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46 32

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Table of

Contents IN EVERY ISSUE

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6 8 10 12 72 74 81

Staff Letter From the Editor Calendar Trends Literature Events Advertisers

ANNOUNCEMENTS

11 Katie Brown and Kevin Langston

HOME AND GARDEN 16 Neighborhood Strong 20 With These Hands

FEBRUARY 2014

TASTE AND TOAST 22 It’s a Southern Thing 27 Easy Weeknight Meals 32 It’s Anything But a Secret!

HEALTH AND BEAUTY 38 8 Ways to Love Your Skin 42 What’s in your bag? 44 New Year to Staying Fit

LIFE AND STYLE

36 Blog 46 Behind the Camera with Blake McCollum 52 Meet the Locals... Simone Cottrell 58 ...And the Rain Came to Mayfield 62 A Cup of Lindsay Jo 64 Hipster Grunge: A Fashion Intersection and State of Mind

On the Cover

This delicious Clementine Baked Chicken is one of three “Easy Weeknight Meals” found on page 27.Photography by Lisa LaFontaine Bynum.

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Corrections: January (Volume 3, Number 3): Page - Measuring cups and three-bowl server not avaliavble at Merle Norman Luna Bella; Page 60 - Peter’s Pottery found at Purple Elephant; Page 73 - Lace headband by Christine’s Couture.


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A PRODUCT OF HORIZON OF MISSISSIPPI P.O. Box 1068 | Starkville, MS 39760 www.townandgownmagazine.com

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STAFF

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DON NORMAN | PUBLISHER - sdnpub@starkvilledailynews.com CLAIRE MASSEY | EDITOR - claire@townandgownmagazine.com

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ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

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CHELSEA CURE - chelsea@ townandgownmagazine.com SAMANTHA BUTLER - samantha@ townandgownmagazine.com

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INTERNS

BECCA HORTON SARAH CARPENTER LOREN GAMBRELL LINDSEY NORMAN CATHERINE STUKENBORG

{CONTRIBUTORS} AMY TAYLOR CHRISTINE TIBBETT LINDSAY JO WILKINSON

{WRITERS} FORREST BLACKBOURN JOE LEE SUSAN O’BRYAN RICHELLE PUTNAM

{PHOTOGRAPHERS} DIVIAN CONNER ASHLEY COVIN LAURA DANIELS

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STYLIST

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NATALIE PHILLIPS

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DESIGN}

CLAIRE MASSEY

{ADVERTISING

DESIGN}

CHRIS MCMILLEN Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS, 39760, or call 662-323-1642. 6

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Editor

Letter from the

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ou know the things that seem to be right under our nose that we tend to over look? Or, is it the puzzle piece to what we miss or have missed? Those small, over-looked aspects to life, like knowing who your neighbors are, morning coffee with long-time friends, a simple notebook for a little girl or boy in a struggling village over seas, or the creative minds behind an extraordinary, successful project. Open your eyes this month and see what you have been missing in our area. The experiences this month were unimaginable as I met with the people that make this month’s issue so special. What an experience it was to sit down with a group of ladies that form a wonderful neighborhood who have no problem lending a missing ingredient to a cake recipe when asked. And how could I forget the “regulars” at Starkville Café who treated me to a cup of coffee and a delicious breakfast – of course, the Liars Table was taken! Starting this month, we brought a new travel section to the magazine. We asked few Amory, Miss. locals, “What is a must while visiting Amory?” Bill’s Hamburgers topped the list and after visiting during lunch, it exceeded my expectations. Hamburgers are served on wax paper and made with or without onions and mustard. Then a few home-cut potatoes are fried and served along with a cold, glass bottle of Coca-Cola. Not much has changed for Bill’s since they opened in 1929 and probably never will! There is one thing everyone needs to add to their New Year’s resolution list this year - enjoying the small things. I’m going to get off my phone, stop tweeting and instagraming and look up for once. My generation and many more to come are missing what is in front of them. We need to bring back the simple acts of communicating with locals, learning who our neighbors are and what we are missing right outside our backdoor. So, are you going to take the challenge? Happy Reading,

Claire Massey Editor

For our Readers Subscribe

Get Town and Gown Magazine delivered right to your doorstep! Subscribe for $48 a year, $24 for six months or $4 for one time. To order call 662-3231642 or email info@townandgownmagazine.com.

Weddings or Engagements January is our Bridal issue! Wedding and engagement announcement pricing is listed at townandgownmagazine. com. Submit 15-20 wedding photos to info@townandgownmagazine.com for review to be featured in Town and Gown Magazine.

Events

Town and Gown Magazine would love to be at your next event. If your organization or business is having an event please email info@townandgownmagazine.com a month before event date. We cannot promise we will be at all events, but we will try!

If we missed out

Send us your event photos with names from left to right (if available) and a brief description of event to info@ townandgownmagazine.com or mail or drop off a disc to 304 Lampkin St., Starkville, MS 39759.

Give a Town andGown! Town and Gown Magazine offers gift cards for subscriptions. Call us at 662323-1642 to order. Pricing listed above under subscription.

Previous Issues

Miss an issue? We can ship a copy of any previous issue to you for only $4. Call us at 662-323-1642.

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Happy Valentine’s Day From Town and Gown Magazine

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2014

February Submit calendar events each month to be in our monthly calendar. Email info@townandgownmagazine.com with event information. Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 Volunteer Emerson’s Fresh Start/ Farm to School every Friday @ 9 a.m.

Teach art at the Boys and Girls Club: Every Tues./ Thurs. @ 4:45 p.m.

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First Thursday in Columbus: Join partcipating downtown Columbus merchants as they extend their hours the first Thurs. of each month from 5-7 p.m. 6

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Starkville Young Volunteer at Professionals @ Peter’s Rock Magnolia Manor Food Pantry every Wednesday from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at 10 a.m.

Starkville Community Theatre: Steel Magnolias Feb. 13-16 & 18-22 $15 Adults; $10 Children

7 Rotary Rodeo Feb. 7-8 @ MSU Horsepark

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Happy 15 Valentine’s Day Opening weekend for MSU Baseball

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Magnolia Independent Film Festival Feb. 20-22

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Bettersworth Auditorium @ 7:30 p.m.

MSU’s 136th Birthday Celebration @ Colvard Student Union Bull Ring at MSU - 11 a.m.

22 Meridian Mardi Gras: 11 a.m.-5 p.m., City Hall Lawn in downtown Meridian.

Facebook @ Town and Gown Mag; Instagram @townandgown; Twitter @townandgownmag1


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ieutenant Colonel and Mrs. Lavell W. Brown, III, of Starkville, Mississippi, announce the engagement of their daughter, Katherine (Katie) Elizabeth Brown, to Kevin Van Langston, son of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Van Langston of Madison, Mississippi. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mrs. Erline Pogue Brown and the late Lavell Wheeler Brown, Jr. of Starkville, Mississippi, and General James Edwin Womack and the late Jeannie Crowe Womack of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Miss Brown is a 2004 graduate of Starkville Academy and a 2008 graduate of Mississippi State University, where she received a Bachelor of Arts in International Business. She earned her Juris Doctor at the University of Alabama School of Law in May 2012. Miss Brown is currently practicing real estate law at Brown Law Office in Starkville, Mississippi. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Austin Eugene (Gene) Langston of Salem, Arkansas, and Mrs. Shirley McMullen Sims and the late William Edward (Bill) McMullen of Hazen, Arkansas. Mr. Langston is a 2000 graduate of Madison Ridgeland Academy and a 2004 graduate of Mississippi State University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts in Real Estate and Mortgage Finance. He is currently employed as a Regional Sales Representative at ChemAqua. The couple will exchange vows March 15, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Starkville, with a reception to follow at the Stables of Starkville. february

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eet Kate, she is one of Town & Gown’s newest finds. Kate Kubler is a heartfelt blogger and photographer from Mississippi who loves to document every aspect of life. From proposals and new mommy tips to fashion and DIY’s, her blog “Kate and Kuby” covers almost everything. When Kate and her husband were married, she wanted to be able to remember what life was like when it was just two, and at the age of 19 she started her blog. Her and her husband now have a son, and she loves to document just as much now as when she started it. There is one post on Kate’s blog that stood out the most to us, and it was her younger brother’s proposal. Kate met her brother’s fiancé, Alyssa, at a family Christmas event for the first time three years ago. Skeptical at first, Kate realized how special she was to her younger brother, Ricky, and knew she was the perfect one for him. Kate’s brother, Ricky, and his fiancé, Alyssa, as Kate took their engagement photos.

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Proposal and engagement photography by Kate Kubler.

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fo l l ow h e r bl o g

kateandkuby.blogspot.com Ricky and Alyssa went on their first date at Starbucks and that would be the place where Ricky would propose. Family and friends all arrived early to help set up for the surprise proposal and anxiously waited in the two small bathrooms at the coffee shop. Ricky had placed the ring (that he picked out on his own) on a Church shaped ornament on the Starbucks Christmas tree. Ricky and Kate waited in the back while their anxiety rose for her arrival. When Alyssa finally arrived at the Starbucks, Ricky and Kate snuck out of the back when she was not looking. Alyssa, now shocked, saw family and friends emerging from the two bathrooms. The whole proposal went off without a hitch and the couple is now happily engaged awaiting their wedding date. The newly engaged couple, accompanied by family and friends, spent the evening celebrating and enjoying each other’s company. Kate’s blog can be found at www.kateandkuby.blogspot.com. Her photography site can also be found through her blog, Katie Kubler Photography. KKP specializes in session types such as engagements, proposals, maternity, play-dates, and more out of the DeSotoand Tate counties of Mississippi. Kate has such a special gift that she shares through her blog and photography. We encourage all of our readers to check out her blog and let us know what you love best about it! 14

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HOME AND GARDEN

Betty Sue, Kitty Henry, Pattie Little, Lisa Thomas, Paula Prather, Tamra Grimes, Kathy Prentice, Sandy Jackson and Jacqueline Garner at Lost Pizza Co. for their monthly meeting.

Neighborhood

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By Ric helle Putnam Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner and Ashle y Co vin

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n one of Starkville’s most desired subdivisions, residents are leaving the privacy and safety of their own homes to reach out to neighbors and make their neighborhood a better place – for everyone! Over seven years ago, Carol and Keith Winfield built the first house in Country Club Estates located in Starkville. As more houses were built and families moved in, they watched the neighborhood develop into a small community. “Before we moved into Country Club Estates we had not lived in a neighborhood for many years. We had friends, but no close neighbors,” said Carol. “It has been so much fun watching the children play and seeing them grow. We love sitting outside in late afternoon and interacting with our neighbors.”

Neighbors, Mary Bradway, Patty Spivey and Kathy Prentice, of the County Club Estates in Starkville at their annual Christmas Party.

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Pattie Little, Patty Spivey at their neighborhood Christmas Party.

Kathy and Tommy Prentice were also one of the first families to build in the subdivision. “I have lived in neighborhoods where I have not known my neighbors,” said Kathy. “When we were building this house, I was miserable. We had neighbors, but we weren’t social with them. It was just like being on another planet and I felt very isolated and alone.” Now a six-year resident of Country Club Estates, Kathy is building her second house in the subdivision. “It’s a great neighborhood,” she said. “We love and really enjoy each other.” Here, neighbors have become family. If a fire truck rolls up to a neighbor’s house, everyone checks on that neighbor to see if they can help. If a mother comes down with the

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flu, the neighbors help with the children. If someone goes out of town, the neighbors keep watch over the house. Plus, Carol added, one of your neighbors may know how to do a quick fix on your computer, or how to do a house project, or even agree to feed and walk your pet while you are away from home. The first neighborhood cookout was seven years ago and included a small group of about 40 people. “This event has grown to include over 100 people,” said Carol. Each year, on the Monday after Mother’s Day, the subdivision holds the cookout that includes all the families living there. “We meet in the mid-section of the neighborhood and cook hamburgers and hot dogs,” said Kathy. “Everybody brings a dish.” Kathy and Carol also participate in smaller groups. “We wanted to see each other more than once a year,” said Kathy, “so we formed the lady’s group and within the group formed a couple of smaller groups.” It’s a great opportunity to get to know everybody and to meet any new neighbors in the subdivision, Carol explained. “Smaller groups plan their own activities according to their interest.” About 20 women are in the smaller group, most enjoying their mid-lives. This group has been together a little over two years. At Easter, they host an Easter Egg Hunt. Close to Halloween, they “Boo” each other by making little ghosts cards that read: You’ve been booed. The ghost, along with a little gift bag of Halloween candy or some type of fall item is secretly placed on a neighbor’s porch. In turn, the neighbor being “Booed” displays the ghost on their front door or window. They, in turn, make up and deliver another ghost and gift bag to another neighbor. No one knows who slips the ghost and bag onto their porch, but the ghosts keep showing up until everyone has been booed! This past October, one of the ladies in the group hosted a chili night and everyone brought different types of chili. At the end of November, the group did a cookie swap. They also held a high tea, which may not appeal to everyone because it’s something from the past, but all who attended from ages 30 to 70 enjoyed it. “It’s good to have diversity in that way,” said Kathy, “and bring back some of the old into the new again.” The group meets annually for dinner to decide what type of event each is going to host and in what month. In the past, they have held a get-together every other month.


However, they have decided that on the off months, they will meet for lunch or go out to dinner. The South has long been known for its hospitality and fellowship, but in an era of social media, Skype, texting, and people clinging to their privacy, Kathy and Carol agree that being neighborly is fast becoming a thing of the past. In Starkville, we have the best of both words, Kathy explained. “We are still a small enough town where you can know each other. But with the University, people move in and people move out, so it feels big. You don’t know your neighbors.” Kathy grew up in the era where you did know your neighbors. If you needed to borrow an ingredient for a recipe, you didn’t hesitate marching over to your neighbor’s house and knocking on the door. “I think a lot of younger women aren’t familiar with that. In our fast paced society they are not getting close to their neighbors. We’re in our own worlds.” Kathy loves knowing that in her neighborhood if she does need a cup of flour or a teaspoon of vanilla, she can still run next door or down the street and borrow what she needs. Many families are simply too busy, most being two income families with children, said Carol. “There is just not enough time after they get home from work and tend to all their children’s activities.” Still, Carol feels it’s important for neighbors to build relationships and get together on a regular basis. “Neighbors can become an extended family and be there for each other. Good neighbors help each other out when needed.” Therefore, instead of technology separating Carol from her neighbors, she uses email and social media to communicate things going on in the neighborhood. Possibly the best thing about the neighborhood is the diversity, from ages to backgrounds to talents and skills. But with diversity comes a variety of views, opinions, and beliefs. So how do they all get along? “If you’re around somebody long enough, you’re going to see flaws,” said Kathy. “I think we’re all on our best behavior because we do care about one another and respect each other enough to simply enjoy each other’s company.” As with most things in life, Kathy realizes there is more than one way to do something and that having other people’s influences and opinions is a good thing. “You learn from each other and become more accepting.” In other words, said Kathy, we live by: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. “Unless you’ve lived in the South,” said Kathy, “you may be overwhelmed by the hospitality at first.” Given time, however, the camaraderie and fellowship of good neighbors make you glad you moved to friendly neighborhood in Starkville, Mississippi.

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WITH THESE HANDS

Amy Taylor Taylor, a Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a Bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a Master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-ityourself crafter, artist and has a passion for home design and projects.

*

Even write on these mugs. Be creative by writing names, words, phrases, Bible verses or anything else of your interest!

@townandgown Instagram us a photo of your custom, finished mug. We love to see what our readers are up to!

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D

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o you have old or plain coffee mugs you want to replace? Instead of buying new ones, add some personality to what you already have! There are countless ways you can spruce up your mugs to use in your home, or as gifts. Materials: Coffee mugs (white is shown here, but colored ones can also be used) Permanent markers (Metallic Sharpies are shown here. However, “Porcelain” brand markers work better. They’re just not as easy to find in stores.) Painter’s tape Clear sealer or glaze Oven

1.Tape the mug in the design of your choice. Color in a thin layer first, letting it dry, then color in more layers. 2.Peel away the tape, fill the mug with a small amount of water and place it on a pan in the oven. Then set your oven to 350 degrees. DO NOT put the mug in a hot oven. It will crack. Leave the mug in the oven for about 30 minutes. Let the oven cool down before removing. 3. Place painter’s tape around the rim of the mug. Set it UPSIDE DOWN, and spray with the clear glaze sealer. You do not want to spray the glaze inside the mug. It won’t hurt you if some of it gets in there, but it’s still better to avoid it.

*The sealer should protect the paint, so you can drink out of this mug! To clean, wash it by hand. I have not tested these mugs in a dishwasher. february

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It’s a Southern Thing...

The “Main” Regulars

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By Joe Lee l Pho t og r aph y b y Laur a Daniels

generation ago, John Peeples joined his friends for breakfast and hamburger steak at the Starkville Café. Little did he know, he would own the establishment one day. “I actually think of myself as the caretaker, not the owner,” said Peeples, who worked for Ducks Unlimited and owned a catering business before buying the Café in 2009. “As a lifelong resident of Starkville, I know what this place means to the community. I try to keep it fresh and clean, make sure it’s the place the locals want to eat.” In its same location on East Main since 1945, the Café is open for breakfast and lunch seven days a week and serves dinner on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. It features red-paneled walls, black leather booths, a black-and-white tiled floor, and Formica-topped tables. There’s original artwork from Carole McReynolds Davis, loads of MSU sports memorabilia, vintage soft drink signs, and a chalkboard with daily specials. There are enough characters in the Café each day to launch a successful Hollywood sit-com, or an equally popular reality show. But the sense the visitor picks up very swiftly is that of family. One of the most beloved regulars is John Crawford, a stalwart of the “Liars Table” and the lone Ole Miss grad in the bunch. Pictures of him – which are tacked up on a wall near the table – include Crawford drinking from an MSU coffee cup, eating while unaware that an MSU sign had been affixed to his shirt, and posing with the newly-installed Black Bear mascot. 22

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Clockwise from top left: Regulars on an early Monday morning; one of Starkville Café’s cooks, Felicia Crawford; Server, dishwasher, general manager, Darin Beall, and “caretaker”/owner of Starkville Cafe, John Peeples; an old notebook listing that day’s menu.


“I’ve been eating here since 1956. Started coming up here five mornings a week when my wife said twenty years ago that ‘the kitchen was closed,’” Crawford said. “I enjoy the camaraderie. They got nobody else to pick on.” Allan White has dined at the Café since 1989 and not only enjoys breakfast five days a week, but he’s back for lunch six times a week. Likewise, Andy Sims has been dropping in for breakfast just about every day for over two decades. He enjoys the Sunday

lunch and lists the squash casserole, cabbage, cornbread and the Baby Duck greens as his favorite menu items. As many as 25-30 folks cycle through both the Liars Table and the restaurant’s front table each day, as one group gives way to another as diners head off to work or run errands. Charles and Roxene Atkinson, both of whom retired 15-20 years ago, enjoy breakfast and lunch at the Café seven days a week and are also on hand each night dinner is served.

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But that’s not to say the Café is home to a group of cliques, where “outsiders” aren’t made to feel welcome. Shirley Basall moved to Starkville from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, in 2009 to be near her son after her husband passed away. She has made many friends at the Café and has gotten to know the staff so well they prepare different omelets for her each day. “They’re nice people of all kinds. They all blend in,” Basall said. “It’s a typical small-town gathering where people discuss everything from football to kids and grandkids. When the power was off one morning and I didn’t come in for breakfast, they called to check on me.” Darin Beall, the Café’s brand-new general manager, echoes that sentiment. Beall, whose wife grew up in Starkville, just moved his family from Fort Worth, Texas, and brings a decade of experience in the restaurant business as well as twenty-five years of customer service. “John told me, ‘You’re not coming to work here. You’re coming to join a family,’” Beall said. “And it is. Ninety-five percent of the customers who walk in are stopping at tables to say hello to folks. We’ll seat people at mostly-full tables when we’re tight on space, and our regulars are always receptive to meeting new people. I’ve watched conversations start right up.” The Café does especially big business on MSU home football weekends – it’s not uncommon for customers to be lined up out the door for a place to sit and enjoy a mouth-watering plate of eggs, bacon, grits, toast and a steaming cup of coffee.

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It’s also a regular dining spot for members of the Starkville Police Department (they have their own table in the adjoining room that was added to the original floor plan in 1983), as well as home to a group of World War II veterans who stop by once a month. “No governor of Mississippi has ever been elected who didn’t campaign here,” said Dan Moreland, who owned the Café for eighteen years and still enjoys meeting friends like Jimmy Cole at the front table. “The Jackie Sherrill retirement party (a decade ago) was held here. This is the first place a lot of alums go when they’re in town.” Many folks who love the Café say that very little has changed over the years – there’s still good food and good times with old friends – but the people have come and gone over the years. The front table crowd, which includes Mark Hedin, SPD Officer Andy Fultz, Pee Wee Gregg, and Jimmy Joe Buckley, is so close-knit that several of their friends who’ve passed away are memorialized on the wall adjacent to the table. “We talk about politics, the weather, hunting and fishing, and horses,” Buckley said. “I’ve met lots of hunters from all over Mississippi, and many from out of state.” Randy Pannell coaches the MSU rugby team and is a Coast transplant, having moved to Starkville after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He walked right up to the crew at the front table, asked if he could join them, and said he was immediately welcomed and became part of the conversation each day.


At the Liars Table, Carl Duckworth, Robert Bock, Marco Nicovich, Steve Langston and Hugh LeBaron also discuss the day’s news, sports, and weather. Additionally, they cover what isn’t in the newspaper, and other people’s business, of course. All enjoy the home-cooked food; Duckworth is partial to the brisket and fried okra. And they’re quick to rally around the Café’s staff in a moment of difficulty. “One of them had her paycheck stolen, and we took up a collection to reimburse her,” LeBaron said. “We check on our friends we eat with and send cards to them when we don’t see them, just to make sure they’re okay.” Peeples says that perhaps the biggest Café cheerleader of all is Carole McReynolds Davis, who grew up in Starkville and recalls eating meals there before 1950. Her husband, Frank, arrived from the Delta in 1957, and they stop by seven days a week for lunch or breakfast and sit at their favorite table. With their fiftieth wedding anniversary ahead in several weeks, where else would they hold the party? “It’s on Tuesday, March 18 at 5 p.m.,” Carole said. “We’ll have a tub of banana pudding, peanut butter sandwiches and tiny Cokes. We’ll have Joe Ray Underwood and Richard Brown’s band inside the front window of the main part of the building. The Café is really the hub of Starkville. It’s like you’re eating in your mama’s kitchen.” “The food is delicious. The hamburger steak with gravy and onions is out of this world,” Frank said. “Carole loves the oatmeal, the crispy bacon, the rutabaga and the homemade soup. Very little has changed: people come and go, but they still enjoy the food and talk about the same things.” Beall, who created a Café Facebook page and posts the menu each day, has learned very quickly what Peeples has known for years: their customers are extremely loyal to Renee Herd, Shirley Ross, Liz Johnson, Rita Jones and the other ladies who not only prepare and serve the food, but make it a point to get to know the regulars so well that – in many cases – a favorite omelet or breakfast plate and coffee is waiting when they walk in the door. “We put up Christmas stockings for the employees, and our customers loaded them with cards, cash, and M&M’s,” Peeples said. “There’s been very little turnover here, which I think says a lot – it’s the staff that keeps people coming back. We take each order by hand, cook it by hand, and deliver it by hand. My mother said that I never met a stranger, and my goal is simply to make people feel comfortable when they’re here.”

Page24 (clockwise from right): Regulars during lunch hours. Page 25 (clockwise from top): “Caretaker”/ owner of Starkville Café, John Peeples; Server, Rena Herd; old sign for servers to “stab” their tickets; John Peeples’ nickname is Baby Duck hinting the yellow duckies he receives from his customers.

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Easy Weeknight Meals

Ingredient

Meyer Lemons

By Lis a LaFontian Bynum

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Ingredient

Short Ribs

Braised Beef Short Ribs with cream corn

8 bone-in short ribs (about 5¾ lbs.) Kosher salt Extra-virgin olive oil 1 large Spanish onion, cut into ½-inch pieces 2 ribs celery, cut into ½-inch pieces 2 carrots, peeled, cut in ½ lengthwise, then cut into ½-inch pieces 2 cloves garlic, smashed 1½ cups tomato paste 2 to 3 cups hearty red wine 2 cups water 1 bunch fresh thyme, tied with kitchen string 2 bay leaves 28

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Season short ribs on all sides with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large pan or stockpot over medium high heat. Working in batches, brown ribs on all sides. Set aside. Drain grease and coat the pan with fresh oil. Puree onion, carrots, celery, and garlic in a food processor. Add to oil and sauté until tender, 5-7 minutes. Add tomato paste and sauté for another five minutes. Add red wine and scrape the bottom of the pan. Continue to simmer until liquid is reduced by half, about 10 minutes. Transfer vegetables to the crock of a slow cooker. Add thyme bundle and bay leaves. Nestle short ribs in the mixture. Cook on low for 4-6 hours until meat is tender and sauce is concentrated. Discard thyme bundle and bay leaves before serving. Serves 8


The Main Ingredients

Meyer Lemons

Short Ribs

Clementines

Photo (page 29)

Myer Lemon Pesto

and Feta Penne with Shrimp For the meyer lemon pesto: 1 meyer lemon, seeded and cut into wedges 1/2 cup basil (packed) 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. pine nuts 1/4 cup grated parmesan 3 Tbsp. olive oil salt and pepper to taste For the pasta: 1 pound penne pasta 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1/2 lbs. shrimp, peeled and deveined 1/4 cup chicken broth 1 cup meyer lemon pesto 1/2 cup feta, crumbled Combine pesto ingredients in food processor. Process

until everything is well combined. Cook penne in salted water according to package directions. In the meantime, season shrimp with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the shrimp and cook about 2-3 minutes per side, until shrimp is bright pink and opaque. Remove shrimp from the skillet and set aside. Add the chicken broth to the hot pan, scraping up any browned bits off the bottom of the pan. Remove pan from heat and stir in the pesto. Mix the feta into the pesto. Add the pasta to the pan and toss to coat. february

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Clementine Baked Chicken 1/3 cup chicken broth 1/4 cup olive oil 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed clementine juice 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp. grainy mustard 3 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 tsp. kosher salt freshly ground black pepper 8 chicken thighs, bone-in and skin-on 2 fennel bulbs, cut into quarters 4 clementines, unpeeled, sliced thin 2-3 few sprigs of fresh thyme In a large mixing bowl or resealable plastic bag, whisk together chicken broth, olive oil, clementine and lemon juices, mustard, maple syrup and salt. Season with pepper, to taste. Place chicken in the mixing bowl or bag. Toss gently until chicken is evenly coated with the sauce. Allow chicken to marinate in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours. Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Place marinated chicken skin side up in a 9 x 12 x 2-inch baking dish. Reserve the marinade. Arrange fennel slices in between the chicken, layer clementine slices and thyme over the top. Pour the reserved marinade over the entire dish. Bake chicken for 30 minutes. If the skin is browning too quickly, turn the oven down to 400ยบF and continue roasting until the skin is brown and crisp, 20 to 25 minutes longer. Allow chicken to rest for 10 minutes. Arrange everything in a serving platter and drizzle the pan juices over the top. Serves 8.

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Ingredient

Clementines


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Take a trip to Bill’s Hamburgers

It’s Anything But a Secret! By Ric helle Putnum Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

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t’s a typical morning at Bill’s Hamburgers in downtown Amory, located on the busy, but beautiful, TennTom waterway. Diana Wilkerson, restaurant manager for almost 20 years, arrives around 7 a.m. to stock the restaurant and turn the grill and fryer machines on. Not far behind her is James Wilkerson, who begins processing the meat. “We freshly grind our meat every single day,” said James. “It’s 100 percent beef and is never frozen.” To prepare Bill’s famous buns, they spread on mustard and onion, package the buns back up and store them above the grill to be steamed. “That way, all day long they are absorbing that flavor,” said James. “So even if you take the onions off, you still have the taste,” a process James calls the with/ without. The doors open at 7:30 a.m. for the breakfast crowd. So, what’s on the breakfast menu? Hamburgers!

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The restaurant first opened in 1929 as Bob’s Hamburgers, named after the original owner, Bob Hill. In 1955, Bob sold the business to longtime employee, Bill Tubb, who in turn renamed the restaurant Bill’s Hamburgers. For the past twelve years, Reid and Janice Wilkerson, who now live in Nashville, Tennessee, have been the owners. Their children, James and Crysta, and Reid’s sister-in-law, Diana, run the restaurant. The owners of Bill’s may have changed over the years, but its reputation has not. A local historical landmark, Bill’s is nationally recognized as one of the oldest continuous hamburger restaurants in the country. The first hamburgers in the U.S. were served with just mustard and onion. During the Depression, people brought a quarter to town, purchased a hamburger and drink at the restaurant, ambled down to the theatre to see the latest movie, and went home with change in their pocket. Of course, the prices at Bill’s have changed a bit, but tradition has not. Bill’s still offers the With, which includes mustard and onion, and the Without, which is simply meat and bun. The favorite among the customers is the Double Cheeseburger With. A suggestion from a University of Mississippi professor sent George Motz, America's foremost hamburger expert, to Amory to feast on a Bill’s Hamburger. Once he did, he included Bill’s in his book Hamburger America, which covered the 100 best hamburger joints in the country. In February 2013, while filming Motz’s documentary on hamburger restaurants in North Mississippi, the Travel Channel highlighted Bill’s Hamburgers. Both documentary film and book are titled Hamburger America and the film was nominated for a James Beard Award. Bill’s was also featured on the Travel Channel show, “Burgerland.”

Also visit: Murals by John H. Ward/JHW Studios Main Street from Vinegar Bend The Park Hotel

Amory Regional Museum Drive: Greenwood Springs to Splunge Drive: Hatley To Smithville

Plan trip:

Bed & Breakfasts:

www.amorymainstreetinc.com www.amoryrailroadfestival.com www.gomonroe.org www.aberdeenpilgrimage.com

Amory: The Old Place Bed & Breakfast Aberdeen: Three Goats Cottage Cypress Lakes Lodge

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“We’ve had people drive in from as far away as six states just to come eat because they saw us on TV,” said James. “They couldn’t believe we didn’t have lettuce, tomato or pickles.” Yes, Bill’s Hamburgers has survived all these years without serving lettuce, tomato and pickles although mayonnaise and ketchup are available upon request. Twenty years ago, French fries were added to the menu. In fact, Bill’s is the only place this side of the Mississippi River you can by their 100% Idaho Potato French fries. Competing against the many large hamburger and food chains can’t be easy, so how has Bill’s Hamburgers thrived almost unchanged since 1929? “The community keeps us going,” said James. “If it wasn’t for our community, we would’ve shut the doors a long time ago.” Community support is as important to Bill’s Hamburgers as it is to any other independent business. In return, Bill’s Hamburgers contributes to local charities and events. “After the tornado in Smithville, we had a policy. If you came in and you were a victim of the tornado, you were not allowed to pay for your meal, even if you wanted to,” said James, whose favorite thing about his hometown is that everybody is willing to help one another. “There are strong community and family ties here. I think that’s why Amory has stayed the same way for so many years.”

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Probably the biggest surprise of all is that Bill’s doesn’t do any advertising. In fact, all advertising is by word of mouth or by the people wearing Bill’s Hamburgers t-shirts that are sold at the restaurant. James credits a lot of their continued success to the daily, freshly processed meat they order from Mississippi producers, like Comer Packing Co. in Aberdeen and Mar-Dan, Inc. in Guntown. “Everything is so much fresher when you can get it right at your back door,” said James. “We know what we’re going to be serving and our customers know what they are going to be getting.” The special processing of the meat is a secret, but we do know that Bill’s sticks to a specific leanto-fat ratio. Also a secret is the superb seasoning of the meat. However, James did offer one hint: “Using the same grill for over 70 years may have a little to do with it.” On the other hand, the flavor of Bill’s hamburgers is anything but secret. You won’t find hamburgers anywhere in the world with the same taste as Bill’s because of the special processing and seasoning of meat and buns. While most resolutions for the New Year include change, Bill’s Hamburgers resolution has remained the same since 1929: Don’t change a thing.


Owners Reid and Janice Wilkerson’s son, James Wilkerson, cooks their famous hamburger for a packed lunch hour.

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By Sar ah Car pent er l Pho t og r aph y Cour t esy Mississippi S t at e Univ er sity

Day Mississippi State University

Date Night C

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For more Town and Gown Blog posts visit our website: www.townandgownmagazine.com

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ontemplating what to do on Valentine’s Day for your special someone? How about spending the evening with the MSU baseball team at Dudy Noble Field! Opening day for the 2014 baseball season to be on February 14, so there is no better way to plan the perfect date than to start the evening off with the Bulldogs! Opening pitch will be a 4 p.m. versus Hofstra. Every girl deserves a diamond this Valentine's, whether it is at the Dudy Noble diamond, or comes in a small box. With Dudy Noble Field offering such a fun environment, it is a great setting for long lasting or new relationships! Rather than your usual Valentine’s Day dinner and a movie, the baseball game offers an exciting change of plans. So let’s ditch the fancy dinners and dressy clothes, and come out to the baseball fields where burgers and T-shirts are the way to go! After such an astounding 2013 season and with the baseball team returning from Omaha, give them the home field advantage by packing Dudy Noble and the Left Field Lounge! You can catch your bulldogs play Hofstra all weekend long with two games also on Saturday and one on Sunday. Let’s start this season off with a bang, and cheer on our Bulldogs! Along with the baseball team playing Valentine's weekend, we do not want to miss out on other teams! Women's Basketball will be playing at home on Sunday, February 16. The game will start at 1 p.m. against Vanderbilt! This game will also be the Women's Basketball Breast Cancer Awareness Game, so come out and support the basketball team! Make sure you don’t strike out this Valentine’s Day and plan the perfect date with your Bulldogs!


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8 Ways to

Love

Your Skin By Be t han y R eed Hair s t on, M.D. Boar d-cer tif ied Der mont olois t Dir ect or of The Der mat ology Clinic and V it ality Skin & Spa

February is a great time to show people in your life how much you love that. It is also a wonderful time to take care of yourself and your skin. Check out the following 8 tips to show your skin that you care about how it looks and feels. >

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1.

Moisturize > People struggle with dryness and itching during the winter months. With so many products marketed to moisturize, it is often difficult to make the right choice. In general, people with oily skin looking for a little extra help will prefer a “lotion” formula. For those with dry skin needing to significantly hydrate, a “cream” is best. A moisturizer will be most effective and best absorbed if it is applied daily directly after the bath or shower.

2.

Use Sunscreen

>

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, an estimated one in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in a lifetime. Skin cancer is an abnormal growth of cells that most often develops on areas of the skin exposed to the sun’s rays. Skin cancer affects people of all races, but those who have light skin who sunburn easily have a higher risk. Ultraviolet light from the sun also accelerates premature aging of the skin. Studies have shown that regular application of a sunscreen can slow signs of aging as well as reduce the risk of skin cancer. No matter how cold it is outside, the sun shines all year, and sunscreen should be used in the winter as well as in the summer.

Choose the right Cleanser

3.

There is not one “best cleanser” on the market. Cleanser choice must be based on your age, complexion type, skin concerns, dermatologic conditions, and skincare goals. The face should generally be washed twice daily, in the morning and evening. In addition to keeping a clear complexion, proper cleansing ensures maximum performance from other skin care products. Two cleansers may be best for optimal results: mild cleanser may be more appropriate in the morning and then a foaming or exfoliating cleanser in the evening to remove cosmetics. february

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5.

Despite the fact that there are a multitude of products that can improve skin tone, texture, and signs of aging, too much of a good thing may be a bad idea. Combining too many skincare items can lead to irritated skin, rashes, and breakouts. If a person has sensitivity to a new regimen that contains multiple products, it is often difficult to determine which portion of the regimen is the problem. Then, one is left with avoiding all of the products, some of which may have been great choices for improvement. Additionally, mixing products may destabilize the active ingredients of each, effectively cancelling out the benefits. When beginning a new program, either keep it simple with a minimum number of active formulas or add in products serially so that your skin can adjust along the way.

8.

4.

Be careful of natural and “organic” All things natural are not necessarily good for the skin. Herbs, essential oils, and botanical ingredients may be a wonderful choice for some skin types, but they can also be a source of skin irritation for many people. When a person has an allergic reaction to an ingredient in a skincare formula, contact dermatitis (the same reaction we have to poison ivy) is visible on the skin. It is important that you understand your skin sensitivities and learn what your skin likes and does not like to avoid problems with contact dermatitis.

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Focus on the feet

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Keep it simple

The skin on our feet is naturally dry, which worsens in the winter. Dry feet that are not caused by a dermatologic problem such as eczema, psoriasis, athlete’s foot, or other skin condition will typically respond to moisturizers. Beneficial ingredients include extra-rich moisturizers like petrolatum, glycerin and shea butter, alpha hydroxyl acids to exfoliate, and antioxidants like vitamins E, C and A to help dry, cracked skin repair itself. A pedicure can also be very therapeutic in the winter when the licensed nail technician is able to pamper the feet and address dry hangnails, cuticles, and calluses.

Talk to the professionals

Skin concerns that do not improve with over-the-counter products may represent dermatologic conditions needing a medical evaluation. Dermatologists are physicians with advanced training in skin diseases. They also are experts in skincare product selection and can greatly assist you in choosing the best formulas for your specific skin type and needs. Before spending a fortune on a skincare regimen or trying to explore solutions for a skin concern in the skincare aisle, getting professional advice may save you time and money. Sometimes prescription formulas are needed to get the desired results whether for anti-aging or for a skin condition such as acne, eczema, or psoriasis. If you have returned to the skincare aisle at the store multiple times and are frustrated with your results or have invested much with minimal return – a little advice may go a long way. 40

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Life lessons teach us that we get what we pay for. This is true much of the time when it comes to skincare products. In general, prescription skincare products are more effective at targeting wrinkles and sunspots than over-the counter formulas, but price is not the determining factor. Despite the promises of many antiaging products, people do not always see major changes from an over-the-counter cream – regardless of how much you spend on it. It is very important for you to determine what your skin problems are and purchase products directly designed to improve those concerns. For example, an expensive anti-aging cream in a small jar may help prevent wrinkles but not necessarily be the best choice for dry skin when compared to less expensive options.


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What’s in your bag?

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HEALTH AND BEAUTY By Chr is tine T ibbe tt Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

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recently sat down with the first lady of Starkville, Lindsey Wiseman, and as always, she was perfectly poised and put together. Lindsey will be turning 30 this month, and she and Parker are expecting a new baby boy in April. Of course I had to find out all of her favorites: shopping destinations, restaurants and hang out spots. Accompanying Lindsey was her daughter, Amelia, and I can already see that at one year old, she takes after her mother with such a fun personality and a love of all things girly! This month, you’re getting the inside scoop on the contents of her handbag and Amelia’s bag, too. Q: What are some things that you never leave the house without? A: Lipstick, cell phone, credit card holder, and Amelia’s sippy cup. Q: What do you, Parker, and Amelia do for fun? A: Go to McKee Park. Of course MSU sports! We love tailgating and football in the fall, basketball games now and soon baseball. Amelia also has a blast at the open gym playtime for toddlers at ACPA here in Starkville and Parents' Morning Out at First Methodist. Q: Where do you and Parker go for a fun date night? A: We love going to the movies and dinner at the Veranda, Umi, La Terazza and Peppers. Q: Where do you go when you want to treat yourself? A: Bops! Q: Where are your favorite places to shop? A: Sprout, Giggleswick, Polka Tots, Deep South Pout, The Sundial, Occasions, and the Old Navy maternity section.

Christine Tibbett, Starkville resident, is an MSU graduate with a Bachelors degree in Apparel, Textiles, and Merchandising. She studied makeup artistry at the Atlanta Makeup Academy, and she is a licensed Esthetician (skin care specialist). In her spare time, she loves spending time outdoors, exercising, and has a passion for helping others look and feel their best.

Lindsey's Bag: - Bag, Michael Kors - Quilted cosmetic case in Signature Pink, Victoria’s Secret - Coin purse in Hydrangeas, Merle Norman Luna Bella - Mint box in Pink Birds, Merle Norman Luna Bella - Card holder in Vivid Snapdragon, Kate Spade - Leather gloves in Mocha, Ralph Lauren - Sunglasses, Ray Ban - Tribal iPhone case, Pandamimi - Striped ruffle umbrella, Forever 21 - Be Delicious perfume, DKNY - Glamorous Hands lotion in Diva, Merle Norman Luna Bella

- Breath strips in Cool Mint, Listerine - Glittered stripe brush holder, Forever 21 - Makeup brushes in Signature Pink, Victoria’s Secret - Lipstick in Pink & Proper, Maybelline - Bobbi Brown makeup: - Loose powder in Sand - Gel eyeliner in Black Ink - Eye shadow bronze color palette - Blush in Sand Pink - Pot rouge in Powder Pink - Dual action concealer in Light,Merle Norman Luna Bella : - Lip polish in Modern Princess, Merle Norman Luna Bella

Amelia's Bag: - Bag, Monogram Magic - Metallic pink changing pad by Kalencom, Giggleswick - Ice cream cone wipes case, Über Mom - Diapers, Luvs - Diaper cream, Desitin - Pink nasal aspirator - 30-second thermometer - Gerber pink pacifier - Graduates lil' Crunchies in Apple & Sweet Potato - Go-pack Teddy Grahams - Ella's Kitchen go-packs in Carrot + Butternut Squash and Pears Peas + Broccoli - CVP Hand Sanitizer - Puff pink mittens - Hot pink monogrammed bib

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Tom is a Starkville native who has a personal training company Tom Campbell Fitness. He offers one on one and small group training exclusively at Starkville Snap Fitness. Tom is a certified personal trainer through the National Council of Strength and Fitness, and he has a graduate degree in exercise science from North Dakota State University. Tom is a former assistant collegiate strength and conditioning coach who has been working in the Starkville community for the last four years.

>

Workout Clubs in the Area Starkville Cycling Club: www.starkvillecyclingclub. org Boardtown Runners: www.boardtownrunners.org Golden Triangle Running and Cycling Club: www.runcyclegtr.org

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New Year to Staying By Tom Cam pbell

Planning Ahead:

FIT

Easy Recipes - Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

BREAKFAST RECIPE LUNCH RECIPE

DINNER RECIPE

Ingredients: - 2 cups grated or finely chopped vegetables (Carrots, onion, zucchini, squash, asparagus, bell peppers, mushrooms, spinach) - 18 egg whites, or 2 ¼ cups of liquid egg whites - Ground black pepper - ¼ cup grated low-fat cheddar, jack, or mozzarella cheese - Hot Sauce (optional)

Ingredients: - 2 tsp. garlic powder - 2 tsp. lemon pepper seasoning chicken breasts - ½ tsp. seasoned salt - 4 small (4oz) boneless, skinless chicken breasts trimmed of visible fat - 1 cup lemon juice - 4 slices of lemon

Tom’s Egg White Bites

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly coat two 6-cup muffin pans with olive oil cooking spray. Spray a nonstick skillet with cooking spray and cook the vegetables briefly, until they reach the desired crispness or tenderness. Place a small amount of the vegetables in the bottom of each muffin cup, then fill the cups ¾ full with egg whites. Add black pepper, and other seasoning as desired. Sprinkle a small amount of cheese over each cup. Bake the eggs for 10 minutes, until they are just set. Cool in the pans. MAKES 12 (1-Bite) SERVINGS Per Serving: 40 calories, 6g protein, 3g Carbohydrates (3sugars), less than 1 g of fat

TCF BBQChicken Pizza

Ingredients: - 1 whole-wheat flour, 96% fat free tortilla (8” diameter) - 2 Tbsp. barbeque sauce (7 grams of carbs or less per 2 Tbsp.) - ½ cup (2 ounces) finely shredded light cheddar cheese - 2/3 cup (3 ounces) chopped grilled chicken breast - ¼ cup slivered red onion -1 ½ tsp. chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Lean Lemon Chicken

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Place the tortilla on a small nonstick baking sheet. Bake for 4 to 5 minutes per side, or until crisp. If air bubbles form, poke them with a fork, then press out the air with a spatula. Remove the sheet form the oven. Top the tortilla evenly in layers with the sauce, cheese, chicken, onion, and cilantro. Bake for 2 to 4 minutes or until the cheese is completely melted. Slice into wedges and serve immediately.

In a small bowl, combine the garlic powder, lemon pepper, and seasoned salt. Mix to blend. Rub the seasoning mixture evenly over the chicken. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly mist an 8 x 8 glass pan with olive oil spray and place the chicken in the pan. Pour the lemon juice over the chicken breasts and top each breast with a lemon slice. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the juices run clear. Remove from the oven. Let stand for 5 minutes. Serve the chicken with cooked or raw veggies.

MAKES 1 SERVING Per Serving: 381 calories, 45 g protein, 32 g carbs, 9 g fat

MAKES 4 SERVINGS Per Serving: 147 calories, 27 g protein, 7g carbs, 1g Fat


5 Easy Body Weight Exercises

Push-ups: Begin with your arms straight and your back flat. Slowly bend your arms and bring your body down to one inch above the ground. Keep your back flat and your head up. Make sure to keep your core tight and don’t let your hips sag down. Extend your arms and drive the body back to the starting position. This exercise can be modified and performed from the knees. Perform: 2 sets of 10.

Regular and Side Bridges: Lie on your back, supporting your body on your shoulder blades and feet. Knees are bent to 90 degrees and your feet are flat on the floor. Your hands are on the floor by your hips. Press through your heels and raise your body off of the floor. Your hips are pressed toward the ceiling so that your body is straight from your knees to your shoulders. Slowly descend and continue the next repetition before the buttocks returns to the floor. Do this the same way but support with your elbow and feet placed on top one another. Repeat on both sides moving hips toward the ceiling. Perform 2 sets of 15. Jumping Jacks: Begin with your feet together and your arms by your sides. Jump and spread your feet out to the sides about 2 to 2 ½ feet as you lift your arms to the side and over your head. Keep your core engaged and land gently with your heels on the floor. Immediately jump and pull your feet back in as you bring your arms to your sides. Perform 2 sets of 30 seconds.

Planks: The body is supported by the forearms and the toes. The torso should be parallel to the floor and the head up with the eyes focused straight ahead. The abdominal and gluteus muscles should be contracted throughout the exercise. Hold this position for a prescribed amount of time. Perform 2 sets of 30 seconds.

5 Health and Fitness

Apps

My Fitness Pal: This is an excellent app that will allow you to count your calories. It has the largest food database of any calorie counter.

Nike Fuel:

This app is an excellent options to aid in monitoring your activity levels, steps, and sleep. You have to purchase the bracelets but they provide beneficial data.

Nike+ Running:

This app will track your running/ walking. It allows you to set goals and participate in challenges.

C25K “Couch to 5K”:

This is an excellent app to promote running. It is tailored for the beginning runner to be able to build strength and stamina in 3 day a week running/walking program.

Virtual Trainer Bodyweight:

It’s a great app if you are traveling or if you are away from the gym. All of the exercises are bodyweight and most workouts last 20-25 minutes.

> > > > > > > > > >

Squats: Position your feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart. Keep your heels flat on the floor, chest out, and chin up. Slowly descend as if you’re sitting in a chair. Descend as your flexibility allows, but don’t go any lower than your thighs parallel to the floor. Push through your heels and extend your legs back into a standing position. Perform: 2 sets of 15 reps.

> > > > > > > > > >

*Note: the sets, reps and duration of the exercises can be increased once you become more comfortable with the exercises.

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Blake McCollum directing shoot for the Mississippi State University Softball team with player, Loryn Nichols.

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Behind the Camera with Blake McCollum By Becca Hor t on Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

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hat a great time it is to be a Mississippi State bulldog – having just concluded an interesting football season, currently rooting for the basketball teams on the courts and gearing up to see our favorite spring sports kick into gear. But as we prepare for the spring sports – baseball and softball, track & field, tennis and golf – takeover, we forget to remember all of the hard work that goes into promoting them before the athletes even don their uniforms in their respective arenas. The promotion of spring athletics certainly goes beyond the basic social media blasts and website advertisements, and this promotion gets put to use on posters and billboards around town and schedule cards to be handed out at athletic events. When it comes to the marketing of these sports, MSU’s graduate assistant of athletic marketing Rhett Hobart says the goal is to make the promotions stand out and appear wonderfully different from the previous promotion of the fall athletics. “For spring sports,” Hobart said, “we typically try to go a little brighter in color and more spring-like in our posters, schedule cards and design work.” While promotion of college sports in general can easily become repetitive and typical, MSU has managed to keep their athletic marketing sprightly and consistently unique. With the help of photographer and MSU graduate Blake McCollum, the promotion of Mississippi State University’s spring athletics and their athletes truly comes alive. february

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Left: Brett Pirtle (Baseball) Above: Florian Lakat (Tennis). Photography by Blake McCollum.

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Blake McCollum shoots as MSU Softball player, Amanda Ivy, looks on.

McCollum got the attention of the athletic marketing department after helping a friend with photos for a marketing class project, which required the student to create a slogan or poster of something MSU related. After his friend decided to use former MSU basketball player Dee Bost for the project’s photos (and after getting proper permission from the university), McCollum got the opportunity to photograph Bost and truly show his chops as a sports photographer. After receiving a large amount of feedback from tweeting the photo, McCollum got an unexpected call from the marketing president of the university. “I was bummed and worried that maybe it wasn’t truly cleared or I was in trouble. Long story short,” said McCollum, “they said they wanted me to do it again, but on a bigger scale.” McCollum was then asked to take some photos of the basketball players for MSU’s billboards and, he said, “it snowballed from there.” His unique photographic style and wonderfully dramatic use of lighting in his photos continue to make him a great addition to MSU’s athletic marketing team. “We began using Blake in the fall of 2012 because we felt like his style would fit very well into the new look we were wanting with our posters and graphic design work,” said Hobart. “He does a great job using different types of lighting to create really unique images that stand out, and we have really enjoyed working with him.”

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McCollum typically uses a black background behind the athlete in his athletic work and then uses lighting to “paint” the photo how he pleases. “I keep it simple and interesting at the same time,” McCollum said. “I feel like that is my goal – simple, modern, unique, crisp with a bit of delicacy and a lot of fun. It’s not worth it if you’re not having fun, so I always like trying new things when it comes to lighting.” It can be said that photographers tell stories through their photos, and McCollum is definitely not an exception when it comes to photographing MSU’s spring athletics. Through his photos and the marketing of the sports, McCollum wishes to show viewers that MSU’s athletes are truly “the best in the country.” He uses the unique delicacy and lighting of his photographic style to make each sport personal as well as entertaining. “That’s what I like – showing something you’ve seen, like a soccer player diving or a baseball player throwing or a tennis player serving and making it different and interesting. The story I’m trying to show is that these athletes are amazing at what they do,” McCollum continues, “and something so basic can be extremely interesting. It just depends on how you view it.” While McCollum has undoubtedly found success in his athletic work for the university, he also enjoys photographing members of MSU’s Fashion Board and their fashion shows as well as shooting Miss MSU every year. It is obvious that – despite his graduation from our favorite college institution – McCollum isn’t done with Mississippi State University and vice versa. McCollum says that working with MSU’s spring athletes is a unique photographic experience. The opportunity to photograph the athletes for the various spring sports has brought some good friends into his life, such as the men’s golf team and the baseball team – who always “keep it interesting.” Hobart also admits that working with MSU’s athletes on a professional and personal level is a wonderful experience, especially when the athletes share their unique personalities that many of MSU’s sports fans don’t typically get to see. “We try to share those personalities with our fans through many of the marketing methods that we use,” Hobart said. “We’re a family, and we want our fans to feel connected to our student athletes – to not only see how great of athletes they are, but how great of people they are as well.” Rhett Hobart also stated that the major principles of Mississippi State University’s athletic marketing are “to focus on the student athlete and to aggressively promote Mississippi State.” With the help of photographer Blake McCollum, they’ve accomplished these goals – and a successful spring sports promotion – in style.

www.blakemc.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/blakemccollumphotography Twitter: @blakemccollum Instagram: @blakemccollum 50

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Fred Thomas (Basketball) Lower Leftt: Rachael Zdeb (Softball); Lower Right: Jonathan Holder (Baseball). Photography by Blake McCollum.

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Meet . . SIMONE the local

COTTRELL

YOUR AMERICAN COUSIN By Joe Lee l Pho t og r aph y submitt ed

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hile many Starkville folks were unwrapping presents Christmas morning and hoisting glasses of champagne to ring in 2014, Starkville native Simone Cottrell spent the holidays in Cambodia, some 9,000 miles from Oktibbeha County. Hardly a vacation, however, the trip was a culmination of years of hard work put forth by Cottrell and the generosity of people all over Starkville and the MSU campus. “I created a fundraiser called ‘Your American Cousin’ that raised almost $4,000 to purchase school supplies for two villages in Cambodia,” Cottrell said. “My mom’s from Cambodia and I went there for the first time in December to visit the village my mom grew up in. There are approximately 600 students in the two schools I visited. While I was there, family members assisted the purchasing and the distribution of the school supplies.” Cottrell, who graduated from Starkville High School in 2003, was a Communication major at MSU with an emphasis in Theater and graduated in 2008. Today she’s an administrative assistant in the Dean’s office of the College of Arts & Sciences. Cottrell at Kompong Luong with teachers and principal outside of a school building.

Cottrell at Kompong Roteh giving a school supplies packet to young girl from the fifth grade class.


Cottrell at Kompong Roteh. ���I’m not sure what prompted the students in Kompong Roteh to hold their school supplies packets in the air, but they did. Of course, I couldn’t resist joining in with my excitement with some old fashioned American jazz hands. The kids loved it!”

“The children in these villages are extremely poor, and the Cambodian government requires such purchases as materials and uniforms in order to attend school,” she said. “For example, uniforms are shared between the children that attend school in the morning, and then switched to children who attend in the afternoons. My father visited last year and told me that the teachers – who get paid only $20 a month – were using photocopied materials from the 1960s to teach.” Amanda Glenn-Bradley met Cottrell while both were members of the MSU Famous Maroon Band. A resident of North Carolina, Glenn-Bradley shares the birthday month of September with her friend and said that Your American Cousin stemmed from Cottrell’s desire to put what she calls “Sim-tember” to good use. “I think Simone has been so successful because she’s incredibly passionate and is amazing at elucidating this passion in terms that everyone can understand,” Glenn-Bradley said. “Since I’m out of state now, we keep in contact via social media, so I got to see the social explosion that accompanied the movement. “Also, you can see your effort being put to good use. Sure, someone can donate their monies to a charity, but Simone has kept everyone in the loop and shared where their funds go in order to help these children. For me, at least, I saw a chance to really make a difference through a friend.”

Kompong Luong only source of "fresh" water, a well that is located on the school grounds.

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“Once the students heard the "putter-putter-putter" of boats, they came running down the hill into the muddy banks of the Tonle River to help carry boxes up to their school.�

nts g stude ee youtsn for trading r th h ote ke pong cRh others pac a At Kom e g in ll eyebaon. later

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At Kompong Luong the oldest of the three school buildings housing fourth and fifth graders, the foundation and walls have completely separated.


“The Simone I know today is the same Simone I have known since we were little girls,” said Cottrell’s high school classmate Ashley Gillespie. “She is unfiltered and outspoken in a way that should be admired. She also has a very gentle spirit. She has always been a friend to the friendless and never hesitates to lend her hand or heart to someone who needs it. “I was not surprised at all when Simone contacted me about her cause and making a contribution. She has always been very vocal about her culture and ethnicity, which did not go unnoticed to her peers in a small Mississippi town. Now she has made a tangible difference. I am inspired by her amazing accomplishment.” Cottrell hopes to continue Your American Cousin each year. She documented her trip on her blog, sim1saysgo@ tumblr.com, and posted photographs of everything from the marshy surroundings to the antiquated school buildings that house the students she desires so deeply to help. Some pictures are lighthearted, including a squeamishlooking Cottrell after she tasted a deep-fried cricket smothered with honey and sesame seeds. Others show the young students packed into classrooms that resemble one-room schoolhouses in this country from perhaps a century ago. february

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Above: At Kompong Luong, Cottrell and her father, Dr. Stephen Cottrell (assistant director of MSU’s International Institute [yellow shirt]) meet with teachers and the principal for almost two hours. They talked about what the needs are for the school in Kompong Luong and, for many, this was the first time that they felt comfortable enough discussing their frustrations with Cambodia’s education system. Right: At Kompong Roteh a young boy greets and thanks Cottrell with a traditional Cambodian “som pas”. Because the fingertips are higher than his chest, he is showing the highest respect to someone who is not royalty or a religious figure.

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“Probably the thing that stuck with me the most is how persistent Simone was with trying to get support,” said Martin McCoy, a graduate student in Denton, Texas, who met Cottrell while at MSU. “Your American Cousin targets a very specific and poignant need. Also, I learned about what’s going on in Cambodia. I had no idea there was a link between young girls not being in school and ending up in human trafficking. Why wouldn't I try to help?” “What touched me so far about this fundraiser is that most of the money came from friendships I made at MSU while an undergrad,” Cottrell said. “Starkville may not be the most metropolitan college town, but I firmly believe that it is what you make of it. When I ask my fellow alumni what experiences stand out when thinking about their time at MSU, it is the friendships made that last years after graduation.” Another of those college friends, Casey Heflin, was so inspired by Cottrell that she did her own fundraising through www.charitywater.org. “I had the great fortune to go on a trip to the Dominican Republican last June, and while I was there the community I was staying in finally struck water where they had been trying to dig a well forever,” said Heflin, a teacher at East Rankin Academy in the Jackson area. “The importance of clean, usable water had meant something to me for a while, and Simone’s fundraiser planted the seed I needed to start my own. “My birthday was coming up and I found out about Charity: Water’s birthday campaigns, so I just went for it. My campaign ended New Year’s Eve and raised $320. It seems like a small amount, but that’s sixteen people in the world who will hopefully have access to clean water, and it makes me very happy.” “My friends, my Famous Maroon Band members, my Sigma Alpha Iota sorority sisters, professors, classmates, resident advisers, student workers – they all came out to help children thirteen time zones away,” Cottrell said. “Because I believed in it, they believed in it with me.”

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A c t ... And the Rain Came to

Mayfield

Donna Clevinger, director of “...And the Rain Came to Mayfield” and Rasneda Forbes, assistant director of Holmes Cultural Diversity Center at Mississippi State University. 58

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t i o n Keynote Speaker:

Ernest Green

Born in Little Rock, Ark. in 1941, Ernest Green rose to prominence when he and eight other students tried to enroll in the white Central High School. Their decision to enter Central came on the heel of the historic 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, which declared that segregation in public education is illegal. The students became known as the “Little Rock Nine.” After earning his diploma, Green went on to receive his bachelors and masters degrees from Michigan State University. He has also been awarded honorary doctorates from three colleges. He has been an Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employment and Training during the Carter Administration. He has spent most of his professional career as an investment banker. Information courtesy of: Mississippi State University Department of Communications; Photo courtesy of American Program Bureau, Inc.

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By Joe Lee Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

ive years before James Meredith became the first African American student at Ole Miss, an Arkansas high school student named Ernest Green – along with eight other African Americans – attempted to integrate Central High School in Little Rock. The students became known as the “Little Rock Nine,” making national news when Governor Orval Faubus refused their enrollment before President Dwight Eisenhower intervened and ordered the state of Arkansas to admit them. Green, who went on to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Social Science and a Master’s in Sociology from Michigan State University, joined Lehman Brothers in 1987 and is the Managing Director for Public Finance in the company’s Washington, D.C. office. In December 1999, President Bill Clinton presented him with the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest honor given to a civilian. As part of Black History Month, Green, now 72, will give the keynote address at MSU on Thursday, February 27. february

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“Ernest Green’s robust contributions to American society long after his courageous accomplishments at Central High School make his life one worth of close examination,” said Sid Salter, Director of the Office of University Relations at MSU. “Mr. Green is a role model not only for the sheer courage in his role in the struggle for civil rights, but also for his commitment to a fiercely competitive business career among Wall Street’s finest and most able players. “Since the late 1950s, Mr. Green has lived a life of service that truly complements his role as a pivotal civil rights activist. We hope our student body and the broader university community will join with Starkville and Oktibbeha County residents in hearing what this legendary man of principle has to say.” Dr. Donna Clevinger, a professor of Theater in Department of Communication and a Senior Honors Fellow at MSU Honors College, is directing three performances of “…And the Rain Came to Mayfield” at the end of this month. She and Dr. Stephen Middleton, Director of African American studies at MSU and a professor in the Department of History, are working to promote Green’s talk and get people around the Golden Triangle interested in seeing the play. “James Meredith spoke at MSU several years ago, before I got here,” Clevinger said. “I wanted to bring in a speaker who could discuss the turbulent times in the South. That’s how Dr. Middleton and I arrived at inviting Mr. Green. I asked for his support of us putting on the play. Then I went to Cultural Diversity Center and asked if they wanted to include it during Black History Month as part of their activities.” “Ernest Green is a true trailblazer of the civil rights movement,” said Cedric Gathings, Director of the Holmes Cultural Diversity Center at MSU. “His tenacity and fortitude during an incredibly difficult time for African Americans shows the undeniable power of human strength. Through his sheer bravery and commitment to equality, he secured his place in history when he enrolled in Central High School’s student body. “Students will benefit greatly from hearing stories of individuals like Green, who were integral to the success of the civil rights movement. For the younger generation, the realities of deep-seated racism in America go unremembered. Hearing stories from Green will remind students of the immense price that was paid for the liberties we experience.” Clevinger said that “Mayfield” was first produced in Alabama and has been around about twenty-five years. “There’s a young man named Carl who, in 1962, wants to go to college,” Clevinger said of the play. “He’s from a very small Mississippi town, and his father – who is running for mayor – wants him to stay there and help run the family-owned, white-only business, which is a rundown luncheonette and gas station. Carl meets Nathan, and the two of them become friends and realize how much they have in common.” A big part of the show will be the music from that era. Clevinger met with Steve Ellis, General Manager of the MSU campus radio station, WMSV 91.1 FM, and put several songs he suggested into critical parts of the play. 60

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A sketch of the set of “...And the Rain Came to Mayfield.” Donna Clevinger discussing the playbook with students at auditions.


The challenge for me, as the director, is how to bring out the emotion for the audience,” Clevinger said. “They will hear 1960s music such as Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye, B.B. King, the Four Tops, the Temptations, and Martha Reeves and the Vandellas. We will have people watching the play who lived through that period, so the language, the set, the costumes and the emotion must ring true. “The students from the Holmes Diversity Center will be our ushers, and we’re very excited about that. Also, having speakers just before each night of the performance will hopefully set the audience’s

minds into 1962 Mississippi and get them in the frame of mind for what they are about to hear.” Ernest Green’s keynote address is set for Tuesday, February 27 at 2pm in the Colvard Student Union Ballroom at MSU. Performances of “…And the Rain Came to Mayfield” will be held at the McComas Theater at 7:30 p.m. on the 27th, 28th, and March 1. For more information, Clevinger can be reached at 662-325-4034. Tickets can be ordered online through the MSU Department of Communication at www.comm.msstate.edu.

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A CUP OF LINSAY JO Pho t og r aph y Submitt ed

Lindsay is an online lifestyle blogger. Her blog, www.acupoflindsayjo. com, has a primary focus on fashion. Lindsay is a member of the Independent Fashion Bloggers (IFB) and attends various conferences and workshops with other fashion bloggers regularly.

Wear It Now & Wear It Later : The Sequin Mini >I > >

always find it difficult to shop at this time of the year. Some days are still cold, and others you can begin to feel Spring settling in. I like to start buying new items for Spring, but only if I can also wear them now. A bright sequin mini skirt is a safe option to purchase right now. Wear it now with your favorite, most comfortable oversized sweater. In the springtime, pair it with a fun trendy top and bright jewelry.

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> > >


Get the Look:

L.A. Green: Ark & Co. sequin skirt; Kerisma sweater; Ark & Co. fringe top; Whats-In-Store necklace; L.A. Green gold bangles.

> > >

Deep South Pout and L.A. Green: Catherine Popesco gemstone bracelet

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Hipster Grunge: A Fashion Intersection and State of Mind By For r es t Blac kbour n l Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner S ty ling b y N at alie Phillips Clo t hes Pr o vided b y Deep Sout h P out

“C

ome as You Are,” on Nirvana’s “Nevermind” album was released on Sept. 24, 1991. As one of the most popular bands of the 1990s and a pioneer for the grunge musical and cultural movement, Nirvana has made a comeback, albeit with a twist, in the fashion and attitude features of the cultural sensibility that many college students and people in their twenties possess. This movement in fashion and comportment is what some are categorizing as hipster grunge. “Not being” a hipster is a bit of a paradox. This identification is based primarily on a defiance of everything that is designated as part of the mainstream. However, this ethos has diachronically become more and more of what it seeks to avoid. “Are you a hipster?” “Yes, I am.” This person is definitely not a hipster. “Are you a hipster?” “No, I’m not.” This person may or may not be a hipster. For both men and women, some of the fashion differences that constitute the hipster designation are wide-rimmed glasses that often ironically come from designers like Dolce & Gabbana or Versace. So if a person walks into a store to look at glasses and walks out sporting a new pair of frames that bear the all-too-familiar D&G, s/he is definitely not a hipster. S/he may self-identify as a hipster, but both the self-identification and the D&G defy the hipster logic. If s/he were to not self-identify as a hipster, and if the Dolce & Gabbana glasses were to come from a thrift store, then this person might just be a hipster. Skinny jeans have also caught on as celebratory of the hipster sensibility. Men often wear oxfords or some other type of dress shoes with skinny jeans, and women are often bearing a narrow version of combat boots with their skinny jeans, leggings, or tights. This has been a progression over time. Several years ago, college women started wearing leggings, tights, or shorts depending on the weather with an oversized t-shirt to classes and activities on university campuses.

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This garb provided and in many cases still provides them with an athletic look, comfort, and the ability to go straight from class to the gym without having to change clothes. This attire does not have a strikingly hipster look or feel whatsoever. However, the leggings or tights have been drastically transformed from an athletic to a hipster aesthetic by the mere way in which they are accessorized and complemented. If a woman takes off the running shoes and puts on narrow combat boots and a skirt or shorts over the leggings or tights, the athletic look subsides and the hipster look is born. This look is furthermore complemented by the wearing of a flannel shirt on top of a t-shirt for both men and women. It is at this point that the hipster look intersects with the grunge look. Whereas in the past men were expected to be clean-shaven or at least to have their facial hair neat and trimmed, the five o’clock shadow or “scruff” is far more popular than having trimmed beards, goatees, mustaches, or being clean-shaven. Facial hair is often let free by men who prescribe to the hipster look and idea. Women who are dressing and accessorizing in the hipster way may often wear less makeup and have less-prepared hairstyles. Michael Kors watches in rose gold and yellow gold have become very popular among women in college and in their twenties. Despite the existence of several designs for men, they have not caught on in the same force. Men, however, may be seen wearing sports watches to complement the hipster look. As is often the case with fashion, it is all about combinations. A suit that is accessorized with dress shoes, a Michael Kors watch, and Dolce & Gabbana glasses provides a very professional and often metropolitan and/or European look. With khakis and a collared shirt or a blouse, these accessories are business casual. The pairing of these same accessories with casual clothing perpetuates a hipster grunge aesthetic. Hipster grunge is caring about being perceived not to care about being part of any mainstream ethos. It is about combining mainstream objects and ideas to create an aesthetic that is new and different, regardless of what the person next to you is thinking, doing, or wearing.


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BP Collection black & white blouse; Flying Monkey ripped denim; Leshop cargo pullover, Deep South Pout Gold tribal necklace; Forest green platform heel; Stylist hat.


Ellison denim shirt; Chris & Carol white tank with black birds; Niki Biki black shirt; Peppermint plaid skirt; Deep South Pout Triangle necklace with rhinestones; Stylist hat.

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Cecio navy stripe cardigan; Lilliana fringe ankle booties; Flying Monkey gray ripped jeans.


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BP Collection denim vest; Sage blue plaid dress; Bamboo black boots; Deep South Pout Gold necklaces.

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The T Invention of Wings Book R e vie w b y Susan O’Br y an

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he intensity and complexity of relationships is the basis for “Invention of Wings,” the latest by novelist Sue Monk Kidd, author of the “Secret Life of Bees.” Kidd has penned a fictionalized story of real-life Sarah Grimke, a ground-breaking abolitionist, Quaker and suffragist in the 1800s. Her writings are credited with helping end slavery and begin the women’s rights movement. Kidd takes her readers to another place and time, both fictional and factual, and moves them with insight about racial and social struggles of the past. The interwoven story of a lifelong search for love, a quest for freedom and a desire to be heard is the newest Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 selection. “Sue Monk Kidd has written a conversation changer,” said Oprah Winfrey in the January issue of O, The Oprah Magazine. “It is impossible to read this book and not come away thinking differently about our status as women and about all the unsung heroines who played a role in getting us where we are.” “I was interested in how my characters could invent their own freedom, their own voices in the world – their wings,” Kidd said in the magazine interview. “My aim was not to write a thinly fictionalized account of Sarah Grimke’s history, but a thickly imagined story inspired by her life,” Kidd writes in the novel’s epilogue. “From the moment I decided to write about Sarah Grimke, I felt compelled to also create a story of an enslaved character, giving her a life and a voice that could be entwined with Sarah’s.”


Readers are first introduced to Hetty “Handful,” a family slave in early 19th century Charleston, S.C. In truth, Hetty, a thin, yet spunky 10-year-old, was presented as a “gift” to 11-year-old Sarah, despite protests from the young mistress who dares to speak against slavery and the lack of educational opportunities for young women. Kidd’s research found little mention of Hetty, so the writer added her interpretation – the voice - of the young African-American girl dreaming of a life outside the confines of the wealthy Grimke home. Social conflicts continue to build as the bond between Hetty and Sarah strengthens. They share secrets as best they can, and Sarah even goes as far as teaching Hetty to read and write. When caught, it carries a heavy punishment for both girls. Kidd continues the narrative, following Hetty and Sarah for more than 35 years as each strives for a life of their own. Sarah knows she is destined to bring social change, while Hetty is determined that someday she will be free. Each step by the pair, as well as those taken by all meet along their journeys,

will impact the other’s destiny. Hetty witnesses, and personally endures, physical punishment and emotional loss as plantations take actions against slaves who only want a chance, whether it be freedom, education or basic acknowledgement as a human being. Sarah suffers, too, feeling the loss of family, the confinements of a male-dominated society and the constraints of inequality. Throughout their struggles, each woman learns that relationships are complex, often hampered by guilt, estrangement and defiance. However, they also discover that strength can come from outside themselves, whether it be a sister, lover or the memories hand-sewn into a patched quilt. Through it all, their paths continue to touch, entwine and separate. In their own ways, they endure loss, find courage and, most importantly, learn a sense of self-worth and purpose. Together and apart, they embody a message of determination and devotion. It’s a call that rings loud for generations to come.

Other Best Sellers by Sue Monk Kidd: Firstlight The Secret Life of Bees Traveling with Pomegranates When the Heart Waits The Mermaid Chair The Dance of the Dissident Daughter

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Christmas Tree Lighting

The Starkville Public Library held their annual “The Lighting of the Christmas Tree” on Sunday, December 8, 2013. The tree was decorated by the Starkville Town and Country Garden Club and was held during the Civic League’s Christmas Tour of Homes. The tree theme this year was Mississippi Proud. Photography by Laura Daniels

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1. Ellen Boles and Martha Wells 2. Jace Fye, Hannah Daniels, Cindy Melby. Kayelynn Bateman and Dash Turman 3. Tim Turman, Rob Leach and Vicky Leach 4. Jennifer Prather and Bart Prather 5. Don and Leslie Fye 6. Pam Salmon, Jamie Hutchinson and Audrey Hutchinson

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Cooking for the Family

Mississippi Modern Homestead Center held a Cooking for the Family class taught by Amy Whatley. She focused on real, healthy, kid-friendly meals that stretch a dollar. Below are class members from Wednesday, January 15, 2014. Photography Laura Daniels

Photo above: Sal Keith, Amy Wheatley, Alisha Landry, Amy Wheatley, Melissa Anderson and Lauren Love

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Civil Rights Exhibit Opening On Monday, January 13, 2014 the City of Birmingham, The Columbus Arts Council, Dream 365 and the Columbus Covention and Visitors Bureau held a reception for the Civil Rights Exhibit opening at the Rosenzweig Arts Center. Photography by Laura Daniels

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1. John Ross, “Mother Goose�, Columbus, Miss. Mayor Robert Smith, Anne Ross and Columbus Air Force Base Commander Jim Sears 2. Thomas and Susa Nawrocki 3.Fairie Johnson, Vivian Irby and Laverne Greene Leech 4.Whirlie and Willie Byrd 5. Nancy Carpenter and Brennan Dockery 6. Tina Sweeten-Lunsford and Bridget VanHolland-Williams 76

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Golden Triangle Kennel Club of Miss. Dog Show On January 11-12, 2014 at the Mississippi Horse Park, the Golden Triangle Kennel Club of Mississippi held their annual dog show, while online they held their 2nd Annual MS Horse Park Virtual Dog Show. Photography Laura Daniels.

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1. Mary Martha Morgan - chairman and Nancee Jones - committee chair 2. Laura Cox and Michelle Jones 3. Mary Lee and Kathy Knapp 4. Keith and Eileen Frazier 5. Kassie Van Nostrand and Amelia Woote 6. Tim and Ashley Haskew

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Starkville City Christmas Party Mayor Parker Wiseman and First Lady, Lindsey Wiseman hosted the annual Christmas party for Starkville City staff members and family at their home. Photography by Ashley Covin

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4 5 1. Front row: Taylor Adams Jr., Doug Devlin, David Little and Hudson Adams. Middle row: Lindsey Wiseman, Lisa Wynn, Margaret Boyd, Pattie Little, Phoenix Adams and Karis Adams. Back row: Henry Vaughn, Joey Deason, Annette Deason, Cindi Thompson, Parker Wiseman, Cathy Kemp, Terry Kemp, Tony Rook, Randy Boyd, Lisa Rook, Scott Maynard, Sandy Maynard, Jean Mann, Rodger Mann, Taylor Adams and Kinsey Adams 2. Joey Deason, Annette Deason and Henry Vaughn 3. Parker and Lindsey Wiseman 4. Cindi Thompson and Pattie Little 5. Phoenix, Karis, Taylor Adams and Lisa Wynn 78

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Starkville Animal Shelter

The Starkville Animal Shelter along with the United Way and the Oktibbeha County Humane Society held “A Home for the Holidays Christmas Open House� on December 19,2013. Photography by Ashley Covin

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1.Amy, Jack, Molly Kate Aarhus 2. Bubby, Donna Barnes, Starkville Mayor Parker Wiseman 3. Ivy Dozier and Miriam Britt 4. David Vanlandingham, Sherrie Wiygul and Sharon Breckenridge 5. Ivy Dozier and Kayla Tew 6. Carey Woods, Nikki Mckenzie and Carrie Shannon february

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moment in in AA moment your tummy… tummy… your

hen it’s time for a Special Beginning, OCH delivers! Our hen it’s time for a Special Beginning, OCH delivers! Our board certified physicians and expert staff provide advanced, board certified physicians and expert staff provide advanced, compassionate care for mom, baby and the entire family. compassionate care for mom, baby and the entire family. Plus, our new Center for Women and Children includes all the Plus, our new Center for Women and Children includes all the advanced equipment and resources you need. From beautiful, advanced equipment and resources you need. From beautiful, accommodating LDR suites to our comfy new waiting spaces and accommodating LDR suites to our comfy new waiting spaces and Special Beginnings Gift Shop, OCH offers the very best amenities. Special Beginnings Gift Shop, OCH offers the very best amenities. Our prenatal, breast-feeding, sibling and grand-parenting classes Our prenatal, breast-feeding, sibling and grand-parenting classes help prepare everyone for the arrival, and our web nursery enables help prepare everyone for the arrival, and our web nursery enables those who can’t be there to share in the celebration. And, when those who can’t be there to share in the celebration. And, when it’s time to go, our certified car seat safety experts stand ready to it’s time to go, our certified car seat safety experts stand ready to make sure baby’s seat is safely installed for the ride home! make sure baby’s seat is safely installed for the ride home!

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February 2014