research Center. “We are very grateful for the support of MSU President Mark Keenum, who embraced the historical importance of the collection and works tirelessly to provide the resources necessary to showcase this collection at the university,” said Frances N. Coleman, dean of libraries. “These papers have a significant place in our nation’s history and it is a profound honor for our library to have responsibility for them.” n For more information about the Ulysses S. Grant Collection at Mississippi State University Libraries, please visit http://library. msstate.edu/USGrant/ or contact Dr. John Marszalek at 662-3254552.


At the suggestion of a former Cornell colleague of Jones’, Oklahoma State University called with a job offer that was too attractive to pass up, and in July Jones again found himself in the States. This time, the difference from England was even more apparent: Oklahoma was in the middle of a drought, dust storms were raging, and the day the couple arrived in Stillwater, it was 117 degrees. “Had we the money,” remembers Jones, “we would’ve turned right around and gone back.” Despite a rough first impression, the years in Oklahoma were good ones, and Jones would stay there until 1978. Despite this apparent stability, he remained a “jack of all trades,” working with medical colleges, engineers, architects, and animal scientists, as well as working on pharmaceutical trials, doing research on new products for industry, getting a pilot’s license, and developing the first large animal anesthesia machine. Loretta Corley, who has worked for Jones for 30 years off and on, beginning at Oklahoma State University, describes him as a dynamic individual. “He was involved in so many activities, and I had never worked with anyone quite like him before – that first morning, he just came roaring in,” she said. “He’s a visionary, and I learned a lot from him.” It was that visionary spirit and need for stimulation that finally brought Jones to the College of Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University. Dr. James Miller had been appointed the first dean just a short time earlier, and he contacted Jones, who had a fellowship at Harvard taking program development training and assisting with a nursing program in diabetes, to help Mississippi State develop its veterinary college.

Dr. Jones supervises a bovine surgery laboratory at the London College in 1947.

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Dr. Jones and a colleague perform an impromptu comedy routine at a veterinary college function.

“This was an opportunity to participate in the design of a facility that became far more advanced than anything I had seen on visits to North American and European veterinary colleges,” said Jones, noting that plans for MSU-CVM included combination classrooms/lab spaces, plus common core resources between large animal and small animal areas. As someone who has seen MSU-CVM develop over the years, Jones has been impressed with the veterinary education here and the strength that has been developed, especially in the poultry and fish programs. He has also been impressed with the quality of MSU-CVM’s graduates. One of those graduates, Dr. Lane Corley, calls Jones a “tremendous mentor—the greatest mentor in my career...and maybe even in my life!” That over the course of his career he would’ve inspired others is a surprising thought to Jones. “If someone was tarred with the same brush as I was, with interests in new things and a desire to become involved with those things to the detriment of continuing involvement in the ones he’d already encountered, then I suppose I could be an inspiration,” he laughs. “I’ve had a plethora of activities that I’ve enjoyed, and made lifetime friends of so many people both in America and overseas.” CVM Dean Kent Hoblet sees Jones’ pioneering spirit in a positive light. “Dr. Jones’ tireless efforts on behalf of both our College and the veterinary profession can’t be overstated,” Hoblet said. “He is an inspiration, an inventor, and an innovator.” n


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Reading Aloud BOOK REVIEWS BY HELLEN POLK

uly is the month when we Americans take time to honor our country’s rich heritage and to celebrate the many freedoms we enjoy. It is our responsibility as adults to pass along to our children and grandchildren the patriotic spirit and history of The United States of America. As families and friends gather for barbeques, fireworks and watermelon, use this time as an opportunity to instill in our children the pride we should feel whenever we see the red, white and blue!

Lynne Cheney has written a number of books for children about a subject she holds dear, American history. In Our Fifty States: A Family Adventure Across America, Mrs. Cheney shares her extensive knowledge of American history combined with her grandchildren’s road trip accounts to take us on a virtual adventure across America. Delightful illustrations accompany the many facts that allow us to get a real sense of the greatness of our 50 states. First published in 1960, Miroslav Sasek’s classic book, This is New York, has been updated for the 21st century. It tells the story of the purchase of the island of Manhattan in 1626 and how New York has grown to include the “biggest” things. There is the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, Staten Island and many other landmarks that have made New York famous. It is a really a classic children’s guide to travel in the big city. If a big family trip is not in your budget this year, be sure to “see the USA” through the pages of these two books! All American children should be taught the history of our flag as well as the importance of the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem. The Little Golden Books Classic, Our Flag, does this beautifully. Carl Memling gives the history of the many flags that have flown over our country, the battles for our independence and continued freedom and the care and respect that should be given our flag.

Another great book on our flag is I Pledge Allegience, by the beloved children’s author, Bill Martin Jr. He has taken the words of the pledge and broken them down into parts that children can fully understand. So many times, the words and their meaning are lost in the rote memorization and recitation of the pledge. This book is one to be cherished by children and adults alike. For the history of our national anthem, choose Monica Kulling’s book, Francis Scott Key’s StarSpangled Banner. Considering that the poem was inspired by the events surrounding the War of 1812, it is especially appropriate to share this book on the war’s 200th anniversary. Kulling has written an entire series of books for young children that promote American history. Speaking of patriotism, what an exciting time we will have as we cheer on the American athletes at the 2012 Summer Olympics this month! I never get tired of seeing our young athletes compete and hear our national anthem being played. Matt Christopher, the great children’s sports author, has just published his newest book in his sports series. It is entitled Great Moments in the Summer Olympics. This book is filled with facts about the accomplishments of some of our greatest Olympic athletes who have thrilled us over and over with their many successes. Join with your families and friends as we proudly display our flag and sing the national anthem in celebration of our great country and as we cheer on the USA Olympic teams this month. Let the fireworks begin! n townandgownmag.com

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Reading the Classics BOOK REVIEWS BY KATE SALTER

spent my summer three years reading every Richard Ford book in my dad’s collection while jogging on a treadmill, and I’ll never forget how engrossed I became by Ford’s straightforward storytelling and grounded approach to his characters. A native of Jackson and good friend of Eudora Welty’s, Ford is a living testament to Mississippi’s literary value. At age 68, he continued his career this year with the release of a new novel, Canada. I’m currently in the middle of reading that novel because I can think of many, many less enjoyable ways to spend the summer reading than to take time with some of Ford’s strongest works. Here a few suggestions for those who may be interested in Ford’s offerings.

The Sportswriter The first novel of Ford’s acclaimed Bascombe trilogy, The Sportswriter finds its main character, the believable and likable Frank Bascombe, stuck in a perpetual, directionless lull. Bascombe wanted to write seriously and fumbled into a sportswriting gig, which he somewhat likes but does not find challenging or exciting. Due also in part to the death of a son and an ensuing divorce, Frank’s dissatisfaction is not paralyzing, but has left him in an disconnected, dreamlike state. The novel follows Frank through an Easter weekend during which some strange events occur,

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and in almost all of which Frank hilariously avoids conflict. He is kind to a girlfriend whom he does not really like. He maintains a solid relationship with his ex-wife. He keeps cool around an infuriating acquaintance and fellow divorced man, Walter. This realistic portrait of a suburban American man trying to survive despite many crises in his life exemplifies the tendency of many adults to ignore the crises in an attempt to move beyond them without much of a look back to the past. Joining Frank on his “dreamy” ride in this novel is worth the journey through the trilogy’s next two novels.

Independence Day

Rock Springs

Independence Day, the follow-up to The unquestionably bests The Sportswriter, Sportswriter – the novel won both the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/ Faulkner award, as evidence. Ford’s writing soars to an even higher level than in The Sportswriter, Bascombe’s story develops further tension and conflict and the characters take a much clearer form. Bascombe, again the protagonists, ends the emotional detachment that dominated the first novel. His ex-wife gains a new husband and a last name, and problems with his surviving, adolescent son move him to change his ways. Another strange weekend trip to the Cooperstown, N.Y. is the backdrop of this story of father/son love and Frank’s struggle become independent from the emotionally imprisoning qualities of his former uncaring attitude.

Ford’s Rock Springs masterfully explores themes such as destitution, disconnection, indifference and struggles in external relationships in a natural, credible manner. His writing here is terse and readable; however, the stories are still richly attractive and complex. This collection of short stories features intriguing pieces about ordinary men and women and how they react when forced to make decisions. The stories all fittingly take place in the deserted, rural western part of America, which add to the lonely mood of the characters. Fans of Hemingway will appreciate Ford’s brevity in this collection, and his idea of the meaning of masculinity echoes that of Hemingway as well. Rock Springs is a great read and an early sign of vitality in the writing lives of one of Mississippi’s most notable literary sons.n

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| july 2012


{On the Page

gone to green BOOK REVIEW BY SUSAN O’BRYAN

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rading big-city life for small-town living comes with its share of pluses and minuses for Lois Barker, the heroine in a five-book series by Judy Christie that focuses on the strengths – and weaknesses – of a close-knit community. Christie, who hails from northwest Louisiana, has woven her love of small towns and their eccentric residents into inspirational stories focusing on Barker’s move from a hotshot journalist to the editor of a community newspaper in fictional Green, La. The author also has written a series of nonfiction books – the “Hurry Less, Worry Less” series. Each novel, starting with Gone to Green, provides readers with more than a glimpse into how small towns cope with racial prejudice, natural disasters, economic hard times, local corruption and everything in between. Without being preachy or heavy-handed, Christie shows that at the heart of any community is its residents and by standing together, anything can be accomplished. In Gone to Green released in 2009, Barker makes the move to Green after a dear friend bequests the twice-weekly paper, The Green News-Item, to her. It means relocating to rural north Louisiana, but she plans to stay only long enough to sell the paper. She quickly finds, though, that the heart can overrule the head. From there until the last page of Downtown Green released in April, Barker encounters small-town corruption and destruction, mean-tempered dogs and good-hearted neighbors – and the love of her life. Within a short time, Green is more than a dot on the map. It is all that “home” could ever be. Barker and her friends are determined to rebuild their community after a tornado tears it apart, government

officials apply stifling regulations and a bypass siphons off business. In between all that, Barker marries a catfishfarming gym coach, markets her town’s liveability and stands up to paunch-bellied politicians. Christie, a former journalist, touches on the struggles of community newspapers in a time when the industry is dying and advertising dries up faster than a magnolia bloom. Her heroine may lean, but she never bends under the pressure of competing with other media for news and ad dollars. Through trials and tribulations, Christie’s cast of characters accept that faith – in God as well as community and neighbors – is truly the foundation for a fulfilling existence. The “Green” series also stands out among contemporary fiction for what it doesn’t have – graphic sex, violence or profanity. Instead, Christie chooses to make her point about life’s lesson in a tender, often humorous tone. Through her words, the author makes Green a place we’d all like to call home. n townandgownmag.com

| july 2012

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{On the Page

White Shirts

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BOOK REVIEW BY JOE LEE

n April 24, 1996, I was in the final stages of an 18-month stay in the marketing department at WJTV-12, the CBS affiliate in our state’s capital city of Jackson. As I’ve told friends over the years, the frantic newsroom scenes from movies like Network with 30 people screaming and running in all directions wasn’t anything I ever saw on the job – until that day. Kenneth Tornes, a Jackson Fire Department employee, stormed into a management meeting at Central Fire Station and began shooting, killing four men and critically wounding two others. We learned that he’d also shot and killed his estranged wife, Gloria, that morning, and he wounded two Ridgeland police officers before one of them immobilized him and put a merciful end to the rampage. It was a national news story for several days, a Jackson-area story for weeks, and a tragic and horrifying event that changed the lives of those affiliated with JFD forever. What kind of person would gun down his co-workers in cold blood? That was the question we asked ourselves at work in the coming days and weeks, and it was on the minds of our viewers, who were just as shocked as we were. Then a seemingly endless series of legal motions and appeals began, setting the stage four years later for a pair of capital murder trials in Hinds County. The District Attorney then was Ed Peters, and his top assistant in prosecuting Tornes was Bobby DeLaughter (both of whom, regrettably, went down with Richard “Dickie” Scruggs less than a decade later). The last thing I remember about Tornes was his unexpected death in prison on April 9, 2000 while awaiting the second capital murder trial. My wife, Leslie, worked for Peters that year and said that if Tornes had lived, she would have handled prosecuting duties for the state – by then Delaughter had just left the D.A.’s office for his first judgeship. The painful memories, though, never faded away for Noraine Moree, whose husband, Don, died that day at the hands of Tornes. The same was true of Dave Berry, the JFD Arson Division supervisor who pursued the then-unknown shooter into a parking garage and at one point aimed his weapon at the assassin. Moree and Berry, who not only have their memories but saved many newspaper clippings and made untold journal entries, have teamed up to write and publish White Shirts (Cannon Ridge Publishing, 2012), and they take you behind the scenes of the Tornes shootings in a way nobody else can. You’ll feel your own blood 64

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pumping as the deadly shooting spree is recreated, and you’ll grieve as the lives of four good men were taken in the blink of an eye by a madman. The book title refers to part of the uniform for JFD upper management at the time (they wore white dress shirts) and, chillingly, zeroes in on what was on the mind of Kenneth Tornes: a former JFD employee testified at the first Tornes capital murder trial and said the murderer told him “he was going to kill Chief Thompson, Chief Bell, Chief Donovan, Chief Graves, Chief Graham, and anybody else in a white shirt.” And that leads to an aspect of the tragedy which was largely overshadowed by the sheer horror: the role that internal city and JFD departmental politics may have played in the years, months, and weeks leading to that awful spring day at Central Fire Station. How much of a role, in fact, does poor workplace morale play in workplace violence, and could the Tornes shootings have been prevented if city and department leadership had been more effective? A story of anger, heartbreak and forgiveness, White Shirts will give you a whole new appreciation for the courage and bravery of the men and women who work for our fire departments as well as an entirely new perspective on the inner-workings of our city governments and legal system. It’s a book I strongly recommend, as the subject matter is just as relevant today as it was in the summer of 1996. n Visit www.cannon-ridge-publishing.com to contact the authors about a speaking appearance or to order signed copies.


{On the Page

Imperfect

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BOOK REVIEW BY MILTON WHATLEY

mperfect is more than a sports book, it’s a life book. It’s the story of a man who took hold of a big league dream early and refused to let it go. Jim Abbott was born in Flint, Mich. in 1967. In high school he played quarterback and baseball for his school’s teams. He was drafted in 1985 in the 36th round of the Major League Baseball draft by the Toronto Blue Jays. Abbott chose to go to college and was an outstanding baseball player for the University of Michigan. In 1987, he won the Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in America, the first baseball player to do so. In 1987, Abbott was the flag bearer for the United States at the Pan Am Games in Indianapolis where he led the team to a silver medal. At the Olympics the following year, he pitched the final game assuring the gold medal for the United States. Later that year Abbott was drafted by the California Angels and began a 10year major league career in which he played for four different teams (Angels, Yankees, White Sox, Brewers). With one of those teams he became one of the few major leaguers to ever throw a no-hitter. And, by the way, he has no right hand. Jim Abbott has spent his life refusing to be defined by an undeniable fact of life. He was born without a right hand. Almost unconsciously he slips his handless right arm into his pocket, not out of shame for it, but not to allow it to become a distraction to others. A man known to be one of the kindest to have played the game of baseball, has refused, in his memory, to sign only one autograph. While having dinner at Elaine’s in New York with some friends one evening, he was politely approached by the bartender who asked him to sign a baseball. Taking the ball, Abbott noticed another man’s name already on it, Pete Gray. Pete Gray played in 72 Major League Baseball games in 1945 with no right arm. Abbott told the bartender that he’d be glad to sign anything else for him, but not that particular ball. Imperfect is the title of Abbott’s autobiography with coauthor Tim Brown. Imperfect is the story of a man, who with the support of his family and with his own fiercely competitive spirit, strived to move beyond the looks of people at his handless right arm to succeed in ways so many others have not. The book recounts the story of his parents and their belief that imperfect would not be the word they would allow to be attached to their son. As young Jim Abbott began to find his way in sports, his parents were with him all the way.

There are many fascinating stories in books about Abbott and his career. In this story you meet the first pro scout that saw Abbott, Don Welke. Welke was told about Jim Abbott by a friend who said, “He doesn’t have a right hand, but you’d never know it.” Welke was convinced from his first experience that Abbott had the right talent and attitude to be a major league ball player, right out of high school. At the University of Michigan where Abbott chose to go rather than immediately signing a professional contract, he ran afoul of legendary Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler, when in an interview, he compared him in a way, to Fidel Castro. You read about his signing with the California Angels and his fondness for their owner at the time, the legendary Gene Autry. If not for his agent Scott Boras, Jim Abbott may have played most, if not all, of his career for the Angels. The pain is felt by the reader as Abbott recounts the waning years of his career as he realizes he no longer has the speed or control of the baseball he once had. A story that winds through the book concerns one particular game in Abbott’s career. On September 4, 1993 while pitching for the New York Yankees, he pitched a no-hitter against the Cleveland Indians. One of Jim Abbott’s joys has been his ability to inspire children with physical limitations to dream bigger dreams than the world says they should. There were those in his story who inspired him and so he takes it as a special privilege to reach out to young people. My favorite Jim Abbott quote is, “Find something you love, and go after it, with all of your heart.” n townandgownmag.com

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{Near Far

The kids will enjoy the slides at Lake Tiak-O’Khata in Louisville.

Summer Staycations W BY JOE LEE

ho says there’s nothing to do during the summer in Mississippi? We in the Golden Triangle area are within reasonable driving distance of a wide variety of prime spots for family day trips or mini-vacations, and you’ll receive the same warm welcome you’re accustomed to at home. You might start by rounding up your t-ball players and Little Leaguers and taking them to Rankin County to watch the Mississippi Braves, the AA farm team of the beloved Atlanta Braves. Trustmark Park, which opened in 2005, is far more than just a baseball park. There are space jumps and hamster ball races for the kids, a surprising menu of delectable treats, and a clubhouse store loaded with Braves memorabilia. The seating is fantastic throughout the park.   “We have fans from all 82 counties who come to the games, and we’re committed to giving them a family friendly experience and keep them coming back,” said M-Braves advertising and design director Brian Byrd. “We can’t promise it won’t rain, but I’m part of the tarp crew, and I can tell you that rainouts at Trustmark Park are very rare.” You’ll find the 48,000-acre Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Complex a little closer to home, as it’s located within the counties of Oktibbeha, Winston and Noxubee. Managed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the area is a dream for hunters and fishermen. But some of the trails, including the Woodpecker Trail, Craig Pond Trail and Scattertown Trail, offer truly breathtaking scenery and the sights and sounds of some of the most fascinating living creatures. During the summer the Goose Overlook offers the best view of the Bluff Lake rookery, which contains thousands of nesting egrets, herons and ibis. Many people associate Elvis Presley with Graceland and the city of Memphis. The King, however, was born in Tupelo in 1935, and his birthplace is open for tours. You can even visit the Assembly of God Church that Elvis attended as a small boy and watch a video of an old-time worship service. The gift shop, of course, is loaded with everything from Elvis t-shirts and statues to shot glasses and mouse pads. If you travel as far as Tupelo, you’re very close to a true history lesson in the form of a visit to the Civil War Interpretive Center 66

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in Corinth. The center is a wealth of knowledge for the Civil War enthusiast as well as anyone who wants to learn about the Battle of Corinth. “We’re a unit of Shiloh Military Park, which is 23 miles away,” said Park Ranger Tom Parson of the National Park Service. “We offer self-guided tours of the building, and there are two films that start every 15 minutes. We’ve had adult travel groups, school groups, and people on vacation who’ve stopped in from all over the country. We’re at our busiest between April and Labor Day.” The kids, of course, will be clamoring to swim, and you’ll certainly want to tire them out with a day in the sun and water before loading them up for the next big summer adventure. Geyser Falls Water Park in Neshoba County has every kind of water ride imaginable, from Mt. Everwet and Pipe’s Peak to Whitewater Express and the much-loved Backsplash water slide. There’s even Geyser Flats, which provides refreshing mist as you walk in through the front gates, and Clearwater Key, which offers eight acres of white sand beaches and crystal-clear pools in an eye-popping tropical environment. You’re advised to bring lots of sunscreen and to wear t-shirts while in direct sunlight (they’re also helpful in preventing sunburns). Every city of any size has a zoo, but the Memphis Zoo is known far and wide for a spectacular array of animals, clean grounds, a friendly staff, great food, and more attractions than you could ever hope to see in one day. Summer specials include the Camel Excursion, the Giraffe-Feeding Adventure, and Music on the Porch each Saturday through early October. And this is another road trip that will be just as educational for your youngsters as well as fun: the zoo’s conservation programs circle the globe, from cooperative programs in China for giant pandas to local efforts to save the Louisiana pine snake. More than 90,000 children visit on annual field trips and more than 100,000 folks visit with free admission every year. Your next stop might be Roosevelt State Park in Morton, which is just off I-20 in Scott County. You’ll find many outdoor recreational opportunities in a picturesque setting, including water skiing, disc golf, biking and power boating. There are plenty of great fishing spots, and the park’s scenic overlook provides a panoramic view of the Bienville National Forest. “Last year my husband, Kenneth, and I really enjoyed our stay so much that we decided to book another stay this year,” said Edna Daniels, who added that Roosevelt State Park is their favorite anniversary getaway. “The fishing was great, and the room was clean and peaceful. We will try and visit every year.” The fishing is good at Bonita Lakes in Meridian, where there’s a city-owned 3,300-acre park (situated on three lakes) that includes Long Creek Reservoir and Lakeview Golf Course. The park features paddle boats, horseback riding, a jogging/walking track, nature trails and picnic facilities. Shelter rental rates are available, making it the perfect location to camp out overnight or on a weekend. Then there’s scenic Lake Tiak-O’Khata, a family owned resort in Louisville. With a full service restaurant including six private rooms, two conference centers, a lakeside motel, waterfront cabins and efficiency suites, it’s an ideal spot for a family vacation or even a business meeting (if you’re combining business and pleasure this summer). Try the Lake’s lodging special for only $79 plus tax. It includes breakfast for two and movie tickets to Northgate Cinema. “We have a full-service restaurant, motel rooms and recreational facilities – something for everyone,” said Carmen White. “Our tranquil environment sets the stage for a tranquil event. Our food is wonderful and all made from scratch.” Consider making it a goal to hit every one of these getaway locations before school starts this fall. Your kids will certainly have plenty of great material for their essays about what they did over the summer. n


{Rhythms

Riley Center to host Alice Tan Ridley BY JUSTIN FRITSCHER

a

lice Tan Ridley started her musical career not on a stage, but in the innards of the New York City subway system. Ridley had a rocky start but she persisted, eventually rising to runner-up in America’s Got Talent in 2010. Her raw musical talent and tenacious spirit is bringing her to the MSU Riley Center in July, where she will take the stage to show her wide repertoire of vocals. Her concert is July 17 at 7:30 p.m. “If people haven’t heard her on Amercia’s Got Talent, they’re going to be blown away by her vocals and stage presence,” said Dennis Sankovich, the Riley Center’s executive director. “She is an amazing vocalist,” Sankovich said, likening her to Diana Ross, Tina Turner and Etta James. She will also headline the Whole Schools Initiative conference planned for July 16-19 at the Riley Center, gathering 300 teachers from across the state to focus on how to better incorporate the arts into classrooms. “She does a terrific program,” Sankovich said. “She is going to talk about her career and her tenacity.”

After raising her family in New York City and years of teaching in the city’s schools, Ridley embarked on a journey to establish herself as a vocalist. She began amid the bustle of the subway stations. “To get people’s attention when they’re heading to a subway, you have to have some raw talent,” Sankovich said. “She has won people over.” Not only did he pursue her own artistic career but she emphasized the importance of the arts as a mother. Her daughter, Gabourey Sidibe, is an Academy Awardwinning actress, making her debut in Precious in 2009. “Ridley and her family make a wonderful story how they have flourished in the arts,” Sankovich said. He recommends people to visit www.msurileycenter.com to hear some of Ridley’s clips. n Tickets cost $22-$28, and they can be purchased at msurileycenter.com or by calling (601) 696-2200. townandgownmag.com

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SeeHear

JULY

BY CLAIRE MASSEY | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILANI SALTER

NEW Music Releases

LIVE Music Schedule

July 2

July 7

July 3

July 12

n Untitled by 50 Cent

n n n n n n

Fortune by Chris Brown H.N.I.C. 3 by Prodigy One Crazy Weekend by Young Zee & Mr. Green The Murder Murder Kill Kill Double EP by Necro Wild Ones by Flo Rida The Odessa Tapes by The Flatlanders

July 9

n Unsound by Mission Of Burma n Always by Summer Camp

July 10 n n n n n n

Masters Of The Dark Arts by La Coka Nosta Skelethon by Aesop Rock Confess by Twin Shadow Swing Lo Magellan by Dirty Projectors Old School, New Rules by Hank Williams Jr. Uncaged by Zac Brown Band

Open Mike at Dave’s Dark Horse Tavern Star & Micey at Riverwalk in Columbus

July 13

Star & Micey at Cafe Aromas in Columbus Badstick at Rick’s Cafe

July 14

Stars & Micey at The Hitching Lot Farmer’s Market in Columus Stephanie Jackson at Casa Bravo

July 15

Suicide Shift at Rick’s Cafe

July 16

Mississippi Shakedown at Dave’s Dark Horse Tavern

July 12

July 20

n The Farm by The Farm

High Road Out at Rick’s Cafe

July 17

July 21

n Excuse My French by French Montana n Russian Roulette by Alchemist n Dope Sick by Madchild (Swollen Members) n Life Is Good by Nas n Channel Orange by Frank Ocean n Exo by Gatekeeper n Yellow and Green by Baroness n CA Collection of Rarities and Previously Unreleased Material by John Maus n Live at Billy Bob’s Texas by Billy Joe Shaver

July 24 n n n n n 68

Stephanie Jackson at Casa Bravo

I.M. 4 E-VA by Big Shug Handwritten by The Gaslight Anthem Never by Micachu and the Shapes Shrines by Purity Ring Gossamer by Passion Pit

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Stephanie Jackson at Casa Bravo

July 27

Jeff Norwood at Sopranos in West Point Jamie Davis & Soul Gravy at Rick’s Cafe

July 28

Stephanie Jackson at Casa Bravo


SAAC Membership Appreciation Photography by debbie montgomery

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Bonnie Raitt at MSU Riley Center Photography by JOY HENSON

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Starkville’s 175th Anniversary Celebration Photography by ASHLEY COVIN

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MSU Staff’s ‘Luncheon in the Junction’ Photography by Debbie Montgomery

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Art in the Garden Photography by Ashley Covin

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Mississippi Brawl Stars Bout Photography by debbie montgomery

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Wynonna Judd at MSU Riley Center Photography by Hannah Tibbetts

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Veranda’s Happy Hour Fashion Photography by debbie Montgomery

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Pops in Pink Photography by laura daniels

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1. Mildred Stickley, Geneva Nelson 2. Lynn Mcadams, Dolly Moore 3. Jim Miller, Doris Miller 4. Mark Turner, Gloria Turner 5. Joe Mosley, Betty Chatham 6. Latarsha Gibson, Kisha Adams 7. Nora Strickland, Amber Strickland, Lynne Strickland 8. Donald Lasell, Cherri Lightsey, Kay Milam, Edd Milam 9. Dolph Bryan, Greta Bryan 10. Beth Parsons, George Parsons, Sharon Powe 11. Betty Holmes, Helen Takacs 12. Steve Langston, Linda Langston, Bonnie Oppenheimer, Art Cosby, Eric Cosby 13. Grace Ward, Barry Ward, John Hendricks, Beth Ramsey 14. Kelly Marsh, Debbie Dunaway, Lynne Cossman, Shalyn Claggett, Shirley Barall 15. Jeanette Koelling, Harold Koelling townandgownmag.com

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Blair Batson Fundraiser Tea Photography by Laura Daniels

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Reed’s TOMS One for One Photography by Jessica Bailey

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Renasant Bank Ground Breaking Photography by jessica Bailey

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More

JULY

3 fourth of july 5 11 12

Louisville’s Red White and Blue Parade The Chamber of Commerce and sponsors will host a celebration of the fourth of July on Mainstreet starting at 6 p.m. The band Deja Vu will play at Lake Tiak-O’Khata from 7-9 p.m. and a fireworks display will be held at 9 p.m. following band. Movies in Tupelo Fairpark Bring a blanket or chair and enjoy a family movie night under the stars in downtown Tupelo. This event is free to the public and starts at 8 p.m. For more information visit tupelo.net.

celebration

Starkville Parks and Recreation presents a

Celebration of

Independence on the

Fourth of July at the Sportsplex Lynn Lane, Starkville beginning at 6 p.m. and firework presentation at 9 p.m. For more information contact Starkville Parks and Recreation 662-324-4028 or visit starkvilleparks.com 80

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Tupelo Downtown Merchants’ First Thursday Downtown merchants will be open until 7 p.m. for a fun and relaxing shopping experience and will have special promotions. For more information visit tupelomainstreet.com. Philadelphia Choctaw Indian Fair Enjoy four fun-filled days of Choctaw culture and spirit including tribal arts, crafts, dances and the thrilling action of World Championship stickball at the Choctaw Indian Festival. For more information visit neshoba.org. Down on Main Dangermuffin will open for Keller Williams at Fairpark Amphitheater in Tupelo at 6:30 p.m. For more information visit tupelomainstreet. com.

Sounds of Summer Downtown Columbus will host the Sounds of Summer at the Riverwalk from 7-9 p.m. Come enjoy live music for a fun-filled night out. For more information visit columbusmainstreet.com.

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Crawford Cotton Bowl Festival This two-day festival celebrates and honors those who make cotton. The event features live entertainment including speakers, a step show and more. The festival is free to the public and will start at 9 a.m. in downtown Crawford.

Summer Sunset Series Bring a blanket and enjoy the night in New Albany at the Summer Sunset Series. The event will be free to the public and will include movies and music. For more information visit newalbanymainstreet.com.

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Running of the Bulldogs and Champion Steak Cook-off Mississppi State University will host anathletic-themed evening which will include Athletic Director, Scott Stricklin, food, MSU Diamond Girls and more. And don’t forget to visit the Steak Cook-off in downtown Starkville. For more information visit visit.starkville. org. 26th Annual Sunfish Triathlon Bonita Lakes in Meridian will host the Sunfish Triathlon inlcuding a 1/3 mile swim, 17 mile bike trail, and 5K run. For more information visit racesonline.com. Professional Bull Riders Tupleo’s BancorpSouth Arena will host the Professional Bull Riders at 8p.m. For more information visit bcarena.com.


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MSU Riley Center hosts Alice Tan Ridley Alice Tan Ridley will perform at 7:30 p.m. in Meridian. Tickets are $22-28. Call 601696-2200 or visit msurileycenter.com for more information.

Christmas in July Local Starkville businesses will participate in Christmas in July and offer discounts and Santa around town in his summer attire. For more information visit visit.starkville.org.

Starkville Community Theatre: Unplugged Unplugged is a SCT summer fundraiser through July 21 and July 26-28 at Starkville Community Theatre. Reservations are strongly suggested. Champagne/dessert reception will follow each show. Unplugged is a musical of the old MTV Unplugged acoutic show. Music ranging from pop to country to gospel. For more information visist stc-online.com. Sip N Shop Dine and enjoy music from 5-10 p.m. in downtown Louisville. For more information visit winstoncountyms.com.

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Jeremy Camp and Kutless Jeremy Camp and Kutless will perform at the BancorpSouth Arena at 6 p.m. in Tupelo. Call 662-841-6528 or bcarena.com for more information.

unWine Downtown The Starkville Development Partnership will host unWine Downtown. Enjoy a glass of wine at each participating merchant while shopping with a discount. For more information visit starkville.org.

Sounds of Summer Downtown Columbus will host the Sounds of Summer at the Riverwalk from 7-9 p.m. Come enjoy live music for a fun-filled night. For more information visit columbusmainstreet.com.

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Summer Sunset Series Bring a blanket and enjoy the night in New Albany at the Summer Sunset Series. The event will be free to the public and will include movies and music. For more informa tion visit newalbanymainstreet.com. Heart O’Dixie Triathlon Philadelphia will hold the 33rd Heart O’Dixie Triathlon at 6:30 a.m. starting at Lake Tiak-O’Khata and finishing at the Neshoba County Fairgrounds. For more information visit heartofdixietri.com.

Miss Hospitality Pageant Pageant will be held at the Saenger Theater in Hattiesburg starting at 8 p.m. For more information and tickets visit misshospitality.com. Neshoba County Fair Philidelphia will hold the Neshoba County Fair through August 3 at the Neshoba County Fair Grounds which will include live entertainment, dancing, singing, harness race and more. For more information visit neshobacountyfair. com or see page 22.

Ladies Football Clinic

Q

BY SHEA ALLEN

uarterback or corner back? Tight end or left end? Safety or touchback? It’s easy for those of us lacking a Y chromosome to feel left out and confused when men start yelling at the refs for not calling a blatant hold on the offense – or whatever that means. Staying on top of the action is even more challenging when you’re high inside a stadium and you can’t really tell the difference between crimson and maroon from the upper deck of Davis Wade, let alone see the ball or the names on the backs of jerseys. Thankfully, the first family of Mississippi State football, Dan and Megan Mullen, are holding a Ladies Football Clinic on Saturday, July 21 in Davis Wade to provide female fans with a crash course in everything football and a behind-thescenes look at what it means to be a bulldog. Participants will meet the MSU coaching staff and players and learn actual plays used during the games, including that “spread offense” your husband keeps talking about. Ladies will travel where no lady as ever traveled before – inside the locker room and will have the opportunity to wear the real MSU uniform, including helmet, pads, jersey and gloves. On the field, Dan Mullen will teach each participant how to throw the perfect spiral. Dan, Megan, the coaching staff, their wives and the players will host a question and answer session, so prepare a list of your burning football questions because an opportunity like this is rare. And don’t forget your camera because you’ll want to show off to all your friends that picture of you with Dan and Megan. Once you’ve had enough testosterone for the day, the football clinic will wrap up with an Adidas fashion show. Then head home to talk football with confidence and gear up for the 2012 college football season. To register for the Ladies Football Clinic, visit www.hailstate.com/camps.

townandgownmag.com

| july 2012

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townandgownmag.com

| july 2012



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