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building creativity

May 7, 2012

Final Report Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks Alberta

contact: Duncan Webb or Liz Bloomfield Webb Management Services, Inc. 350 5th Avenue, Suite 4005 New York, NY 10118 t. (212) 929-5040 f. (212) 929-5954 info@webbmgmt.org Webb Management Services Inc.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

table of contents 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................. 3 2. INTRODUCTION + CONTEXT .......................................................................... 7 3. MARKET INDICATORS + TRENDS ................................................................... 9 4. MARKET ANALYSIS .................................................................................... 12 5. INVENTORY + COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS ........................................................ 17 6. USES + USERS ........................................................................................... 21 7. BENEFITS + IMPACTS ................................................................................. 24 8. FACILITY CONCEPT .................................................................................... 26 9. THE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE .................................................................. 31 10. THE SPLIT FACILITIES SCENARIO .............................................................. 51 11. NEXT STEPS ............................................................................................ 60

APPENDIX A: STAKEHOLDER PARTICIPANTS APPENDIX B: MARKET REVIEW APPENDIX C: 20KM RADIUS DATA APPENDIX D: FACILITY INVENTORY APPENDIX E: COMPARABLE PROJECTS APPENDIX F: ONE-FACILITY SCENARIO SPACE PROGRAM APPENDIX G: ONE-FACILITY SCENARIO RENDERINGS APPENDIX H: CAPITAL BUDGET APPENDIX I: ONE-FACILITY SCENARIO PRO-FORMA OPERATING BUDGET APPENDIX J: ECONOMIC IMPACT MULTIPLIERS APPENDIX K: TWO-FACILITY SCENARIO SPACE PROGRAM APPENDIX L: TWO-FACILITY SCENARIO RENDERINGS APPENDIX M: TWO-FACILITY SCENARIO PRO-FORMA OPERATING BUDGET

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

1. executive summary Located in the Sheep River Valley in the Alberta Foothills, Okotoks is one of Canada’s fastest growing towns, well known for its small-town identity defined by a high quality of life, commitment to sustainability and social wellness. In 2010, the Town of Okotoks adopted the Culture, Heritage + Arts Master Plan (CHAMP), which defines the arts and heritage needs of the Town through 2030, including the need for additional performance facilities. To that end, Town leadership wish to understand the potential to develop a new performing arts venue and the potential partners, programs and benefits that a new facility could provide. In September 2011, Webb Management Services and Nyhoff Architecture were engaged by the Town of Okotoks to undertake a Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study. This report confirms the feasibility of developing new performing arts facilities in the Town of Okotoks, suggests preliminary physical plans and lays the framework of a business plan to guide Town leadership towards the development and operation of arts facilities. Needs Assessment In the first phase of work, the needs assessment, Webb Management Services concluded that the Town of Okotoks is well positioned to undertake the development of a performing arts venue. This analysis studied facility trends, the market for arts and culture, demand on part of uses and users and the benefits and impacts performing arts facilities could have on the future of Okotoks. Key conclusions follow. 1.

The Market for Arts + Culture ✲

The Town‘s levels of educational attainment and household income suggest that residents have notable propensity to participate in arts, culture and heritage activities. Demographic data also indicates the presence of many young families, a segment that tends to have limited leisure time. This segment responds well to weekend activities, community-based programming and festivals, affordable programming, all-ages classes and workshops and family oriented events and programs.

Regional populations also have good propensity to participate in the arts. The Foothills Municipal District’s rural populations are more likely to respond to arts and culture programming than the area’s urban centres. Overall, the Calgary Region is also home to well-educated and affluent residents that are likely to respond to unique programming or events that have a regional reputation or profile.

The Town’s strategy for cultural tourism should continue to focus on day-trippers from the Calgary Region and Southern Alberta. These visitors have high levels of affluence and educational attainment, suggesting strong potential to participate in the arts.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

2.

3.

4.

Inventory + Competitive Analysis ✲

The physical features and quality of existing Town performance facilities are limiting the delivery and quality of cultural programs and educational experiences as well as the organizational development of community and professional not-for-profit arts organizations.

Aside from privately owned facilities, there is a gap in the inventory for studio spaces that provide a quality educational experience for participants, particularly for community dance and movement classes. Existing facilities are limited in the accessibility, availability and condition and could not meet community demand for additional levels of programming. Additionally, existing visual arts studios and workspaces for hands-on activities are limiting the quality, capacity and delivery of visual arts, fibre arts, ceramics, and arts and crafts instruction.

The region’s largest arts organizations and facilities are located in downtown Calgary. The market in Calgary is highly competitive for touring product and artistic talent, with few identified gaps in cultural activity. However, a recent assessment of Calgary’s cultural spaces for arts concluded that the City’s performing arts venues are operating near or at capacity, and that the space inventory was below comparable Canadian communities.

Facility User Demand ✲

Demand for performance space is primarily for facilities that can accommodate theatre, dance and educational productions. Potential users include the Town’s own programs, the Foothills School Division, promoters, and local arts organizations.

There is also a need for accessible and purpose-built art and rehearsal studio space, which would support demand on part of Town programs and not-for-profit cultural organizations.

Town staff indicate a need for improved and expanded visual arts and heritage spaces, particularly a gallery suitable for traveling art exhibitions and informal exhibition spaces.

There is also potential for public spaces in a new performing arts venue to serve as informal exhibition spaces, which would allow Town staff to curate additional archival exhibitions and photo exhibits and encourage the integration of heritage themes and assets into public spaces.

Benefits + Impacts ✲

Performing arts facilities would advance a number of concepts outlined in The Town of Okotoks Social Wellness Framework, particularly learning, planning, sense of place and working.

Performing arts facilities would support Town goals defined by The Culture Heritage + Arts Master Plan, which also charges the Town with creating structure for regional cultural collaboration and partnerships, cultivating education programs, supporting creative businesses and individuals, ensuring that creative physical infrastructure is in place and advancing the identity of “Creative Okotoks”.

New cultural facilities must support the Town of Okotoks Four Foundations of Sustainability and maintain a small town atmosphere, preserve the river valley, serve all ages and cultures

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

and potentially provide equality schooling. These facilities should operate with fiscal responsibility, practice social consciousness and support economic development. The needs assessment also found that a set of facilities could be developed within one structure, but that alternative options might have facilities developed in multiple locations. This idea came out of discussions with the Foothills School Division, as it became clear that their interest in using facilities is dependent on location of a new Theatre. Additionally, other elements of the project could be sited in proximity to other Okotoks cultural facilities, including the Rotary Performing Arts Centre (RPAC). As a result, physical and business planning focused on two options. It should be noted that these two scenarios were developed to highlight the distinctions between the choice of a single facility at one location and multiple facilities in difference places. The first scenario assumes that recommended facilities are developed in one building in or around downtown Okotoks. The second scenario assumes the project is developed in two pieces. One Facility Scenario: Community Arts Centre The Community Arts Centre would be a 45,000 gross square foot space that includes a 300-seat Theatre, a Multipurpose Room, Rehearsal and Movement Studio, Gallery, Arts Classroom, Community Room, Lobby, Community Media Lab and a cafÊ/concessions area. The preferred site for a Community Arts Centre was not determined as a part of this process, but analysis suggests that the facility could be situated in the downtown core relatively close to other cultural assets or away from the downtown in an area that is more attractive in terms of access, size, cost and views. A LEED Gold level of sustainability is anticipated for the project, and the capital cost estimate suggests that the Community Arts Centre could be built for a total cost between $24 million and $30 million. This cost estimate includes soft costs, design fees and equipment but excludes site acquisition. There are a number of options for how the Community Arts Centre could be governed, but the preferred option would be for the Town to establish two not-for-profit organizations: a foundation to lead the private fundraising campaign and an arm’s length operator to govern the facility once it opens. Cultural and Historical Services would manage the Centre’s personnel. Activities at the Community Arts Centre will be diverse, including film and live presented events, Town events and festivals, exhibitions, community media programs, and all-ages programming and visual arts education programs. Additionally, the facility will be available to resident arts organizations, schools, other not-for profits and clubs. The pro-forma operating budget suggests the Community Arts Centre will have annual expenditures totaling $887,564 in the first year of operations and would require $337,500 in annual funding after earned revenue. Additionally, the Community Arts Centre would have one-time impacts of $58.5 million and 257 jobs created and on-going annual operating impacts of $983,158 and 9 jobs supported.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Split Facility Scenario: High School Theatre + Downtown Arts Centre The split facility scenario assumes that facilities would be developed in two pieces in at least two different locations, perhaps even at two different times. One piece, developed adjacent to the Foothills Composite High School + Alberta High School of Fine Arts, would include 34,600 gross square feet with a 400-seat Theatre and a Rehearsal Room. The second piece, a Downtown Arts Centre, would include 15,500 gross square feet with a Multipurpose Room, Community Media Lab, Gallery, Community Room, and Rehearsal and Movement Studio and Arts Classroom. While the High School Theatre would be located adjacent to the Foothills Composite High School + Alberta High School of Fine Arts, a preferred site for a Downtown Arts Centre was not determined as a part of this process. A LEED Gold level of sustainability is anticipated for the project, and capital cost estimates suggest that the Split Facility Scenario could be built for a total cost between $27 million and $34 million. This cost estimate includes soft costs, design fees and equipment but excludes site acquisition. Again, there are a number of options for how each could be governed, but the preferred option would be for Foothills School Division to operate the High School Theatre. A Community Advisory Board should also be established to advise the School Division. The Town of Okotoks through Cultural and Historical Services is the most viable operator the Downtown Arts Centre. The split facilities scenario differentiates from the Community Arts Centre in that it would allow the Foothills School Division to utilize the High School Theatre on a daily basis throughout the academic year. Downtown Arts Facilities would be programmed with exhibitions, all-ages visual arts, media arts and performing arts education activities and would also be available to arts organizations, not-for-profits and clubs. A separate pro-forma was developed for each venue. The High School Theatre would have expenditures of $567,847 in the first year of operations and would require $350,000 in annual funding. The Downtown Arts Centre would have expenditures of $264,080 in the first year of operations and would require $155,000 in annual public funding and grants after earned revenue. Together, these projects have a onetime economic impact of $66.2 million and 291 jobs created. On an on-going basis, the split facilities scenario suggests annual operating impacts of $1,0498,988 and 10 jobs supported.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

2. introduction + context 2.1 The Town of Okotoks Located in the Sheep River Valley in the Alberta Foothills, Okotoks is one of Canada’s fastest growing towns, well known for its small-town identity defined by a high quality of life, commitment to sustainability and social wellness. Geographically, Okotoks is situated 18km south of Calgary city limits and surrounded by the Municipal District of Foothills No. 31. Okotoks is a part of in the Calgary Region, home to a population of 1.26 million people residing in rural areas, cities, towns, villages and First Nations. Anecdotally, Okotoks is regarded as having a large commuter population composed of skilled professionals and young families. The community’s unparalleled population growth has led to new residents and housing, small businesses, infrastructure and amenities. Recent growth has also inspired the Town’s commitment to strategic planning and decision-making that ensures intelligent and sustainable growth. 2.2 Arts, Culture + Heritage in Okotoks Notably, the Town’s resources and planning have allowed Culture and Heritage Services to actively facilitate the development of policy, programs and infrastructure. As a result, there is an abundance of Town arts, heritage and cultural programs, outreach initiatives and facilities. Town operated facilities include the Okotoks Art Gallery (OAG) and gift shop, the Okotoks Museum and Archives (OMA) and the recently reactivated Rotary Performing Arts Centre (RPAC.) In addition to organizing annual events such as the Holiday Light-up, Parade Day, Children’s Festival and Canada Day celebrations, the Town offers a number of family, adult and educational programs. More recently, Town leadership and personnel have modestly increased the number of offerings provided by Cultural and Historical Services. In partnership with the Okotoks Arts Council, the Town launched First Saturdays, a monthly event in Old Towne Okotoks with free performances, exhibitions, events and promotions from local merchants. The Okotoks Arts Council also partners with the Town to present concerts, films and events at the RPAC. Additionally, there are a number of other cultural providers operating in the community, including community-based organizations such as the Dewdney Players Theatre Group, the Foothills Theatre Company and the Foothills Music Society. Cultural facilities, including the Okotoks Public Library, Foothills Composite High School/Alberta High School of Fine Arts, Holy Trinity Academy and the United Church offer arts programs, rental space and events. In 2010, the Town of Okotoks undertook a cultural master planning process, which was led by Pendergast Nyhoff Collaborative Architecture and Dr. Adriana A. Davies. The Culture, Heritage + Arts Master Plan (CHAMP) defines the arts and heritage needs of the Town through 2030. Having adopted the (CHAMP) in

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

June 2010, the Town of Okotoks wished to understand the potential to develop a performing arts venue, which inspired this work. 2.3 The State of the Arts in the Region + Province The Calgary Region is home to numerous festivals, performance venues, museums and heritage assets, with cultural activity centred in Calgary’s Cultural District. Major cultural events include folk, music, film and multi-cultural festivals as well as concerts and performances at the EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts and the Southern Jubilee Auditorium. With the creation of Calgary Arts Development (CADA) the City of Calgary has recognized the importance of arts and culture as an economic engine. The region has also maintained low unemployment rates and has weathered the global economic recession better then many Canadian communities. As a result, consumer spending on culture for both high-art and popular events has remained steady. Notably, Albertans have the highest average per capita spending on culture of all the provinces. Albertans spend $963 per resident on cultural spending, 15% higher then the national average and totaling $3.3 billion in 2008. More specifically, Albertans have the highest per capita spending for museum admission and heritage-related activities, artwork and books. Data specific to the Calgary Metropolitan Area indicated annual spending of $1,020 per capita, the highest of all metropolitan areas analyzed1. In January 2008, Alberta Culture and Community Services launched Spirit of Alberta, a cultural plan that provides a decision-making framework for the support, growth and development of culture on the provincial level. The plan’s key points include access, capacity, excellent and growth of cultural industries. This framework shapes decision-making on a provincial level, as well as provincial programs such as special events, exhibits and tours, education programs and resources, Alberta Main Street, training services, community spirit donation grants and much more.

1

Consumer Spending on Culture in Canada, the Provinces and 12 Metropolitan Areas in 2008

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

3. market indicators + trends 3.1 Propensity to Participate in Arts + Culture First, it is important to understand demographic characteristics of arts and culture audiences for exhibits and performances as well as participatory activities. Research commissioned by the Department of Canadian Heritage indicates that 86% of Canadians attends at least one arts or cultural event per year, with the most popular activities being live performance (69%), craft shows (58%) and festivals (53%.)2 Data from Statistic Canada’s General Social Survey (GSS), an annual telephone questionnaire that gathers information on trends in society, provides some insight into the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of arts participants. Each year the survey focuses on one topic, such as leisure time use, social networking, social support, retirement, health or education. Cultural participation information is gathered as a subset of time use and most recently was collected from January to November 2005 as a part of General Social Survey: Time Use (Cycle 19). Similar information was gathered in 1986, 1992, and 1998. This research can be used to infer a population’s propensity to participate in the arts and respond to the development of new facilities. GSS data confirms that both educational attainment and income are the best indicators of potential to participate in the arts. This chart illustrates the correlation between

Rate of Participation: Education University degree Film

Some university College or tech diploma High school diploma

Music Listening

Some secondary or less

Public Galleries/ Art Museums

Historic Sites

Popular Music Performances

Theatrical Performances 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

Source: Understanding Culture Consumption in Canada, Statistics Canada, 2005

2

The Arts and Heritage in Canada – Access and Availability 2007

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

educational attainment levels and the rate at which Canadians aged 15 and over participate in the arts. Additionally, this data found that individuals with higher educational attainment levels were more likely to be frequent attenders at theatres, heritage sites, public museums and galleries, and cinemas. Similarly, information gathered as a part of the GSS suggests that participation in cultural activities, particularly at theatrical performances, popular music performances, public galleries and art museums is directly related to household income levels.

Rate of Participation: Income $60,000 and greater Film $30,000 to $59,999 Less than $30,000

Music Listening

Public Galleries/ Art Museums

Historic Sites

Popular Music Performances

Theatrical Performances 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

Source: Understanding Culture Consumption in Canada, Statistics Canada, 2005

Research on participation by age group found that individuals aged 50 and over accounted for a higher percentage of attenders at theatrical performances, public galleries and art museums while audiences under 50 had higher levels of attendance at popular music performances, movies and music listening. Particularly relevant to Okotoks, the GSS also indicated lower arts attendance rates among families with young children. 3.2 Population Trends Affecting Arts Participation The ways in which Canadians participate in the arts, culture and heritage along with their needs, beliefs and values is shifting. Participation trends are largely the result of national and global changes in demographics, entertainment and technology. These trends include: 1.

Decreasing Leisure Time: Particularly relevant to Okotoks, one of the primary barriers to cultural participation is competing activities and lack of time. An analysis of leisure time of Canadians, a key indicator of well being, indicates that on average, Canadians are spending less

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

time on leisure activities than they did ten years ago. In fact, the average time Canadians spent on leisure in 2005 was 5.5 hours per day, compared to 5.8 hours per day in 19983. 2.

Cultural Time Use: An analysis of GSS time use data from 1992 to 2005 indicated several trends in how Canadians spend time on cultural activities. While attendance at performing arts events has remained steady, more Canadians are watching movies and visiting public art galleries and art museums. The percentage of Canadians 15 and older that attended at least one movie per year increased 10% during this 13-year period. Notably, the percentage of the population over 15 that visited a public art gallery or art museum increased from 20% to 27%.

3.

An Aging Population: Nationally, the country’s shifting age demographics project a growing proportion of populations age 65 and over. As previously mentioned, older populations attend theatrical performances, public galleries and arts museums more frequently. On average, individuals age 65 and over spent 7.6 hours per day on leisure time, significantly higher than the national average.

4.

Technology: Globally, the way individuals consume culture has shifted with the introduction and growth of the Internet. More than 80% of Canadians browse the Internet for personal use; 31% of home Internet users download or watch TV or movies and 27% of home Internet users create content via blogs, post photographs and participate in discussion groups4. It is critically important for arts and cultural programs to embrace technology as a means to reach potential consumers, extend the shelf life of cultural programs and offerings, and interact with audiences and visitors.

3

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Leisure Time Use 1998 to 2005, http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/.3ndic.1t.4r@eng.jsp?iid=52 4 Canadian Internet Use Survey, Industry Canada and Statistics Canada, 2009

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

4. market analysis As a part of this study, it is important to consider resident and non-resident audiences that are likely to participate in arts activities and the types of programming that would be attractive to them. To inform the study effort, Webb Management Services reviewed a variety of socioeconomic and demographic data for the Town of Okotoks, Municipal District of Foothills No. 31, the 20-kilometer radius surrounding the Town and the Calgary Region. 4.1 Town of Okotoks The Town of Okotoks has a number of population demographic and socioeconomic characteristics that position the community as unique to the Calgary Region. Okotoks was one of the fastest growing Canadian towns and between 1996 and 2006. Data from the Town of Okotoks Water – Residential Flat Rate Accounts estimate that the Town’s population in December 2011 was 24,931. Population projection data provided by the Calgary Regional Partnership indicate that the community is likely to continue to experience significant growth in the coming years at a rate of 4% per year. Mobility status and place of residence data from the 2006 Federal Census confirms that population growth is largely the result of new residents that relocated to Okotoks from within the province. Notably, the Town’s 1998 Municipal Development Plan – Legacy Plan created a sustainable growth policy linking the population of the Community to the Sheep River aquifer. As a result, it is likely that the town will approach “build-out” as the population approaches 30,000. This market analysis assumes that the Town integrated sustainable framework will limit population growth above these levels. Okotoks has considerably higher concentrations of children and young adults than the Calgary Region, province or country. In fact, 41% of the population is under age 24. Comparatively, 45% of Okotoks family households include a couple The Market Today: Young and Old Population (married or common-law) Segments with children, well above 30% Canada provincial averages of 30%. Alberta

25%

Calgary Region Okotoks

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%

Age 65+

Source: Calgary Regional Profile 2009

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Age 14 and under

Census data also confirms the perception of Okotoks as a “commuter town” – 48% of the labour force ages 15 years and over worked outside of the municipality, well above the 19% provincial average. Both of these population characteristics confirm anecdotal input that Okotoks’ is composed of many young families.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

The Town’s income levels are well above provincial averages. Statistics Canada data indicates that 2005 median income of private households was $77,438, considerably higher than the provincial median of $63,988. Notably, the Town of Okotoks Social Wellness Framework’s community consultation process found sensitivity around the cost of living, particularly around the high costs of housing and commuting and a higher than average number of children in each family. As a result, residents are sensitive to the local cost of community services and programming. Local educational attainment levels are comparable to provincial and national averages. The following chart compares the percentage of the Town’s residents with that have completed either College or some University or hold a University certificate, diploma or degree.

30%

Educational Attainment: University Degrees Canada Alberta

25%

Calgary Region Foothills MD + Urban Centres Town of Okotoks

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%

College or some University

University certificate; diploma or degree

Source: Statistics Canada, Calgary Regional Profile 2009

4.2 Municipal District of Foothills No. 31 The Foothills Municipal District is a rural municipality that surrounds the communities of Black Diamond, Okotoks, High River, Turner Valley, Longview and the Eden Valley Indian Reserve. Combined, these populations total 52,000.5 Population projections provided by the Calgary Regional Partnership indicate that the Municipal District and urban centres within its boundaries are outpacing regional growth. Between 1996 and 2006, the area’s trade population increased from 34,068 to 51,705. Estimates predict populations will increase by an additional 25% by 2014. The Municipal District’s socioeconomic characteristics are notable in that these populations are less likely to participate in arts activities and have disparate levels of affluence. Within the Municipal District, average educational attainment levels are below national, provincial and regional averages. Overall, the Calgary Region has high levels of educational attainment, making the Municipal District an outlier in the region. In the Municipal District, median household income for private households varies greatly. Urban 5

Municipal District of Foothills No. 31 Fact File, 2006

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

centres within district boundaries have lower than average median household income. The Municipal District’s median household income is $90,890, higher than Okotoks, Turner Valley and High River. 4.3 20-Kilometer Radius There is a significant population concentration in the 20KM radius surrounding Okotoks, particularly to the North, because the Town is situated 18KM from Calgary City Limits. As a result, demographic data was analyzed to understand the market for presented events talent that would be attractive to regional populations. Demographic estimates and projections were purchased from Environics Analytics, a Toronto-based marketing and analytics firm that provides projections using a variety of data sources. For reference, the data was benchmarked against provincial averages. Complete demographic data is attached to this report as Appendix C. The following map shows the 20KM radius surrounding Okotoks.

Demographic data indicates that 28,060 households with populations totaling nearly 80,000 are located within this 20KM radius. Considering the Town’s population data, this suggests that 70% of populations within the 20KM radius live outside of Okotoks. Comparable to Town and regional levels, these populations have high levels of educational attainment, with nearly 25% of the adult population holding a University degree. Additionally, Environics data indicates that populations within the 20KM radius are similar to Okotoks in that 53% of family households are couples with children, somewhat higher than the provincial average of 48%. In 2012, estimated average household income was $139,624, significantly higher than provincial averages of $114,844. Homeownership levels for the 20KM radius (87% owned) were also higher than provincial averages (73% owned).

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

4.4 Calgary Region Defined by the Calgary Regional Partnership, the Calgary Region encompasses 28,632 square kilometers (11,054 square miles), is bordered by Banff, Strathmore, Crossfield and Nanton, and includes urban populations residing in Calgary, as well numerous suburban and rural communities. The Region is home to populations totaling 1.26 million, and experienced a 32% increase in population between 1996 and 2006, a growth rate well above provincial and national averages. At1.04 million, the City of Calgary’s population accounts for 83% of Region’s total residents. The Region has experienced a wave of immigration, particularly from 2001 to 2006. The area’s diverse population includes notable levels of Chinese, South Asian and Filipino populations, and more than 20% of the population identifies as a visible minority. The growth of the Calgary Region has led to increased individual and family incomes, with 10% of individuals and 46% of couples earning over $100,000. The Calgary Region has a skilled and educated workforce, boasting some of the highest educational attainment levels in Canada. More than 23% of the population holds a University certificate, diploma or degree, well above province and national averages of 18%. 4.5 Non-resident Visitors + Cultural Tourism Presently, the annual number of leisure visitors to Okotoks represents a small percentage of regional tourism, although increasing the number of visitors is a priority for Okotoks economic development. Anecdotally, visitors are likely to be day-trippers, traveling from Calgary in search of a charming, rural destination, and attracted to the heritage and identity of Okotoks. The Okotoks Visitor Information Centre located at the OAG gathers statistics on the annual numbers of visits and inquiries. 2011 statistics indicate that the Centre received 536 visits, an increase of 22% from the prior year. Alberta Tourism, Parks and Recreation include Okotoks as part of the Calgary and Area Tourism Destination Region. Visitor statistics, which are based on Statistic Canada’s 2009 Travel Survey of Residents in Canada and the 2009 International Travel Survey indicated that the Calgary and Area Tourism Destination Region received 5.16 million person-visits that year, and approximately 4.5 million can be attributed to the Calgary Metropolitan Area6. Notably, 21% of total visits were on the part of Calgary Area residents, and 71% of total person-visits were made by Albertans. Day-trippers to the Calgary and Area Tourism Destination Region accounted for 2.4 million person-visits, or 47% of all travelers. Overnight visitors are primarily visiting friends and relatives (72%), and are likely to stay in private homes. 4.6 Market Conclusions 1.

6

The Town’s levels of educational attainment and affluence indicate that residents are likely to participate in arts, culture and heritage activities. However, several characteristics of the population suggest a need for strategic programming decisions that are attractive to Okotoks’ unique population demographic, which is primarily composed of young families, a segment that tends to have limited leisure time and lower participation levels. Additionally, the youthful

Summary, Visitor Volumes and Spending, Calgary CMA, http://www.visitcalgary.com/members/research/visitor-volume-spending

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

population is more likely to respond to popular music performances, movies and music listening. Programming and infrastructure development should emphasize weekend activities, communitybased programming and festivals, all-ages classes and workshops, and family-oriented presented events and programs. 2.

Regionally, there is good propensity to participate in the arts. The Foothills Municipal District’s rural populations are more likely to respond to arts and culture programming than the area’s urban centres. Additionally, a population base of nearly 80,000 resides within a 20KM radius of Okotoks.

3.

Cultural tourism strategy for Okotoks should continue to focus on attracting day-trippers from the Calgary Region and Southern Alberta. As a segment, the Calgary Region has high levels of affluence and educational attainment, suggesting strong potential to participate in the arts.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

5. inventory + competitive analysis An assessment of the Town’s existing cultural facilities can identify gaps in the inventory for cultural spaces, consider the overall quality of spaces for cultural programming and provide insight into the competitive market for touring product and other cultural activities. In 2009, the Town of Okotoks completed a detailed Facility Inventory Report as a part of CHAMP. The Facility Inventory Report compiled a list of all spaces that are or could be used for cultural activities, including spaces for meeting, assembly, rehearsal, and visual art display. This facility inventory and competitive analysis first considers the Facility Inventory Report as well as recent changes in the inventory such as improvements to the Rotary Performing Arts Centre and the new Okotoks United Church. This chapter also summarizes limitations of other Town exhibition, classroom and rehearsal space and than reviews the competitive market for touring product and presenting. 5.1 Performance Facilities in Okotoks and the Municipal District Most importantly, this analysis considers how the current inventory of small and mid-size performance facilities and event spaces serve Okotoks. The inventory, included as Appendix D, considers the physical features and types of activity hosted within each space. The condition and functionality of each facility has been rated using 8 variables. Variables are rated on a scale of 1 to 4, higher being best. Building condition and staff and support categories carry the most weight. Variables include: 1.

Facility condition

2.

Staff and support

3.

Theatrical functionality

4.

Room acoustics

5.

Customer amenities

6.

Performer amenities

7.

Atmosphere and character

8.

Suitability for users

Ratings are based on observations from site visits, conversations with facility managers and interview input. We analyzed the quality and capacity of Okotoks facilities for ten facilities that are regularly used for public performances and events. Additionally, there are 3 facilities in the Foothills Municipal District that regularly accommodate cultural performances and events.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

The following matrix shows that most facilities are small to mid-size capacity and receive a low facility rating.

Facility Rating vs. Capacity 4.0

3.5

3.0

0

200

400

600

2.5

800

1,000

1,200

1,400

1,600

2.0

1.5 Town of Okotoks

1.0

Foothills Municipal District

Five of the ten Okotoks facilities are located within houses of worship or educational institutions. Generally, these facilities have limited availability (and in some cases are not available for rent at all), have a primary function other than the arts, and lack sufficient equipment for performances. Within the district, three facilities have presenting series, including the RPAC, the Flare + Derrick Community Hall in Turner Valley, and the High River United Church. Four Okotoks facilities are utilized by local arts organizations, including the Centennial Centre, the Okotoks United Church Sanctuary + Foyer, the Foothills Composite High School/Alberta High School of Fine Arts and the Rotary Centre for the Arts. Input from representatives of the local arts community indicated that each of these facilities has significant limitations, including configuration, capacity, backstage support space and technical equipment. The Town recently made structural improvements to RPAC to create an intimate performance venue. The Town received the RPAC property, a former church and heritage asset, from the Okotoks Arts Council and proceeded to make investments in the facility to ensure its use as a theatre. Now, RPAC facilities include an elevator, community room and a 170-seat performance venue with a lighting grid, outstanding acoustics, church pew seating and a small stage. There are certain physical characteristics of the space that limit what can be presented in it as well as which local groups can rent the facility. Specifically, the stage size prevents performances or concerts with more than a handful of actors, musicians, dancers or artists. The facility lacks modern electrical infrastructure and audiovisual systems including recording,

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

broadcast and high quality projection capability. Loading in and out of the facility can be a challenge because there is a lack of a loading dock, door or area. Finally, it can also be difficult to produce theatrical productions in the space because of the natural light that leaks into the venue, lack of back stage support space and dressing rooms. The RPAC is well positioned to serve as venue for small concerts, meetings, lectures and film but does not fulfill the need for a well-equipped venue that can accommodate theatre, festivals, musicals, dance and larger concerts. 5.2 Town of Okotoks Classroom and Studio Facilities The inventory for program spaces for learning, rehearsing and meeting includes a range of spaces varying in capacity, condition and use. Many of the Town’s larger assembly spaces have multi-purpose rooms, meeting rooms and wall dividers. The Okotoks Library, Recreation Centre, Elks Hall, Centennial Centre and RPAC have sufficient meeting spaces that can accommodate meetings for 20 up to several hundred people. However, the inventory of classroom facilities that can accommodate participatory activities, visual arts, and fibre arts participatory activities is limited. The OAG has a small arts classroom with a sink, worktables, bathroom, storage for supplies and worktables. Located in a heritage building, the arts classroom is on the second floor of the OAG making it inaccessible to persons with disabilities. Although the RPAC community room and Recreation Centre TV Room have been used for fibre arts, drawing and painting instruction, these spaces lack suitable clean up, storage and work areas. The Town’s existing supply of municipal dance and rehearsal studios is also limited. The Town’s Community Services programs have used a variety of spaces, including the Foothills Composite High School/Alberta Fine Arts High School Dance Studio, the Recreation Centre Community Room and the Imperial Ballet Dance School. Beyond the Town’s own programs, several privately owned creative businesses, such as the Alberta Dance Academy, lease or own private studios. Additionally, the Dewdney Players lease Aldersyde Hall, a re-purposed space owned by the Municipal District, for their rehearsals. ✲

✲ ✲

Aside from privately owned facilities, there is a gap in the inventory for performing arts studio spaces that provide a quality educational experience for participants, particularly for community dance and movement classes. Existing facilities are limited in the accessibility, availability and condition and could not meet community demand for additional levels of programming. Existing arts studios and workspaces for hands-on activities are limiting the quality, capacity and delivery of visual arts, fibre arts, ceramics, and arts and crafts instruction. There is a lack of rehearsal studio facilities available to community-based arts organizations and not-for-profits. However, many not-for-profit organizations lack the financial resources to afford to rent facilities.

5.3 Regional Competitive Market Calgary’s downtown is the hub of cultural activity for the region and is home to major arts organizations such as the Alberta Ballet, Alberta Theatre Projects, the EPCOR Centre, Glenbow Museum, Calgary Opera and other companies and galleries. Regionally, Calgary is a highly competitive market for touring product and artistic talent, with few identified gaps in cultural activity. Broadway Across Canada presents national tours at the Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, and the EPCOR Centre presents a range of events at

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

multiple venues. Because of its market size, Calgary does not always attract major international tours and artists. The most frequent public arts and cultural activities in Calgary are festivals, media arts, visual arts and theatre. Smaller communities in the region and Southern Alberta frequently offer intimate presenting series, often with a focus on folk, indie or country music. These programs rely on community halls, clubs and churches to provide space for these concerts. A 2007 assessment of Cultural Spaces for Arts in Calgary completed by Calgary Arts Development (CADA) concluded that the City’s performing arts venues are operating near or at capacity, and that cultural space inventory was below other Canadian communities of a comparable size. Additionally, there are a small number of high-quality cultural facilities with technical capability, performance capacity and audience amenities. Many smaller capacity performance venues lack audience amenities and need improved technical/performance equipment and capability. Local and regional arts organizations rely on churches to provide community space. CADA’s study also identified an overwhelming need for technically equipped theatre presentation space. 2006 data indicated that the City was home to 29 theatre organizations with stable or growing audiences. More theatre organizations exist than permanent homes, and there is a distinct lack of supporting spaces for rehearsal and set and prop construction.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

6. uses + users A key part of our work has involved testing demand for performance, exhibition and support facilities on the part of potential users. Information on potential facility usage was gathered through a series of oneon-one interviews with staff and board representatives of Okotoks performance, exhibition, media, literary and arts service organizations. 6.1 Demand for Performance Facilities One of the most important indicators of the need for new performance facilities is interest on part of the community’s local cultural organizations and providers. To that end, the following organizations and institutions indicated an interest in performance facilities. 1.

Foothills Composite High School + Alberta High School of Fine Arts (FCHS/AHSFA): One of 17 schools in the Foothills School Division, FCHS/AHSFA is a grade 10 to 12 school that serves the Town of Okotoks. Performing arts programs at the school include jazz band, an annual Mainstage production, concert band and orchestra. Mainstage productions require a full month in the venue as well as 10 to 20 performances that sell out the school’s existing cafetorium performance venue. The drama program also includes one acts and short plays that use the theatre, concerts, and more, totaling approximately 55 public events. Representatives of FCHS/AHSFA indicated a need for a theatre that could accommodate daytime use for classes, rehearsals and other academic activities when school is in session for 10 months of the year. FCHS/AHSFA’s existing facilities are limiting in that there is insufficient equipment, storage and production space and the stage breaks out into the school’s cafeteria. Production space is particularly limited and requires set construction to take place at parents’ homes. Representatives of the school indicated that these activity estimates would require performance facilities to be located in proximity to the school campus.

2.

Town of Okotoks: In partnership with the Okotoks Arts Council, the Town recently launched a presenting series at RPAC that includes live popular folk, jazz and country music and film. The acts presented at RPAC are usually selected because they will fit well in the space and are solos, duos or small ensembles. There is potential for Cultural Services to explore the development of a performing arts festival, which would require an intimate flexible theatre and utilize several weeks in a theatre.

3.

Foothills Theatre Company: A not-for-profit professional theatre company in development, the Foothills Theatre Company currently produces 2 to 3 productions annually, including an outdoor show. The company has used RPAC, Old Town Okotoks outdoor stage and the Elks Hall for its shows, which average audiences of 180 to 200. Notably, Foothills Theatre Company is actively exploring partnerships and opportunities that would allow the company to offer educational programs and work with students. Representatives of the Foothills Theatre Company anticipate utilizing a space with a capacity of 150 to 250 seats for 9 to 12 weeks per year. Each production would have 12 performance days and 8 on-stage rehearsal tech days.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

4.

Dewdney Players: A producing theatre company, the Dewdney Players are an Okotoks-based charitable organization governed by a board of directors. Presently, the Dewdney players produce 3 shows per year, including a one act run, fall production and spring production. The fall and spring productions generally have a 3-week run with 3 performances per weekend. For each show the organization would require access to the space for 7 days prior to opening. The Dewdney Players have rented several venues in town, including the Centennial Centre and the RPAC. Both of these facilities are insufficient for the organization, particularly due to the small stage size, lack of a fly tower and limited backstage area. The opportunities of a purpose-built theatre are numerous – with a 200 to 400-seat theatre, the Dewdney Players could consider large ensemble productions, expanded education programs and dinner theatre.

5.

Local Dance Studios: There was notable demand for larger performance venues on part of the area’s private dance studios and schools. Particularly, the Alberta Dance Academy, which operates with 3 studios and serves 600 students, has a need for performance facilities in Okotoks for competitions and recitals. The Alberta Dance Academy would require a venue with a minimum of 1,000 seats, with a large stage, backstage space and sufficient parking. Presently, the Academy uses the 1,700-seat First Alliance Church in Calgary but has rented the Centennial Centre and Strathcona Tweedsmuir School in the past. The Academy could potentially use a smaller venue for competitions.

The following chart summarizes user demand for performance facilities indicating notable demand for 300 to 500-capacity facilities that can accommodate intimate theatre, education and dance.

User Demand: Performance Venue Perf/Event Days

Reh/Tech Days

Other Days

Total Days

Capacity Requirements

Foothills Theatre Company

36

24

--

60

150 to 250

Town Presented Events/Arts Festival

10

14

--

24

300 to 500

Foothills Composite HS/Alberta HS of Fine Arts

55

60

200

315

300 to 500

Dewdney Players

22

21

--

43

200 to 400

Alberta Dance Academy

5

5

--

10

1,000 +

Other Dance Recitals and Competitions

10

10

--

20

500 to 1,250

Other Local and Regional Arts Organizations

21

7

7

35

Various

159

141

207

507

TOTAL

6.2 Demand for Classroom + Rehearsal Studios Our work also found demand for classroom and rehearsal space to accommodate educational activities, Town programming and community use. The following organizations expressed an interest in utilizing these facilities. 1.

Town of Okotoks: Presently, the Town has a number of programs that could potentially utilize classroom and rehearsal facilities. ✲

The Community Dance Program for children and adults has shown considerable growth, and movement-based classes are notable in that they combine fitness, health and wellness with performing arts education. However, studio facilities suitable for dance education are limited

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

in terms of quality and accessibility. Classes have taken place at the Imperial Ballet Dance School, Recreation Centre and the Foothills Composite High School Dance Studio. âœ˛

Through Community Services, the Town offers numerous visual arts programs. By providing arts programs in the community, residents do not have to travel to Calgary to enroll in arts classes. In the last 10 years, program participation has increased from 3,000 to 10,000. Using the Town’s current facilities, the Community Services program is only able to offer one program at a time. A number of the spaces have limited accessibility and are insufficient for the needs of residents and Town programming. New classroom facilities should be suitable for all ages and would be utilized for classes such as papermaking, painting, fibre arts, and drawing instruction.

2.

Dewdney Players: Presently, the Dewdney Players utilize a facility that is owned by the Municipal District. However, the future of their relationship is uncertain and there is potential for the organization to need rehearsal facilities in the coming years.

3.

Foothills Theatre Company: This organization requires 80 to 120 hours of rehearsal space per production, and uses the Dewdney Players rehearsal space. However, the likely expansion of the Company’s productions will require additional space, which that rehearsal space may not be able to accommodate.

4.

Bow Valley College: The College is in the process of launching Okotoks-based programming. Presently, the College has 200 on-line students from the Town of Okotoks and is actively exploring the potential to provide on-site classes. Bow Valley College does not presently offer humanities or liberal arts courses, but could facilitate arts-related programming if there was sufficient demand. There is also potential for Bow Valley College to be a possible user of classroom facilities if available to the community. The College anticipates offering on-site classes starting in 2012.

6.3 Demand for Visual Arts + Heritage Spaces As identified in the CHAMP, there is a need for visual arts and heritage spaces. There is some potential for new performance facilities to fulfill these needs, particularly if these opportunities can create a stronger facility concept and attract project partners. 1.

Town staff indicate a need for a gallery suitable for traveling art exhibitions. The OAG and OMA have facilities that lack sufficient humidity and temperature controls, prohibiting the display of certain pieces, particularly artworks that are sensitive to humidity or on loan from art museums. New exhibition facilities should have modern climate and environmental controls, storage and loading areas.

2.

There is also potential for public spaces in a new performing arts centre to serve as informal exhibition spaces. The Town already curates archival and photo exhibitions in municipal facilities and encourages the integration of heritage themes and assets into public spaces.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

7. benefits + impacts Broadly, the development of arts and cultural facilities and vibrant cultural communities can enhance quality of life, attract and create a well educated and skilled workforce, advance economic and downtown development strategies, and encourage cultural tourism. It is important to consider the benefits and impacts of cultural facility development in the context of the long-term vision for Okotoks. As one of the first municipalities in Canada to design and adopt a philosophy of sustainable growth, Okotoks has a progressive long-term vision that should be considered in anticipation of cultural facility development. The Town of Okotoks has adopted a number of planning documents and studies that identify action items, initiatives, strategies, land use polices and guidelines for the future of the community. To understand how the development of new cultural facilities supports the community’s vision and goals, we reviewed a number of Town planning documents, including: 1.

Town of Okotoks Social Wellness Framework, September 2010: Recognizing the Town’s commitment to community sustainability as well as economic and environmental sustainability, The Social Wellness Framework is a 20-year plan that realizes the Town’s sustainability vision for a “safe, caring and vital community that honors culture, heritage and environment.” The social wellness survey completed in this process found that Okotoks residents believe that one of the most important aspects of social wellness is access to a quality school system. Additionally, 51% of respondents indicated that free or no-cost recreation, events and celebrations were one of the most important factors of social wellness. Twenty-seven percent of survey respondents aged 65 over indicated that a vibrant arts and cultural scene was a priority. Confirming the Town’s reputation as an active community, the highest percentage of survey respondents felt that that a range of opportunities for sport and recreation for all was essential to social wellness. The development of cultural facilities should advance the concepts outlined by the Social Wellness Framework, particularly those that address playing, learning, sense of place and working. The development of cultural facilities could advance these goals in the following ways:

2.

Learning and Playing: Increase the depth and availability of after school programming for students (grades 1 – 12), programming available for preschool aged children, and lifelong learning. These programs should be financially accessible for all students.

Sense of Place: Support the perception of Olde Towne Okotoks as a vibrant downtown core, creating a sense of community through being a ‘community hub’.

Culture, Heritage + Arts Master Plan: 2010 – 2030: The Town’s Cultural Master Plan is the framework for cultural and heritage policy and considered the cultural community, infrastructure, creative industries and workers, and heritage and established a number of strategic directions that guide the development of cultural infrastructure and the Town’s role as facilitator. Particularly, the Town is charged with: ✲

Creating structure for regional cultural collaboration and partnerships.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Cultivating educational institutions as well as life-long learning programs for the teaching of arts and heritage.

Nurturing and supporting creative individuals, business, institutions and organizations.

Ensuring that creative physical infrastructure is available to current and future generations.

Advancing the identity of “Creative Okotoks” and support place branding and marketing.

The CHAMP also identified 19 action items, many which could be fulfilled by the development of cultural facilities. The Town has already undertaken the action of planning for the development of a purpose-built arts centre with this study effort. Additional cultural facilities would also allow the Town to:

3.

Establish shared community and educational cultural spaces.

Market a culturally vital Okotoks.

Develop an Arts Festival.

Nurture the development of a sustainable cultural governance model.

Promote the Town’s historic downtown core precinct.

Facilitate regional structures for cultural collaboration and dissemination.

Support creative exchanges by acting locally and thinking globally.

Town of Okotoks Integrated Sustainability Framework, March 2010: Okotoks’ Integrated Sustainability Framework includes documents that directly relate the four foundations of sustainability created over the last 20 years. Since 1998, Okotoks has maintained a commitment to sustainable growth and planning. ✲

Programs and infrastructure should maintain the philosophy of sustainable growth. Acknowledging the Town of Okotoks Municipal Development Plan - The Legacy Plan, adopted in September 1998, the Town’s population growth is defined by the licensed limits of the Sheep River aquifer. Cultural facilities should provide services and amenities to a local population of no more than 30,000.

New cultural facilities must support the Town of Okotoks Four Foundations of Sustainability and maintain a small town atmosphere, preserve the river valley, serve all ages and cultures and potentially provide equality schooling. These facilities should operate with fiscal responsibility, practice social consciousness and support economic development. Finally, there is terrific opportunity for cultural facilities to embrace the tenet of environmental stewardship by utilizing green construction practices, materials and aesthetic and connect arts and culture to Okotoks’ vital natural resources.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

8. facility concept 8.1 Conclusions The Town of Okotoks is well positioned to undertake the development of an arts and cultural facility because: 1.

There is notable market demand on the part of residents, particularly for programs that serve young families, including weekend activities, community-based programming and festivals, hands-on classes and workshops, and family-oriented presented events and programs. Additionally, Calgary Region populations are well educated and affluent, indicating potential to visit Okotoks for signature events with a regional appeal.

2.

There is positive user demand for several types of cultural spaces, including performance facilities, classroom and studio space. Demand for performance space is primarily for facilities that can accommodate theatre, dance and educational productions. There is also a need for accessible and purpose-built art and rehearsal studio space, which would support demand on part of Town programs and not-for-profit cultural organizations.

3.

Existing Town facilities are limiting the delivery and quality of cultural programs and educational experiences as well as the organizational development of community and professional not-forprofit arts organizations.

4.

Cultural facilities should be designed and operated using the Town’s sustainable planning strategies and can advance the vision for Okotoks by providing learning experiences and opportunities for all ages and cultures, incorporating environmentally sustainable physical and operating characteristics and creating a stronger sense of place.

8.2 Recommendations Having researched facilities, discussed the potential to develop additional performance facilities with organizations and individuals that would directly benefit from the project, and reviewed the project’s role within the context of the development of Okotoks, we recommend the following facility components. We have structured our facility recommendations as a menu of options that could be combined as one cultural centre, developed as a part of a future community infrastructure project, or as an adaptive reuse of an existing building or space. 1.

Theatre for learning + community use: A theatre and teaching space with a capacity of 300 to 400, a flexible seating configuration and two tiers of seating. The first tier should have a flexible seating configuration and a seat capacity of 200 to 250 seats. The balcony level should have seating that can accommodate an additional 100 to 150 seats that wrap around the room, and can have either fixed seats or moveable chairs. The flexibility of the space should allow for it to be configured as a proscenium stage, cabaret space, flat floor, stage or in the round. The theatre should have a control room or booth, dressing rooms sufficient for ensemble

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

productions, a loading area and space to build and store sets and props. Example: Moncus Performing Arts Theater, Acadiana Center for the Arts, Lafayette, Louisiana Opened in 2010, the 46,000 square foot Acadiana Center for the Arts includes a theatre, art gallery, retail space, meeting facilities and a cafĂŠ. Its theatre is high in quality and flexibility, with a capacity of 300 seats and the ability to arrange seating configurations on a flat floor, in-theround or a traditional theatre-style set-up. Retractable seating allows for the configuration to be quickly converted. The theatre includes a flysystem, high-definition audio/visual technology, and acoustics that are appropriate for spoken word and unamplified or amplified music. It is used for presented events, film, a family performance series, dance, music and presentations brought in by outside promoters. The space also hosts rentals for activities by arts organizations as well as private events.! Example: Aeolian Hall, London, Ontario Aeolian Hall, managed by the non-profit Aeolian Hall Musical Arts Association, is a multidisciplinary arts centre and school for the arts. The Aeolian operates as a performance hall available for community use and also houses the Aeolian Music School, offering programs including private music lessons, ensemble training, Gamelan classes, and the newly launched El Sistema Aeolian, a free music training program for youth. The performance space has two levels: a main floor and a balcony. The main floor has a flexible seating configuration and can accommodate theatre seating (240 people), cafĂŠ style tables (120 people), long tables (120) or a standing room event (272.) The balcony has fixed seating for 60 people. The hall also features a raised stage with a proscenium arch. Example: Bert Church LIVE Theatre, Airdrie, Alberta

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

The Bert Church LIVE Theatre is a 377-seat venue with raked, fixed theatre seating and a proscenium stage. Facility characteristics include projection equipment, professional audiovisual equipment, wing space and a control area. The facility is adjacent to the Bert Church High School and operated by the City of Airdrie. Programming at the Theatre is diverse and includes:

2.

Rentals to local arts organizations and dance studios for theatrical productions, recitals, concerts and other performances.

Private rentals to local businesses for meetings, lectures and presentations.

The City presents a professional music series with popular, folk, rock, gospel, blues and country, classical artists and ensembles and family acts.

The Theatre is used for showcases and programming as a part of the City’s annual Live@Airdrie Fest.

The Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra and the Calgary Opera perform outreach concerts at the Theatre.

The Theatre is home to the Bert Church Theatre PACK – performing arts classes for youth that are offered throughout the academic year as well as in summer camps.

The Bert Church High School incorporates the use of the Theatre into its Fine Arts curriculum, which includes courses in jazz and instrumental music, general music, drama, choir, metal smithing, studio art and advanced acting. The Bert Church High School drama program utilizes the facility for its musicals and the music program uses it for jazz band, concert band and choir concerts.

Media lab: The community media lab would include a recording booth, an equipment library, classrooms and editing suites and a gathering and exhibition area where students can display and share their finished films, slideshows and media art. The media lab would offer all-ages classes in graphic design, digital photography and film editing as well as professional or curriculum-based digital media skill training. There is good potential to cultivate a postsecondary educational institution to partner in this effort. This facility component could be developed by retrofitting or adapting an existing space or as a part of a larger project. Example: Grand Rapids Community Media Center, Grand Rapids, Michigan The Community Media Center started as a public access television station, the Grand Rapids Cable Access Center in 1981 and became a role model for the transformation from a traditional public access television station to a multi-disciplinary Community Media Center.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

The non-profit centre provides training in radio, television, media and information technology as well as access to all the necessary equipment. The centre also has a special program to assist non-profits with information technology needs and traditional and new media marketing tools. With the successful completion of its $1.2 million capital campaign in 1997, the Community Media Center integrated its services under one roof for the first time in a renovated historic 1920s neighborhood library. In 2005, the Media Center acquired the Wealthy Theatre, a struggling historic theatre, with a plan to transform the space into a technically advanced theatre for community use. A subsequent $2.4 million campaign helped pay off the debts associated with the acquisition and raise additional funding to upgrade the Media Center’s other programs. In January 2011 the Community Media Center launched another campaign to celebrate the Wealthy Theatre’s Centennial. The campaign will raise funds for 30 separate projects related to further technological upgrades as well as increasing the energy efficiency of the theatre. 3.

Public + community spaces: Public spaces should serve the dual function of gathering and meeting areas (before and after events and classes) as well as informal exhibition spaces for Town artifacts and photographs, school exhibitions and a community gallery space. These facilities should incorporate display cases, moveable lighting and wall space to mount drawings, photographs and paintings. Public spaces for the theatre could serve as a way to strengthen the sense of community and relationship between the school and Town. Additionally, outdoor public space for informal performances and events should be incorporated in facility designs.

4.

Arts classroom: The development of an additional arts studio and classroom to accommodate community and educational programs would create a space for hands-on learning that is accessible to all. This facility could be developed separately from the theatre, as a part of another community infrastructure project, or by adaptive reuse of an existing building. Facility characteristics should include water access, the ability to safely dispose of paint, storage for supplies and student projects, natural light and workspace. The arts classroom should have a capacity that can accommodate student classes and field trips.

5.

Rehearsal + movement studio: There is a need for additional performing arts facilities that accommodate theatre, dance and music rehearsals and movement and wellness classes offered by the Town. Again, this facility could be developed as a component of the theatre, adding a second dance studio to the FCHS/ASFAHS’s campus, or as an adaptive reuse project or as a part of other community facilities.

The needs assessment also found that a set of facilities could all be developed within one structure, but that alternative options might have some facilities developed in multiple locations. This idea came out of discussions with the Foothills School Division, as it became clear that their interest in using facilities is dependent on location of the Theatre. Additionally, other elements of the project could be sited in proximity to other Okotoks cultural facilities, including the Rotary Performing Arts Centre (RPAC).

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

As a result, physical and business planning considered two options. It should be noted that these two scenarios were developed to highlight the distinctions between the choice of a single facility at one location and multiple facilities in difference places. The first scenario assumes that recommended facilities are developed in one building in or around downtown Okotoks. The second scenario assumes the project is developed in two pieces – a High School Theatre beside the Foothills Composite High School + the Alberta High School of Fine Arts and than other facilities (including a second rehearsal hall) in downtown Okotoks. Before explaining these two scenarios, it must be said that these are not the only choices available to the community. There are many other possibilities in terms of the configuration of spaces and their location. We’ve chosen these two scenarios because they highlight the distinctions between the choice of a single facility at one location and multiple facilities in different places. The information provided in this report will allow community leadership to test other options and opportunities as they arise. We should also point out that any option that puts a theatre at or near the Foothills Composite High School + the Alberta High School of Fine Arts is responding to the needs expressed by School and Division teachers and staff for performance facilities. Responding to those needs should come with a significant capital contribution from the Foothills School Division and Province. The Foothills School Division has expressed optimism about the idea of a partnership and a willingness to proceed with that exploration, but it is difficult to predict if and when that might happen and what capital contribution might be possible. Therefore, it is important to proceed with these two facility concepts on parallel tracks: 1. 2.

A Community Arts Centre developed at a single location. Two facilities, including one facility located adjacent to the Foothills Composite High School + Alberta High School of Fine Arts and other facilities developed at a site in downtown Okotoks.

It is also important that recommended facilities respond to a set of fundamental goals that fulfill to the needs of Okotoks and the region. To that end, new facilities should: ✲

Respond to the desires of local and regional audiences by bringing new arts and entertainment programs to the community.

Provide better cultural facilities for schools, local arts organizations and others in the community of Okotoks.

Create needed space to support Town sponsored arts, culture and heritage programs.

Build Okotoks’ profile as an arts destination in the region.

Advance the Town’s community and economic development goals by enhancing local quality of life in a sustainable fashion.

Many of our recommendations on facility development and operation are based on the experiences of comparable national and regional facilities. Appendix E describes the physical, programmatic, operating and financial information on these comparable facilities.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

9. the community arts centre First we’ll consider the concept of a Community Arts Centre developed as a single facility in or around downtown Okotoks. 9.1 Facility Concept The Community Arts Centre (‘the Centre’) includes all of the recommended components from the first phase of work, as follows: ✲

Theatre: A 300-seat performance venue with a partial fly tower, a large stage and significant backstage space to support a wide range of programs, including professional and student theatre, live music, dance, film screenings and the spoken word.

Multipurpose Room: A 2,000 sf space that can accommodate rehearsals, special events and smaller performances for up to 100 people.

Rehearsal and Movement Studio: a 1,600 sf studio for dance and movement rehearsal and classes.

Gallery: A 1,000 sf gallery space with professional lighting, climate control and security features that allow it to accommodate high quality touring and local exhibits.

Arts Classroom: A 2,300 sf classroom for the teaching of arts programs. The Arts Classroom would also include amenities such as sinks and storage areas.

Community Room: A 400 sf meeting room for various community programs and meetings.

Lobby: A 2,100 sf lobby to support events in the Theatre and could serve as a venue for receptions and other events.

Community Media Lab: A 2,260 sf lab that includes a recording studio equipment library, classroom, editing suites, gathering and exhibition space and storage.

Café/Concessions: A small café and concessions area that supports various performances, exhibits and special events, and is also open on a daily basis for those coming to or congregating at the Community Arts.

In addition to these programmable spaces, support facilities are required to make the building work efficiently. A complete space program is attached as Appendix F. The proposed space program has been built upon a collection of spaces typically found in similar sized community arts facilities. We anticipate a program verification exercise to occur in the future in order to fine-tune the program to more specifically address the needs of the community and the selected site. The total net square footage of the proposed spaces is approximately 28,000 sf. By applying a 1:1.6 net to gross ratio (typical for this type of building), the Community Arts Centre will result in approximately 45,000 gross square feet of space.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Appendix G is a rendering that confirms the basic components of the Community Arts Centre and how they might be laid out. This is not a design for the Centre, but it does highlight how various spaces might be organized and the overall spaces that are required for the facility. Note the following: ✲

The Community Arts Centre concept assumes a 55’ fly tower to serve the 300-seat Theatre and an 18’ height clearance to the underside of the pipe grid within the Multipurpose Room. The planning concept places the 300-seat Theatre and Multipurpose Room in the centre of the building, surrounded by supporting public, administration and service spaces. This planning helps to acoustically isolate the performance spaces from exterior noise sources such as the railway and helps to reduce the height of the building.

The community oriented spaces such as the Gallery, Arts Classroom, Rehearsal and Movement studio, Community Media Lab and Community Room are located along the south side of the building where improved visual and physical connections to nature or community are available if desired. To support the goal of barrier free access throughout the building, most spaces have been placed on the main floor. Depending on the future development of the building, a second floor, accessed via elevator, may be used to accommodate some of these spaces.

Loading, service and administration spaces have been located on the west and north sides of the building for proper separation from public spaces and ease of access to the back of house service spaces.

9.2 Locating the Community Arts Centre An integral component of this planning process considers where recommended facilities might be located. he following questions are intended to suggest conditions and criteria that should be used to select a site. These might include: ✲ ✲

Site area, footprint, boundaries and expandability: Is the size of the site large enough to accommodate program components? Parking: is sufficient parking available on or adjacent to the site? Parking should be sufficient for audience parking as well as performer and staff parking. School bus staging for drop-off and pick-up should also be considered.

Local patron access: does the site have good access for pedestrians, motorists and those using public transportation?

Regional access: is the site close to highway entrances and exits so as to be accessible to regional audiences?

Service access: do site conditions support efficient loading and unloading of service vehicles?

Noise isolation: is the noise environment problematic to the siting of performance facilities?

Cost: what is the cost of acquisition of the site?

Topography and site conditions: is the site topography favorable to the siting of performance and educational facilities?

Amenities: are amenities available near the sites that make it an attractive destination for residents and visitors (e.g. restaurants, shopping and hotels)?

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Neighborhood acceptance and compatibility: will the site be favorably received by the surrounding neighborhood?

Visibility and architectural impact: will a new building be visible to the general public and therefore be recognizable as a significant civic building?

Availability: can the site be obtained? Is it for sale? Is it publicly owned? Would it have to be obtained by process of condemnation?

Setting and urban impact: is the site appropriate to the construction of performance facilities that will represent a significant civic undertaking?

Views: does the site offer interesting views of the community and/or the mountains?

It is highly unlikely that any one site would satisfy all or even most of these criteria and it is too early to begin the effort of searching for the specific site that might score well in terms of all of these conditions. Nevertheless, there are a couple of observations that can be made for the potential location of the Community Arts Centre: ✲

There are really two types of sites that are likely for this project. One is a site located in the downtown area that is relatively close to other cultural assets and has the potential to support other downtown development initiatives. The other is a site located away from the downtown core in a less developed area that is attractive in terms of access, size, cost and views.

Considering the Town’s priorities for urban redevelopment, the downtown location has a greater probability of supporting other community development goals, including support of downtown businesses to the development of cultural tourism. However, both options have good potential to serve Okotoks.

9.3 Capital Costs The final element of our physical planning is a preliminary estimate of what it would cost to build the Community Arts Centre. Appendix H is a capital cost estimate prepared by Calgary-based firm Western Cost Consulting LP. The capital cost estimate was based upon the conceptual drawings and program issued in February 2012. Assumptions of a steel framed building with high quality architectural finishes, typical site work including services to the building, new surface parking and a 25% glass to wall ratio have been made. Pre-tender estimates and tender results for similar projects within the Okotoks and the region have been used for the price levels anticipated in these estimates. Good architectural and engineering practices are accounted for at the lower end of the range of costs shown and it is assumed that no environmental issues exist on the sites, subject to a future geotechnical report. A LEED Gold level of sustainability is anticipated as the goal for this concept and the associated costs for achieving this standard have been included. A 10% design contingency, a 5% construction contingency, a 25% soft cost, an assumed equipment allowance and one-year escalation contingency have all been included. This construction budget is presented as an estimate of probable costs and is intended to use for budget discussions.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Overall, this analysis suggests that the Community Arts Centre could be built for a total cost between $24 million and $30 million, excluding any site acquisition costs. 9.4 Goals and Practices Now we move on to the business planning elements of the Community Arts Centre. In order to consider how the facility is operated, we would express the following operating goals: âœ˛

New facilities should be as busy as possible with a wide range of arts and entertainment opportunities for Okotoks residents as well as regional residents, and visitors.

âœ˛

The Community Arts Centre should be affordable and accessible for local artists and organizations.

âœ˛

Annual funding requirements for the Community Arts Centre should be both achievable and sustainable.

Each one of these goals sounds relatively straightforward and viable. It is the combination that presents a series of challenges to facility managers in the day-to-day operation of facilities. 9.5 Governance Arts and cultural facilities can be governed and operated in many different ways. Here is an overview of the potential choices for this project. A. Not-for-profit charitable organization A not-for-profit would be established to operate the Community Arts Centre on behalf of the Town of Okotoks and the community. The Town would retain ownership of the facility and develop an operating agreement or a fee-for-service grant for the not-for-profit charitable organization. Pros o Oriented towards public service and community impact due to the mission. o Transparent operations, which allow for greater public accountability. o Strong fundraising infrastructure, which can reduce reliance on earned revenue and provide greater curatorial flexibility. Cons o Lack of a guaranteed source of contributed income available to these organizations. o Must compete each year for funding with a range of other charitable organizations in the sector. o May not be the most viable approach to ensuring long-term stability of operations due to fluctuations in the economy and in the commitment of philanthropists and corporate sponsors.

B. User-run facilities Users run facilities are a slight variation on the not-for-profit-run model, in which the principal user of the facility is also the operator. This is an attractive model when there is one user that dominates the

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

facilities. This model is notable but not likely to be an option for the Community Arts Centre, because of the size and complexity of the facility and the diverse set of programs and users at the facility. C. Government-run facilities In this scenario, a department or agency of local government manages the facility. This is best when the facility is operated primarily as a rental facility, making spaces available to local cultural organizations and for local and regional presenters to bring touring activity to the market. Pros o Management’s orientation toward public service can provide significant benefits to local cultural organizations in terms of cost and scheduling. o Access to resources that often extend to the operation of other facilities can also help keep costs down. o The principal benefit of a government-controlled operation is the relative guarantee of funding to support ongoing operations. The vehicle for such support may vary, and could include grants, enterprise taxes, hotel/motel tax funds and/or line-item budget allocations, but the assurance of annual support provides a significant operating cushion. Cons o Operation of these facilities requires a significant investment on part of the government entity. o Some risk on part of the government entity, particularly as it relates to the presenting function. D. Arm’s length not-for-profit corporation A popular governance model for libraries, economic development organizations, recreation centres and other community facilities, arm’s length entities are increasingly utilized for arts and cultural facilities. This is a similar model to the not-for-profit corporation, except the Town and community provide governance through a board of directors appointed by the Town Council. In some instances, the bylaws of the organization require additional Town oversight, such as budget approval, utilizing City or union staff and more. Pros o Strong Town oversight and accountability, while maintaining a certain transparency and operating at an arm’s length. o More flexibility when hiring personnel and there is potentially the ability to hire union or non-union personnel as needed. o Some flexibility in requirements to follow established Town budgeting policies and procedures. o Combines the positives of a not-for-profit organization with existing City resources and policies. Cons o Some level of reliance on the Town or municipality for funding and other support o Not a Town-operated facility in the traditional sense and will require own resources and infrastructure. E. Commercially-run facilities There are a number of variations on the commercial operating model. Commercial venues could be forprofit entities owned and operated for a profit or facilities that are owned by the public sector or a

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

nonprofit organization and then subcontracted to commercial operators to manage the facility on their behalf. Pros o If profitable, the owner and manager can share in the operating results. o Commercial operators present (and occasionally produce) entertainment programming. o The facility can be made available to outside groups, including non-profit cultural organizations o In subcontracted arrangements, the commercial operator provides staff Cons o Operating expenses and revenues vary significantly from year-to-year depending on the level of risk exposure and the success of their programs. o For the owner (either a commercial entity or otherwise) there is some level of risk associated with this model. The size and purpose of the Community Arts Centre indicates that a commercial operator wouldn’t be a viable option. Although occasionally used for meetings and events, the Centre will be primarily utilized for community meetings, not-for-profit arts performances and civic events. Having reviewed these options, there are several scenarios and options available for the operation of the Centre. First, a foundation and not-for-profit charitable organization should be established to sustain the private fundraising campaign for the Centre. The next step would be to determine the possibilities for how the facility could be owned and operated. Here are some possibilities: ✲

The preferred option is for the Town to set up an arm’s length not-for-profit entity to manage it. This new not-for-profit entity should also obtain charitable status to fundraise. This model would be comparable to how the Okotoks Public Library is operated.

The foundation, with the original purpose to fundraise for construction, becomes the operator. The Town retains ownership of the Community Arts Centre and this relationship is defined by an operating agreement with the Foundation.

The Town of Okotoks owns the Centre and operates it through the Cultural and Historical Services Division.

Each of these models has strengths and challenges. It is our recommendation that the Town pursue the arm’s length entity, as this model will create the greatest level of flexibility, allow the Centre to benefit from Town resources as required, and allow the Town a comfortable and reasonable level of oversight. 9.6 Programming We see the Community Arts Centre coming to life in many different ways: A. Town Programming ✲

Film + Live Presenting: Buying and presenting touring arts and entertainment programs will be a small but important element of the Community Arts Centre’s programs. Presented events, which might include one-off events as well as a new festival, will be booked by the Town of Okotoks Cultural and Historical Services staff and will occur in both the Theatre and Multipurpose Room. Presented events can support the mission of the Centre by providing

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

residents with opportunities to see and hear regionally and nationally known artists and films. The challenge with presenting is having the ability to choose and access the right shows and promote them effectively such that a small set of performances has a large and positive impact on the community. ✲

Town Events: The Community Arts Centre will host festivities and other programming in concurrence with existing Town Events such as Light up Okotoks. These events could be building wide, but would primarily utilize the Theatre.

Exhibitions: New purpose-built galleries at the Community Arts Centre will allow the Town to bring in touring exhibitions and display more on-loan art and heritage pieces from other museums. Additionally, the Community Art Centre’s public areas will be utilized as informal gallery spaces and are places where the Town can display archival exhibitions and photo exhibits (as it currently does in existing municipal facilities).

Community Media Programs: The Community Media Lab is a membership-based facility that provides access to new media equipment onsite, rental of equipment to go offsite, and the opportunity to take classes and participate in larger projects, for example, the production of a film following important local issues. It would ideally be open and active all–day everyday, but it would likely take some time to build up. It is critically important that the lab be accessible and affordable for local youth, providing them the opportunity to use, create and collaborate with new media.

All-ages Performing + Visual Arts Education Programs: The Community Art Centre’s Rehearsal and Movement Studio, Arts Classroom and Community Room will all be utilized by the Town for a variety of programs including the existing Community Dance Program, hands-on visual art instruction including fibre arts, drawing, paper-making and painting. Additionally, these programs would include field trips, after-school programs, evening and weekend programs and summer camps. Moving forward, partnerships may emerge that allow the Community Arts Centre to offer courses for college or university credit.

B. Resident Arts Organizations + School Use: Per input from local and regional arts and cultural organizations, there is a desire for a set of not-for-profit arts organizations to obtain status as resident arts organizations, rehearsing, producing and presenting theatre, music, and other education and cultural programs. Though the proposed Community Arts Centre will not be located on or near the Foothills Composite High School + Alberta High School of Fine Arts campus, there is also potential for occasional school use for plays, recitals, concerts and special events. School and Resident users will rent a number of spaces, including the Theatre, Multipurpose Room, Rehearsal and Movement Studio, Gallery, Arts Classroom, Community Room and Lobby. Potential residents include the Okotoks Arts Council, Foothills Theatre Company, Dewdney Players and others. C. Other Not-for-profit + Club Rentals: There is also outside demand for facilities coming from other occasional users including amateur and professional arts and cultural organizations, dance and music schools and clubs. These groups will also have access to the Theatre, Multipurpose Room, Rehearsal and Movement Studio, Gallery, Arts Classroom, Community Room and Lobby.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

D. Commercial/Private Rentals: There is also anticipated demand on part of businesses and residents that will respond to the opportunity to rent the Theatre and other spaces in the Centre. This might include concerts, fundraisers, sit-down banquets and parties, birthday and retirement parties, weddings, and corporate meetings and presentations. All of these elements of programming are important to the vitality of the Community Arts Centre. But there will be conflicting needs for space, as well as weekly and seasonal peaks and valleys in demand. This then points to the need for clear and progressive operating policies and procedures. 9.7 Operating Policies and Procedures The success of the Community Arts Centre depends on the development of clear, concise and equitable operating policies and procedures, as follows: Utilization and Access: The Centre should be as busy as possible with the range of programs and activities described in the previous section. Here, the challenge is managing demand and scheduling of the programmable spaces. In that regard, we would stress the following: ✲

All the types of activity previously listed must be recognized as important. The facility management team must do its best to balance access and demand among these groups.

Explicit policies must be in place addressing how facilities are booked, including how far in advance dates can be secured, rental rates, scheduling priority, cancellation fees and other charges.

Rental rates should be scaled to favor some combination of local and nonprofit groups as renters.

Resident Arts Organizations: We would recommend community-based arts organizations and educational institutions have the opportunity to seek classification as resident organizations once the Community Arts Centre opens. Resident groups gain preferred rental rates and status for booking in exchange for bringing a certain amount of activity and benefit to the venue. These groups can guarantee a relatively consistent level of activity to attract users, students, audiences, and other visitors and build an image of the facility through consistent use, supporting ongoing marketing and fundraising efforts. We generally favor a process where organizations qualify as residents through an open application. The criteria by which these organizations are selected should be published, and might include some of the following: ✲

Level of programming: The organization agrees to bring a significant portion of their annual activity to the facility. Specific levels of use may be required within policies and criteria for resident groups.

Mission: The organizational mission is worthy and consistent with the goals of the Centre and the Town of Okotoks.

Quality: The organization creates work of quality that will enhance the image and reputation of the facility.

History: The organization has a track record of growth and financial stability.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Organizational Development: The organization has made a commitment to organizational development that will bring their administrative skills and resources to a high level.

Ticketing: The project should take advantage of new technologies in ticketing, including online services, in order to serve users and audiences and to collect data with which to market the facility and its programs once expanded spaces open. The building could develop its own web page with a ticketing function that sells tickets online both for Centre programs and for outside renters. The actual box office at the Centre could also be expanded to take on the role of community ticket outlet for a range of off-site and other Town-sponsored programs. Food Service: The Centre should include professional food service capabilities, including highquality concessions, catering facilities available to a group of approved caterers, and a small café open for extensive hours to drive the idea of the Centre as a community gathering place. In the organizational chart on the previous page and within the coming budget, we assume that the café/concessions area is run internally, but it would also be worth considering the contracting out of the management of the café and concessions to a local food service provider through some sort of competitive process. Volunteer Opportunities: Though the Centre must have a professional staff, we would encourage the development of a volunteer labor force. Local volunteers often play a role in supporting the operation of community arts facilities. Additional human resources are helpful to the organization, but volunteers can play an even more important role as ambassadors, grassroots marketers, and even financial supporters for the organization. Volunteers could serve as ushers and front of house staff for performances, tour guides for the facility, gallery monitors, and greeters, teaching assistants and roving helpers. This body of volunteers should be closely coordinated and perhaps integrated with volunteer operations of key user groups and the Town’s existing pool. We would also stress the importance of treating volunteers like employees in terms of how they are trained, monitored, and evaluated.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

9.8 Staffing and Leadership Community arts facilities are complicated and expensive facilities to staff given the variety of skills necessary to have them programmed, operated and financially sustained. Assuming the arm’s length entity, we would recommend the following staff and structure for the Community Arts Centre: CAC Board (arm’s length)

CAC Foundation

Town of Okotoks, Community Services (Com. Ser. Manager)

Town (Existing) New Entities Full-time Part-time/Contract

Cultural and Historical Services (Team Leader)

Centre Manager

Café/concessions staff

Marketing & Development Manager

Technical Director

Ticketing Staff

Technical Labor

Event Staff

Programming + Education Manager

Administrative Assistant

Event Cleaning

Media Lab Staff

Positions and organizations highlighted in green indicate existing entities. Organizations highlighted in blue indicate the newly created Foundation board that works directly with the Town and Centre staff. Personnel highlighted in red indicate new full-time positions and personnel highlighted in orange indicate part-time and contract labour. Here are basic job descriptions for key staff: ✲

Centre Manager: The manager of the Community Arts Centre is responsible for administering the facility on a day-to-day basis, overseeing operations and staff, preparing annual budgets and capital improvement plans, monitoring performance, and overseeing all programs and rentals. Marketing the facility to educators, cultural organizations, users, and other elements of community leadership will be a particularly important duty, as it relates to both community development and support. We would suggest that this position should be filled one year prior to the opening of the Centre to assist with planning and preparation for operations.

Marketing and Development Manager: This staff person is in charge of creating and executing development and marketing plans, which will include relationships with individual donors and sponsors, managing campaigns, grant-writing and the search for new sources of funding. On the marketing side there will be marketing planning, public relations, and branding strategy, including the development of season and event specific marketing plans + promotional materials, media buying, public relations materials and activities, and the use of various online marketing tools.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Program and Education Manager: Responsible for the day-to-day planning and delivery of programs at the Centre, responsibilities include the booking of presented programs, the coordination of rental events and the management of programs – including those in the media arts lab.

Technical Director: The Technical Director is in charge of backstage operations of performance and rehearsal spaces and the technical aspects of production in the facility. He/she is charged with backstage maintenance, the safe and responsible use of stage equipment and facilities, scheduling all crew calls including load-ins, changeovers, show calls and load-outs, and coordinating with front of house activities. The position requires experience with stage, sound, lighting, mechanical rigging and electronics systems, as well as theatrical equipment setup, operation, and maintenance. The position should be in place at least six months before the building opens.

9.9 Pro-forma Operating Budget Following is a description of the format and structure of the pro-forma we have developed for the Community Arts Centre, and then a detailed review of assumptions and results. The pro-forma, attached as Appendix I, should be considered a “live” model, one that can be adjusted based on changing circumstances and assumptions. It is fundamentally a tool to help prepare for the operation of the Community Arts Centre. The key step in developing the pro-forma has been estimating activity in various programmable spaces in the Centre. Thus, the first part of the pro-forma shows each of the spaces, rental rates scaled for various groups, and then estimates of activity. While the resulting program of events is not an exact forecast of activity, it does provide a basis for projecting earned revenues, expenses, and attendance. Here are some of the key assumptions that have gone into the development of this activity profile: ✲

Rental rates and levels of use are estimated based on our consultation with local and regional user groups, as well as our knowledge of comparable facilities in the region.

We have projected capacity sold percentages by the type of use (presented events and rentals), keeping them conservative.

Presenting activity includes both live and film events presented in the Theatre and Multipurpose Room.

We have made very detailed projections about each type of possible activity in each programmable space, adding up performances, event days (a day on which there is at least one performance), prep days (load-in, rehearsal etc), total use days, attendance, average ticket prices and ticket revenue and then rent. Also note that ticket prices and rents escalate at 3%, a conservative inflation rate for the coming years.

The pro-forma covers six years, starting one year before opening and then extending through the first five years of operations.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Below the activity section is the actual budget in three sections: earned income, contributed income and operating expenses. The earned income section estimates revenues from presenting and rental activity, plus ancillary operations. Here are key assumptions: ✲

Presenting revenues and rental income come directly from the activity estimates.

Hospitality income – concessions and catering in the facility could be significant. Many facilities enter into partnerships or exclusive agreements with one or more local restaurants, caterers or hotels that generate a per event commission. Concessions and catering income is based on a net per capita and a net per event, which gives the Centre the flexibility to contract with an outside operator as long as those net targets can be achieved.

It is important (though unpopular) for the Theatre to charge outside renters for services provided. This should include the use of the box office, technical labor, event security, event cleaning, house staff and occasionally the rent of special performance equipment beyond what would be normally available. Note that we consider these various labor charges as pass-through expenses, as these individuals would be contracted per event and there is no mark-up by the Centre.

Programming income comes from the activities of the community media lab (classes, camps, membership and the rental of equipment) and other classes, such as the teaching of dance and the visual arts.

Another unpopular but necessary revenue stream comes from ticket handling charges, charged to ticket buyers based on online, telephone and walk-up sales.

Contributed income is money given to support operations by the private and public sector. This is the most speculative part of the budget, as we have not tested each line item with different funding sources. Here again it is better to think of this estimate as a scenario – one way that the operations of the Centre could be financially supported. Having said that, we do have some confidence that the overall target is reachable given the experience of other community arts centres in Western Canada and our sense of the community of Okotoks. Specifically: ✲

The first and key funding source is local government; most important in the early years of operation before other funding sources are fully developed.

We show other levels of government and the private sector supporting the Centre, starting slowly in the first operating year and growing over time.

We have also included a line item for endowment income, which also grows over time as more money is added to the endowment.

Finally, we show an allocation from the capital budget to support the pre-opening and first year of operations.

Operating expenses are substantial and grow over time as the level of activity accelerates. ✲

Most important on the expense side are staff costs, including both full and part-time staff to operate the Centre per the organizational chart in section 9.8.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Compensation levels are set to match Town pay grades and comparable positions in the region. Benefit levels vary from 18% for part-time staff to 30% for full-time staff.

Presenting expenses are calculated as a per event fees. Those direct expenses include artist fees, promotion of the event and other costs associated with the performance.

Ticket office expenses cover a series of hard costs, from ticket printing to maintenance of the ticket office computer system.

Administrative expenses include promotion and advertising, professional services, insurance, travel and entertainment, technology services, telephone, and other office supplies and services.

Occupancy expenses include utilities, repairs and other maintenance costs, estimated on a cost per square foot basis given occupancy costs at comparable arts facilities and several existing facilities in Okotoks.

We also show a contribution to a capital reserve (to pay for larger capital expenditures over time), starting in the third year of operations.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Here is a chart that summarizes the five-year operating budget:

CAC: Pro-forma Operating Budget Summary Pre-opening

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

REVENUES Box Office Admissions

113,150

117,213

129,249

142,517

157,141

Rental Fees

183,643

190,539

206,669

223,513

241,729

User Fees

128,550

133,377

144,668

156,459

169,210

Program Fees

34,000

37,544

41,479

53,862

59,375

Food Service

35,120

37,847

41,224

44,885

48,897

Ticketing Fees

33,379

36,188

39,830

43,765

48,081

Membership Fees

4,000

4,944

6,111

7,553

9,335

Miscellanous Revenue

2,500

2,625

2,756

2,894

3,039

534,341

560,276

611,987

675,447

736,808

TOTAL REVENUES PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS Local Government Support

100,000

125,000

131,250

137,813

144,703

151,938

Provincial Support

0

25,000

26,250

27,563

28,941

30,388

Federal Support

0

25,000

26,250

27,563

28,941

30,388

Individual Giving

0

25,000

37,500

39,375

41,344

43,411

Corporate Sponsorships/Giving

0

25,000

37,500

39,375

41,344

43,411

Foundation Grants

0

50,000

75,000

78,750

82,688

86,822

Endowment Revenue

0

12,500

25,000

31,250

39,063

48,828

100,000

50,000

0

0

0

0

Allocation from Capital Budget TOTAL PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

200,000

337,500

358,750

381,688

407,022

435,185

TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

200,000

871,841

919,026

993,674 1,082,469

1,171,993

Full-time Personnel

185,250

284,050

298,253

313,165

328,823

345,265

Part-time Personnel

14,750

153,400

160,598

168,137

176,033

184,304

Event-based Staff

0

20,000

21,000

22,050

23,153

24,310

Programming Costs

0

115,813

120,860

132,757

149,861

164,613

Ticket Office

0

62,551

68,033

74,820

82,178

90,243

24,000

48,500

49,955

51,454

52,997

54,587

Occupancy Costs

0

163,250

173,588

178,795

184,159

189,684

Rental Subsidy Program

0

10,000

10,300

10,609

10,927

11,255

224,000

857,564

902,585

951,787

1,008,132

1,064,261

EXPENDITURES

Administration

TOTAL EXPENDITURES CONTRIBUTION TO CAPITAL RESERVE EXCESS REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES REVENUES/EXPENDITURES

9.10

0

0

0

25,000

50,000

75,000

(24,000)

14,278

16,441

16,887

24,337

32,732

0%

62%

62%

64%

67%

69%

Funding Operations

As previously noted, there is an additional level of financial support required to balance the annual budget. This does not reflect any kind of failure to operate more efficiently, but rather the fact that the Centre delivers significant value to the community, which should motivate annual support. As with any charitable or not-for-profit cause, the success of fundraising for the Centre will depend on careful positioning and branding of the Community Arts Centre as a community resource. Some

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

comparable facilities have found fundraising from community members to be challenging due to their awareness that the Centre is likely to be already supported by their tax dollars. The Case for Private Support Once the Community Arts Centre is accepted as a resource for local arts organizations, community events and audiences, there is a strong case to be made in and around Okotoks that the Centre can and should be financially supported by the private sector. The case for ongoing outside support should start with the goals we expressed at the beginning of the business plan and focus on the following principles: ✲

The Centre will play a significant role in the cultural, economic and community development of Okotoks.

The Centre will drive the development of local arts organizations, building its regional profile and draw as a first-class learning institution.

The Centre will present community art and entertainment, enhancing the quality of life of those who live and work here.

The Centre will serve the community by supporting meeting and event rentals while remaining accessible and affordable to local arts organizations.

9.11

Economic Impacts

One of the key reasons and rationales for this project is the economic impacts it might have on the community of Okotoks. Let us attempt to quantify those impacts as best we can and then speak to other qualitative impacts. Quantitative Economic Impacts Economic impact means that something has happened to increase economic activity, which includes new sales, new earnings for workers and new jobs in the economy. In our world, these impacts are caused by several things: first there are the impacts of construction of new facilities (which are counted as one-time impacts); then there are the ongoing impacts of the new or expanded operating organization (the entity making expenditures in the local economy), and finally there are the impacts of new audiences, who spend money in association with their attendance at events. These audience expenditures are often referred to as induced impacts. All economic impacts are also split between direct and indirect impacts. Direct impacts (which also include the induced impacts of audience) are the measure of the economic effect of the initial expenditure within a community. Then there are the indirect impacts, which occur as people and businesses receive and then re-spend those initial direct expenditures locally. The indirect impact is the effect of this respending on sales, jobs and household earnings. It is often referred to as secondary spending or the dollars “rippling” through a community. When funds are spent outside the market area, they are considered to have “leaked out” of the community and therefore cease to have a positive local economic impact. Indirect impact is then the sum of the rounds of local spending after the initial expenditures.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

The shift from direct impacts to indirect impacts is measured by employing multipliers that come from an “Input-Output� model. Multipliers translate an input into an output: for example, a dollar spent on food (input) has an impact on the local economy by virtue of new sales in that industry and new jobs created in that industry (output). There are two multipliers for each industry. The output multiplier is the estimate of total new sales associated with the initial expenditure. And the employment estimate forecasts the jobs created in each industry as a result of new expenditures. For our analysis, we have received provincial multipliers from Alberta Finance and Enterprise, which are based on the 2005 input-output tables produced by Statistics Canada. Notably, there is a distinct difference between the Statistics Canada model and the Alberta model, in that the Alberta model also provides estimates of induced economic impacts when the model is closed to households and the Statistic Canada model provides inter-provincial impact (the Alberta model is the Province only). The most common use of Alberta economic multipliers is to estimate the economic impact associated with the establishment or expansion of a new business, organization or firm. It should also be noted that there are some limitations to these multipliers, primarily if there has been a shift in the market share for Alberta industries, changes in technology that may affect certain industries, and an increase or decrease in average costs depending on level of capacity utilization. All of those multipliers are attached in Appendix J. It is unfortunate that there are no multipliers for Okotoks or even the region around it, but the provincial multipliers are still helpful in estimating the overall impacts of the project on the provincial economy. Construction Impacts: The following chart shows the sum of construction expenditures and resulting impacts, assuming an average construction budget of $26.5 million.

One-time Impacts of Construction on Alberta Construction Budget Industry: Construction (230)

$

26,500,000

Direct and Indirect Impacts Project Outputs

Gross Production

2.206

Employment (jobs created)

0.097

$58,459,000 257

If $26.5 million dollars are spent on construction, there is gross production in the Province of $58.5 million and 257 person-years of new employment created over the course of the construction project. Operations: The following chart shows how we calculate operating outputs based on a series of new estimated expenditures by the organization running new facilities. Wages are subtracted from the total operating budget and the balance is allocated among the various categories for which multipliers exist. Note that this is all new activity, as opposed to activity transferred from existing facilities.

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Impacts of the Community Arts Centre on Alberta Economy Closed Model (Year One Budget) Category

Inputs Pro-forma Purchases

Multipliers Gross Production

Outputs

Empl't (jobs)

New Sales ($000's)

New Empl't (jobs)

Electrical power generation and supply

$40,000

1.543

0.03

$61,720

Natural gas distribution, water, sewage, etc.

$10,000

1.933

0.06

$19,330

0.1 0.1

Printing and related support activities

$20,000

1.837

0.10

$36,740

0.2

Retail Trade

$50,000

2.185

0.13

$109,250

0.6

Transit and ground passenger transporation

$2,000

2.393

0.20

$4,786

0.0

Postal service, couriers and messengers

$7,500

2.235

0.19

$16,763

0.1

$20,000

1.782

0.08

$35,640

0.2

Motion picture and sound recording Broadcasting and telecommunications

$4,000

1.603

0.07

$6,412

0.0

$40,000

1.833

0.10

$73,320

0.4

$2,000

1.910

0.08

$3,820

0.0

$20,000

2.116

0.19

$42,320

0.4

$2,000

1.570

0.07

$3,140

0.0

Arts, entertainment and recreation

$100,000

2.303

0.25

$230,300

2.5

Accommodation and food services

$5,000

2.027

0.18

$10,135

0.1

$57,500

2.053

0.18

$118,048

1.1

$5,000

2.073

0.19

$10,365

0.1

$15,000

1.980

0.12

$400,000

1.96

0.13

Publishing, info services and data processing Finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing Adminstrative support services Waste management

Repair and maintenance Nonprofit educational services Municipal government services Averages and Totals

$29,700 $811,788

0.2 6.1

Using the Provincial multipliers, we can project the impacts of those expenditures on the Province, allowing us to suggest that in the base year of operations, non-personnel expenditures of $400,000 lead to new sales of $811,788 and 6 new jobs in the region (in addition to those directly employed at the Community Arts Centre). Ancillary Spending: Finally, we project the impacts of new audiences on the regional economy. Our first step is to estimate incremental audiences and audiences coming from outside Okotoks.

Estimated Attendance Total Projected Attendance (Year One)

32,861

Less Relocated Attendance

16,431

Projected Incremental Attendance

16,431

1. Alberta (Okotoks) Attendance

65%

10,680

2. Alberta (non-Okotoks) Attendance

30%

4,929

3. Regional (non-Alberta) Attendance

5%

822

The total projected attendance in the facility in year one, taken from our pro-forma operating budget, is estimated at 32,861. Then, we estimate that half of those attenders are relocated from other facilities in the area. The balance, which is new audience, is then split between Okotoks (65%), Province audiences traveling from outside Okotoks (30%), and the area outside the Province (5%). It is important that we do NOT include existing audiences in the calculation of spending, as these are expenditures that are simply moving around the economic region, as opposed to new economic activity in Okotoks. Now, we input those estimates into per capita spending estimates, useful statistics taken from the new Arts and Economic Prosperity Report published by Americans for the Arts that suggest how much

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audiences generally spend on eating, drinking, shopping, traveling and so on in conjunction with going to a performance (there is no Canadian version of these statistics). Then we apply our Provincial multipliers to these direct impacts and add the totals for each industry to arrive at total impacts associated with the expenditures of audiences. At the bottom of the chart, we show these total impacts. We then highlight just those associated with audiences coming from outside Okotoks. For that group, new expenditures of $171,370 in the opening year lead to new annual outputs of $367,522 and 3 jobs created on an ongoing basis.

Ancillary Spending Impacts Per Capita Expenditure Estimate

Total Direct (Induced) Expenditures

Gross Production Multiplier

Gross Production

Empl't (jobs) Multiplier

Total New Jobs

Resident Attendance (1) Accommodation and food services

$8.15

$87,041

2.03

$176,431

0.18

1.60

Retail Trade

$2.80

$29,904

2.19

$65,339

0.13

0.38

Transit and ground passenger transporation

$4.27

$45,603

2.39

$109,128

0.20

0.89

Sub-total

$162,547

$350,898

2.87

Non-resident Attendance (2+3) Food services and drinking places

$15.28

$87,870

2.03

$178,113

0.18

1.62

Retail Trade

$8.70

$50,031

2.19

$109,317

0.13

0.64

Transit & passenger transportation

$5.82

$33,469

2.39

$80,091

0.20

0.65

Sub-total Total Impact of Ancillary Spending

$171,370

$367,522

2.90

Total

$333,917

$718,420

5.78

Excluding Okotoks Attendance

$171,370

$367,522

2.90

Qualitative Economic Impacts In this section, we look at the broader roles and impacts of new arts and entertainment facilities on Okotoks and the surrounding region. It is only qualitative in that we do not have the formulas to project these impacts in a numerical sense. Nevertheless, the experiences of other communities give us the confidence to predict certain impacts over the life of new facilities. We will start with the more specific and tangible impacts and then look at the broader possibilities. Downtown Economic Development: Thinking from the perspective of a downtown developer, we might imagine what 32,000 attenders and almost $400,000 a year spent principally in the downtown might mean to the community. Clearly, new facilities can and will have a positive impact on the downtown. Changes that can be anticipated include: âœ˛

More restaurants will start, expand, and prosper by servicing audiences before and after performances.

âœ˛

Additional retail businesses will open in response to the street and pedestrian activity around new facilities.

âœ˛

Of particular importance will be the presence of young people around the facility, perhaps associated with activity at the community media lab. Their presence will likely motivate the development of new urban amenities (bars, clubs, coffee shops, bookstores) that fit in a downtown core.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Corporate Recruitment: Performing arts facilities are important amenities to offer to corporations considering where to locate their business. The presence of these facilities is often seen as an indicator of a community that has an educated workforce and offers a high quality of life. Richard Florida and The Creative Class: Economist and author Richard Florida, now associated with the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, has turned a simple idea into an empire. The theory is that people (particularly people with creative jobs and skills) like to live and work in creative places, and that cities ought to promote culture and creativity as a means to recruit these desirable people and thus drive economic development. Cities all over North America (and not just big ones) are now pursuing economic development goals by promoting the presence of arts and culture and the people who enjoy them. Of course, it is all easier said than done. The trick is to help artists in ways that do not stifle creativity, and then surround that creative core with a concentration of more commercially-oriented industries (advertising, design and media) that benefit from and feeds off of that creativity. Cultural Tourism: Tourists and tourism are potentially an important element of the regional economic development strategy. Cultural tourists (those interested in attending and participating in cultural programs) are very attractive in that they tend to spend more and stay longer in a given community than other types of tourists. Thus, the presence of new arts facilities can play a significant role in developing and promoting Okotoks as a destination for cultural tourists. Okotoks as a Regional Service Centre: Rapid population growth has positioned Okotoks as the regional service centre. It is therefore logical to consider Okotoks as the regional centre for the arts, as it is home to a number of established arts organizations, facilities and access to larger audiences that attract shows to the region and thus drive new residential and commercial development. The Role and Impacts of Culture in Smaller Communities Before leaving this set of arguments, let’s be clear that the arts and culture can have significant impacts in smaller communities, not just in larger cities. According to a recent study for the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation7: Recent research suggests that while creative and cultural activities are very prominent in large urban centres, it is not to the exclusion of smaller urban centres (Scott 2004). For example, Norcliffe and Rendace (2003) use the case of comic book artists to demonstrate that, due to changes in the organization of production, it is possible for creative workers to locate outside of major metropolitan centres and continue to work in creative fields. Gibson (2003) also points to the emergence of communities of musicians and other artists in rural and small towns in Australia. Markusen and King’s (2004) work on the role of artists in the regional economy demonstrates this point quite succinctly. Their study clearly shows that geographical distribution of artistic activity within the US economy is decentralizing towards second-tier cities. Specifically, the traditional dominance of artistic and creative centres such as New York and Los Angeles is declining, as artists appear to be spreading out towards cities such as Minneapolis-St. Paul, San Francisco, Albuquerque and Seattle.

7

Vinodrai,!Tara!and!Gertler,!Meric:!Creativity,!Culture!and!Innovation!in!the!Knowledge<based!Economy,!Program!Globalization!and!Regional! Innovation!Systems,!University!of!Toronto!(2006)!

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If such a trend continues this may bode well for mid-sized cities, as well as smaller centres within proximity to large urban regions. Many such places pride themselves on their ‘good quality of life at affordable prices’, while also supporting a vibrant cultural scene. Such characteristics may provide a solid foundation on which to build and maintain successful urban economies. In the Canadian case, Gertler and Vinodrai (2004) find that designers are highly concentrated in Canada’s urban centres, with Toronto being the largest centre in both absolute and relative terms. However, when they examine the distribution of designers working in specific fields they show that smaller centres are also home to a significant amount of design activity. For example, Windsor and Kitchener – both centres of traditional manufacturing activity – also have high concentrations of industrial designers working with local manufacturers to enhance the creative content (and economic value) of their products.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

10. the split facilities scenario 10.1 Facility Concept Here, the concept is that our recommended facilities are developed in two pieces at two different locations, perhaps even at two different times. One piece is built adjacent to the Foothills Composite High School + Alberta High School of Fine Arts, ( ‘the High School Theatre’) with the following elements: ✲

Theatre: A 400-seat performance venue with a full fly tower, a large space and significant backstage space to support a wide range of programs, including professional and student theatre, live music, dance, films and the spoken word.

Rehearsal Room: A 2,000 sf space with retractable seating that can also support special events and smaller performances for up to 100 people on an occasional basis.

Then there is the second piece of the project – a set of community arts spaces located in the downtown core area (‘the Downtown Arts Centre’). These facilities include: ✲

Multipurpose Room: A 2,000 sf space with retractable seating that can accommodate rehearsals, special events and smaller performances for up to 100 people.

Rehearsal and Movement Studio: a 1,600 sf studio for dance and movement rehearsal and classes.

Public Gallery, Lobby and Cafe: A 1,000 sf space that includes a gallery, lobby and café/concessions area.

Arts Classroom: A 2,300 sf classroom for the teaching of arts programs, including sinks and storage areas.

Community Room: A 400 sf meeting room for various community programs and events.

Community Media Lab: A 2,260 sf community media lab that includes a recording studio equipment library, classroom, editing suites, gathering and exhibition space and storage.

Essentially, the Downtown Arts Centre is the Community Arts Centre without the Theatre. As with that other plan, each of these two buildings include all of the support spaces required to make the buildings work efficiently. A detailed space program for each facility is attached as Appendix K. Here are several explanatory comments: ✲

The Downtown Arts Centre and High School Theatre programs utilize two different net to gross ratios. The smaller scale and possibility of a greater planning efficiency, simpler building organization and construction allow us to apply a 1:1.4 net to gross ratio to the Downtown Arts Centre as opposed to the 1:1.6 net to gross ratio applied to both the Community Arts Centre and the High School Theatre. The higher net to gross ratio accounts for the greater complexity of planning, circulation and construction of non-useable areas related to a larger building.

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The creation of two separate buildings requires the creation of two separate building systems, service spaces and public spaces. This has been reflected in the attached program as an estimated proportion of the total building programs.

The High School Theatre is proposed at 21,000 net square feet, grossed to 34,600 square feet (at a 1:1.60 ratio), with the Downtown Arts Centre proposed at 11,000 net square feet, grossed to 15,500 square feet (at a 1:1.40 ratio). Together, these two buildings total 50,100 gross square feet. This is a larger area than the one-building scenario given the duplication of some spaces in two locations. The High School Theatre requires 34,600 gross square feet, with the Downtown Arts Centre adding another 15,500 gross square feet. Together, these two buildings cover 50,100 gross square feet. This is a larger area than the one-building scenario given the duplication of some spaces in two locations. Appendix L includes renderings that show the basic components of the High School Theatre and Downtown Arts Centre, and how they might be laid out. Again, these are not designs, but tests of how the proposed programs may fit on these or similar sites. ✲

The High School Theatre site was identified as a limited portion of the existing parking lot to the south of the high school. A close relationship to the school is critical to this proposed program and design concept. As such, the conceptual building has been placed in a north south orientation with the front of house facing south to Cimarron Drive and the back of house functions facing the school. This planning minimizes the travel distance outside the building and allows for the exploration of possible physical connection such as a covered breezeway between the buildings. The placement of public spaces on the south facing side of the building allows the public to view into the activity of the building, creates a sense of arrival and ease of access from the existing parking lot that surrounds the building.

Similar to the school, the massing of the building is built upon the creation of two building bars (one with the 400-seat Theatre, the other with the Multipurpose Room) with an efficient double loaded corridor between that aligns with the school hallway to the north. The hallway will be an important lifeline of the building leading from the southern public spaces through the theatre support spaces, services spaces and beyond to connect to the school.

Like the Community Arts Centre, the High School Theatre has been conceptualized as a single floor building for ease of access. The public lobby is anticipated to be a two storey open space with an upper lobby accessing the upper level of Theatre seating via a passenger / service elevator.

Adjacent to the public lobby, are the box office, coatroom, public washrooms and administrative space that create opportunities for passive supervision of the building and parking lots as well as a clear visitor arrival point.

The placement and orientation of the 400-seat Theatre within this plan allows for a large expanse of windows along the eastern façade of the Theatre. These windows can be blacked out for performances, but the natural light contributes to greater energy efficiency and flexibility of programming events within the space. It also allows the opportunity for students and the community to connect and view ongoing rehearsals or events through the large windows.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

10.2

Capital Costs

The final element of our physical planning is a preliminary estimate of what it would cost to build the Downtown Arts Centre and the High School Theatre. Appendix H is a capital cost estimate prepared by Western Cost Consulting LP of Calgary. The capital cost estimate has been based upon the conceptual drawings and program issued in February 2012. Assumptions of steel framed buildings with high quality architectural finishes, typical site work including services to the building, new surface parking and a 25% glass to wall ratio have been made. Differences in scale and complexity between the two buildings have been accounted for and reflected in the elemental unit costs. Pre-tender estimates and tender results for similar projects within the Okotoks region have been used for the price levels anticipated in these estimates. Good architectural and engineering practices are accounted for at the lower end of the range of costs shown and it is assumed that no environmental issues exist on the sites, subject to a future geotechnical report. A LEED Gold level of sustainability is anticipated as the goal for this concept and the associated costs for achieving this standard have been included. A 10% design contingency, a 5% construction contingency, a 25% soft cost, an assumed equipment allowance and one-year escalation contingency have all been included. This Construction Budget is presented as an estimate of probable costs and is intended to be used for budget discussions. Overall, we are suggesting that the combination of these two facilities could be built for a total cost between $27 million and $34 million, excluding any site acquisition costs. 10.3

Goals and Practices

The business planning work for our second scenario is more complicated because we are dealing with two very different buildings at two different locations with two distinct purposes. For the Downtown Arts Centre, goals are close to those of the Community Arts Centre, except that performance capabilities are much less, so that the facility is more about supporting local groups and teaching programs. For the High School Theatre, there are still goals about opportunities for audiences and local arts organizations. But there is a significant new goal related to the opportunities to provide Division students and faculty with daily access to professional-quality facilities in support of school teaching programs. Again, pursuit of this goal only makes sense if there is a significant investment by the Province into these new facilities. 10.4

Governance

For the Downtown Arts Centre, we would recommend that the Town (specifically the Cultural and Historical Services Division) operate these spaces in conjunction with other downtown cultural facilities like the Station Gallery and RPAC.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

For the High School Theatre, there are three reasonable options: ✲ ✲ ✲

The preferred option would be for the High School Theatre to be operated by the Foothills School Division and the Foothills Composite High School + the Alberta High School of Fine Arts. The Town of Okotoks could operate the facility through Cultural and Historical Services. The Theatre and Rehearsal Room could be operated by a new not-for-profit with Foothills School Division and Town leadership appointed to the governing board of directors.

Each of these could work. But our sense is that the most efficient model, and the approach likely to attract the most Provincial support, would be to have the Division operate the Theatre. Unfortunately, this is the approach that will be most difficult to sell in the community. As with many other communities, there is deep suspicion about the prospect of partnering with the schools around the idea that personnel and policies will favor school users and effectively shut out the community groups. While that skepticism is healthy, we would point to the examples in Appendix E of successful school/community partnerships, and the fact that these successful partnerships are based on explicit arrangements that have been carefully negotiated. 10.5

Programming

The types of programming we described for the Community Arts Centre are also the types of programming for the High School Theatre and Downtown Arts Centre. The presenting focus might be somewhat different at the High School, with more of an orientation to a mix of professional, student and family events. And the split facilities will make it somewhat harder to pursue multiple space presenting – like festivals in in which all spaces of one building are animated together. 10.6

Operating Policy and Procedures

Policy and procedures are not dissimilar in our second scenario, but here the question of community access to the High School Theatre is the most sensitive issue. We would encourage the Town to approach this question within the larger negotiation for the project. Specifically, the Town’s approach should be – we are prepared to partner with the Division on the development of a new high-quality theatre and rehearsal hall at the High School, contributing capital funding and ongoing operating support in return for access to these facilities on the part of community artists, arts organizations, other community groups and audiences. The challenge is then quantifying what that access means and how much is to be contributed before the project begins. The other key operating issue for the Town is the concern that the High School Theatre will have the staff, feel and atmosphere of a professional community facility, not a school facility. This means a professional box office staff, quality food and beverage (including alcohol) operations, easy parking, secure backstage areas, and so on. This again suggests the importance of upfront negotiations and ongoing between the Town and the Division on the planning, design and operations of the facility.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

10.7

Staffing and Leadership

Staffing for the Downtown Arts Centre is bit simpler than the organizational structure of the Community Arts Centre. Community arts facilities are complicated and expensive facilities to staff given the variety of skills necessary to have them programmed, operated and financially sustained. We would recommend the following staff and structure for the Downtown Arts Centre: Town (Existing) Town of Okotoks, Community Services (Com. Ser. Manager)

New Entities Full-time Part-time/Contract

Cultural and Historical Services (Team Leader)

Centre Manager

Ticketing Staff

Technical Labor

Event Staff

Custodial Staff

Media Lab Staff

Entities and personnel highlighted in green indicate existing organizations/positions and the Centre Manager highlighted in red shows the one new full-time position of Centre Manager. Positions highlighted in orange indicate part-time and contract staff.

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Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Additionaly, the following chart summarizes staffing for the High School Theatre: Town /School (Existing) Community Advisory Board

Foothill School Division #38

Town of Okotoks

New Entities Full-time

Foothills Composite HS/ Alberta HS of Fine Arts Principal

Part-time/Contract

Centre Manager

Box Office and Marketing

Technical Director

Event Staff

Custodial Staff

Technical Labor

Here, the staff is more focused on the operation of the Theatre. The Centre Manager would be charged with day-to-day operations, including maintenance and operation of the Theatre and Rehearsal Roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electrical and control systems. Contract staff would be hired to provide technical support during rentals and presented events. Additionally, we would recommend the creation of a Community Advisory Board (highlighted in blue) to work with the School Division on the ongoing operations of the theatre.

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10.8

Pro-forma Operating Budget

The pro-forma for the High School Theatre and Downtown Arts Centre are constructed in the same manner as the Community Arts Centre, and are also attached to this report as Appendix M. Here is a summary of the High School Theatre budget.

HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE: Pro-forma Operating Budget Summary Pre-opening

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

REVENUES Box Office Admissions

108,000

110,962

122,405

135,029

148,955

Rental Fees

47,340

51,198

55,371

59,884

64,764

User Fees

21,303

23,039

24,917

26,948

29,144

Food Service

12,180

12,549

13,412

14,362

15,408

Ticketing Fees

26,680

28,638

31,513

34,671

38,139

0

215,503

226,387

247,619

270,894

296,410

Local Government Support

62,500

125,000

131,250

137,813

144,703

151,938

School District Support

TOTAL REVENUES PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

62,500

125,000

131,250

137,813

144,703

151,938

Provincial Support

0

25,000

26,250

27,563

28,941

30,388

Federal Support

0

25,000

26,250

27,563

28,941

30,388

Sponsorships/Individual Giving

0

25,000

37,500

39,375

41,344

43,411

0

25,000

37,500

39,375

41,344

43,411

TOTAL PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

Foundation Grants

125,000

350,000

390,000

409,500

429,975

451,474

TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

125,000

565,503

616,387

657,119

700,869

747,884

Full-time Personnel

36,900

73,800

77,490

81,365

85,433

89,704

Part-time Personnel

13,750

67,650

71,033

74,584

78,313

82,229

Event-based Staff

0

100,000

105,000

115,500

127,050

139,755

Programming Costs

0

91,400

93,907

103,591

114,275

126,060

EXPENDITURES

Ticket Office

0

33,047

34,539

38,026

41,864

46,089

9,625

38,500

39,655

40,845

42,070

43,332

Occupancy Costs

0

153,450

164,524

169,459

174,543

179,779

Rental Subsidy Program

0

10,000

10,300

10,609

10,927

11,255

60,275

567,847

596,447

633,979

674,475

718,203

0

0

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

64,725

-2,344

-60

3,140

6,393

9,680

0%

38%

38%

39%

40%

41%

Administration

TOTAL EXPENDITURES CONTRIBUTION TO CAPITAL RESERVE EXCESS REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES REVENUES/EXPENDITURES

Here are the notable differences between the Community Arts Centre Theatre and the High School Theatre budgets: â&#x153;²

With just the Theatre and Rehearsal Room, and limited availability due to school use, rental income at the high school facility is significantly reduced. Additionally, the pro-forma assumes

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that the School would not pay rent for use of the space but rather make an annual contribution to operations that matches the Town’s own financial support. ✲

Staff and other operating expenses are lower with a simpler operation in a smaller facility.

The percentage of operating budget covered by earned income is lower given subsidized access to the school.

Personnel expenses for academic use of the High School Theatre are not included in the proforma.

Now here is the budget summary for the Downtown Arts Centre:

DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE: Pro-forma Operating Budget Summary Pre-opening Year

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Rental Fees

61,086

72,567

76,267

80,203

84,390

User Fees

12,217

14,513

15,253

16,041

16,878

Program Fees

14,500

16,129

17,953

19,997

20,071

0

87,803

103,209

109,474

116,240

121,340

REVENUES

TOTAL REVENUES PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS Local Government Support

37,500

75,000

78,750

82,688

86,822

91,163

Provincial Support

0

20,000

21,000

22,050

23,153

24,310

Federal Support

0

20,000

21,000

22,050

23,153

24,310

Sponsorships/Individual Giving

0

20,000

30,000

31,500

33,075

34,729

0

20,000

30,000

31,500

33,075

34,729

TOTAL PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

Foundation Grants

37,500

155,000

180,750

189,788

199,277

209,241

TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

37,500

242,803

283,959

299,261

315,517

330,581

EXPENDITURES Full-time Personnel

29,250

58,500

61,425

64,496

67,721

71,107

Part-time Personnel

0

110,500

116,025

121,826

127,918

134,313

0

12,500

13,125

13,781

14,470

15,194

7,000

14,500

14,935

15,383

15,845

16,320

Programming Costs Administration Occupancy Costs TOTAL EXPENDITURES CONTRIBUTION TO CAPITAL RESERVE EXCESS REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES REVENUES/EXPENDITURES

0

68,080

75,562

77,829

80,164

82,569

36,250

264,080

281,072

293,316

306,118

319,503

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,250

-21,277

2,887

5,945

9,399

11,077

0%

33%

37%

37%

38%

38%

This is the smallest of the three operating budgets. Earned income comes mostly from community group rental of rehearsal and program space. More of the contributed income comes from the public sector to support what is effectively cultural infrastructure. And operating expenses are limited with a smaller staff and building to maintain.

Webb Management Services, Inc.

58


Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

Finally, here is a comparison of the operating budgets for the two different scenarios in the first year of operations.

SCENARIO COMPARISON CHART: OPTIONS, YEAR 1 Community Arts Centre REVENUES

High School Theatre + High School Theatre Downtown Arts Centre Downtown Arts Centre

534,341

215,503

112,803

328,306

PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

337,500

350,000

155,000

505,000

TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

871,841

565,503

267,803

833,306

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

857,564

567,847

264,080

831,927

0

0

0

0

14,278

(2,344)

3,723

1,379

62%

38%

43%

39%

125,000

125,000

75,000

137,813

CONTRIBUTION TO CAPITAL RESERVE EXCESS REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES REVENUES/EXPENDITURES Local Government Contribution School Contribution Cost per Capita (Town Funding/Population)

125,000 $5.10

$5.10

137,813 $3.06

$5.62

The Community Arts Centre has the largest budget and annual funding requirement, but it would still smaller than the combination of the High School Theatre and the Downtown Arts Centre and more efficient in terms of the earned income percentage. 10.9

Funding Operations

As mentioned above, the School Division would be paying a direct share to sustain the High School Theatre, but there is still a larger campaign required to sustain both of these facilities. In one sense, managing two campaigns to raise slightly more money will be more difficult that one campaign for the Community Arts Centre. But it is also possible that these two campaigns might each be successful by targeting different sectors of the community. Practically speaking, the key for the High School Theatre is the funding split negotiated between the Town and the School Division. 10.10 Economic Impacts There is not much difference between the economic impacts of the two different scenarios. Slightly larger total construction and operating budgets in the two-facility scenario lead to higher outputs, earnings and job creation. But moving the performance venue away from the downtown will likely reduce audience spending and the other impacts related to downtown development and cultural tourism.

Webb Management Services, Inc.

59


Performing Arts Venue Feasibility/Conceptual Design Study Town of Okotoks, Alberta

11. next steps We have complicated our work and the Town’s decision-making process by offering two different ways for the community to achieve new arts facilities. But the good news is that there are at least two ways for Okotoks to pursue the development of cultural facilities. Moving forward, we would suggest that the Town continue to move down these two tracks. It is not necessary or even prudent to choose one path as yet, because we are still dealing with incomplete information. Most important is the coming work with the Foothills School Division, which must answer the following questions: ✲

Can the School and Division agree on the size, shape and components of a theatre located by the School campus?

Will a performance venue developed at the location have the attributes, staffing, service level and quality to attract community arts organizations and audiences?

Can the Town of Okotoks and the Foothills School Division (really the Province) agree to an equitable deal to share the costs of building and sustaining these facilities?

Can that deal ensure community groups fair, affordable and continuing access to these facilities?

While those discussions proceed, we would recommend that the Town continue its thinking and planning on the one-facility scenario, looking more closely at what Town resources are available to finance the construction and operation of new facilities, how the private sector might be engaged by the new Foundation to financially support the project, and then what sites might be available for development or redevelopment of both the Community Arts Centre and the Downtown Arts Centre.

Webb Management Services, Inc.

60


APPENDIX A: STAKEHOLDER PARTICIPANTS


Appendix A: Study Participants Advisory Committee Dale Fea Drew Chipman Dwight Forseth Leslie Duchak Reg Gothard Russ Wheatley Stephen Pope Study Participants Allan Boss Bill Robertson Bob Watkin Cheryl Taylor Christina Ashbourne Collette Seders Derek Losoncy Ed Sands Erica Harding Gerry Spiere Jan Robinson Janette Messer Janifer Calvez Jessica Patterson Kathy Coutts Karen Taggart Lara Grunow Lottie Pederson Mary Ellen Goslin Matt Rockley Melody Enman Michael O'Brien Myrna Campbell Nancy Weigel Paul Rockley Rick Harding Rick Quail Robin Thibodeau Shane Olson Shirley Paradis Tim Todd Schmekel Val McIvor Wendy Doerksen

Town of Okotoks Town of Okotoks Town of Okotoks Cactus Club Salon & Spa Dewdney Players Group, Calgary ACTS Foothills Theatre Company Town of Okotoks Alberta Dance Academy IBD Spiers Town of Okotoks Town of Okotoks Okotoks Arts Council Source Media Group Okotoks Museum & Archives Big Rock Singers Okotoks Public Library Town of Okotoks Foothills Bluegrass Music Society Town of Okotoks Okotoks Arts Council Christ The Redeemer Catholic Schools Okotoks Arts Council Town of Okotoks Okotoks Western Wheel A Room Full of Sound Concert Series Town of Okotoks Okotoks Arts Council Town of Okotoks Town of Okotoks, Aquatics Team Leader Foothills Composite High School/Alberta Fine Arts High School Foothills Centennial Centre Holy Trinity Academy


APPENDIX B: MARKET REVIEW


Population Growth: Region + Province 4,500,000

1996 2006

4,000,000

2014 2019

3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0

Calgary Region

Alberta

Population Growth: Local Market 80,000

1996 2006

70,000

2014 2019

60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0

! ! ! !

Town of Okotoks

Foothills MD + Urban Centres

!


Age Distribution Okotoks Calgary Region

Age 65+

Alberta Canada

Age 25 to 64

Age 15 to 24

Age 0 to 14

0%

30%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

The Market Today: Young and Old Population Segments Canada Alberta Calgary Region

25%

Okotoks Foothills MD + Urban Centres

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%

Age 65+

Age 14 and under

!


Educational Attainment Town of Okotoks Foothills MD + Urban Centres Calgary Region

University certificate; diploma or degree

Alberta Canada College or some University

Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma

High school certificate or equivalent

No certificate; diploma or degree

0.0%

30%

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

35.0%

!

Educational Attainment: University Degrees Canada Alberta

25%

Calgary Region Foothills MD + Urban Centres Town of Okotoks

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%

! ! ! ! ! !

College or some University

University certificate; diploma or degree

!


APPENDIX C: 20KM RADIUS DATA


Trade Area: 20 km circle Benchmark: 2006 Provinces

Demographic Estimates and Projections (2012) Summary Trade Area: 222 Woodhaven Dr, Okotoks, AB T1S 1S7 (20km) Benchmark: Alberta (PR) _ Variable

Trade Area Count

%

_ Benchmark % Index

Trade Area

_ Variable

Count

Base Variables

Total households Total population

1,500,220 3,831,498

Age of Household Maintainer

884 5,321 6,667 6,656 4,535 2,520 1,477

3.15% 18.96% 23.76% 23.72% 16.16% 8.98% 5.26%

4.33% 19.82% 20.82% 21.55% 16.63% 9.26% 7.60%

Education ---8,671 ---- No certificate, diploma or degree High school certificate or equivalent 14,377 Apprenticeship or trades cert/dipl 6,063 12,646 73 College/CEGEP/non-uni cert/dipl 3,520 96 University cert/dipl below bachelor's 14,755 114 University degree

110 97 In the labour force (15+) 97 Not in the labour force 69

Size of Household

1 person 2 persons 3 persons 4+ persons

4,217 9,669 5,088 9,085

15.03% 34.46% 18.13% 32.38%

25.19% 34.02% 15.96% 24.83%

60 101 114 130 100 112 96 70

Household Type

Family households  Couples with children    Couples without children    Lone-parent

21,879 11,758 7,950 2,170

100.00% 53.74% 36.34% 9.92%

100.00% 48.11% 37.81% 14.08%

1 family households Multiple-family households Non-family households

21,490 389 6,181

76.59% 1.39% 22.03%

64.59% 1.72% 33.69%

25.45% 61.75% 3.19% 6.89% 2.73%

32.53% 52.07% 5.00% 7.52% 2.88%

Marital Status

Single (never married) Married (not separated) Widowed Divorced Separated (legally married)

15,391 37,339 1,927 4,165 1,650 Age of Children At Home

Under 5 years of age 5-9 years 10-14 years 15 -17 years 18-24 years 25 years and over

6,782 6,047 5,308 3,434 4,219 905

25.41% 22.65% 19.89% 12.86% 15.81% 3.39%

22.86% 19.81% 18.90% 13.29% 18.04% 7.09%

87.10% 12.90% 0.00%

72.64% 26.66% 0.70%

92.21% 7.03% 80.42% 4.76% 5.67% 5.61% 0.06% 0.76% 1.29%

74.46% 4.79% 62.85% 6.82% 19.96% 15.11% 4.84% 2.48% 2.99%

2.42% 2.16% 2.44% 8.22% 3.72% 2.96% 6.82% 14.75% 26.89% 29.61%

3.84% 9.74% 10.29% 20.73% 8.49% 5.40% 6.41% 8.32% 12.43% 14.35%

Dwelling Characteristics Housing Tenure

Owned Rented Band housing

24,441 3,619 0 Housing Type

Houses  Semi-detached house    Single-detached house    Row house Apartments    Low-rise (<5 floors)    High-rise (5+ floors) Detached duplex Movable dwelling

25,875 1,972 22,567 1,337 1,590 1,574 16 212 361 Age of Housing

Before 1946 1946-1960 1961-1970 1971-1980 1981-1985 1986-1990 1991-1995 1996-2000 2001-2006 After 2006

679 605 686 2,307 1,043 831 1,915 4,140 7,546 8,308

_ Benchmark % Index

Education & Employment

28,060 79,101 Household Characteristics

Under 25 years 25 to 34 years 35-44 years 45-54 years 55-64 years 65-74 years 75 years or over

%

©2012 Environics Analytics Source: Environics Analytics, DEP 2012 based, in part, on computer files from Statistics Canada under Licensing Agreement 6894. No confidential information was provided by Statistics Canada.

92 95

45,798 14,233

70 96 100 117 124 114

76.29% 23.71%

73.32% 26.68%

104 89

10.59% 13.63% 6.76% 3.98% 4.95% 1.87% 16.04% 12.48% 3.71% 1.95%

7.23% 12.98% 5.62% 3.95% 5.15% 1.69% 16.43% 13.10% 4.08% 2.45%

146 105 120 101 96 111 98 95 91 80

89.43% 5.81% 3.12% 0.58%

82.76% 9.10% 5.67% 1.04%

108 64 55 56

$114,844

122

87.99% 50.38% 37.61% 11.70%

82.00% 53.82% 28.18% 17.28%

107 94 133 68

7.75% 1.08% 0.96% 0.75% 1.60% 0.81% 0.32% 1.14% 0.21% 0.20% 0.33%

15.75% 4.03% 3.68% 1.79% 1.81% 0.92% 0.89% 0.91% 0.35% 0.45% 0.32%

49 27 26 42 88 88 36 125 61 45 102

87.30% 1.34% 10.68% 1.22% 1.17% 1.11% 0.64% 0.64% 0.51% 0.34% 0.34% 0.33% 0.30% 0.25% 0.24%

76.92% 1.76% 20.19% 2.24% 1.23% 1.32% 0.71% 0.64% 0.56% 0.64% 1.54% 0.40% 0.36% 0.72% 1.70%

113 76 53 55 95 84 91 101 91 53 22 82 83 34 14

Labour Force by Occupation

6,356 8,184 4,061 2,388 2,974 1,123 9,629 7,490 2,227 1,171 Commuting

35,475 2,306 1,239 230 Household Income

$139,624

Language, Immigration & Ethno-Cultural Immigration Status

Non-immigrant population 69,212 39,625 111 Born in province of residence 29,587 114  Born outside province of residence 9,202 105 Immigrant population Visible Minority 97 88 Total visible minority 6,102 48    Chinese 850    South Asian 755    Black 588 1,259 120    Filipino 635 48    Latin American 250 0    Southeast Asian    Arab 897    West Asian 168 124    Korean 160 147    Japanese 259 128 Mother Tongue (Top 12) 70 68,731 28 English 1,053 37 French 8,405 1 Total Non-Official 964 30    German 923 43    Spanish    Tagalog 871    Arabic 507 63    Polish 506 22    Dutch 398 24    Mandarin 268 40    Chinese n.o.s 265 44    Russian 258 55    Italian 236 107    Ukrainian 196 177    Punjabi 187 216 206

Page 1 of 1 February 23, 2012

20.70% 25.05% 10.08% 17.93% 4.73% 21.51%

Labour Force

Management Business Finance Administration Sciences Health Soc. Sci, Education, Gov't, Religion Art, Culture, Recreation, Sport Sales and Service Trades, Transport, Operators Unique to Primary Industries Unique to Manufacture and Utilities

119 80 Car, truck, van 65 Public Transit Walked Bicycle 78 119 64 Average household income

14.44% 23.95% 10.10% 21.07% 5.86% 24.58%


APPENDIX D: FACILITY INVENTORY


Room Acoustics

Customer Amenities

Performer Amenities

Atmosphere/Character

Suitability for Users

Rating

500 320 320

Theatrical Functionality

Location High River High River Turner Valley

1,500 1,500 619 600 275 200 200 180 170 150

Staff and Support

Foothills Municipal District Highwood Memorial Centre: Medicine Tree Hall High River United Church Flare & Derrick Community Hall

Capacity

Facility Condition

Town of Okotoks Centennial Centre Centennial Arena Strathcona-Tweedsmuir Auditorium Holy Trinity Academy Okotoks United Church Sanctuary + Foyer Foothills Composite HS/Alberta HS of Fine Arts Old Towne Okotoks Outdoor Stage Elks Hall Rotary Centre for the Performing Arts Grace Lutheran Church

Types of Activity

Performance Spaces: Facility Ratings

3 1 3 4 8 6 0 1 8 2

4 3 3 4 4 1 1 1 2 3

3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 3 1

2 1 4 2 2 2 1 2 2 1

1 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 3 3

3 3 1 1 1 2 1 3 2 1

1 1 3 1 2 2 1 1 2 1

2 1 2 2 2 2 3 1 3 2

2 1 4 1 2 2 1 1 2 2

2.5 2.0 2.9 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.2 1.3 2.4 1.8

5 3 4 4 6 2

3 2 3

2 3 3

2 3 3

3 1 3

2 2 2

2 2 3

2 3 3

2.5 2.6 2.7


Performance Spaces: Programs & Activity

Foothills Municipal District No. 31 11 Highwood Memorial Centre: Medicine Tree Hall 12 High River United Church 13 Flare & Derrick Community Hall

Location High River High River Turner Valley

1 1 1 1

40%

1 1 60%

0%

1 1 1 100%

500 320 320

1 1 1 1

1 50%

Private Events/Banquets

1

1 1

1 1

1

1

Promoters

Literary Arts/Lectures

Film & Media Arts

1

1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

30%

10%

10%

10%

40%

40%

20%

50%

1

1

1

0%

1 1 67%

1 67%

1 67%

1 67%

1 1 1 100%

1 33%

Performing Arts

Dance 1 1 1

Rentals

School/Civic

1 1 1 1

Music

Capacity 1,500 1,500 619 600 275 200 200 180 170 150

Education/Cultural

Town of Okotoks Centennial Centre Centennial Arena Strathcona-Tweedsmuir Auditorium Holy Trinity Academy Okotoks United Church Sanctuary + Foyer Foothills Composite HS/Alberta HS of Fine Arts Old Towne Okotoks Outdoor Stage Elks Hall Rotary Centre for the Performing Arts Grace Lutheran Church

Presenting Activity

Performing Arts

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Theatre/Musical Theatre

Producing

0%

0%

3 1 3 4 8 6 0 1 8 2

5 4 6


APPENDIX E: COMPARABLE PROJECTS


BENCHMARKING + REFERENCE POINTS: COMPARABLE SCHOOL FACILITIES Bert Church Theatre, Airdrie, Alberta

Heritage Park Centre/Clarke Theatre, Mission, British Columbia

Horizon Stage Performing Arts Centre, Spruce Grove, Alberta

Maclab Centre for the Performing Arts Leduc, Alberta

42,284 $3.00

36,426 $1.92

26,171 $2.67

24,279 $3.71

509 377 Rehearsal hall, green room, dressing rooms, Dressing rooms with washroom facilities, workshop, wardrobe. The theatre is part of St. theatre lobby Albert Place that houses St. Albert Public Library, Musée Héritage Museum, Visual Arts Studio and Arden Theatre, as well as City Hall and associated city government services.

702 4 dressing rooms, green room, lobby area used for displays, concession and merchandizing sales.

318 Lobby with licensed bar, men &women's dressing rooms(each include 2 washrooms), green room (available upon request only). Link to tech specs.

460 Two dressing rooms with washroom facilities, Lobby and access to coat check/box office.

Owner Operator Operating Agreement

City of St. Albert City of St. Albert A ‘Joint Use Agreement’ is in place where the schools are allowed to use the ‘City’ venues free of charge and the schools must allow community groups use of the schools in the evenings, at no charge.

Mission School District, No. 75 Mission School District, No. 75 The threatre is owned and operated by the Mission School District

City of Spruce Grove City of Spruce Grove The theatre is owned and operated by the City of Spruce Grove. Also two volunteer groups are involved for support; The City also has the Horizon Stage Theatre Advisory Board – A combination of public and council representation from the City of Spruce Grove and Parkland County

City of Leduc Maclab Centre Performing Arts Society The agreement between the City of Leduc and the Black Gold Regional School District gives the school free usage during the day as well as a number of evenings, for rehearsals and events.

School use

School usage 15-18%; 3 local high schools use Bert Church can use the facility until 6pm; School uses the Theatre 20 - 30 N/A the venues; school pays for technical staff after which is community use; the school days/year. Schools pay at a discounted pays the not-for-profit rate. School uses the rate of $300/day theatre 25 evenings/year

Staff

Staffed by the city with full time and part time Staffed by the city with full time and part employees. Volunteers also help. time employees. Volunteers also help.

Arden Theatre, St. Albert, Alberta Municipal population Cost per capita (Municipal funding/population) Seat capacity Other spaces

61,466 N/A

Does the school receive a certain Yes number of booking days or preferential rental rates? Year of Construction 1984

Webb Management Services Inc.

City of Airdrie City of Airdrie By agreement between the City of Airdrie and Rocky View School district, the Bert Church School has access to the Theatre for a defined number of days per year, till 6 p.m. after which it is for community use. Once the defined number of days are used, the School pays at the Not-for Profit rate.

Yes

1984

The school enjoys free usage during the day as well as a number of evenings for rehearsals and events

Staffed by the city with full time Staffed by the city with full time and Pending employees. Some technical employees part time employees. Volunteers are on call and work as needed. also help. Volunteers help with front of house duties, ushering, and ticket sales. There is an after school student program in which the students can earn credit by participating in technical duties. All users pay a fee to use, including the N/A schools, but schools pay at a discounted rate. 1996 N/A

Yes

2005 (renovation to increase seating capacity)

Appendix A: Comparable Projects


BENCHMARKING + REFERENCE POINTS: COMPARABLE SCHOOL FACILITIES

Arden Theatre, St. Albert, Alberta

Bert Church Theatre, Airdrie, Alberta

Heritage Park Centre/Clarke Theatre, Mission, British Columbia

Horizon Stage Performing Arts Centre, Spruce Grove, Alberta

Maclab Centre for the Performing Arts Leduc, Alberta

How was the partnership between the school and municipality developed?

N/A

N/A

The municipality owns, operates and founded the theatre

N/A

A partnership has existed since the 80's, when the City and School District worked together to develop the school's first auditorium.

Rental Rates

Performance Rates- Schools: $70/hr,Local Non-profit, $715, Outside Non-profit, local commerical: $1,180, Outside Commercial, $1,575

Local Not-for-Proft: $500, Local Busiiness & Schools pay at a discounted rate of Non-local NP: $825; Non-local $300.00 per day. Outside groups pay Business/Commerical. between $600.00 - $2,000.00 per day depending on needs.

N/A

Non-profit local: $260 - $295 for 4 Hours; Non-profit Nonlocal/Commerical local: $370 - $420 for 4 hours

Facility booking

The Supervisor of Theatre Rental & Box Office The Rental Program Coordinator Handles all The theatre manager handles the City Hall Ticket Centre handles all bookings bookings. boking of the space. She is employeed by the Mission School District.

What types of community events, Live performances, rehearsals, film showings, Live performances, film showings, awards programs and organizations does awards presentations, school concerts, dance presentations, school concerts, dance the venue rent to? competitions and community theatre competitions, community theatre, corporate events, community groups events political and religious organization events

Live performances, rehearsals, film showings, awards presentations, school concerts, community groups events, meetings, workshops & technical training

How many performances a year does the venue host?

Busy over 300 days of the year with 150 events 24 performances, 60 rentals (click here for annually space usage chart)

Pending

Annual attendance

68,617 (Year 2011)

The theatre is rented 220 days a year. It 25 performances, 118 rentals is closed in the summer along with the school. Annual number is unknown. N/A Attendance varies depending on event. The balcony can be closed off to bring seating capacity down by 200 seats.

30,000 (In 2010, the building averaged 300 attenders per show; approx 100 shows per year)

Live performances, rehearsals, film showings, awards presentations, school concerts, dance competitions, community theatre, corporate events, community groups events, not-for-profit group events

The theatre manager handles the boking of the space. Awards presentations, school concerts, corporate events, community groups events, not-for-profit group events, award ceremonies, guest speakers

Pending

Approximate annual operating N/A budget of the venue (if available)

403,860

Exact annual operating budget is N/A unknown as it is tied in with the school district budget. Thought to be around $250,000.00.

Pending

Annual rental income (if available) Municipal funding contribution

N/A

102,500

60% of annual income is from rentals

N/A

Pending

Yes, exact amount unknown

126,790

70,000

Yes $75,000+. Municiple Yes, $90,000.00+ Federal

Yes, $90,000.00 from the city of Leduc

Webb Management Services Inc.

Appendix A: Comparable Projects


BENCHMARKING + REFERENCE POINTS: PERFORMING + COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRES Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre TransAlta Arts Barns Medicine Hat, AB Edmonton, Alberta

The Laurel Packinghouse Kelowna, BC

Municipal Population Facility Capacities

60,005 2,300 sf art gallery Museum, archive facilities, Gift Shop, and Cafe 710-seat theatre Multi-level Lobby, with capacities of 464 on the first level and 263 on the second level. 140-capacity studio theatre. Discovery Centre

96,288 68,949 100+(flexible seating configuration) 150 (flexible seating configuration)

Other Facility Spaces

Archives, Art Gallery, Discovery Centre, Museum, Theatre, Gift Shop, CafĂŠ

Owner Operator

City of Medicine Hat the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cultural Development Department

City of Edmonton Fringe Theatre Adventures

Operating Agreement

Shared support for all amenities is provided for administration, marketing and promotion, membership, fundraising, volunteer management, and education programs.

The TransAlta Arts Barns are owned by the City of Edmonton with a 30-year lease to Fringe Theatre Adventures, which is entirely responsible for facility rentals, overall facility maintenance, and all capital replacements and upgrades.

Staff

Shared support for all amenities is provided for administration, marketing and promotion, membership, fundraising, volunteer management, and education programs. 2005

Fringe Theatre Adventures, which is entirely responsible for facility staffing

Year of Construction

Webb Management Services, Inc.

812,201 Westbury Theatre (capacity 150-370) PCL Studio Theatre (capacity 78-180) Studio A (capacity 60) Studio B (capacity 45) Boardroom (capacity 59) Lobby (capacity 180) Westbury Theatre, PCL Studio Theatre, Studios, Cohos Evamy Boardroom, Lobby, Shop facilities, Wardrobe facilities

2003

BC Orchard Industry Museum BC Wine Museum and VQA Wine Shop Office space for cultural groups Multi-use rental space

Maple Ridge Art Centre Maple Ridge, B.C.

500 seat professional theatre; 2,300 sq. ft. studio theatre; 3D pottery/sculpture studio; 2D drawing/painting studio; Teaching darkroom; Craft studio; Conference room; Lobby/reception space; Catering kitchen; Ticket Centre; Art Gallery and gift shop; Ridge Meadows Arts Council Offices.

City of Kelowna Kelowna Museums Society

District of Maple Ridge Ridge Meadows Arts Council. N/A The Ridge Meadows Arts Council operates and manages the art centre through a fee-for-service grant with the Ridge Meadows Parks and Leisure Service Commission, an agency of the municipality. Staffed by Kelowna Museums Staffed by Ridge Meadows Arts Society with full time, part time, and Council volunteer workers 1918; Restored in 1983/84; grand opening in 1989

2003

Appendix A: Comparable Projects


APPENDIX F: ONE-FACILITY SCENARIO SPACE PROGRAM


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - ONE FACILITY Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012 ONE FACILITY OPTION Space PUBLIC AREAS Foyer Main Floor Lobby Upper Mezzanine Lobby Chair and Table Storage Box Office First Aid Room Café / Concessions Café / Concession Storage Coat Room Catering Kitchen Janitor Closet Female Restrooms Male Restrooms Unisex Restroom 1 Unisex Restroom 2 Furniture Storage Elevator Elevator Machine Room Total

Notes

7 sf / seat

10 assumed 5 assumed

Passenger / Service Elevator

ADMINISTRATION Reception Box Office Manager Theatre Manager Office Flex Office Small Meeting Room Storage Kitchenette Copy Room Total 300 SEAT THEATRE Seating Area Stage Mezzanine Control Room Sound and Light Locks Chair Storage Miscellaneous Storage

Net Area (sf)

150 2,100 1,200 100 150 100 200 100 100 200 50 500 250 60 60 100 75 50 5,545

100 100 100 100 200 100 75 75 850

200 Floor 25'd x 55'w 100 Mezzanine 4 @ 55sf

2,700 1,500 1,500 250 220 250 450

1


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - ONE FACILITY Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012 Equipment Storage Riser Storage Piano Storage Dimmer Room Catwalk Total THEATRE SUPPORT SPACES Green Room / Multipurpose Room Large Dressing Rooms Dressing Room Unisex Washrooms Small Dressing Rooms Small Dressing Room Washrooms Wardrobe and Laundry A/V Equipment Storage Tech Equipment Storage Loading Area Workshop Total MULTIPURPOSE ROOM Multipurpose Room Storage Room Total

Genie Lift

2 @ 350sf (2) Washrooms w/ Showers 2 @ 50sf (2) Washrooms w/ Showers

Retractable Seating for 100 people

300 300 100 100 0 7,670

600 700 120 100 120 300 50 100 300 600 2,990

2,000 100 2,100

SERVICE SPACES Garbage and Recylcing Room Electrical Room Mechanical Room I.T. Closet Dimmer Room Janitor Storage Total

200 300 600 30 40 50 1,220

COMMUNITY MEDIA LAB Recording Studio Equipment Library Classroom Editing Suites Storage Gathering and Exhibit Area Total

400 200 600 160 100 800 2,260

2 @ 80sf

2


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - ONE FACILITY Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012 PUBLIC GALLERY AND COMMUNITY SPACE Gallery Community Room Gallery Storage Total

1,000 400 100 1,500

REHEARSAL AND MOVEMENT STUDIO Studio Storage Total

1,600 100 1,700

ARTS CLASSROOM Studio Classroom Storage Total

Sinks Sinks

TOTAL NET AREA TOTAL GROSS AREA

EXTERIOR SPACES Loading Area Loading Dock Total Exterior Spaces

1,300 800 200 2,300

28,135 Assumed Net to Gross - 1 : 1.60

Lift / Stairs etc.

45,016

1,200 300 1,500

3


APPENDIX G: ONE-FACILITY SCENARIO RENDERINGS


APPENDIX H: CAPITAL BUDGET


Single Facility COST SUMMARY, LOWER FEASIBILITY STUDY and CONCEPT DESIGN

Title Location Owner/Client Architect

: : : :

Okotoks Performing Arts Venue Okotoks Alberta Town of Okotoks Nyhoff Architecture

Report Date: 02-Mar-12 Single Facility - Park Area: 45,016 sq.ft.

ELEMENT A SHELL A1 SUBSTRUCTURE, assumed spread footings for foundations A2 STRUCTURE, based on steel framed building A3 EXTERIOR ENCLOSURE, glazing represents app. 25% of all wall surfaces B INTERIORS B1 PARTITIONS & DOORS, CEILINGS B2 FINISHES B3 FITTINGS & EQUIPMENT C SERVICES C1 MECHANICAL C2 ELECTRICAL D SITE & ANCILLARY WORK D1 SITE WORK, incl. services to building D2 ANCILLARY WORK, demo and site clearing Z ALLOWANCES, GENERAL REQ'S/CONTRACTOR FEES Z1 ESTIMATING & DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% Z2 GEN. REQUIREMENTS & GEN. CONTRACTOR FEE, 12% PERMITS AND TESTING SUB-TOTAL excl GST ESTIMATING AND DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% ESTIMATED TENDER COST, excl. GST CONSTRUCTION CONTINGENCY 5% (change orders) ESTIMATED CURRENT CONSTRUCTION COST, excl. GST SOFT COSTS 25% EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE, estimated ONE YEAR ESCALATION ALLOWANCE, 5% on all above costs ESTIMATED PROJECT COST, excl. GST Feb 09 preliminary estimate

Unit price

Cost

$14.86

$669,100 $1,547,400 $2,592,900

$34.37 $57.60 $28.80 $12.08 $10.22 $53.88 $27.87 $23.97 $0.00

$327.75 360.53 378.55

$1,296,500 $543,700 $460,000 $2,425,600 $1,254,600 $1,079,000 $0 $1,186,900 $1,566,700 $131,600 $14,754,000 $1,475,400 $16,229,400 $811,500 $17,040,900 $4,260,200 $1,750,000 $1,152,600 $24,203,700 $23,695,161

NOTES: The estimate is based on drawings and program issued February 2012. Pre-tender estimates and tender results for similar projects have been used as a basic for the price levels expected in these estimates. Good architectural and engineering practices are accounted for also at the lower end of the range of costs shown. It is assumed that no environmental issues exist on the sites, subject to geotechnical report. A consistent approach has been taken for sub-structure. Due to location, different substructure requirements may apply to the three buildings depending on geotechnical report not yet available. In this estimate it is assumed that spread footings can be used. LEED Gold is anticipated as the target for the project. LEED Platinum as a target would require further research of costs since assemblies and systems may change compared to those now common to the building industry subject to public funding. All project elements may vary in cost depending on final choices of finishes and systems. The LEED certification drive specifications for an energy efficient building with respect to envelope and mechanical and electrical equipment/fixtures, included in these estimates. There may be a substantial variance in substructure cost depending on geotechnical reports. Only minor variance is expected for structural components generally driven by building architecture. The cost for finishing selections will depend on choices and architecture, and all interior and exterior selections will impact the costs and are the reason for the variance suggested in the estimates. Also, the selection of equipment and fixtures related to the theatre portion of the project can vary a great deal, and at this early stage only allowances have been carried, costs to be verified during selection of components. Site work and services to the buildings are targeted at 5 to 12% of building cost, all sites will require new civil, mechanical and electrical services. This Construction Budget is presented as an estimate of probable costs and is intended to be used for budget discussions. While we have made every effort to ensure accuracy of the information presented in this budget, Western Cost Consulting LP or its partners or manager can not be held liable for its content. Western Cost Consulting LP Phone (403) 217-6035 Fax (403) 217-6047 E-mail westcost@telus.net


Single Facility COST SUMMARY, HIGHER FEASIBILITY STUDY and CONCEPT DESIGN

Title Location Owner/Client Architect

: : : :

Okotoks Performing Arts Venue Okotoks Alberta Town of Okotoks Nyhoff Architecture

Report Date: 02-Mar-12 Single Facility - Park Area: 45,016 sq.ft.

ELEMENT A SHELL A1 SUBSTRUCTURE, assumed pile foundations, no structural SOG A2 STRUCTURE, based on steel framed building A3 EXTERIOR ENCLOSURE, glazing represents app. 25% of all wall surfaces B INTERIORS B1 PARTITIONS & DOORS, CEILINGS B2 FINISHES B3 FITTINGS & EQUIPMENT C SERVICES C1 MECHANICAL C2 ELECTRICAL D SITE & ANCILLARY WORK D1 SITE WORK, incl. services to building D2 ANCILLARY WORK, demo and site clearing Z ALLOWANCES, GENERAL REQ'S/CONTRACTOR FEES Z1 ESTIMATING & DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% Z2 GEN. REQUIREMENTS & GEN. CONTRACTOR FEE, 12% PERMITS AND TESTING SUB-TOTAL excl GST ESTIMATING AND DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% ESTIMATED TENDER COST, excl. GST CONSTRUCTION CONTINGENCY 5% (change orders) ESTIMATED CURRENT CONSTRUCTION COST, excl. GST SOFT COSTS 25% EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE, estimated ONE YEAR ESCALATION ALLOWANCE, 5% on all above costs ESTIMATED PROJECT COST, excl. GST Feb 09 preliminary estimate

Unit price

Cost

$23.41

$1,053,900 $1,779,500 $3,429,300

$39.53 $76.18 $36.00 $24.15 $20.44 $59.27 $32.05 $24.88 $0.00

$417.58 459.34 482.31

$1,620,600 $1,087,400 $920,100 $2,668,200 $1,442,800 $1,120,100 $0 $1,512,200 $1,996,100 $167,700 $18,797,900 $1,879,800 $20,677,700 $1,033,900 $21,711,600 $5,427,900 $1,750,000 $1,444,500 $30,334,000 $29,873,607

NOTES: The estimate is based on drawings and program issued February 2012. Pre-tender estimates and tender results for similar projects have been used as a basic for the price levels expected in these estimates. Good architectural and engineering practices are accounted for also at the lower end of the range of costs shown. It is assumed that no environmental issues exist on the sites, subject to geotechnical report. A consistent approach has been taken for sub-structure. Due to location, different substructure requirements may apply to the three buildings depending on geotechnical report not yet available. In this estimate it is assumed that pile foundations are used. LEED Gold is anticipated as the target for the project. LEED Platinum as a target would require further research of costs since assemblies and systems may change compared to those now common to the building industry subject to public funding. All project elements may vary in cost depending on final choices of finishes and systems. The LEED certification drive specifications for an energy efficient building with respect to envelope and mechanical and electrical equipment/fixtures, included in these estimates. There may be a substantial variance in substructure cost depending on geotechnical reports. Only minor variance is expected for structural components generally driven by building architecture. The cost for finishing selections will depend on choices and architecture, and all interior and exterior selections will impact the costs and are the reason for the variance suggested in the estimates. Also, the selection of equipment and fixtures related to the theatre portion of the project can vary a great deal, and at this early stage only allowances have been carried, costs to be verified during selection of components. Site work and services to the buildings are targeted at 5 to 12% of building cost, all sites will require new civil, mechanical and electrical services. This Construction Budget is presented as an estimate of probable costs and is intended to be used for budget discussions. While we have made every effort to ensure accuracy of the information presented in this budget, Western Cost Consulting LP or its partners or manager can not be held liable for its content. Western Cost Consulting LP Phone (403) 217-6035 Fax (403) 217-6047 E-mail westcost@telus.net


Two Facilities COST SUMMARY, LOWER FEASIBILITY STUDY and CONCEPT DESIGN

Title Location Owner/Client Architect

: : : :

Okotoks Performing Arts Venue Okotoks Alberta Town of Okotoks Nyhoff Architecture

Report Date: 02-Mar-12 Two Facility - Town Site Area: 15,540 sq.ft.

Unit price ELEMENT A SHELL A1 SUBSTRUCTURE, assumed spread footings for foundations $15.79 $32.52 A2 STRUCTURE, based on steel framed building A3 EXTERIOR ENCLOSURE, glazing represents app. 25% of all wall surfaces $53.88 B INTERIORS B1 PARTITIONS & DOORS, CEILINGS $26.01 B2 FINISHES $9.29 B3 FITTINGS & EQUIPMENT $10.22 C SERVICES C1 MECHANICAL $53.88 C2 ELECTRICAL $26.01 D SITE & ANCILLARY WORK D1 SITE WORK, incl. services to building $11.38 D2 ANCILLARY WORK, demo and site clearing $0.00 Z ALLOWANCES, GENERAL REQ'S/CONTRACTOR FEES Z1 ESTIMATING & DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% Z2 GEN. REQUIREMENTS & GEN. CONTRACTOR FEE, 12% PERMITS AND TESTING SUB-TOTAL excl GST $297.09 ESTIMATING AND DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% ESTIMATED TENDER COST, excl. GST 326.80 CONSTRUCTION CONTINGENCY 5% (change orders) ESTIMATED CURRENT CONSTRUCTION COST, excl. GST 343.14 SOFT COSTS 25% EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE, estimated ONE YEAR ESCALATION ALLOWANCE, 5% on all above costs ESTIMATED PROJECT COST, excl. GST Feb 09 preliminary estimate

Two Facility - School Area: 34,600 sq.ft.

Cost Unit price $245,400 $505,300 $837,400

$15.79

$404,200 $144,400 $158,800

$28.80

$837,400 $404,200

$53.88

$176,900 $0

$28.87

$371,400 $490,200 $41,200 $4,616,800 $461,700 $5,078,500 $253,900 $5,332,400 $1,333,100 $250,000 $345,800 $7,261,300

$34.37 $57.60

$12.08 $10.22

$27.87

$0.00

$341.10 375.21 393.97

$6,247,920

Total - Two Facility Area: 50,140 sq.ft.

Cost Unit price $546,500 $1,189,300 $1,993,000

$15.79

$996,500 $417,900 $353,600

$27.94

$1,864,400 $964,300

$53.89

$999,100 $0

$23.45

$1,119,000 $1,253,200 $105,300 $11,802,100 $1,180,200 $12,982,300 $649,100 $13,631,400 $3,407,900 $1,750,000 $939,500 $19,728,800 $18,809,175

$33.80 $56.45

$11.21 $10.22

$27.29

$0.00

$327.46 360.21 378.22

Cost $791,900 $1,694,600 $2,830,400 $1,400,700 $562,300 $512,400 $2,701,800 $1,368,500 $1,176,000 $0 $1,490,400 $1,743,400 $146,500 $16,418,900 $1,641,900 $18,060,800 $903,000 $18,963,800 $4,741,000 $2,000,000 $1,285,300 $26,990,100 $25,057,095

NOTES: The estimate is based on drawings and program issued February 2012. Pre-tender estimates and tender results for similar projects have been used as a basic for the price levels expected in these estimates. Good architectural and engineering practices are accounted for also at the lower end of the range of costs shown. It is assumed that no environmental issues exist on the sites, subject to geotechnical report. A consistent approach has been taken for sub-structure. Due to location, different substructure requirements may apply to the three buildings depending on geotechnical report not yet available. In this estimate it is assumed that spread footings can be used. LEED Gold is anticipated as the target for the project. LEED Platinum as a target would require further research of costs since assemblies and systems may change compared to those now common to the building industry subject to public funding. All project elements may vary in cost depending on final choices of finishes and systems. The LEED certification drive specifications for an energy efficient building with respect to envelope and mechanical and electrical equipment/fixtures, included in these estimates. There may be a substantial variance in substructure cost depending on geotechnical reports. Only minor variance is expected for structural components generally driven by building architecture. The cost for finishing selections will depend on choices and architecture, and all interior and exterior selections will impact the costs and are the reason for the variance suggested in the estimates. Also, the selection of equipment and fixtures related to the theatre portion of the project can vary a great deal, and at this early stage only allowances have been carried, costs to be verified during selection of components. Site work and services to the buildings are targeted at 5 to 12% of building cost, all sites will require new civil, mechanical and electrical services. This Construction Budget is presented as an estimate of probable costs and is intended to be used for budget discussions. While we have made every effort to ensure accuracy of the information presented in this budget, Western Cost Consulting LP or its partners or manager can not be held liable for its content.

Western Cost Consulting LP Phone (403) 217-6035 Fax (403) 217-6047 E-mail westcost@telus.net


Two Facilities COST SUMMARY, HIGHER FEASIBILITY STUDY and CONCEPT DESIGN

Title Location Owner/Client Architect

: : : :

Okotoks Performing Arts Venue Okotoks Alberta Town of Okotoks Nyhoff Architecture

Report Date: 02-Mar-12 Two Facility - Town Site Area: 15,540 sq.ft.

ELEMENT A SHELL A1 SUBSTRUCTURE, assumed pile foundations, no structural SOG A2 STRUCTURE, based on steel framed building A3 EXTERIOR ENCLOSURE, glazing represents app. 25% of all wall surfaces B INTERIORS B1 PARTITIONS & DOORS, CEILINGS B2 FINISHES B3 FITTINGS & EQUIPMENT C SERVICES C1 MECHANICAL C2 ELECTRICAL D SITE & ANCILLARY WORK D1 SITE WORK, incl. services to building D2 ANCILLARY WORK, demo and site clearing Z ALLOWANCES, GENERAL REQ'S/CONTRACTOR FEES Z1 ESTIMATING & DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% Z2 GEN. REQUIREMENTS & GEN. CONTRACTOR FEE, 12% PERMITS AND TESTING SUB-TOTAL excl GST ESTIMATING AND DESIGN CONTINGENCY 10% ESTIMATED TENDER COST, excl. GST CONSTRUCTION CONTINGENCY 5% (change orders) ESTIMATED CURRENT CONSTRUCTION COST, excl. GST SOFT COSTS 25% EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE, estimated ONE YEAR ESCALATION ALLOWANCE, 5% on all above costs ESTIMATED PROJECT COST, excl. GST Feb 09 preliminary estimate

Unit price

$25.08 $37.39 $74.32 $29.91 $18.58 $20.44 $59.27 $29.91 $11.80 $0.00

$381.27 419.40 440.37

Two Facility - School Area: 34,600 sq.ft.

Cost Unit price $389,800 $581,100 $1,155,000

$25.08

$464,900 $288,700 $317,600

$36.00

$921,100 $464,900

$59.27

$183,300 $0

$30.33

$476,600 $629,200 $52,800 $5,925,000 $592,500 $6,517,500 $325,900 $6,843,400 $1,710,900 $250,000 $440,200 $9,244,500

$39.53 $76.18

$24.15 $20.44

$32.05

$0.00

$426.43 469.08 492.53

$7,093,380

Total - Two Facility Area: 50,140 sq.ft.

Cost Unit price $867,900 $1,367,700 $2,635,800

$25.08

$1,245,600 $835,800 $707,200

$34.11

$2,050,800 $1,109,000

$59.27

$1,049,500 $0

$24.59

$1,186,900 $1,566,700 $131,600 $14,754,500 $1,475,500 $16,230,000 $811,500 $17,041,500 $4,260,400 $1,750,000 $1,152,600 $24,204,500 $23,558,025

$38.87 $75.60

$22.43 $20.44

$31.39

$0.00

$412.44 453.68 476.36

Cost $1,257,700 $1,948,800 $3,790,800 $1,710,500 $1,124,500 $1,024,800 $2,971,900 $1,573,900 $1,232,800 $0 $1,663,500 $2,195,900 $184,400 $20,679,500 $2,068,000 $22,747,500 $1,137,400 $23,884,900 $5,971,300 $2,000,000 $1,592,800 $33,449,000 $30,651,405

NOTES: The estimate is based on drawings and program issued February 2012. Pre-tender estimates and tender results for similar projects have been used as a basic for the price levels expected in these estimates. Good architectural and engineering practices are accounted for also at the lower end of the range of costs shown. It is assumed that no environmental issues exist on the sites, subject to geotechnical report. A consistent approach has been taken for sub-structure. Due to location, different substructure requirements may apply to the three buildings depending on geotechnical report not yet available. In this estimate it is assumed that pile foundations are used. LEED Gold is anticipated as the target for the project. LEED Platinum as a target would require further research of costs since assemblies and systems may change compared to those now common to the building industry subject to public funding. All project elements may vary in cost depending on final choices of finishes and systems. The LEED certification drive specifications for an energy efficient building with respect to envelope and mechanical and electrical equipment/fixtures, included in these estimates. There may be a substantial variance in substructure cost depending on geotechnical reports. Only minor variance is expected for structural components generally driven by building architecture. The cost for finishing selections will depend on choices and architecture, and all interior and exterior selections will impact the costs and are the reason for the variance suggested in the estimates. Also, the selection of equipment and fixtures related to the theatre portion of the project can vary a great deal, and at this early stage only allowances have been carried, costs to be verified during selection of components. Site work and services to the buildings are targeted at 5 to 12% of building cost, all sites will require new civil, mechanical and electrical services. This Construction Budget is presented as an estimate of probable costs and is intended to be used for budget discussions. While we have made every effort to ensure accuracy of the information presented in this budget, Western Cost Consulting LP or its partners or manager can not be held liable for its content.

Western Cost Consulting LP Phone (403) 217-6035 Fax (403) 217-6047 E-mail westcost@telus.net


APPENDIX I: ONE-FACILITY SCENARIO PRO-FORMA OPERATING BUDGET


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE SPACES AND RATES Theatre

Usable Square Feet/Capacity 300

Multipurpose Room

2,000/100

Rehearsal and Movement Studio

1,600

Gallery

1,000

Arts Classroom

2,300

Community Room

400

Lobby

2,100/200

Total Gross Square Feet (GSF) ACTIVITY BY SPACE 300-seat Theatre

% Change

$600 $750 $1,125 $40 $50 $75 $30 $38 $56 $30 $38 $56 $25 $31 $47 $25 $31 $47 $40 $50 $75

3%

20 60% 3,600 $25.00 $90,000 20 5 25

5% -5%

10 5 33% 990 $10.00 $9,900

5%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Year 2

% Change

$618 $773 $1,159 $41 $52 $77 $31 $39 $58 $31 $39 $58 $26 $32 $48 $26 $32 $48 $41 $52 $77

3%

21 57% 3,591 $25.75 $92,468 21 5 26

5% 2%

11 5 31% 988 $10.30 $10,172

5%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Year 3

% Change

$637 $796 $1,194 $42 $53 $80 $32 $40 $60 $32 $40 $60 $27 $33 $50 $27 $33 $50 $42 $53 $80

3%

22 58% 3,846 $26.52 $102,005 20 5 25

5% 2%

11 6 32% 1,058 $10.61 $11,220

5%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Year 4

% Change

$656 $820 $1,229 $44 $55 $82 $33 $41 $61 $33 $41 $61 $27 $34 $51 $27 $34 $51 $44 $55 $82

3%

23 59% 4,119 $27.32 $112,524 21 5 26

5% 2%

12 6 33% 1,133 $10.93 $12,378

5%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Year 5 $675 $844 $1,266 $45 $56 $84 $34 $42 $63 $34 $42 $63 $28 $35 $53 $28 $35 $53 $45 $56 $84

45,000

Presenting Live Performances Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Presented Perfs Box Office Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Film Screenings Use Days Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Film Box Office Town Events Use Days

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1 Rental Period Renter Type Daily Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents/School Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial

2 2

3%

-5% 3%

2 2

3%

2% 3%

2 2

3%

2% 3%

2 2

3%

2% 3%

24 60% 4,411 $28.14 $124,129 22 5 27 12 6 33% 1,213 $11.26 $13,654 2 2

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Box Office Internal Days of Use

Webb Management Services, Inc.

32

Year 2 81% 485 $$-

% Change 2% 3%

34

Year 3 % Change 82% 2% 494 $3% $32

Year 4 % Change 84% 2% 504 $3% $34

Year 5 86% 514 $$35

Rentals Resident + School Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rent Paid

80 60% 14,400 80 40 120 $72,000

5%

84 61% 15,372 84 42 126 $77,868

5%

88 62% 16,405 88 44 132 $84,214

5%

93 63% 17,503 93 46 139 $91,078

5%

97 64% 18,670 97 49 146 $98,501

Not-for-profits + Clubs Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rent Paid

25 60% 4,500 25 13 38 $28,125

5%

26 61% 4,804 26 13 39 $30,417

5%

28 62% 5,127 28 14 41 $32,896

5%

29 63% 5,470 29 14 43 $35,577

5%

30 64% 5,834 30 15 46 $38,477

Commercial/Private Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rent Paid

20 67% 4,020 20 0 20 $22,500

5%

21 68% 4,284 21 0 21 $24,334

5%

22 69% 4,564 22 0 22 $26,317

5%

23 70% 4,862 23 0 23 $28,462

5%

24 71% 5,178 24 0 24 $30,781

All Uses & Users Performances Attendance Use Days Rent Paid Multipurpose Room

Year 1 % Change 85% -5% 510 $3% $-

Presenting Live Performances Average Capacity Sold

155 27,510 210 $122,625

10 60%

163 29,038 220 $132,619

5%

11 61%

171 31,000 228 $143,427

5%

11 62%

179 33,087 239 $155,117

5%

12 63%

188 35,307 251 $167,759

5%

12 64%

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE Attendance Average Ticket Price Presented Perfs Box Office Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Film Screenings Use Days Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Film Box Office

10 5 50% 250 $5.00 $1,250

Town Events Use Days Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Film Box Office

0 0 85% $$-

Internal Days of Use

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1 % Change 600 $20.00 3% $12,000 10 0 10 5%

3%

-5% 3%

15

Year 2 641 $20.60 $13,194 11 0 11 11 5 51% 268 $5.15 $1,379 0 0 81% $$-

% Change 3%

5%

3%

2% 3%

16

Year 3 % Change 684 $21.22 3% $14,504 11 0 11 11 6 52% 287 $5.30 $1,521 0 0 82% $$-

5%

3%

2% 3%

17

Year 4 % Change 729 $21.85 3% $15,939 12 0 12 12 6 53% 307 $5.46 $1,676 0 0 84% $$-

5%

3%

2% 3%

17

Year 5 778 $22.51 $17,511 12 0 12 12 6 54% 328 $5.63 $1,847 0 0 86% $$18

Rentals Resident + School Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

30 60% 1,800 30 45 75 600 $24,000

5%

32 60% 1,890 32 47 79 630 $25,956

5%

33 60% 1,985 33 50 83 662 $28,071

5%

35 60% 2,084 35 52 87 695 $30,359

5%

36 60% 2,188 36 55 91 729 $32,834

Not-for-profits + Clubs Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

4 60% 240 4 8 12 93 $4,640

5%

4 61% 256 4 8 12 97 $5,018

5%

4 62% 273 4 9 13 102 $5,427

5%

5 63% 292 4 9 13 107 $5,869

5%

5 64% 311 4 10 14 113 $6,348

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE

Rehearsal and Movement Studio

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

All Users Performances Attendance Use Days Rent Paid

66 3,610 152 $39,440

69 3,823 159 $42,654

73 4,087 165 $46,732

77 4,328 173 $50,541

81 4,583 182 $54,660

104

106

108

110

112

Internal Days of Use Resident + School Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

Commercial/Private Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid All Users Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Internal Days of Use Resident + School Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Not-for-profit + Clubs Total Use Days

Webb Management Services, Inc.

% Change

12 60% 720 12 6 18 144 $10,800

Not-for-profits + Clubs Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

Gallery

Year 1

Commercial/Private Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

5%

13 61% 769 13 6 19 151 $11,680

10%

14 62% 859 14 7 21 166 $13,234

5%

15 63% 917 15 7 22 175 $14,312

5%

15 64% 978 15 8 23 183 $15,479

10 30 $900

5%

11 32 $973

5%

11 33 $1,053

5%

12 35 $1,138

5%

12 36 $1,231

10 30 $1,125

5%

11 32 $1,217

5%

11 33 $1,316

5%

12 35 $1,423

5%

12 36 $1,539

10 30 $1,688

5%

11 32 $1,825

5%

11 33 $1,974

5%

12 35 $2,135

5%

12 36 $2,309

134 90 $3,713

138 95 $4,015

250 2 16 $480

2

141 99 $4,342

252

5%

2 17

2

145 104 $4,696

254

5%

2 18

2

148 109 $5,079

256

5%

2 19

2

258

5%

2 19

2

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE

Arts Classroom

Community Room

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1

% Change 5%

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

2 16 $600

5%

2 17 $649

5%

2 18 $702

5%

2 19 $759

5%

2 19 $821

All Users Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

2 16 $1,200

5%

2 17 $649

5%

2 18 $702

5%

2 19 $759

5%

2 19 $821

2 16 $400

5%

2 4 $108

5%

2 4 $117

5%

2 5 $126

5%

2 5 $137

Not-for-profit + Clubs Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

2 16 $500

5%

2 4 $135

5%

2 4 $146

5%

2 5 $158

5%

2 5 $171

Commercial/Private Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

12 96 $4,500

5%

13 13 $608

5%

13 13 $658

5%

14 14 $712

5%

15 15 $770

All Users Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

116 128 $5,400 100

106

19

internal Days of Use Resident/School Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

Internal Days of Use Resident/School Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Not-for-profit + Clubs Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Commercial/Private

104

19

% Change 5%

Private Events Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

102

18

% Change 5%

16 $600

100

17

% Change 5%

Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

119 21 $852

122 22 $921

125 23 $996

102

104

106

108

127 24 $1,077 108

15 120 $3,000

5%

16 32 $811

5%

17 33 $877

5%

17 35 $949

5%

18 36 $1,026

15 120 $3,750

5%

16 126 $4,056

5%

17 132 $4,386

5%

17 139 $4,744

5%

18 146 $5,130

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid All Users Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Lobby

Internal Days of Use Resident/School Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Not-for-profit + Clubs Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Commercial/Private Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid All Users Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid Activity & Rental Summary Total Presented Live Performance Attendance Total Presented Film Attendance Total Resident Performance Attendance Total Nonprofit Performance Attendance Total Commercial Performance Attendance Total Attendance Total Live Event Box Office Total Film Box Office Total Rent Collected

ESCALATION RATE

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1 5 40 $1,875

% Change 5%

135 280 $8,625

Year 2 5 42 $2,028

% Change 5%

139 200 $6,895

10

Year 3 6 44 $2,193

% Change 5%

143 209 $7,456

12

14

Year 4 6 46 $2,372

% Change 5%

Year 5 6 49 $2,565

147 220 $8,064

151 231 $8,721

16

18

2 16 $640

5%

2 17 $692

5%

2 18 $749

5%

2 19 $810

5%

2 19 $876

2 16 $800

5%

2 17 $865

5%

2 18 $936

5%

2 19 $1,012

5%

2 19 $1,094

2 16 $1,200

5%

2 17 $1,298

5%

2 18 $1,404

5%

2 19 $1,518

5%

2 19 $1,642

16 32 $2,640

18 37 $2,855

21 41 $3,088

23 46 $3,340

25 51 $3,612

Year 1 4,200 1,240 16,200 4,740 4,740 31,120

Year 2 4,232 1,255 17,262 5,060 5,053 32,861

Year 3 4,530 1,344 18,390 5,400 5,424 35,087

Year 4 4,848 1,440 19,587 5,761 5,779 37,415

Year 5 5,189 1,541 20,858 6,146 6,156 39,890

$102,000 $11,150 $183,643

$105,663 $11,550 $190,539

$116,508 $12,741 $206,669

$128,463 $14,054 $223,513

$141,640 $15,501 $241,729

3%

3%

3%

3%

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE

Year 1

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

Pre-opening EARNED REVENUE Box Office

102,000 11,150

105,663 11,550

Theatre Multipurpose Room Rehearsal and Movement Studio Gallery Arts Classroom Community Room Lobby

122,625 39,440 3,713 1,200 5,400 8,625 2,640

132,619 42,654 4,015 649 852 6,895 2,855

143,427 46,732 4,342 702 921 7,456 3,088

155,117 50,541 4,696 759 996 8,064 3,340

167,759 54,660 5,079 821 1,077 8,721 3,612

Technical Labor Equipment Rental Event Staff Event Cleaning

55,093 36,729 18,364 18,364

57,162 38,108 19,054 19,054

62,001 41,334 20,667 20,667

67,054 44,703 22,351 22,351

72,519 48,346 24,173 24,173

Membership Classes Camps Equipment Rental Education Programs Dance, Acting + Wellness Classes Other Events + Classes Arts Classes + Outreach

5,000 10,000 2,500 7,500

5,665 11,330 2,704 8,111

6,418 12,837 2,924 8,772

7,272 14,544 3,162 9,487

8,239 16,479 3,420 10,260

4,000 3,000 2,000

4,326 3,245 2,163

4,679 3,509 2,339

9,638 7,228 2,530

10,423 7,818 2,736

Food Service

Live Event Concessions (net) Film Concessions (net) Revenue from Catered Events (net)

29,880 1,240 4,000

32,554 1,293 4,000

35,798 1,426 4,000

39,312 1,573 4,000

43,162 1,735 4,000

Ticketing Fees

Ticketing Fees from Presented Events Ticketing Fees for Resident Organizations Ticketing Fees for Other Organizations

7,888 11,745 13,746

8,194 12,890 15,103

9,036 14,144 16,650

9,963 15,517 18,285

10,984 17,020 20,076

Membership Fees

Annual Membership Fees

4,000

4,944

6,111

7,553

9,335

Rental Revenue

Live Events Film Screenings

User Fees

Programming

2,500 Total Revenue

Webb Management Services, Inc.

128,463 14,054

141,640 15,501

Media Lab

Miscellaneous Revenue

CONTRIBUTED INCOME

116,508 12,741

Local Government Support Provincial Support

0

534,341

100,000

125,000 25,000

5%

2,625

5%

560,276 5% 5%

131,250 26,250

2,756

5%

611,987 5% 5%

137,813 27,563

2,894

5%

675,447 5% 5%

144,703 28,941

3,039 736,808

5% 5%

151,938 30,388

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE Federal Support Individual Giving Corporate Sponsorships/Giving Foundation Grants Endowment Revenue Allocation from Capital Budget Total Public Funding + Grants TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS EXPENDITURES Full-time Personnel

Part-time Personnel

Event-based Personnel

Programming Costs

Centre Manager Programming and Education Manager Marketing and Development Manager Administrative Assistant Salary Sub-Total Benefits Sub-total Technical Director Media Center Manager Ticketing Staff Café/Concessions Staff Sub-total Benefits Sub-total Technical Labor Event Staff Event Cleaning Sub-total Direct Costs of Live Events Direct Costs of Film Events Direct Costs of Exhibitions Media Center Direct Program Costs Education Program Direct Costs

0 0 0 100,000 200,000 200,000

70,000 25,000 25,000 22,500 142,500 42,750 185,250

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Network Maintenance Postage Ticket Printing Supplies Credit Card Fees

871,841

% Change 5% 5% 5% 5%

919,026

Year 3 % Change 27,563 5% 39,375 5% 39,375 5% 78,750 5% 31,250 0 381,688 993,674

Year 4 % Change 28,941 5% 41,344 5% 41,344 5% 82,688 5% 39,063 0 407,022

Year 5 30,388 43,411 43,411 86,822 48,828 0 435,185

1,082,469

1,171,993

5% 5% 5% 5%

77,175 52,500 52,500 47,250 229,425 68,828 298,253

5% 5% 5% 5%

81,034 55,125 55,125 49,613 240,896 72,269 313,165

5% 5% 5% 5%

85,085 57,881 57,881 52,093 252,941 75,882 328,823

5% 5% 5% 5%

89,340 60,775 60,775 54,698 265,588 79,676 345,265

5% 5% 4% 4%

52,500 42,000 20,800 20,800 136,100 24,498 160,598

5% 5% 4% 4%

55,125 44,100 21,632 21,632 142,489 25,648 168,137

5% 5% 4% 4%

57,881 46,305 22,497 22,497 149,181 26,853 176,033

5% 5% 4% 4%

12,500 2,250 14,750

50,000 40,000 20,000 20,000 130,000 23,400 153,400

60,775 48,620 23,397 23,397 156,190 28,114 184,304

5% 5% 5%

10,500 5,250 5,250 21,000

5% 5% 5%

11,025 5,513 5,513 22,050

5% 5% 5%

11,576 5,788 5,788 23,153

5% 5% 5%

0

10,000 5,000 5,000 20,000

12,155 6,078 6,078 24,310

12,500

0 0

5%

Year 2 26,250 37,500 37,500 75,000 25,000 0 358,750

73,500 50,000 50,000 45,000 218,500 65,550 284,050

0 Ticket Office

Year 1 % Change 25,000 5% 25,000 50% 25,000 50% 50,000 50% 12,500 50,000 337,500

86,700 8,363 10,000 6,250 4,500 115,813 7,780 6,224 311 1,556 23,340

5%

89,813 8,663 10,500 7,017 4,867 120,860 8,462 6,769 338 1,692 25,385

5%

99,032 9,556 11,025 7,880 5,263 132,757 9,306 7,445 372 1,861 27,918

5%

109,193 10,540 11,576 8,853 9,698 149,861 10,221 8,177 409 2,044 30,663

5%

120,394 11,626 12,155 9,949 10,488 164,613 11,224 8,979 449 2,245 33,673

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE Ticketing Service (net) Sub-total Administration

Occupancy Costs

Year 1 % Change 23,340 62,551

0

Travel Training Professional Memberships Freight Postage Telephone Advertising + Public Relations Insurance Supplies Miscellaneous Sub-total

0

10,000

Total Expenditures

224,000

857,564

902,585

951,787

1,008,132

1,064,261

Operating Result

-24,000

14,278

16,441

41,887

74,337

107,732

25,000

50,000

75,000

Rental Subsidy Program

3%

3%

10,300

3%

Contribution to Capital Reserve

Webb Management Services, Inc.

10,609

3% 3% 3% 3%

3%

1,093 2,185 546 3,278 546 4,371 16,391 5,464 16,391 2,732 52,997 49,173 24,586 12,293 12,293 12,293 10,927 27,318 7,957 27,318 184,159 10,927

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

3% 3% 3% 3%

3%

1,126 2,251 563 3,377 563 4,502 16,883 5,628 16,883 2,814 54,587 50,648 25,324 12,662 12,662 12,662 11,255 28,138 8,195 28,138 189,684 11,255

Final Result

-24,000

14,278

16,441

16,887

24,337

32,732

Revenue as % of Expenditures

0%

62%

62%

64%

67%

69%

RATIOS AND FORMULAS Escalation Rate User Fees as a % of Rent

47,741 23,870 11,935 11,935 11,935 10,609 26,523 7,725 26,523 178,795

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

Year 5 33,673 90,243

45,000 22,500 11,250 11,250 11,250 10,000 25,000 2,000 25,000 163,250

3% 3% 3% 3%

1,061 2,122 530 3,183 530 4,244 15,914 5,305 15,914 2,652 51,454

Year 4 % Change 30,663 82,178

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

46,350 23,175 11,588 11,588 11,588 10,300 25,750 7,500 25,750 173,588

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

Year 3 % Change 27,918 74,820

1,000 2,000 500 3,000 500 4,000 15,000 5,000 15,000 2,500 48,500

3% 3%

1,030 2,060 515 3,090 515 4,120 15,450 5,150 15,450 2,575 49,955

% Change

500 1,000 250 1,500 250 2,000 7,500 2,500 7,500 1,000 24,000

Utilities Repairs and Maintenance Service Contracts Building Supplies Cleaning Supplies Technology Services Performance Equipment R&M Trash Hauling Security System Sub-total

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

Year 2 25,385 68,033

3% Technical/Event Labor Equipment Rental/Maintenance Event Staff Event Cleaning

3% 30% 20% 10% 10%

3% 30% 20% 10% 10%

3% 30% 20% 10% 10%

3% 30% 20% 10% 10%

30% 20% 10% 10%

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE Media Lab

Media Lab Memberships Sold Average Price

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

10% 3%

110 $52

10% 3%

121 $53

10% 3%

133 $55

10% 3%

146 $56

2,000 $5

10% 3%

2,200 $5

10% 3%

2,420 $5

10% 3%

2,662 $5

10% 3%

2,928 $6

1,000 $2.50

5% 3%

$1,050 $2.58

5% 3%

$1,103 $2.65

5% 3%

$1,158 $2.73

5% 3%

$1,216 $2.81

500 $15.00

5% 3%

$525 $15.45

5% 3%

$551 $15.91

5% 3%

$579 $16.39

5% 3%

$608 $16.88

Dance, Acting + Wellness Classes (hours) Average Price

800 $5

5% 3%

840 $5

5% 3%

882 $5

100% 3%

1,764 $5

5% 3%

1,852 $6

Other Events + Classes (hours) Average Price

600 $5

5% 3%

630 $5

5% 3%

662 $5

100% 3%

1,323 $5

5% 3%

1,389 $6

Arts Classes + Outreach (hours) Average Price

400 $5

5% 3%

420 $5.15

5% 3%

441 $5.30

5% 3%

463 $5.46

5% 3%

486 $5.63

3% 3%

$1.03 $1.03

3% 3%

$1.06 $1.06

3% 3%

$1.09 $1.09

3% 3%

$1.13 $1.13

Media Lab Camp (hours delivered) Average Fee/Hour # Equipment Items Rented Average Rental Rate

Food Service

Concession Net per Live Theatre Attender Concession Net per Film Attender

$1.00 $1.00

Catered Events

Theatre Catered Events Fee/per Event Multipurpose Room Catered Events Fee/per Event

4 $500 4 $500

Membership fees

Average Membership Fee # of Members

Box Office Revenues

Ticketing Fee for Resident Organizations Online Telephone Walk-up Tickets Sold for Resident Organizations Online Telephone Walk-up Ticketing Fee for Other Organizations Online Telephone

Webb Management Services, Inc.

% Change

100 $50

Media Lab Classes (hours delivered) Average Fee/Hour

Other Education Programs

Year 1

4 $500 4 $500

3%

4 $500 4 $500

3%

3%

4 $500 4 $500

3%

3%

4 $500 4 $500

3%

$40 100

3% 20%

$41 120

3% 20%

$42 144

3% 20%

$44 173

3% 20%

$45 207

$1.00 $0.75 $0.25 16,200 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$1.03 $0.77 $0.26 17,262 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$1.06 $0.80 $0.27 18,390 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$1.09 $0.82 $0.27 19,587 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$1.13 $0.84 $0.28 20,858 50% 20% 30%

$2.00 $1.50

3% 3%

$2.06 $1.55

3% 3%

$2.12 $1.59

3% 3%

$2.19 $1.64

3% 3%

$2.25 $1.69

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: Community Arts Centre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE

Year 1 % Change $0.50 3% 9,480 50% 20% 30%

Walk-up Tickets Sold for Other Organizations Online Telephone Walk-up Ticketing Fee for Presented Events Online Telephone Walk-up Tickets Sold for Presented Events Online Telephone Walk-up Endowment

Box Office Expenses

$2.00 $1.50 $0.50 5,440 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

100%

Year 2 $0.52 10,113 50% 20% 30%

% Change 3%

Year 3 % Change $0.53 3% 10,824 50% 20% 30%

Year 4 % Change $0.55 3% 11,540 50% 20% 30%

Year 5 $0.56 12,302 50% 20% 30%

$2.06 $1.55 $0.52 5,487 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$2.12 $1.59 $0.53 5,874 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$2.19 $1.64 $0.55 6,288 50% 20% 30%

3% 3% 3%

$2.25 $1.69 $0.56 6,731 50% 20% 30%

$500,000 5%

25%

$625,000 5%

25%

$781,250 5%

25%

$976,563 5%

Principal Average Rate of Return

$250,000 5%

Total Tickets Sold Cost/Ticket Sold Network Maintenance Postage Ticket Printing Supplies Ticketing Service (net)

31,120 $0.25 $0.20 $0.01 $0.05 $0.75

Credit Card Fees

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

32,861 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.26 $0.21 $0.01 $0.05 $0.77

35,087 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.27 $0.21 $0.01 $0.05 $0.80

37,415 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.27 $0.22 $0.01 $0.05 $0.82

39,890 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.28 $0.23 $0.01 $0.06 $0.84

Benefits

Full-time Part-time

30% 18%

30% 18%

30% 18%

30% 18%

30% 18%

30% 18%

Direct Event Cost as % of Revenues

Live Events Film Events

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

Occupancy Costs

Total Gross Square Footage Direct Costs/Square Foot

45,000

45,000

45,000

45,000

45,000

Utilities Repairs and Maintenance Service Contracts Building Supplies Cleaning Supplies

Webb Management Services, Inc.

$1.00 $0.50 $0.25 $0.25 $0.25

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.03 $0.52 $0.26 $0.26 $0.26

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.06 $0.53 $0.27 $0.27 $0.27

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.09 $0.55 $0.27 $0.27 $0.27

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.13 $0.56 $0.28 $0.28 $0.28

3/22/12


APPENDIX J: ECONOMIC IMPACT MULTIPLIERS


ALBERTA

ECONOMIC MULTIPLIERS 2005


Š Government of Alberta, 2009 Representations and Warranties The information contained in this publication is based on the 2005 input-output tables produced by Statistics Canada. All computations were prepared by Alberta Finance and Enterprise, Statistics. The responsibility for the application and interpretation of these data is entirely that of the user(s). Except as stated herein, Alberta Finance and Enterprise makes no representations or warranties, expressed or implied, as to merchantability or fitness of these data for any particular purpose. June, 2009


Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 PREFACE This publication presents economic multipliers, intensity ratios and supply ratios for the Alberta economy calculated using the 2005 Alberta Finance and Enterprise, Statistics Input-Output Model. Information is provided for both the open (direct and indirect impacts) and closed (direct, indirect and induced impacts) forms of the model. Economic impacts are presented for the Alberta economy only.

Inquiries concerning this publication or requests for simulations using the 2005 Alberta Input-Output Model should be directed to:

The tables used in this publication are derived from the 2005 interprovincial Input-Output tables released by Statistics Canada in November, 2008. Most of the employment numbers in this publication are lower than the 2003 publication due to revised employment vectors produced by Statistics Canada.

Phone: (780) 427-3099 Fax: (780) 427-0409

Alberta Finance and Enterprise, Statistics 545, Terrace Building 9515-107 Street Edmonton, Alberta Canada T5K 2C3

Custom Impact Analyses In addition to this publication, Alberta Finance and Enterprise, Statistics maintains a highly disaggregated Input-Output Model for 2005 at the link level which covers 302 industries and 727 commodities. The model may be used to simulate directly both open and closed impacts where additional precision or more detailed output is required than is presented in this publication. The Alberta input-output model industry and commodity structure can also be customized to client specifications to make it more descriptive of changing economic conditions. The I/O Model also has a Tax Module that provides impacts on Federal, Provincial and Local Tax Revenues.

i


Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Description of Economic Multipliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

The Open and Closed model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

Producer and Purchaser Prices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

Uses and Limitations of Multipliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Description of Economic Multiplier Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

An Example of using Multipliers (Open model) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

TABLES

Open Model Table 1:

Alberta Industry Intensity Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

Table 2:

Alberta Industry Multipliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

Table 3:

Alberta Commodity Intensity Ratios in Producer Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Table 4:

Alberta Commodity Intensity Ratios in Purchaser Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

Closed Model Table 5:

Alberta Industry Intensity Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Table 6:

Alberta Industry Multipliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18

Table 7:

Alberta Commodity Intensity Ratios in Producer Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19

Table 8:

Alberta Commodity Intensity Ratios in Purchaser Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

Commodity Supply Rates Table 9:

Alberta Commodity Supply Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Appendices Appendix 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

Appendix 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

ii


Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 INTRODUCTION Estimates of Alberta Gross Domestic Product (GDP) found in the income and expenditure accounts of the Alberta Economic Accounts provide unduplicated measures of economic production. They are “unduplicated” because GDP measures the value of final transactions only, with all interbusiness purchases and sales associated with intermediate production cancelled out.

A by-product of measuring GDP in this fashion is that the record of such intermediate transactions is lost and, as a result, extremely useful information concerning the economic linkages between industries is not revealed. The input-output accounts bring back into record these inter-industry flows of good and services, detailing gross output of commodities by producing industries, industry use of such commodities and primary inputs, and the final consumption and investment of commodities plus any direct purchases of primary inputs for final demand.

For example, the value of a good or service sold by industry A to industry B, and then used in industry B’s production process for sale into final demand, is not directly recorded in GDP. Industry A’s output is not counted directly because it is implicitly included in the value of output of industry B when it is sold into final demand. If the output of industry A were counted when it is sold as an intermediate good or service, the value of this output would be double counted - once when it was sold as an intermediate input to industry B, and again as part of the value of the output of Industry B when it sells its output into final demand. To avoid this problem, goods or services are valued only at the point where they are sold into final demand (i.e., to households for consumption, to business for investment, or to government for current or capital expenditure) or when they are exported.

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Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 DESCRIPTION OF ECONOMIC MULTIPLIERS The most common components of the inputoutput model are economic multipliers which include commodity and industry intensity ratios as well as industry multipliers. The concept of a multiplier is a fairly simple one to understand. For example, an increase in demand for a commodity will produce three effects which are described by economic multipliers. The first is the impact on industries (firms) which expand production to satisfy increased demand. These effects are termed the direct impacts. Secondly, there is a ripple effect as these firms purchase additional required inputs from other firms. These effects are termed the indirect impacts. Lastly, as firms expand production, they also hire more staff and pay out wages thereby increasing the income received by employees. Households, after withdrawing a certain portion for taxes and savings, spend this income which in turn increases demand for other commodities. These impacts are termed induced effects.

Industry multipliers are presented in ratio form and cannot be less than one since the direct impact is included in both the numerator and denominator. Users are cautioned that they must know the direct impact on GDP at basic prices, labour income, or person years of employment before they can use this type of multiplier. Intensity ratios for commodities and industries are calculated by dividing the total economic impact by the change in consumption or output that led to the change. For example, if an industry increases its output by $5.0 million and this leads to an increase of $4.0 million in Alberta GDP, the intensity ratio would be 0.80 (that is 4.0/5.0). Intensity ratios are particularily useful for users because they are applied to gross output or expenditure, unlike absolute multipliers which have to be applied to the direct change. This is the type of “multiplier” that most users should use since they generally know the direct change in revenue or expenditure, but don’t know the direct change in GDP that they are interested in analyzing.

Economic multipliers presented in this report are expressed in two forms: as industry multipliers and as intensity ratios for industries and commodities.

There are two main kinds of multipliers. The first are called “open” multipliers which reflect only direct and indirect effects, and are derived from the open model. The second type of multipliers are called “closed” multipliers and include induced impacts as well as direct and indirect effects. These multipliers are derived from the closed model.

Industry multipliers are calculated by taking the total impact observed for a change in an economic variable and dividing it by the direct change. For example, if adding 100 jobs (the direct change) to an industry’s workforce resulted in a total increase of 180 jobs (the total change) in the economy overall, the industry employment multiplier would be 1.8.

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Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 THE OPEN AND CLOSED MODEL The Alberta Finance and Enterprise, Statistics Input-Output Model (open version) provides estimates of direct and indirect economic impacts. Results based on the Alberta open model are virtually identical to those provided by the Statistics Canada interregional input-output model since both models are based on Statistics Canada inputoutput tables.

The impacts of closing the system to households are referred to as induced effects. The closed model has been criticized because it introduces a bias in favor of those economic projects with a higher labour content. For example, consider the case where two projects have the identical purchased inputs and the same level of direct GDP, but where one project has a higher proportion of labour income and the other a higher proportion of other operating surplus (e.g., corporate profits). For this case, the closed model will estimate a larger economic impact for the project with the higher proportion of labour income (other things being equal). This result occurs because the model has been â&#x20AC;&#x153;closedâ&#x20AC;? to household spending but not to profits and the induced impacts estimated by the model are related to the level of household income rather than profits.

There are two significant difference between the Statistics Canada model and the Alberta Finance and Enterprise Model. While both models provide estimates of direct and indirect production, the Alberta Finance and Enterprise Model also provides estimates of induced economic impacts when the model is closed to households. The second is that the Statistics Canada model provides inter-provincial impact, while the Alberta Finance and Enterprise model provides impacts for Alberta only.

Results from both the open and closed (to households) models are presented in this publication. This approach allows users to use both versions for the purposes of analysis and to judge for themselves where the inclusion of induced impacts is warranted or advisable.

For the closed version of the Alberta input-output model, the household sector is treated as a production sector. The input of the household sector is consumer expenditure on goods and services, while output is labour income (consisting of wages and salaries, supplementary labour income, and net income of unincorporated business). It is assumed that households, after withdrawing a portion of their income for savings and taxes, spend the rest of their income on consumer goods and services. Closing an input-output model to households increases the interdependence of the system and results in a higher impact on the variables of the model leading to multipliers of a larger magnitude than those based on the open version.

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Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 PRODUCER AND PURCHASER PRICES Commodity intensity ratios are presented in both producer and purchaser prices. Data that are measured in producer prices reflect the price received directly by the producer of the commodity. For example, this corresponds to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;farm gateâ&#x20AC;? price in agriculture or the price received directly by a producing establishment in manufacturing.

These other costs which are added to producer prices to derive purchaser prices are referred to as margins. The model treats these margins as if they were purchased directly by the purchaser of the final good. For example, if a consumer purchases a television set from a retail outlet in Alberta, the model would treat the transaction as if the consumer had purchased separately the retail and wholesale mark-ups, the transportation costs from the producer to the seller, indirect taxes, and the actual price of the television set received by the producer.

Data in purchaser prices reflect the price paid by the final users of the good. This price, in addition to price received by the producer of the commodity, reflects other costs such as the price of transportation from the producer to the final seller, wholesale and retail mark-ups, and commodity indirect taxes.

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Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 USES AND LIMITATIONS OF MULTIPLIERS

Uses

● increased output in Alberta occurs at industry

average production costs using 2005 technology.

Economic multipliers based on input-output models are a very useful tool in the decision making process, but users should be aware of their limitations. Firstly, input-output models (and the multipliers derived from these models) are static and not subject to the limits of production capacity. Secondly, these models reflect industry averages for technology use and average input costs. For these and other reasons, an input-output model will not provide a totally complete or absolute measure of the impact of economic change.

Limitations It is unlikely that any of these assumptions would hold fully in the real world. In all likelihood, there would be some change in market share for Alberta industries and the marginal costs associated with increased output may be greater or less than average costs depending on the level of capacity utilization. In addition, significant changes in technology may have occurred for some industries since 2005.

The most common use for multipliers is to estimate the economic impact associated with the establishment of a new firm; or the expansion, contraction or closure of existing firms. In these cases, it is preferable to use economic multipliers for relative rather than absolute comparisons due to the limitations of input-output models. For example, while economic multiplier analysis may be used to determine which activity has the largest economic impact, it should not be used to estimate the absolute impact of any single activity. Where multipliers are used to estimate the impacts of a single activity, the results should be treated as general estimates only and not as absolute values.

When using the employment multipliers, users are cautioned that these multpliers show the total number of jobs that are required to support the change in activity being considered. The I/O model cannot distinguish between fulltime jobs and part-time jobs. Also, when the economy is running at full employment, users are cautioned to remember that the number of jobs required for a particular project must come from other projects/industries or from outside the province. The I/O model does not indicate new jobs created – only the number of jobs required to support a given level of economic activity. As indicated above, the I/O model assumes unlimited capacity, whereas in reality, there are a limited number of people in the workforce.

For example, if there is an increased demand for a commodity, the Alberta input-output model (and the multipliers included in this report) assume that:

Some of these limitations may be overcome by using an updated industry input structure based on more current data, and subjecting this revised information to a computer simulation using the input-output model developed by Alberta Finance and Enterprise. If users wish to exercise this option they should contact the Statistics Section of Alberta Finance and Enterprise directly.

● production increases can be met with no change

in capacity (e.g., the construction of new plants); ● Alberta industries are able to maintain a fixed

share of the market for the commodity with the remainder imported from outside the province; and

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Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 DESCRIPTION OF ECONOMIC MULTIPLIER TABLES In this publication, economic multipliers are presented for gross domestic product (at basic prices), labour income, employment and gross production. Below is a brief description of each of the tables contained in this report and how they should be used. Tables 1 to 4 present results from the open model, while tables 5-8 present results from the closed model. Table 9 presents commodity supply ratios for Alberta.

Example:

TABLE 1: OPEN MODEL

● Employment would grow by $1,000,000/$10,000

If there was a $1 million increase in the output of the construction industry (industry no. 230) in 2008, the effects would be as follows: ● GDP at basic prices would rise by 0.657 *

$1,000,000 = $657,000. ● Total labour income would increase by 0.476 *

$1,000,000 = $476,000.

Industry Intensity Ratios

* 0.061 = 6.2 jobs (based on the second column of employment intensity ratios).

Table 1 presents multipliers for the direct and indirect effects on the Alberta economy due to a change in output for each of 59 major industies. The results are in the form of intensity ratios and measure the effects on the Alberta economy in terms of GDP at basic prices, labour income, employment and gross production. The impacts on GDP, labour income and gross production are expressed as impacts per dollar of output change while employment impacts are expressed as the number of jobs per $10,000 of output (both in 2005 and 2008 dollars).

● Gross Production would rise by 1.656 *

$1,000,000 = $1,650,000. TABLE 2: OPEN MODEL

Industry Multipliers Table 2 consists of multipliers (direct and indirect) for industries. To use these multipliers, the user must know the direct increase in GDP at basic prices, labour income, and person years of employment for which the economic impacts are being analyzed. ● To use the GDP multiplier, the direct GDP

content associated with some change in output must be known or calculated. The components of direct GDP are those items which make up a firm’s operating surplus (wages, profits, depreciation, etc.). The GDP multiplier is applied to this value.

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The impacts on GDP and labour income are expressed as impacts per dollar of expenditure change while employment impacts are expressed as the number of jobs per $10,000 purchased (both in 2005 and 2008 dollars). Table 3 presents results calculated for data that is in producer prices.

● To use the labour income multiplier, the direct

increase in wages, supplementary labour income and net income of unincorporated business must be known or estimated. The labour income multiplier is then applied to this value. ● The employment multiplier is expressed in

Example:

terms of total number of jobs of employment per direct job. For example, if a firm in construction (industry no. 230) was established and in 2008 employed 100 people directly, it would create of total of 100 * 1.842 = 184.2 jobs (i.e.100 direct jobs plus an additional 84.2 indirect jobs). Please note that the model cannot distinguish between full-time and part-time jobs.

If Alberta demand for Non-Metallic Mineral Products (commodity 25) increased by $10 million during 2008, the economic effects for GDP at basic prices and for labour income would as follows: ● GDP at basic prices would rise by 0.932 *

$10,000,000 = $9,320,000. ● Total labour income would increase by 0.435 *

● The gross production multiplier is expressed

$10,000,000 = $4,350,000.

in terms of total gross production per dollar of direct production. For this multiplier, the direct production equals the total expenditure or output of the project.

● Employment multipliers are presented for

commodities purchased at both 2005 and 2008 prices, and are used somewhat differently. The first column of employment multipliers is scaled in units of $10,000 purchased in 2005 dollars. The second column which expresses employment per $10,000 in 2008 dollars can be used to estimate employment impacts for production taking place in the year 2008. For this column, multipliers have been adjusted to reflect average price changes from 2005 to 2008. In this case, the calculation would be ($10,000,000/10,000) * 0.063 = 63.0 jobs.

It must be remembered that the change in output of a firm is not what constitutes its direct contribution for labour income, employment, or GDP. This means that the multipliers corresponding to these items are not applied to the change in output for an industry. The only exception is the multiplier for gross production (column 5) which is applied to this quantity. TABLE 3: OPEN MODEL

Commodity Intensity Ratios – Producer Prices Table 3 presents multipliers for the direct and indirect effects on the Alberta economy due to a change in expenditure (purchase) for each of 43 commodities. The results are in the form of intensity ratios and measure the effects on the Alberta economy in terms GDP at basic prices, labour income and employment. 7


TABLE 4: OPEN MODEL

TABLE 8: CLOSED MODEL

Commodity Intensity Ratios –Purchaser Prices

Commodity Intensity Ratios at Purchaser Prices

Table 4 is analogous to Table 3 except that it presents results for data in purchaser prices.

Table 8 is analogous to Table 4 except that it presents results for the closed model and includes induced impacts in addition to the direct and indirect effects.

TABLE 5: CLOSED MODEL

Industry Intensity Ratios

TABLE 9

Table 5 is analogous to Table 1 except that it presents results for the closed model and includes induced impacts in addition to the direct and indirect effects.

Commodity Supply Ratios – Producer Prices Table 9 shows the source of supply for commodities purchased in Alberta. The data is presented as a percent for Alberta, the rest of Canada, and the rest of world. This table indicates both the extent of “openness” of the Alberta economy and the degree to which the economy depends on imports. For example, 63.8 percent of forestry products (commodity 3) purchased in Alberta was supplied from Alberta domestic production, 35.8 percent was imported from the rest of Canada, and 0.4 percent was imported from outside Canada.

TABLE 6: CLOSED MODEL

Industry Multipliers Table 6 is analogous to Table 2 except that it presents results for the closed model and includes induced impacts in addition to the direct and indirect effects. TABLE 7: CLOSED MODEL

Commodity Intensity Ratios at Producer Prices Table 7 is analogous to Table 3 except that it presents results for the closed model and includes induced impacts in addition to the direct and indirect effects.

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Alberta Economic Multipliers 2005 AN EXAMPLE OF USING MULTIPLIERS (OPEN MODEL) This example shows how multipliers and intensity ratios are used. Which you choose and how they are used is dependent upon the information you have available. For the purposes of this example, the results are presented for the open model only. The same calculations can be done using the appropriate closed model tables. For this example, the goal is to analyze which of two projects will provide a greater economic impact on the Alberta economy. The following information is given:

PROJECT 2

Expansion of output by an establishment in the Wholesale Trade Industry This project expands production by $3 million (in producer prices) in 2008 and 2009.

Analysis of Project 1 To analyze the impact of project 1, it is necessary to divide the project into two phases. The first phase occurs in 2008 and involves the effects of constructing the plant and purchasing the machinery and equipment. The second phase is the economic impacts of the yearly output of the plant beginning in 2009.

PROJECT 1

Construction of an establishment in the Wood Manufacturing Industries The plant (establishment) will cost $4 million to build in 2008. A further $1 million will be spent purchasing machinery and equipment. When in operation in 2009, the plant will provide 15 jobs and generate annual sales of $3 million with the following distribution of costs (all data are in producer prices):

Construction Phase of Project 1 To measure the impact of the construction phase, refer to Table 3 which presents commodity intensity ratios. Since project 1 involves the construction of a plant to manufacture wood products, the appropriate intensity ratios are those for commodity 30 (non-residential construction). The commodity table is used because the activity would be completed in Alberta by contractors whose output (or commodity) is construction.

($000’s)

Wages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Profits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 600 425 340 35 1,600

Total Output (Sales). . . . . . . . . .

$ 3,000

The construction phase during 2008 would have the following effects: ● GDP at basic prices would increase by 0.670 *

$4,000,000 = $2,680,000. ● Labour income would increase by 0.489 *

$4,000,000 = $1,956,000. ● Employment would rise by $4,000,000/$10,000

* 0.060 = 24.0 jobs (based on the column scaled in 2008 dollars). 9


An example of using multipliers (open model), cont’d.

Operations Phase of Project 1

The impacts of purchasing the machinery and equipment in 2008 are also estimated by using intensity ratios from Table 3, specifically the ratios for commodity 22 (machinery and equipment).

The second phase of impacts associated with Project 1 involves the actual operation of the plant which would begin operations in 2009. For this phase the industry based tables are used since the impacts associated with the economic activity of a particular industry are being analyzed. Since both the value of direct output and a breakdown of inputs has been given, either industry intensity ratios (Table 1) or industry multipliers (Table 2) can be used. To use Table 1, the procedure is to locate the appropriate industry and apply the ratios to the value of output. Here, information for industry no. 321 (wood product industries) is used yielding the following impacts: ● GDP at basic prices would grow by 0.692 * $3,000,000 = $2,076,000.

Since Alberta manufactures only a portion of the machinery or equipment it uses, it has a small impact on Alberta GDP (in this case only 27.7 percent of the machinery & equipment used in Alberta is produced in the province – see Table 9). The calculated impacts due to machinery and equipment purchases are as follows: ● GDP at basic prices would grow by 0.773 *

$1,000,000 = $773,000. ● Labour income would rise by 0.371 * $1,000,000

= $371,000. ● Employment would increase by

$1,000,000/$10,000 * 0.051 = 5.1 jobs (based on the column scaled in 2008 dollars).

● Labour Income would increase by 0.370 *

Alberta clearly derives more economic benefit from the construction activity associated with Project 1 than it does from the purchase of machinery and equipment. This is due to the higher Alberta content for construction (i.e., local labour and materials) compared to machinery and equipment which is predominately produced outside the province.

● Employment for 2008 would increase by

$3,000,000 = $1,110,000. $3,000,000/$10,000 * 0.054 = 16.2 jobs (based the 2008 industry employment intensity ratio). The effects of price increases should be accounted for when determining employment impacts beyond 2008 for which employment intensity ratios are provided in Table 1. For example, if industry selling prices for wood product manufactures (or some other suitable proxy for inflation) increased by 3 percent during 2009, the industry employment intensity ratio would be adjusted as follows: ● Estimated employment multiplier for 2009

= 0.054/1.03 = 0.052. Using this revised employment multiplier, growth in employment for 2009 would be estimated at 3,000,000/10,000 * 0.052 = 15.6 jobs. 10


An example of using multipliers (open model), cont’d.

Since detailed cost information has been provided, the industry multipliers provided in Table 2 can also be used. The first step is to analyze the categories for which cost information has been provided and identify which of these enter into the establishment’s operating surplus and thereby directly into GDP at basic prices.

Included in this contribution is an estimated $600 of direct labour income and 15 direct jobs to which the appropriate multipliers from Table 2 (industry no. 321, wood product manufacturing) would be applied. Based on Table 2, the indirect effects are: ● 1.735 * $1,400,000 = $2,429,400 of growth in

GDP at basic prices.

As a rule, wages, profits and depreciation are primary inputs (not purchased from another industry) and go directly into GDP. If overhead consists of rent payments and salaries for administration (as is assumed in this case), this category also enters directly into GDP. Materials and other purchased inputs do not since they are purchased from other industries and involve indirect economic impacts.

● 1.750 * $600,000 = $1,050,000 of labour

income. ● 1.905 * 15.0 direct jobs = 28.6 total jobs.

Direct GDP Direct GDP Direct GDP Direct GDP Direct GDP

In this example, the results using multipliers from Table 2 are almost identical to those calculated using the intensity ratios from Table 1. In practice, the multipliers from Table 2 should be used in preference to the intensity ratios from Table 1. Intensity ratios assume an “average” direct contribution to labour income, GDP at basic prices, and employment, and these factors can vary substantially from industry averages for particular firms. Generally, a more accurate result can be obtained by using actual data for firms and industry multipliers rather than the industry averages implied in the intensity ratios.

Indirect GDP Gross Output

Analysis of Project 2

Therefore, the cost categories can be allocated as follows: Wages Profit Depreciation Overhead Subtotal

$

600 420 340 35 1,400

Materials 1,600 Total Costs (Inputs) $ 3,000

Thus, $1,400,000 out of the firm’s $3 million gross output (total costs) constitutes its direct contribution to GDP at basic prices.

The only information provided for project 2 is that output will increase by $3 million in both 2008 and 2009 for an establishment in the wholesale trade industry. Since only industry data has been given, one of the industry tables must be used (Table 1 or 2). As there is no breakdown of costs provided, direct GDP content associated with the change in output cannot be calculated. Therefore, industry intensity ratios from Table 1 rather than the multipliers from Table 2 must be used.

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An example of using multipliers (open model), cont’d.

Comparison of the Two Projects

For Table 1 the wholesale trade industry is number 410. The $3 million change in the value of output is applied to each intensity ratio yielding the following total impacts:

The last step in the analysis is to compare the results of the two projects. The following is a summary of the results (note that for Project 1, we have to add the impacts of the construction and machinery and equipment purchases to get total impact for 2008):

● 0.844 * $3,000,000 = $2,532,000 growth in GDP

at basic prices. ● 0.518 * $3,000,000 = $1,554,000 growth in

labour income.

PROJECT

1

● $3,000,000/$10,000 * .083 = 24.9 jobs required.

Since the change in output of $3 million is the same for 2008 and 2009, the labour income and GDP impacts would be the same for both years. To calculate the 2009 employment impact it is necessary to allow for price increases over 2008. For example, if the industry selling price (or another appropriate price proxy) for the wholesale trade industry increased by 3 percent in 2009, the employment multiplier (scaled in 2008 dollars) could be adjusted as follows:

2

GDP at Basic prices ($000’s) 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,453 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,076

2,532 2,532

Labour Income (000’s) 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,327 1,110

1,554 1,554

Employment (Jobs) 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29.1 16.2

24.9 24.3

It is clear that project 1 has the larger economic impact for 2008. This result is largely due to the construction phase of the plant. If a longer term view is taken, then project 2 may in fact yield the larger economic benefit. This can be seen by comparing impacts for 2009 for which project 2 has a greater effect on GDP, labour income and employment.

● 0.083/1.03 = 0.081.

Therefore, the employment impact in 2009 would be: ● $3,000,000/$10,000 * 0.081 = 24.3 jobs.

It must be remembered that when the economy is in a phase of full employment, an increase in resources in one project may draw resources from other industries, reducing the overall impact.

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TABLE 1: ALBERTA INDUSTRY INTENSITY RATIOS

(Open Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct and Indirect Impacts)

Industry 11A 113 114 115 211 212 213 22A 22B 230 311 312 31A 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 410 4A0 484 485 486 48A 49A 493 512 513 51A 5A0 541 561 562 610 620 710 720 811 813 81A NP1 NP2 GS1 GS2 GS4 GS5 GS6

Crop and animal production Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Support activities for agriculture and forestry Oil and gas extraction Mining (except oil and gas extraction) Support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction Electric power generation, transmission and distribution Natural gas distribution, water, sewage and other systems Construction Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile and textile product mills Clothing manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Non metallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal products manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment, appliance and component manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Pipeline transportation Air, Rail, Water & Scenic & Sightseeing Transportation & Support Activities for Transportation Postal service and couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting and telecommunications Publishing industries, information services and data processing services Finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing Professional, scientific and technical services Administrative and support services Waste management and remediation services Educational services Health care and social assistance Arts, entertainment and recreation Accommodation and food services Repair and maintenance Grant making, civic, and professional and similar organizations Personal and laundry services and private households Non profit institutions serving households (excluding education) Non profit education services Hospitals and government nursing and residential care facilities Universities and government education services Other municipal government services Other provincial and territorial government services Other federal government services

GDP at Basic Prices 0.784 0.695 0.724 0.804 0.899 0.839 0.767 0.853 1.121 0.657 0.594 0.622 0.600 0.592 0.592 0.692 0.560 0.650 0.828 0.725 0.586 0.754 0.276 0.580 0.563 0.367 0.572 0.487 0.633 0.674 0.844 0.850 0.821 1.015 0.934

Labour Income 0.269 0.363 0.575 0.550 0.154 0.315 0.516 0.185 0.292 0.476 0.279 0.264 0.416 0.510 0.363 0.370 0.307 0.467 0.168 0.229 0.347 0.350 0.170 0.379 0.334 0.262 0.427 0.374 0.470 0.405 0.518 0.622 0.563 0.717 0.218

Employment 2005 0.108 0.055 0.277 0.143 0.019 0.039 0.063 0.023 0.045 0.068 0.078 0.041 0.093 0.129 0.175 0.057 0.040 0.076 0.022 0.033 0.057 0.057 0.026 0.057 0.048 0.037 0.071 0.056 0.084 0.099 0.092 0.191 0.099 0.165 0.028

Employment 2008 0.098 0.052 0.249 0.129 0.017 0.035 0.059 0.020 0.041 0.061 0.071 0.038 0.084 0.117 0.166 0.054 0.039 0.067 0.020 0.030 0.053 0.050 0.023 0.052 0.046 0.034 0.067 0.047 0.075 0.089 0.083 0.179 0.090 0.146 0.026

Gross Output 2.078 1.856 1.643 1.573 1.322 1.392 1.497 1.371 1.657 1.656 2.074 1.566 1.397 1.282 1.467 1.715 1.624 1.393 2.160 2.127 1.610 1.614 1.352 1.332 1.376 1.293 1.340 1.313 1.452 1.361 1.528 1.536 1.552 1.648 1.237

0.767 0.839 0.904 0.638 0.837 0.819 0.874 0.825 0.845 0.925 0.930 0.886 0.771 0.722 0.869 0.836 0.856 0.848 0.866 0.817 0.918 0.877 0.785 0.800

0.486 0.680 0.669 0.286 0.310 0.467 0.445 0.623 0.667 0.300 0.769 0.655 0.542 0.482 0.586 0.693 0.633 0.712 0.751 0.707 0.810 0.582 0.571 0.660

0.076 0.155 0.115 0.069 0.047 0.081 0.052 0.110 0.167 0.052 0.267 0.135 0.244 0.177 0.165 0.163 0.304 0.180 0.167 0.135 0.135 0.097 0.106 0.096

0.070 0.148 0.107 0.062 0.045 0.073 0.047 0.101 0.144 0.046 0.246 0.120 0.214 0.151 0.145 0.147 0.273 0.155 0.143 0.123 0.125 0.080 0.095 0.088

1.590 1.541 1.278 1.482 1.301 1.382 1.456 1.504 1.449 1.279 1.348 1.277 1.705 1.521 1.456 1.516 1.333 1.460 1.328 1.334 1.250 1.401 1.849 1.430

Notes: Intensity ratios for GDP, Labour Income and Gross Output expressed as total impact per dollar of output change Intensity ratios for employment expressed as total number of jobs required per $10,000 of output change

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TABLE 2: ALBERTA INDUSTRY MULTIPLIERS

(Open Model - Direct and Indirect Impacts) Industry 11A 113 114 115 211 212 213 22A 22B 230 311 312 31A 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 410 4A0 484 485 486 48A 49A 493 512 513 51A 5A0 541 561 562 610 620 710 720 811 813 81A NP1 NP2 GS1 GS2 GS4 GS5 GS6

Crop and animal production Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Support activities for agriculture and forestry Oil and gas extraction Mining (except oil and gas extraction) Support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction Electric power generation, transmission and distribution Natural gas distribution, water, sewage and other systems Construction Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile and textile product mills Clothing manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Non metallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal products manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment, appliance and component manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Pipeline transportation Air, Rail, Water & Scenic & Sightseeing Transportation & Support Activities for Transportation Postal service and couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting and telecommunications Publishing industries, information services and data processing services Finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing Professional, scientific and technical services Administrative and support services Waste management and remediation services Educational services Health care and social assistance Arts, entertainment and recreation Accommodation and food services Repair and maintenance Grant making, civic, and professional and similar organizations Personal and laundry services and private households Non profit institutions serving households (excluding education) Non profit education services Hospitals and government nursing and residential care facilities Universities and government education services Other municipal government services Other provincial and territorial government services Other federal government services

GDP at Basic Prices 2.333 1.586 1.298 1.380 1.213 1.279 1.338 1.333 1.484 1.861 2.813 1.528 1.382 1.251 1.414 1.735 1.903 1.380 12.790 3.981 1.655 1.661 2.043 1.335 1.401 1.618 1.367 1.391 1.440 1.292 1.389 1.399 1.482 1.430 1.154

Labour Income 3.318 1.643 1.224 1.268 2.150 1.409 1.251 1.661 1.825 1.679 2.448 1.919 1.263 1.163 1.374 1.750 1.699 1.279 7.697 3.469 1.461 1.576 1.823 1.291 1.383 1.525 1.273 1.292 1.311 1.269 1.352 1.283 1.351 1.281 1.441

Employment 2005 1.801 1.853 1.077 1.190 3.023 1.665 1.439 1.922 1.824 1.820 3.575 2.363 1.212 1.133 1.133 1.954 2.214 1.311 9.486 4.746 1.484 1.646 2.058 1.350 1.475 1.795 1.308 1.380 1.336 1.193 1.405 1.163 1.368 1.240 1.664

Employment 2008 1.805 1.829 1.078 1.191 3.030 1.663 1.425 1.966 1.813 1.842 3.479 2.330 1.213 1.134 1.127 1.905 2.054 1.322 8.859 4.592 1.466 1.660 2.068 1.346 1.443 1.760 1.294 1.421 1.346 1.194 1.405 1.156 1.367 1.245 1.642

Gross Output 2.078 1.856 1.643 1.573 1.322 1.392 1.497 1.371 1.657 1.656 2.074 1.566 1.397 1.282 1.467 1.715 1.624 1.393 2.160 2.127 1.610 1.614 1.352 1.332 1.376 1.293 1.340 1.313 1.452 1.361 1.528 1.536 1.552 1.648 1.237

1.542 1.441 1.152 1.473 1.199 1.286 1.328 1.365 1.292 1.175 1.264 1.162 1.586 1.468 1.318 1.308 1.211 1.325 1.202 1.181 1.140 1.278 2.665 1.339

1.415 1.296 1.116 1.630 1.351 1.292 1.427 1.288 1.200 1.311 1.138 1.117 1.474 1.350 1.242 1.205 1.152 1.169 1.084 1.126 1.089 1.221 2.658 1.249

1.514 1.264 1.128 1.500 1.491 1.328 1.918 1.322 1.154 1.404 1.071 1.111 1.211 1.178 1.159 1.182 1.060 1.131 1.071 1.140 1.119 1.276 3.125 1.364

1.499 1.245 1.123 1.498 1.453 1.331 1.919 1.316 1.163 1.419 1.068 1.113 1.217 1.188 1.164 1.183 1.060 1.136 1.074 1.136 1.113 1.307 3.108 1.356

1.590 1.541 1.278 1.482 1.301 1.382 1.456 1.504 1.449 1.279 1.348 1.277 1.705 1.521 1.456 1.516 1.333 1.460 1.328 1.334 1.250 1.401 1.849 1.430

Notes: Multipliers for GDP expressed as total impact per direct change in GDP Multipliers for Labour Income expressed as total impact per direct change in Labour Income Multipliers for Gross Output expressed as total impact per direct change in Gross Output Multipliers for Employment expressed as total jobs required per direct job required You must know the direct change in GDP at basic prices, labour income or number of direct jobs required before using these multipliers.

14


TABLE 3: ALBERTA COMMODITY INTENSITY RATIOS IN PRODUCER PRICES

(Open Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct and Indirect Impacts) GDP at Basic Prices 0.796 0.822 0.702 0.973 0.759 0.946 1.427 0.767 0.964 0.990 0.875 0.000 0.877 0.834 1.102 1.044 0.917 0.604 0.835 0.328 0.598 0.773 0.619 0.406 0.932 1.242 0.813 0.852 0.630 0.670 0.703 0.872 0.891 0.932 0.833 0.857 0.850 0.862 0.895 0.876 0.766 0.890 0.854 0.837

Commodity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 43 47 48

Grains Other agricultural products Forestry products Fish and seafood and hunting and trapping products Metal ores and concentrates Mineral fuels Non metallic minerals Services incidental to mining Meat, fish and dairy products Fruit, vegetable and other food products and feeds Soft drinks and alcoholic beverages Tobacco and tobacco products Leather, rubber, and plastic products Textile products Hosiery, clothing and accessories Lumber and wood products Furniture, mattresses and lamps Wood pulp, paper and paper products Printing and publishing Primary metal products Fabricated metal products Machinery Motor vehicles, other transportation equipment and parts Electrical, electronic and communication products Non metallic mineral products Petroleum and coal products Chemicals, pharmaceuticals and chemical products Miscellaneous manufactured products Residential building construction Non residential construction Repair construction Transportation and storage Communications services Other utilities Wholesaling margins Retailing margins and services Finance, insurance, and real estate services Business and computer services Private education services Health care and social assistance services Accommodation services and meals Miscellaneous services Non market services provided by non profit institutions serving households Non market government sector services

Notes: Intensity ratios for GDP, Labour Income and Gross Output expressed as total impact per dollar of output change Intensity ratios for employment expressed as total number of jobs required per $10,000 of output change

15

Labour Income 0.190 0.320 0.363 0.554 0.608 0.164 0.476 0.515 0.482 0.415 0.482 0.000 0.491 0.412 0.983 0.565 0.706 0.333 0.501 0.207 0.388 0.371 0.454 0.308 0.435 0.238 0.255 0.491 0.438 0.489 0.544 0.506 0.406 0.272 0.510 0.618 0.482 0.606 0.750 0.667 0.510 0.583 0.719 0.666

Employment 2005 0.079 0.121 0.056 0.238 0.241 0.020 0.067 0.063 0.149 0.088 0.149 0.000 0.082 0.088 0.203 0.090 0.123 0.045 0.089 0.031 0.059 0.053 0.070 0.047 0.071 0.031 0.038 0.093 0.069 0.067 0.082 0.089 0.072 0.040 0.090 0.188 0.077 0.110 0.171 0.137 0.190 0.173 0.182 0.116

Employment 2008 0.071 0.109 0.052 0.214 0.217 0.018 0.061 0.058 0.135 0.081 0.129 0.000 0.076 0.080 0.184 0.085 0.109 0.043 0.081 0.028 0.054 0.051 0.060 0.044 0.063 0.028 0.034 0.085 0.063 0.060 0.075 0.081 0.068 0.035 0.081 0.175 0.069 0.100 0.157 0.122 0.162 0.153 0.157 0.105

Gross Output 1.889 2.181 1.862 2.056 1.630 1.392 2.480 1.497 3.757 2.531 2.007 0.000 2.443 2.315 2.533 2.560 2.141 1.728 1.608 1.352 1.407 1.679 1.598 1.463 1.996 2.690 2.376 1.820 1.630 1.718 1.446 1.568 1.429 1.519 1.529 1.544 1.628 1.552 1.388 1.313 1.624 1.637 1.440 1.507


TABLE 4: ALBERTA COMMODITY INTENSITY RATIOS IN PURCHASER PRICES

(Open Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct and Indirect Impacts) Commodity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 43 47 48

Grains Other agricultural products Forestry products Fish and seafood and hunting and trapping products Metal ores and concentrates Mineral fuels Non metallic minerals Services incidental to mining Meat, fish and dairy products Fruit, vegetable and other food products and feeds Soft drinks and alcoholic beverages Leather, rubber, and plastic products Textile products Hosiery, clothing and accessories Lumber and wood products Furniture, mattresses and lamps Wood pulp, paper and paper products Printing and publishing Primary metal products Fabricated metal products Machinery Motor vehicles, other transportation equipment and parts Electrical, electronic and communication products Non metallic mineral products Petroleum and coal products Chemicals, pharmaceuticals and chemical products Miscellaneous manufactured products Residential building construction Non residential construction Repair construction Transportation and storage Communications services Other utilities Wholesaling margins Retailing margins and services Finance, insurance, and real estate services Business and computer services Private education services Health care and social assistance services Accommodation services and meals Miscellaneous services Non market services provided by non profit institutions serving households Non market government sector services

GDP at Basic Prices 0.796 0.781 0.698 0.738 0.759 0.899 0.832 0.767 0.572 0.650 0.680 0.594 0.661 0.577 0.695 0.619 0.570 0.723 0.328 0.572 0.631 0.522 0.359 0.753 0.855 0.728 0.668 0.593 0.667 0.703 0.838 0.838 0.892 0.833 0.849 0.836 0.827 0.883 0.876 0.722 0.821 0.854 0.837

Notes: Intensity ratios for GDP, Labour Income and Gross Output expressed as total impact per dollar of output change Intensity ratios for employment expressed as total number of jobs required per $10,000 of output change

16

Labour Income 0.190 0.304 0.362 0.421 0.608 0.155 0.278 0.515 0.286 0.272 0.375 0.332 0.327 0.514 0.376 0.477 0.314 0.433 0.207 0.372 0.303 0.383 0.272 0.351 0.164 0.229 0.385 0.413 0.487 0.544 0.486 0.382 0.261 0.510 0.613 0.474 0.582 0.739 0.667 0.481 0.538 0.719 0.666

Employment 2005 0.079 0.115 0.056 0.181 0.241 0.019 0.039 0.063 0.088 0.058 0.116 0.055 0.070 0.106 0.060 0.083 0.042 0.077 0.031 0.056 0.043 0.059 0.041 0.057 0.021 0.034 0.073 0.065 0.067 0.082 0.085 0.067 0.038 0.090 0.186 0.076 0.105 0.169 0.137 0.179 0.160 0.182 0.116

Employment 2008 0.071 0.103 0.052 0.163 0.217 0.018 0.036 0.058 0.080 0.053 0.100 0.052 0.063 0.096 0.057 0.074 0.041 0.070 0.028 0.052 0.041 0.051 0.039 0.051 0.019 0.031 0.067 0.059 0.060 0.075 0.078 0.064 0.033 0.081 0.173 0.068 0.096 0.155 0.122 0.153 0.141 0.157 0.105

Gross Output 1.889 2.073 1.853 1.560 1.630 1.323 1.447 1.497 2.230 1.662 1.559 1.654 1.835 1.326 1.705 1.446 1.630 1.392 1.352 1.346 1.371 1.348 1.293 1.611 1.851 2.129 1.427 1.535 1.712 1.446 1.506 1.344 1.454 1.529 1.530 1.600 1.489 1.369 1.313 1.532 1.511 1.440 1.507


TABLE 5: ALBERTA INDUSTRY INTENSITY RATIOS

(Closed Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct, Indirect and Induced Impacts) Industry 11A 113 114 115 211 212 213 22A 22B 230 311 312 31A 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 410 4A0 484 485 486 48A 49A 493 512 513 51A 5A0 541 561 562 610 620 710 720 811 813 81A NP1 NP2 GS1 GS2 GS4 GS5 GS6

Crop and animal production Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Support activities for agriculture and forestry Oil and gas extraction Mining (except oil and gas extraction) Support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction Electric power generation, transmission and distribution Natural gas distribution, water, sewage and other systems Construction Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile and textile product mills Clothing manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Non metallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal products manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment, appliance and component manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Pipeline transportation Air, Rail, Water & Scenic & Sightseeing Transportation & Support Activities for Transportation Postal service and couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting and telecommunications Publishing industries, information services and data processing services Finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing Professional, scientific and technical services Administrative and support services Waste management and remediation services Educational services Health care and social assistance Arts, entertainment and recreation Accommodation and food services Repair and maintenance Grant making, civic, and professional and similar organizations Personal and laundry services and private households Non profit institutions serving households (excluding education) Non profit education services Hospitals and government nursing and residential care facilities Universities and government education services Other municipal government services Other provincial and territorial government services Other federal government services

GDP at Basic Prices 0.953 0.901 1.112 1.129 0.981 1.016 1.043 0.952 1.280 0.973 0.751 0.764 0.843 0.895 0.816 0.900 0.729 0.905 0.920 0.848 0.777 0.948 0.373 0.790 0.751 0.516 0.813 0.693 0.897 0.911 1.126 1.222 1.153 1.443 1.053

Labour Income 0.365 0.480 0.796 0.735 0.201 0.416 0.673 0.241 0.382 0.656 0.368 0.345 0.554 0.682 0.490 0.489 0.403 0.612 0.221 0.299 0.455 0.460 0.225 0.499 0.441 0.346 0.564 0.491 0.620 0.540 0.679 0.833 0.751 0.960 0.286

Employment 2005 0.129 0.081 0.326 0.184 0.030 0.061 0.098 0.035 0.065 0.107 0.098 0.059 0.123 0.167 0.203 0.084 0.061 0.108 0.034 0.048 0.081 0.081 0.038 0.083 0.071 0.055 0.102 0.082 0.117 0.129 0.128 0.238 0.140 0.218 0.043

Employment 2008 0.117 0.075 0.293 0.166 0.027 0.055 0.090 0.031 0.059 0.097 0.089 0.054 0.111 0.151 0.191 0.078 0.058 0.096 0.030 0.043 0.075 0.072 0.034 0.076 0.068 0.051 0.094 0.070 0.105 0.116 0.115 0.221 0.127 0.195 0.039

Gross Output 2.372 2.215 2.318 2.140 1.464 1.700 1.978 1.543 1.933 2.206 2.348 1.814 1.821 1.809 1.855 2.078 1.917 1.837 2.321 2.341 1.943 1.952 1.521 1.697 1.704 1.551 1.759 1.671 1.912 1.773 2.020 2.185 2.129 2.393 1.445

1.038 1.238 1.282 0.810 1.011 1.078 1.136 1.172 1.229 1.092 1.436 1.281 1.114 1.013 1.212 1.231 1.265 1.285 1.294 1.219 1.379 1.210 1.102 1.167

0.640 0.906 0.883 0.383 0.408 0.614 0.593 0.820 0.884 0.395 1.056 0.880 0.737 0.647 0.780 0.918 0.866 0.960 0.994 0.935 1.072 0.771 0.751 0.869

0.110 0.206 0.163 0.091 0.069 0.114 0.085 0.153 0.215 0.073 0.330 0.185 0.287 0.214 0.208 0.213 0.355 0.234 0.220 0.185 0.193 0.139 0.146 0.142

0.101 0.193 0.149 0.082 0.065 0.103 0.076 0.140 0.187 0.065 0.303 0.165 0.252 0.184 0.183 0.191 0.319 0.204 0.191 0.168 0.177 0.117 0.131 0.129

2.061 2.235 1.936 1.782 1.603 1.833 1.910 2.107 2.116 1.570 2.228 1.965 2.303 2.027 2.053 2.204 2.045 2.221 2.073 2.032 2.052 1.980 2.400 2.070

Notes: Intensity ratios for GDP, Labour Income and Gross Output expressed as total impact per dollar of output change Intensity ratios for employment expressed as total number of jobs required per $10,000 of output change

17


TABLE 6: ALBERTA INDUSTRY MULTIPLIERS

(Closed Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct, Indirect and Induced Impacts) Industry 11A 113 114 115 211 212 213 22A 22B 230 311 312 31A 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 410 4A0 484 485 486 48A 49A 493 512 513 51A 5A0 541 561 562 610 620 710 720 811 813 81A NP1 NP2 GS1 GS2 GS4 GS5 GS6

Crop and animal production Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Support activities for agriculture and forestry Oil and gas extraction Mining (except oil and gas extraction) Support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction Electric power generation, transmission and distribution Natural gas distribution, water, sewage and other systems Construction Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile and textile product mills Clothing manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Non metallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal products manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment, appliance and component manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Pipeline transportation Air, Rail, Water & Scenic & Sightseeing Transportation & Support Activities for Transportation Postal service and couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting and telecommunications Publishing industries, information services and data processing services Finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing Professional, scientific and technical services Administrative and support services Waste management and remediation services Educational services Health care and social assistance Arts, entertainment and recreation Accommodation and food services Repair and maintenance Grant making, civic, and professional and similar organizations Personal and laundry services and private households Non profit institutions serving households (excluding education) Non profit education services Hospitals and government nursing and residential care facilities Universities and government education services Other municipal government services Other provincial and territorial government services Other federal government services

GDP at Basic Prices 2.836 2.055 1.994 1.940 1.323 1.548 1.821 1.487 1.695 2.757 3.558 1.877 1.943 1.890 1.947 2.257 2.475 1.922 14.221 4.654 2.196 2.089 2.759 1.818 1.870 2.272 1.943 1.980 2.041 1.746 1.855 2.012 2.080 2.033 1.301

Labour Income 4.499 2.172 1.692 1.694 2.794 1.858 1.631 2.164 2.390 2.311 3.232 2.506 1.683 1.555 1.854 2.309 2.228 1.676 10.101 4.522 1.920 2.074 2.411 1.697 1.825 2.015 1.682 1.696 1.729 1.690 1.771 1.719 1.803 1.715 1.889

Employment 2005 2.154 2.722 1.266 1.530 4.625 2.616 2.230 2.960 2.632 2.887 4.479 3.390 1.611 1.466 1.314 2.843 3.384 1.864 14.518 6.990 2.107 2.352 3.031 1.973 2.205 2.704 1.862 2.012 1.861 1.550 1.947 1.447 1.944 1.645 2.549

Employment 2008 2.156 2.650 1.267 1.529 4.617 2.599 2.182 3.045 2.602 2.916 4.343 3.315 1.611 1.466 1.298 2.728 3.059 1.889 13.475 6.731 2.056 2.381 3.038 1.953 2.102 2.623 1.815 2.120 1.879 1.550 1.944 1.427 1.936 1.654 2.496

Gross Output 2.372 2.215 2.318 2.140 1.464 1.700 1.978 1.543 1.933 2.206 2.348 1.814 1.821 1.809 1.855 2.078 1.917 1.837 2.321 2.341 1.943 1.952 1.521 1.697 1.704 1.551 1.759 1.671 1.912 1.773 2.020 2.185 2.129 2.393 1.445

2.087 2.127 1.634 1.871 1.448 1.694 1.724 1.938 1.879 1.387 1.952 1.681 2.293 2.059 1.839 1.926 1.790 2.008 1.797 1.762 1.712 1.763 3.742 1.955

1.863 1.727 1.475 2.189 1.781 1.700 1.903 1.694 1.591 1.725 1.563 1.499 2.005 1.812 1.655 1.595 1.575 1.577 1.435 1.490 1.441 1.618 3.495 1.643

2.187 1.671 1.592 1.970 2.177 1.859 3.123 1.844 1.486 1.969 1.326 1.518 1.425 1.420 1.461 1.541 1.239 1.476 1.417 1.567 1.599 1.824 4.294 2.023

2.148 1.622 1.570 1.966 2.080 1.860 3.118 1.824 1.511 2.000 1.315 1.524 1.437 1.445 1.474 1.541 1.239 1.497 1.437 1.553 1.576 1.923 4.273 1.994

2.061 2.235 1.936 1.782 1.603 1.833 1.910 2.107 2.116 1.570 2.228 1.965 2.303 2.027 2.053 2.204 2.045 2.221 2.073 2.032 2.052 1.980 2.400 2.070

Notes: Multipliers for GDP expressed as total impact per direct change in GDP Multipliers for Labour Income expressed as total impact per direct change in Labour Income Multipliers for Gross Output expressed as total impact per direct change in Gross Output Multipliers for Employment expressed as total jobs required per direct job required You must know the direct change in GDP at basic prices, labour income or number of direct jobs required before using these multipliers.

18


TABLE 7: ALBERTA COMMODITY INTENSITY RATIOS IN PRODUCER PRICES

(Closed Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct, Indirect and Induced Impacts) Commodity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 43 47 48

Grains Other agricultural products Forestry products Fish and seafood and hunting and trapping products Metal ores and concentrates Mineral fuels Non metallic minerals Services incidental to mining Meat, fish and dairy products Fruit, vegetable and other food products and feeds Soft drinks and alcoholic beverages Leather, rubber, and plastic products Textile products Hosiery, clothing and accessories Lumber and wood products Furniture, mattresses and lamps Wood pulp, paper and paper products Printing and publishing Primary metal products Fabricated metal products Machinery Motor vehicles, other transportation equipment and parts Electrical, electronic and communication products Non metallic mineral products Petroleum and coal products Chemicals, pharmaceuticals and chemical products Miscellaneous manufactured products Residential building construction Non residential construction Repair construction Transportation and storage Communications services Other utilities Wholesaling margins Retailing margins and services Finance, insurance, and real estate services Business and computer services Private education services Health care and social assistance services Accommodation services and meals Miscellaneous services Non market services provided by non profit institutions serving households Non market government sector services

GDP at Basic Prices 0.896 1.024 0.908 1.336 1.168 1.032 1.691 1.043 1.237 1.223 1.157 1.148 1.067 1.679 1.362 1.310 0.788 1.114 0.444 0.813 0.980 0.869 0.581 1.174 1.371 0.950 1.131 0.925 0.999 1.006 1.164 1.122 1.082 1.111 1.226 1.117 1.200 1.338 1.272 1.074 1.234 1.304 1.213

Labour Employment Employment Income 2005 2008 0.246 0.091 0.082 0.435 0.146 0.132 0.480 0.082 0.075 0.760 0.284 0.255 0.840 0.292 0.263 0.213 0.031 0.028 0.626 0.100 0.091 0.672 0.098 0.090 0.637 0.183 0.166 0.547 0.117 0.107 0.642 0.184 0.161 0.645 0.116 0.107 0.545 0.117 0.106 1.310 0.276 0.248 0.745 0.130 0.121 0.929 0.172 0.154 0.437 0.068 0.064 0.659 0.124 0.112 0.273 0.045 0.041 0.511 0.086 0.078 0.488 0.079 0.074 0.596 0.102 0.088 0.408 0.069 0.063 0.572 0.101 0.090 0.312 0.047 0.043 0.333 0.055 0.050 0.649 0.128 0.116 0.606 0.106 0.096 0.676 0.109 0.097 0.716 0.121 0.109 0.672 0.126 0.114 0.537 0.101 0.094 0.357 0.059 0.051 0.668 0.125 0.113 0.828 0.234 0.216 0.633 0.111 0.099 0.798 0.152 0.138 1.001 0.227 0.207 0.892 0.187 0.166 0.685 0.228 0.197 0.778 0.216 0.192 0.974 0.239 0.208 0.879 0.163 0.147

Notes: Intensity ratios for GDP, Labour Income and Gross Output expressed as total impact per dollar of output change Intensity ratios for employment expressed as total number of jobs required per $10,000 of output change

19

Gross Output 2.063 2.533 2.220 2.688 2.342 1.542 2.940 1.978 4.233 2.936 2.498 2.914 2.721 3.537 3.114 2.826 2.047 2.094 1.554 1.781 2.039 2.034 1.768 2.417 2.915 2.615 2.305 2.143 2.291 1.973 2.076 1.830 1.779 2.013 2.186 2.093 2.140 2.159 2.002 2.161 2.235 2.224 2.161


TABLE 8: ALBERTA COMMODITY INTENSITY RATIOS IN PURCHASER PRICES

(Closed Model â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Direct, Indirect and Induced Impacts) Commodity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 43 47 48

Grains Other agricultural products Forestry products Fish and seafood and hunting and trapping products Metal ores and concentrates Mineral fuels Non metallic minerals Services incidental to mining Meat, fish and dairy products Fruit, vegetable and other food products and feeds Soft drinks and alcoholic beverages Leather, rubber, and plastic products Textile products Hosiery, clothing and accessories Lumber and wood products Furniture, mattresses and lamps Wood pulp, paper and paper products Printing and publishing Primary metal products Fabricated metal products Machinery Motor vehicles, other transportation equipment and parts Electrical, electronic and communication products Non metallic mineral products Petroleum and coal products Chemicals, pharmaceuticals and chemical products Miscellaneous manufactured products Residential building construction Non residential construction Repair construction Transportation and storage Communications services Other utilities Wholesaling margins Retailing margins and services Finance, insurance, and real estate services Business and computer services Private education services Health care and social assistance services Accommodation services and meals Miscellaneous services Non market services provided by non profit institutions serving households Non market government sector services

GDP at Basic Prices 0.896 0.973 0.903 1.014 1.168 0.981 0.987 1.043 0.734 0.803 0.899 0.777 0.846 0.879 0.907 0.885 0.743 0.964 0.444 0.778 0.800 0.733 0.514 0.948 0.944 0.851 0.887 0.871 0.996 1.006 1.119 1.055 1.036 1.111 1.215 1.098 1.151 1.320 1.272 1.014 1.139 1.304 1.213

Notes: Intensity ratios for GDP, Labour Income and Gross Output expressed as total impact per dollar of output change Intensity ratios for employment expressed as total number of jobs required per $10,000 of output change

20

Labour Employment Employment Income 2005 2008 0.246 0.091 0.082 0.413 0.139 0.125 0.478 0.081 0.075 0.577 0.215 0.194 0.840 0.292 0.263 0.202 0.030 0.027 0.365 0.059 0.053 0.672 0.098 0.090 0.378 0.109 0.099 0.359 0.077 0.070 0.499 0.143 0.125 0.437 0.079 0.072 0.432 0.093 0.084 0.686 0.144 0.130 0.496 0.087 0.080 0.628 0.116 0.104 0.412 0.064 0.060 0.571 0.107 0.097 0.273 0.045 0.041 0.488 0.082 0.075 0.399 0.064 0.060 0.502 0.086 0.074 0.360 0.061 0.056 0.462 0.082 0.073 0.214 0.032 0.029 0.298 0.049 0.045 0.509 0.101 0.091 0.571 0.100 0.091 0.674 0.108 0.097 0.716 0.121 0.109 0.646 0.121 0.109 0.505 0.095 0.089 0.342 0.056 0.049 0.668 0.125 0.113 0.820 0.232 0.214 0.623 0.109 0.098 0.766 0.146 0.132 0.987 0.224 0.204 0.892 0.187 0.166 0.647 0.216 0.186 0.718 0.199 0.177 0.974 0.239 0.208 0.879 0.163 0.147

Gross Output 2.063 2.407 2.210 2.039 2.342 1.465 1.715 1.978 2.512 1.928 1.940 1.974 2.157 1.851 2.074 1.909 1.931 1.813 1.554 1.704 1.665 1.715 1.563 1.951 2.005 2.342 1.808 2.019 2.284 1.973 1.995 1.722 1.703 2.013 2.167 2.057 2.053 2.130 2.002 2.039 2.063 2.224 2.161


TABLE 9: ALBERTA COMMODITY SUPPLY RATIOS

(Percent) Commodity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

Alberta Grains Other agricultural products Forestry products Fish, seafood and trapping products Metal ores & concentrates Mineral fuels Non metallic minerals Services incidental to mining Meat, fish, and dairy products Fruit, veg. and other food products, feeds Soft drinks and alcoholic beverages Tobacco and tobacco products Leather, rubber, and plastic products Textile products Hosiery, clothing and accessories Lumber and wood products Furniture and fixtures Wood pulp, paper and paper products Printing and publishing Primary metal products Other metal products Machinery and equipment Motor veh., oth. transport equip. and parts Electrical, electronic and communic. prod. Non metallic mineral products Petroleum and coal products Chemicals, pharmaceuticals & chemical prod. Other manufactured products Residential construction Non residential construction Repair construction Transportation and storage Communications services Other utilities Wholesaling margins Retailing margins Other finance, insurance, and real estate services Business and computer services Private education services Health and social services Accommodation services and meals Other services Transportation margins

88.7 72.7 63.8 8.5 0.3 87.6 54.9 97.1 43.2 24.1 59.5 0.0 24.0 12.1 1.5 47.4 25.0 19.5 50.2 26.9 35.8 27.7 2.9 3.2 58.4 82.8 51.5 18.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 79.2 67.5 95.3 74.4 94.5 80.4 73.9 90.6 98.8 95.2 87.3 64.2

21

Rest of Canada 7.7 23.8 35.8 48.7 0.0 12.3 23.0 2.8 53.6 47.0 19.3 84.8 26.5 30.3 11.0 47.2 41.7 48.9 27.6 22.8 22.0 5.7 18.0 11.0 13.6 8.3 15.6 17.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 17.7 25.1 2.9 25.3 5.5 15.5 18.7 4.8 0.8 3.0 8.6 35.8

Rest of World

Total Supply

3.6 3.5 0.4 42.8 99.7 0.1 22.1 0.1 3.2 28.9 21.2 15.2 49.5 57.6 87.5 5.4 33.3 31.6 22.2 50.3 42.2 66.6 79.1 85.8 28.0 8.9 32.9 64.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 7.4 1.8 0.3 0.0 4.1 7.4 4.6 0.4 1.8 4.1 0.0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


APPENDIX 1

Industry Aggregation Parameters Industry

Worksheet Level Number

Link Level Number

11A Crop & Animal Production 113 Forestry & Logging 114 Fishing, Hunting & Trapping 115 Support Activities for Agriculture & Forestry 211 Oil & Gas Extraction 212 Mining ( Except Oil & Gas Extraction) 213 Support Activities for Mining & Oil & Gas Extraction 22A Electric Power Generation, Transmission & Dist'n 22B Natural Gas Dist'n, Water, Sewage & Other Systems 230 Construction 311 Food Manufacturing 312 Beverage & Tobacco Products Manufacturing 31A Textile, 315 Clothing & 316 Leather Industries 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 322 Paper Manufacturing 323 Printing & Related Support Activities 324 Petroleum & Coal Products Manufacturing 325 Chemical Manufacturing 326 Plastics & Rubber Products Manufacturing 327 Non-Metallic Mineral Products Manufacturing 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 332 Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing 333 Machinery Manufacturing & 336 Transportation Equip. 334 Computer & Electronic Products Manufacturing 335 Electrical Equip., Appliance & Component Manufacturing 337 Furniture & Related Products Manufacturing 339 Miscellaneous Manufacturing 410 Wholesale Trade 4A0 Retail Trade 484 Truck Transportation 485 Transit & Ground Passenger Transportation 486 Pipeline Transportation 48A Air, Rail, Water & Scenic & Sightseeing Transportation 49A Postal Service and Couriers & Messengers 493 Warehousing & Storage 512 Motion Picture & Sound Recording Industries 513 Broadcasting & Telecommunications 51A Publishing Industries, Information Services & Data Processing 5A0 Finance, Insurance, Real Estate and Renting & Leasing 541 Professional, Scientific & Technical Services 561 Administrative & Support Services 562 Waste Management & Remediation Services 610 Educational Services 620 Health Care & Social Assistance 710 Arts, Entertainment & Recreation 720 Accommodation & Food Services 811 Repair & Maintenance 813 Grant Making, Civic & Professional & Similar Orgs. 81A Personal & Laundry Services & Private Households NP1 Non-Profit Institutions Serving Households (Excl. Education) NP2 Non-Profit Education Institutions GS1 Hospitals & Residential Care Facilities GS2 Education GS4 Other Municipal Government Services GS5 Other Provincial Government Services GS6 Other Federal Government Services

111400-112A00 113000 114000 115100-115300 211100 212100-21239A 213100 221100 221200-221300 2300A0-2300I0 311100-3119A0 312110-312200 313100-316900 321100-321990 322110-322290 323110-323120 324110-324190 325110-325900 326110-326290 327310-327900 331100-331520 332100-332900 333110-333990, 336110-336900 334100-334600 335200-3359A0 337110-337900 339100-339990 410000 4A0000 484000 485100-485A00 486200-486A00 481000-483000, 487000-488000 491000-492000 493130-4931A0 512130-5122200 513100-513300 511100-511200, 514100-514200 5A0110-5A0650 541300-541B00 561500-561A00 562000 611100-611B00 621110-624000 711000-713A00 721100-722000 811110-811A00 813A00 812200-814000 NP1100-NP1900 NP2000 GS1100-GS1200 GS2100-GS2230 GS4000 GS5000 GS3000, GS6000

111, 112 113 114 115 2111 2121, 2122, 2123 2131 2211 2212, 2213 23 311 312 313, 314, 315, 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333, 336 334 335 337 339 41 44-45 484 485 486 481-483, 487, 488 491, 492 493 512 513 511, 514 521-523, 526, 531-533 541 561 562 611 621, 623, 624 71 72 811 8132-8134, 8139 812, 814 Fictive Fictive 622 6113 Fictive Fictive Fictive

22 22


APPENDIX 2

Industry Codes at the Worksheet Level (W) in terms of 1997 NAICS Code

Industry Title - W

1997 NAICS

111400 111A00 112500 112A00 113000 114000 115100 115200 115300 211100 212100 212210 212220 212230 212290 212310 212320 212393 212394 212396 21239A 213100 221100 221200 221300 2300A0 2300B0 2300C0 2300D0 2300E0 2300F0 2300G0 2300H0 2300I0 311100 311210 311220 311230 311310 3113A0 311410 311420 311500 311611 311614 311615 311700 311810 311821 311822 31182A 311910 311920

Greenhouse, Nursery and Floriculture Production Crop Production (except Greenhouse, Nursery and Floriculture Production) Animal Aquaculture Animal Production (except Animal Aquaculture) Forestry and Logging Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Support Activities for Crop Production Support Activities for Animal Production Support Activities for Forestry Oil and Gas extraction Coal Mining Iron Ore Mining Gold and Silver Ore Mining Copper, Nickel, Lead and Zinc Ore Mining Other Metal Ore Mining Stone Mining and Quarrying Sand, Gravel, Clay, & Ceramic & Refractory Minerals Mining & Quarrying Salt Mining Asbestos Mining Potash Mining Miscellaneous Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying Support Activities for Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution Natural Gas Distribution Water, Sewage and Other Systems Residential Building Construction Non-residential Building Construction Transportation Engineering Construction Oil and Gas Engineering Construction Electric Power Engineering Construction Communication Engineering Construction Other Engineering Construction Repair Construction Other Activities of the Construction Industry Animal Food Manufacturing Flour Milling and Malt Manufacturing Starch and Vegetable Fat and Oil Manufacturing Breakfast Cereal Manufacturing Sugar Manufacturing Confectionery Product Manufacturing Frozen Food Manufacturing Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling and Drying Dairy Product Manufacturing Animal (except Poultry) Slaughtering Rendering and Meat Processing from Carcasses Poultry Processing Seafood Product Preparation and Packaging Bread and Bakery Product Manufacturing Cookie and Cracker Manufacturing Flour Mixes and Dough Manufacturing from Purchased Flour Dry Pasta and Tortilla Manufacturing Snack Food Manufacturing Coffee and Tea Manufacturing

1114 1111-1113, 1119 1125 1121-1124, 1129 113 114 1151 1152 1153 2111 2121 21221 21222 21223 21229 21231 21232 212392 212393 212394 212396 2131 2211 2212 2213 231210 231220 231310 231330 23 23 23 23 23 3111 31121 31122 31123 31131 31131 31141 31142 3115 311611 311614 311615 3117 31181 311821 311822 311823, 31183 31191 31192

23 23


APPENDIX 2: Industry Codes at the Worksheet Level (W) in terms of 1997 NAICS, contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.

Code

Industry Title - W

1997 NAICS

3119A0 312110 312120 312130 312140 312200 313100 313200 313300 314110 314120 314910 314990 315110 315190 315210 315220 315230 315290 315900 316100 316200 316900 321100 321215 32121A 32121B 321911 321919 321920 321990 322110 322121 322122 322130 322210 322220 322230 322290 323110 323120 324110 324120 324190 325110 325120 325130 3251A0 325200 325310 325320 325400 325510

Other Miscellaneous Food Manufacturing Soft Drink and Ice Manufacturing Breweries Wineries Distilleries Tobacco Manufacturing Fibre, Yarn and Thread Mills Fabric Mills Textile and Fabric Finishing and Fabric Coating Carpet and Rug Mills Curtain and Linen Mills Textile Bag and Canvas Mills All Other Textile Product Mills Hosiery and Sock Mills Other Clothing Knitting Mills Cut and Sew Clothing Contracting Men's and Boys' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing Women's and Girls' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing Other Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing Clothing Accessories and Other Clothing Manufacturing Leather and Hide Tanning and Finishing Footwear Manufacturing Other Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing Sawmills and Wood Preservation Structural Wood Product Manufacturing Veneer and Plywood Mills Particle Board, Fibreboard, and Waferboard Mills Wood Window and Door Manufacturing Other Millwork Wood Container and Pallet Manufacturing All Other Wood Product Manufacturing Pulp Mills Paper (except Newsprint) Mills Newsprint Mills Paperboard Mills Paperboard Container Manufacturing Paper Bag and Coated and Treated Paper Manufacturing Stationery Product Manufacturing Other Converted Paper Product Manufacturing Printing Support Activities for Printing Petroleum Refineries Asphalt Paving, Roofing and Saturated Materials Manufacturing Other Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing Petrochemical Manufacturing Industrial Gas Manufacturing Synthetic Dye and Pigment Manufacturing Other Basic Chemical Manufacturing Resin, Synthetic Rubber, & Artificial & Synthetic Fibres & Filaments Man. Fertilizer Manufacturing Pesticide and Other Agricultural Chemical Manufacturing Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing Paint and Coating Manufacturing

31193, 31194, 3119 31211 31212 31213 31214 3122 3131 3132 3133 31411 31412 31491 31499 31511 31519 31521 31522 31523 31529 3159 3161 3162 3169 3211 321215 321211, 321212 321216, 321217 321911 321919 32192 32199 32211 322121 322122 32213 32221 32222 32223 32229 32311 32312 32411 32412 32419 32511 32512 32513 32518, 32519 3252 32531 32532 3254 32551

24

24


APPENDIX 2: Industry Codes at the Worksheet Level (W) in terms of 1997 NAICS, contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.

Code

INDUSTRY TITLE - W

1997 NAICS

325520 325610 325620 325900 326110 326120 326130 326160 3261A0 326193 32619A 326210 326220 326290 327100 327200 327310 327320 3273A0 327400 327900 331100 331210 331220 331313 331317 331410 3314A0 331510 331520 332100 332200 332311 33231A 332320 332410 332420 332430 332500 332600 332710 332720 332800 332900 333110 333120 333130 333200 333300 333400 333500 333600 333910 333920 333990 334100 334210 334220

Adhesive Manufacturing Soap and Cleaning Compound Manufacturing Toilet Preparation Manufacturing Other Chemical Product Manufacturing Unsupported Plastic Film, Sheet and Bag Manufacturing Plastic Pipe, Pipe Fitting and Unsupported Profile Shape Manufacturing Laminated Plastic Plate, Sheet and Shape Manufacturing Plastic Bottle Manufacturing Polystyrene, Urethane and Other Foam Product Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Plastic Parts Manufacturing Miscellaneous Plastic Product Manufacturing Tire Manufacturing Rubber and Plastic Hose and Belting Manufacturing Other Rubber Product Manufacturing Clay Product and Refractory Manufacturing Glass and Glass Product Manufacturing Cement Manufacturing Ready-Mix Concrete Manufacturing Concrete Product Manufacturing Lime and Gypsum Product Manufacturing Other Non-Metallic Mineral Product Manufacturing Iron and Steel Mills and Ferro-Alloy Manufacturing Iron and Steel Pipes and Tubes Manufacturing from Purchased Steel Rolling and Drawing of Purchased Steel Primary Production of Alumina and Aluminum Aluminum Rolling, Drawing, Extruding and Alloying Non-Ferrous Metal (except Aluminum) Smelting and Refining Non-Ferrous Metal (except Aluminum) Rolling, Drawing, Extruding and All Ferrous Metal Foundries Non-Ferrous Metal Foundries Forging and Stamping Cutlery and Hand Tool Manufacturing Prefabricated Metal Building and Component Manufacturing All Other Plate Work and Fabricated Structural Product Manufacturing Ornamental and Architectural Metal Products Manufacturing Power Boiler and Heat Exchanger Manufacturing Metal Tank (Heavy Gauge) Manufacturing Metal Can, Box and Other Metal Container (Light Gauge) Manufacturing Hardware Manufacturing Spring and Wire Product Manufacturing Machine Shops Turned Product and Screw, Nut and Bolt Manufacturing Coating, Engraving, Heat Treating and Allied Activities Other Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing Agricultural Implement Manufacturing Construction Machinery Manufacturing Mining and Oil and Gas Field Machinery Manufacturing Industrial Machinery Manufacturing Commercial and Service Industry Machinery Manufacturing Ventilation, Heating, Air-Conditioning and Commercial Refrigeration Equip. Metalworking Machinery Manufacturing Engine, Turbine and Power Transmission Equipment Manufacturing Pump and Compressor Manufacturing Material Handling Equipment Manufacturing All Other General-Purpose Machinery Manufacturing Computer and Peripheral Equipment Manufacturing Telephone Apparatus Manufacturing Radio & Television Broadcasting & Wireless Communications Equipment

32552 32561 32562 3259 32611 32612 32613 32616 32614, 32615 326193 326191, 326198 32621 32622 32629 3271 3272 32731 32732 32733, 32739 3274 3279 3311 33121 33122 331313 331317 33141 33142, 33149 33151 33152 3321 3322 332311 332314, 332319 33232 33241 33242 33243 3325 3326 33271 33272 3328 3329 33311 33312 33313 3332 3333 3334 3335 3336 33391 33392 33399 3341 33421 33422

25

25


APPENDIX 2: Industry Codes at the Worksheet Level (W) in terms of 1997 NAICS, contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.

Code

INDUSTRY TITLE - W

1997 NAICS

334400 334500 334600 335100 335200 335311 335312 335315 335910 335920 3359A0 336110 336120 336200 336310 336320 336330 336340 336350 336360 336370 336390 336400 336500 336611 336612 336900 337110 337127 33712A 337200 337900 339100 339910 339920 339930 339940 339950 339990 410000 4A0000 481000 482000 483000 484000 485100 485200 485300 485A00 486200 486A00 487000 488000 491000 492000 493130

Semiconductor and Other Electronic Component Manufacturing Navigational, Measuring, Medical and Control Instruments Manufacturing Manufacturing and Reproducing Magnetic and Optical Media Electric Lighting Equipment Manufacturing Household Appliance Manufacturing Power, Distribution and Specialty Transformers Manufacturing Motor and Generator Manufacturing Switchgear and Switchboard, and Relay and Industrial Control Apparatus Battery Manufacturing Communication and Energy Wire and Cable Manufacturing Wiring Devices and All Other Electrical Equipment and Component Manufacturing Automobile and Light-Duty Motor Vehicle Manufacturing Heavy-Duty Truck Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Body and Trailer Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Gasoline Engine and Engine Parts Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Electrical and Electronic Equipment Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Steering and Suspension Components (except Spring) Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Brake System Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Transmission and Power Train Parts Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Seating and Interior Trim Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Metal Stamping Other Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturing Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturing Railroad Rolling Stock Manufacturing Ship Building and Repairing Boat Building Other Transportation Equipment Manufacturing Wood Kitchen Cabinet and Counter Top Manufacturing Institutional Furniture Manufacturing Household Furniture Manufacturing Office Furniture (including Fixtures) Manufacturing Other Furniture-Related Product Manufacturing Medical Equipment and Supplies Manufacturing Jewellery and Silverware Manufacturing Sporting and Athletic Goods Manufacturing Doll, Toy and Game Manufacturing Office Supplies (except Paper) Manufacturing Sign Manufacturing All Other Miscellaneous Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Air Transportation Rail Transportation Water Transportation Truck Transportation Urban Transit Systems Interurban and Rural Bus Transportation Taxi and Limousine Service All Other Transit and Ground Passenger Transportation Pipeline Transportation of Natural Gas Crude Oil and Other Pipeline Transportation Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation Support Activities for Transportation Postal Service Couriers and Messengers Farm Product Warehousing and Storage

3344 3345 3346 3351 3352 335311 335312 335315 33591 33592 33593, 33599 33611 33612 3362 33631 33632 33633 33634 33635 33636 33637 33639 3364 3365 336611 336612 3369 33711 337127 337121, 337123, 337 3372 3379 3391 33991 33992 33993 33994 33995 33999 41 44-45 481 482 483 484 4851 4852 4853 4854, 4855, 4859 4862 4861, 4869 487 488 491 492 49313

26

26


APPENDIX 2: Industry Codes at the Worksheet Level (W) in terms of 1997 NAICS, contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.

Code

INDUSTRY TITLE - W

1997 NAICS

4931A0 511100 511200 512130 5121A0

All Other Warehousing and Storage Newspaper, Periodical, Book and Database Publishers Software Publishers Motion Picture and Video Exhibition Motion Picture & Video Production, Distribution, Post-Production & Other Motion Picture & Video Ind. Sound Recording Industries Radio and Television Broadcasting Pay TV, Specialty TV and Program Distribution Telecommunications Information Services Data Processing Services Monetary Authorities - Central Bank Local Credit Unions Banking and Other Depository Credit Intermediation Insurance Carriers Lessors of Real Estate Owner-Occupied Dwellings Automotive Equipment Rental and Leasing Rental and leasing (except Automotive Equipment) and Lessors of Non-Financial Intangible Assets (except Copyrighted Works) Non-Depository Credit Intermediation and Activities Related to Credit Intermediation Agencies, Brokerages and Other Insurance Related Activities Securities, Commodity Contracts, Funds, and Other Financial Investment Offices of Real Estate Agents and Brokers and Activities Related to Real Estate Management of Companies and Enterprises Architectural, Engineering and Related Services Computer Systems Design and Related Services Advertising and Related Services Legal, Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping and Payroll Services Other Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Travel Arrangement and Reservation Services Investigation and Security Services Services to Buildings and Dwellings Other Administrative and Support Services Waste Management and Remediation Services Education and Educational Support Services (excluding non-profit and gov.) Offices of Physicians Offices of Dentists Miscellaneous Ambulatory Health Care Services Nursing and Residential Care Facilities Social Assistance Performing Arts, Spectator Sports and Related Industries Heritage Institutions (excluding Government Funded) Gambling Industries Amusement and Recreation Industries Traveller Accommodation RV (Recreational Vehicle) Parks, Recreational Camps, and Rooming & Boarding Food Services and Drinking Places Automotive Repair and Maintenance Repair and Maintenance (except Automotive Repair and Maintenance) Funeral Services Dry Cleaning and Laundry Services

49311, 49312, 49319 5111 5112 51213

512200 513100 513200 513300 514100 514200 5A0110 5A0120 5A0130 5A0200 5A0300 5A0400 5A0510 5A0520 5A0610 5A0620 5A0630 5A0640 5A0650 541300 541500 541800 541A00 541B00 561500 561600 561700 561A00 562000 611A00 621100 621200 621A00 623000 624000 711000 712000 713200 713A00 721100 721A00 722000 811100 811A00 812200 812300

27

27

51211, 51212, 51219 5122 5131 5132 5133 5141 5142 521 52213 52211, 52219 5241 5311 5311 5321 5322-5324, 533 5222, 5223 5242 523, 526 5312, 5313 551 5413 5415 5418 5411, 5412 5414, 5416, 5417, 54 5615 5616 5617 5611-5614, 5619 562 61 6211 6212 6213-6216, 6219 623 624 711 712 7132 7131, 7139 7211 7212, 7213 722 8111 8112-8114 8122 8123


APPENDIX 2: Industry Codes at the Worksheet Level (W) in terms of 1997 NAICS, contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.

Code

INDUSTRY TITLE - W

1997 NAICS

812A00 813A00 814000 F10100 F10200 F10300 F10400 F20100 F20200 F30000 NP1100 NP1200 NP1300 NP2000 NP1900 GS1100 GS1200 GS2100 GS2210 GS2220 GS2230 GS3000 GS4000 GS5000 GS6000 GS7000

Personal Care Services and Other Personal Services Grant-Making, Civic, and Professional and Similar Organizations Private Households Operating Supplies Office Supplies Cafeteria Supplies Laboratory Supplies Travel & Entertainment Advertising and Promotion Transportation Margins Religious Organizations Non-Profit Welfare Organizations Non-Profit Sports and Recreation Clubs Non-Profit Education Services Other Non-Profit Institutions Serving Households Hospitals Government Residential Care Facilities Universities Government Elementary and Secondary Schools Government Community Colleges and C.E.G.E.P.s Other Govt Education Services Defence Services Other Municipal Government Services Other Provincial and Territorial Government Services Other Federal Government Services Other Aboriginal Government Services

8121, 8129 8132-8134, 8139 814 Fictive Fictive Fictive Fictive Fictive Fictive Fictive 8131 Fictive Fictive Fictive Fictive 622 Fictive 6113 6111 6112 Fictive 9111 Fictive Fictive Fictive Fictive

28 28


APPENDIX K: TWO-FACILITY SCENARIO SPACE PROGRAM


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - TWO FACILITIES Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012 400 SEAT THEATRE BUILDING Space PUBLIC AREAS Foyer Main Floor Lobby Upper Mezzanine Lobby Chair and Table Storage Box Office First Aid Room Concessions Concessions Storage Coat Room Catering Kitchen Janitor Closet Female Restrooms Male Restrooms Unisex Restroom 1 Unisex Restroom 2 Furniture Storage Elevator Elevator Machine Room Total

Notes

7 sf / seat

9 assumed 5 assumed

Passenger / Service Elevator

ADMINISTRATION Reception Box Office Manager Theatre Manager Office Flex Office Small Meeting Room Storage Kitchenette Copy Room Total 400 SEAT THEATRE Seating Area Stage Mezzanine Control Room Sound and Light Locks Chair Storage Miscellaneous Storage

Net Area (sf)

150 2,800 1,200 100 150 100 200 100 100 200 50 450 300 60 60 100 75 50 6,245

100 100 100 100 200 100 75 75 850

250 Floor 25'd x 55'w 150 Mezzanine 4 @ 55sf

3,000 1,500 1,600 300 220 250 450

1


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - TWO FACILITIES Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012 Equipment Storage Riser Storage Piano Storage Dimmer Room Catwalk Total THEATRE SUPPORT SPACES Green Room / Multipurpose Room Large Dressing Rooms Dressing Room Unisex Washrooms Small Dressing Rooms Small Dressing Room Washrooms Wardrobe and Laundry A/V Equipment Storage Tech Equipment Storage Loading Area Workshop Total REHEARSAL ROOM Studio Storage Total

Genie Lift

2 @ 400sf (2) Washrooms w/ Showers 2 @ 50sf (2) Washrooms w/ Showers

Retractable Seating for 100 people

SERVICE SPACES Garbage and Recycling Room Electrical Room Mechanical Room I.T. Closet Dimmer Room Janitor Storage Total

EXTERIOR SPACES Loading Area Loading Dock Total Exterior Spaces

600 800 120 100 120 300 50 100 300 600 3,090

2,000 100 2,100

200 300 600 30 40 50 1,220

TOTAL NET AREA TOTAL GROSS AREA

300 300 100 100 0 8,120

21,625 Assumed Net to Gross - 1 : 1.60

Lift / Stairs etc.

34,600

1,200 300 1,500

2


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - TWO FACILITIES Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012 SECONDARY ARTS FACILITY MULTIPURPOSE ROOM Multipurpose Room Storage Room

COMMUNITY MEDIA LAB Recording Studio Equipment Library Classroom Editing Suites Storage Gathering and Exhibit Area Total

Retractable Seating for 100 people

2 @ 80sf

2,000 100 2,100

400 200 600 160 100 800 2,260

PUBLIC GALLERY AND COMMUNITY SPACE Gallery / Lobby Café / Concessions Community Room Café / Gallery Storage Total

900 100 400 100 1,500

REHEARSAL AND MOVEMENT STUDIO Studio Storage Total

1,600 100 1,700

ARTS CLASSROOM Studio Classroom Storage Total

1,300 800 200 2,300

PUBLIC AND SUPPORT SPACES Female Washrooms Male Washrooms Unisex Washroom Kitchenette Total

Sinks

5 assumed 3 assumed

250 200 60 100 610

3


OKOTOKS PERFORMING ARTS VENUE FEASIBILITY / CONCEPT DESIGN STUDY DRAFT PROGRAM - TWO FACILITIES Nyhoff Architecture March 21st, 2012

SERVICE SPACES Garbage and Recycling Room Electrical Room Mechanical Room I.T. Closet Janitor Storage Total

100 150 300 30 50 630

TOTAL NET AREA TOTAL GROSS AREA

11,100 Assumed Net to Gross - 1 : 1.40

15,540

4


APPENDIX L: TWO-FACILITY SCENARIO RENDERINGS


APPENDIX M: TWO-FACILITY SCENARIO PRO-FORMA OPERATING BUDGET


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE SPACES AND RATES Theatre

Usable Square Feet/Capacity 400

% Change

$600 $900 $1,800 $40 $50 $75 $40 $50 $75

3%

Town Presenting Performances/Events Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Presented Perfs Box Office Event Days School Days Prep Days Total Use Days

20 50% 4,000 $25.00 $100,000 20 0 5 25

5% -5%

School Use Performances/Events Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Presented Perfs Box Office Event Days School Days Prep Days Total Use Days

55 85% 18,700 $$55 130 60 245

5% -5%

Film Screenings Performances/Events Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Presented Perfs Box Office Event Days School Days Prep Days

4 50% 800 $5.00 $4,000 2 0 0

5% -5%

Rehersal Room

2,000/100

Lobby

2,100/200

Total Gross Square Feet (GSF) ACTIVITY BY SPACE 400-seat Theatre

Year 1 Rental Period Renter Type Daily Residents Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial Hourly Residents Not-for-profit + Clubs Commercial

3%

3%

Year 2

% Change

$618 $927 $1,854 $41 $52 $77 $41 $52 $77

3%

21 48% 3,990 $25.75 $102,743 21 0 5 26

5% 2%

58 81% 18,653 $$58 150 60 268

5% 2%

4 48% 798 $5.15 $4,110 2 0 0

5% 2%

3%

3%

Year 3

% Change

$637 $955 $1,910 $42 $53 $80 $42 $53 $80

3%

22 48% 4,273 $26.52 $113,338 20 0 5 25

5% 2%

61 82% 19,978 $$55 150 60 265

5% 2%

4 48% 855 $5.30 $4,534 2 0 0

5% 2%

3%

3%

Year 4

% Change

$656 $983 $1,967 $44 $55 $82 $44 $55 $82

3%

23 49% 4,577 $27.32 $125,027 21 0 5 26

5% 2%

64 84% 21,396 $$57 150 60 267

5% 2%

5 49% 915 $5.46 $5,001 2 0 0

5% 2%

3%

3%

Year 5 $675 $1,013 $2,026 $45 $56 $84 $45 $56 $84

34,600

Webb Management Services, Inc.

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

24 50% 4,902 $28.14 $137,921 22 0 5 27

67 86% 22,915 $$60 150 60 270

5 50% 980 $5.63 $5,517 2 0 0

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE Total Use Days Town Events Performances/Events Use Days Average Capacity Sold Attendance Average Ticket Price Box Office Internal Days of Use

Year 1

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

2

2

2

2

2

2 2 85% 680 $$-

2 2 81% 646 $$-

2 2 82% 659 $$-

2 2 84% 672 $$-

2 2 86% 686 $$-

-5% 3%

274

2% 3%

298

2% 3%

294

2% 3%

298

302

Rentals Resident Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rent Paid

20 60% 4,800 20 10 30 $18,000

5%

21 61% 5,124 21 11 32 $19,467

5%

22 62% 5,468 22 11 33 $21,054

5%

23 63% 5,834 23 12 35 $22,769

5%

24 64% 6,223 24 12 36 $24,625

Not-for-profits + Clubs Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rent Paid

10 60% 2,400 10 3 13 $11,250

5%

11 61% 2,562 11 3 13 $12,167

5%

11 62% 2,734 11 3 14 $13,158

5%

12 63% 2,917 12 3 14 $14,231

5%

12 64% 3,112 12 3 15 $15,391

Commercial/Private Performances/Events Ave. Cap sold Attendance Event Days Prep Days Total Use Days Total Rent Paid

5 67% 1,340 5 0 5 $9,000

5%

5 68% 1,428 5 0 5 $9,734

5%

6 69% 1,521 6 0 6 $10,527

5%

6 70% 1,621 6 0 6 $11,385

5%

6 71% 1,726 6 0 6 $12,313

All Uses & Users Performances/Events Attendance

116 32,720

Webb Management Services, Inc.

122 33,201

128 35,489

134 37,932

141 40,544

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE Use Days Rent Paid Rehersal Room

Year 1 322 $38,250

% Change

Year 2 348 $41,367

% Change

Year 3 % Change 346 $44,739

Year 4 353 $48,385

% Change

Year 5 360 $52,328

School Use Rehearsal/Instruction Hours School Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

120 600 720 90

5%

126 600 726 91

5%

132 600 732 92

5%

139 600 739 92

5%

146 600 746 93

Town Use Rehearsal/Instruction Hours School Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

80 0 80 10

5%

84 0 84 11

5%

88 0 88 11

5%

93 0 93 12

5%

97 0 97 12

Internal Days of Use

100

101

103

104

105

Rentals Residents Rehearsal/Instruction Hours School Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

30 0 30 4 $1,200

5%

32 0 31.5 4 $1,298

5%

33 0 33.075 4 $1,404

5%

35 0 34.72875 4 $1,518

5%

36 0 36.4651875 5 $1,642

Not-for-profit + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours School Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

60 0 60 8 $3,000

5%

63 0 63 8 $3,245

5%

66 0 66.15 8 $3,509

5%

69 0 69.4575 9 $3,795

5%

73 0 72.930375 9 $4,104

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours School Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

30 0 30 4 $2,250

5%

32 0 31.5 4 $2,433

5%

33 0 33.075 4 $2,632

5%

35 0 34.72875 4 $2,846

5%

36 0 36.4651875 5 $3,078

All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours School Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

320 600 920 115

Webb Management Services, Inc.

336 600 936 117

353 600 953 119

370 600 970 121

389 600 989 124

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE Total Rent Paid Lobby

Year 1 % Change $6,450

% Change

14

Year 4 % Change $8,159

5%

2 17 $692

5%

2 18 $749

5%

2 19 $810

5%

2 19 $876

Not-for-profit + Clubs Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

2 16 $800

5%

2 17 $865

5%

2 18 $936

5%

2 19 $1,012

5%

2 19 $1,094

Commercial/Private Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

2 16 $1,200

5%

2 17 $1,298

5%

2 18 $1,404

5%

2 19 $1,518

5%

2 19 $1,642

All Users Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

16 32 $2,640

18 37 $2,855 3%

16

Year 5 $8,824

2 16 $640

Webb Management Services, Inc.

12

Year 3 % Change $7,544

Internal Days of Use Resident Total Use Days Total Rental Hours Total Rent Paid

ESCALATION RATE

10

Year 2 $6,976

21 41 $3,088 3%

18

23 46 $3,340 3%

25 51 $3,612 3%

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA BUDGET FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE REVENUE Box Office

% Change

Live Events Film Screenings

Rental Income

User Fees

Year 1

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Theatre Rehersal Room Lobby

38,250 6,450 2,640

41,367 6,976 2,855

44,739 7,544 3,088

48,385 8,159 3,340

52,328 8,824 3,612

Technical Labor Equipment Rental Event Staff Event Cleaning

9,468 2,367 4,734 4,734

10,240 2,560 5,120 5,120

11,074 2,769 5,537 5,537

11,977 2,994 5,988 5,988

12,953 3,238 6,476 6,476

8,180 4,000

8,549 4,000

9,412 4,000

10,362 4,000

11,408 4,000

9,600 0 17,080

9,863 0 18,775

10,880 0 20,632

12,003 0 22,668

13,240 0 24,899

226,387

247,619

270,894

296,410

Ticketing Fees from Presented Events Ticketing Fees for School Events Ticketing Fees for Rental Events Total Revenue

0

215,503

Local Government Support School District Support Provincial Support Federal Support Sponsorships/Individual Giving Foundation Grants Total Public Funding + Grants

62,500 62,500

0 0 125,000

125,000 125,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 350,000

125,000

565,503

5% 5% 5% 5% 50% 50%

131,250 131,250 26,250 26,250 37,500 37,500 390,000 616,387

5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

137,813 137,813 27,563 27,563 39,375 39,375 409,500 657,119

130,028 5,001

Year 5

117,872 4,534

Box Office

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 2 106,852 4,110

Event Concessions (net) Income from Catered Events (net)

TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS

% Change

104,000 4,000

Food Service

CONTRIBUTED INCOME

Pre-open

5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

144,703 144,703 28,941 28,941 41,344 41,344 429,975 700,869

143,438 5,517

5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

151,938 151,938 30,388 30,388 43,411 43,411 451,474 747,884

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA BUDGET FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE EXPENDITURES Full-time Personnel

Part-time Personnel

Event-based Staff

Administration

% Change

Theatre Manager Salary Sub-Total Benefits Sub-total

30,000 30,000 6,900 36,900

Technical Director Box Office + Marketing Manager Sub-total Benefits Sub-total

7,500 6,250 13,750

Technical Labor Event Staff Event Cleaning Sub-total

Programming & Event Marketing Costs Direct Costs of Live Events Direct Costs of Film Events

Box Office

Pre-open

Network Maintenance Postage Ticket Printing Supplies Credit Card Fees Ticketing Service (net) Sub-total Travel Training Professional Memberships Freight Postage Telephone Advertising + Public Relations Insurance Supplies Miscellaneous Sub-total

Occupancy Costs

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Utilities Repairs and Maintenance Service Contracts

5%

Year 1

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

60,000 60,000 13,800 73,800

5%

63,000 63,000 14,490 77,490

5%

66,150 66,150 15,215 81,365

5%

69,458 69,458 15,975 85,433

5%

72,930 72,930 16,774 89,704

5% 5%

31,500 26,250 57,750 13,283 71,033

5% 5%

33,075 27,563 60,638 13,947 74,584

5% 5%

34,729 28,941 63,669 14,644 78,313

5% 5%

13,750

30,000 25,000 55,000 12,650 67,650

36,465 30,388 66,853 15,376 82,229

5% 5% 5%

42,000 36,750 26,250 105,000

10% 10% 10%

46,200 40,425 28,875 115,500

10% 10% 10%

50,820 44,468 31,763 127,050

10% 10% 10%

0

40,000 35,000 25,000 100,000

55,902 48,914 34,939 139,755

0 0 0

88,400 3,000 91,400

90,824 3,082 93,907

100,191 3,400 103,591

110,524 3,751 114,275

121,922 4,138 126,060

0

8,180 6,544 327 1,636 8,180 8,180 33,047

8,549 6,839 342 1,710 8,549 8,549 34,539

9,412 7,530 376 1,882 9,412 9,412 38,026

10,362 8,290 414 2,072 10,362 10,362 41,864

11,408 9,126 456 2,282 11,408 11,408 46,089

250 500 125 750 125 1,000 2,500 1,250 2,500 625 9,625

1,000 2,000 500 3,000 500 4,000 10,000 5,000 10,000 2,500 38,500

0 0 0

43,250 34,600 17,300

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

1,030 2,060 515 3,090 515 4,120 10,300 5,150 10,300 2,575 39,655 44,548 35,638 17,819

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

1,061 2,122 530 3,183 530 4,244 10,609 5,305 10,609 2,652 40,845 45,884 36,707 18,354

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

1,093 2,185 546 3,278 546 4,371 10,927 5,464 10,927 2,732 42,070 47,260 37,808 18,904

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

1,126 2,251 563 3,377 563 4,502 11,255 5,628 11,255 2,814 43,332 48,678 38,943 19,471

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA BUDGET FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE Building Supplies Cleaning Supplies Technology Services Performance Equipment R&M Trash Hauling Security System Sub-total Rental Subsidy Program

Pre-open

% Change 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Year 1 % Change 8,650 8,650 5,000 3% 25,000 3% 1,000 10,000 3% 153,450 3%

3% 3% 3% 3%

3%

Year 3 % Change 9,177 9,177 5,305 3% 26,523 3% 7,725 3% 10,609 3% 169,459 10,609

3%

Year 4 % Change 9,452 9,452 5,464 3% 27,318 3% 7,957 3% 10,927 3% 174,543 10,927

3%

Year 5 9,736 9,736 5,628 28,138 8,195 11,255 179,779

10,000

Total Expenditures

60,275

567,847

596,447

633,979

674,475

718,203

Operating Result

64,725

-2,344

19,940

23,140

26,393

29,680

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

11,255

Final Result

64,725

-2,344

-60

3,140

6,393

9,680

Revenuese as % of Expenditures

0%

38%

38%

39%

40%

41%

RATIOS AND FORMULAS Escalation Rate

3%

User Fees as a % of Rent

Technical/Event Labor Equipment Rental/Maintenance Event Staff Event Cleaning

Food Service

Concession Net per Attender

Catered Events

Theatre Catered Events Fee/per Event Rehearsal Room Catered Events Fee/per Event

Box Office Expenses

10,300

% Change

0

Contribution to Capital Reserve

Box Office Revenues

Year 2 8,910 8,910 5,150 25,750 7,500 10,300 164,524

Ticketing Fees from Presented Events Tickets from Presented Events Ticketing Fees for School Events Tickets from School Events Ticketing Fees for Rental Events Tickets from Rental Events Total Tickets Sold Cost/Ticket Sold Network Maintenance

Webb Management Services, Inc.

3% 20% 5% 10% 10% $0.25

3% 20% 5% 10% 10%

3%

4 $500 4 $500

$0.26 4 $500 4 $500

$2.00 4,800 $18,700 $2.00 8,540 32,720

3%

$0.25

3%

3% 3%

3% 20% 5% 10% 10%

3%

3% 3%

$2.06 4,788 $18,653 $2.06 9,114 33,201

3%

$0.26

3%

3% 3%

$0.27 4 $500 4 $500

3% 20% 5% 10% 10%

3%

3% 3%

$2.12 5,128 $19,978 $2.12 9,724 35,489

3%

$0.27

3%

3% 3%

$0.27 4 $500 4 $500

20% 5% 10% 10% 3%

3% 3%

$2.19 5,492 $21,396 $2.19 10,372 37,932

3%

$0.27

3%

3% 3%

$0.28 4 $500 4 $500 $2.25 5,882 $22,915 $2.25 11,061 40,544 $0.28

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget: High School Theatre MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA BUDGET FOR HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE Postage Ticket Printing Supplies Ticketing Service (net)

Pre-open

% Change

Year 1 $0.20 $0.01 $0.05 $0.25

% Change 3% 3% 3% 3%

Year 2 $0.21 $0.01 $0.05 $0.26

% Change 3% 3% 3% 3%

Year 3 % Change $0.21 3% $0.01 3% $0.05 3% $0.27 3%

Year 4 $0.22 $0.01 $0.05 $0.27

% Change 3% 3% 3% 3%

Year 5 $0.23 $0.01 $0.06 $0.28

Credit Card Fees

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Benefits

Town Employee

23%

23%

23%

23%

23%

23%

Direct Event Cost as % of Revenues

Live Events Film Events

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

85% 75%

Occupancy Costs

Total Gross Square Footage Direct Costs/Square Foot

34,600

34,600

34,600

34,600

34,600

Utilities Repairs and Maintenance Service Contracts Building Supplies Cleaning Supplies

Webb Management Services, Inc.

$1.25 $1.00 $0.50 $0.25 $0.25

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.29 $1.03 $0.52 $0.26 $0.26

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.33 $1.06 $0.53 $0.27 $0.27

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.37 $1.09 $0.55 $0.27 $0.27

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1.41 $1.13 $0.56 $0.28 $0.28

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE SPACES AND RATES Usable Square Feet/Capacity Multipurpose Room 2,000/100

Year 1 Rental Period Four-hours

Movement Studio

1,600

Four-hours

Gallery

1,000

Daily

Studio Classroom

1,300

Two-hours

800

Two-hours

Lobby

2,100/200

Four-hours

Total

15,540

Classroom

Renter Type Residents/School Not-for-profits + Clubs Commercial Residents/School Not-for-profits + Clubs Commercial Residents/School Not-for-profits + Clubs Commercial Residents/School Not-for-profits + Clubs Commercial Residents/School Not-for-profits + Clubs Commercial Residents/School Not-for-profits + Clubs Commercial

% Change

$50 $63 $94 $40 $50 $75 $143 $179 $268 $20 $25 $38 $20 $25 $38 $40 $50 $75

3%

160 600 30 760 95

40 0 40 80 10

Year 2

% Change

$52 $64 $97 $41 $52 $77 $147 $184 $276 $21 $26 $39 $21 $26 $39 $41 $52 $77

3%

10%

176 600 30 776 97

5%

42 0 42 84 11

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Year 3

% Change

$53 $66 $99 $42 $53 $80 $152 $189 $284 $21 $27 $40 $21 $27 $40 $42 $53 $80

3%

10%

194 600 30 794 99

5%

44 0 44 88 11

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

$55 $68 $102 $44 $55 $82 $156 $195 $293 $22 $27 $41 $22 $27 $41 $44 $55 $82

3%

10%

213 600 30 813 102

10%

234 600 30 834 104

5%

46 0 46 93 12

5%

49 0 49 97 12

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

$56 $70 $106 $45 $56 $84 $161 $201 $301 $23 $28 $42 $23 $28 $42 $45 $56 $84

ACTIVITY BY SPACE Multipurpose Room

Town Use: Dance, Acting + Wellness Classes Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Town Use: Other Classes + Events Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Internal Days of Use

105

5%

108

5%

110

5%

113

5%

116

Rentals

Webb Management Services, Inc.

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Residents/School Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

Movement Studio

Year 1

% Change

160 0 40 200 25 $10,000

5%

Not-for-profits + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

40 0 80 120 15 $7,500

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 160 160 20 $15,000

All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

400 600 350 1320 165 $32,500

Town Use: Dance, Acting + Wellness Classes Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

160 0 30 160 20

Year 2

% Change

168 0 42 210 26 $10,815

5%

5%

42 0 160 202 25 $13,004

5%

0 0 160 160 20 $15,450

5%

176 0 30 176 22

% Change

176 0 44 221 28 $11,696

5%

5%

44 0 160 204 26 $13,533

5%

0 0 160 160 20 $15,914

5%

428 600 434 1432 179 $39,269

10%

Year 3

194 0 30 194 24

% Change

Year 5

185 0 46 232 29 $12,650

5%

5%

46 0 160 206 26 $14,090

5%

49 0 160 209 26 $14,675

5%

0 0 160 160 20 $16,391

5%

0 0 160 160 20 $16,883

5%

458 600 438 1466 183 $41,143

10%

Year 4

5%

491 600 443 1503 188 $43,130

10%

213 0 30 213 27

194 0 49 243 30 $13,681

526 600 447 1543 193 $45,239

10%

234 0 30 234 29

Town Use: Other Classes + Events

Webb Management Services, Inc.

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Internal Days of Use

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1 40 0 40 80 10

% Change 5% 5%

30

Year 2 42 0 42 84 11

% Change 5% 5%

33

Year 3 44 0 44 88 11

% Change 5% 5%

35

Year 4 46 0 46 93 12

% Change 5% 5%

38

Year 5 49 0 49 97 12 41

Rentals Residents/School Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

40 0 0 40 5 $1,600

5%

42 0 0 42 5 $1,730

5%

44 0 0 44 6 $1,871

5%

46 0 0 46 6 $2,024

5%

49 0 0 49 6 $2,189

Not-for-profits + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

40 0 0 40 5 $2,000

5%

42 0 0 42 5 $2,163

5%

44 0 0 44 6 $2,339

5%

46 0 0 46 6 $2,530

5%

49 0 0 49 6 $2,736

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

80 0 0 80 10 $6,000

5%

84 0 0 84 11 $6,489

5%

88 0 0 88.2 11 $7,018

5%

93 0 0 92.61 12 $7,590

5%

97 0 0 97.2405 12 $8,208

All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

360 0 70 360 50 $9,600

386 0 72 386 54 $10,382

414 0 74 414 57 $11,229

444 0 76 444 61 $12,144

477 0 79 477 66 $13,133

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Gallery

Town Use: Exhibitions Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

0 1200 0 1200 150

0 1200 0 1200 150

0 1200 0 1200 150

0 1200 0 1200 150

0 1200 0 1200 150

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

154

154

154

154

154

Rentals Residents/School Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

Not-for-profits + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 30 30 4 $2,679

0 0 30 30 4 $4,644

0 0 30 30 4 $4,833

0 0 30 30 4 $5,032

0 0 30 30 4 $5,241

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

0 0 30 30 4

Town Use: Other Classes + Events Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Internal Days of Use

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Total Rent Paid All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid Studio Classroom

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1 % Change $8,036

0 1,200 90 1,290 161 $10,714

Year 2 % Change $8,277

0 1,200 90 1,290 161 $12,921

Year 3 % Change $8,525

0 1,200 90 1,290 161 $13,358

Year 4 % Change $8,781

0 1,200 90 1,290 161 $13,813

Year 5 $9,044

0 1,200 90 1,290 161 $14,285

Town Use: Art Classes + Outreach Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

200 0 30 200 25

10%

220 0 30 220 28

10%

242 0 30 242 30

10%

266 0 30 266 33

10%

293 0 30 293 37

Town Use: Other Classes + Events Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

100 0 30 100 13

10%

110 0 30 110 14

10%

121 0 30 121 15

10%

133 0 30 133 17

10%

146 0 30 146 18

Internal Days of Use

38

41

45

50

55

Rentals Residents/School Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 30 30 4 $600

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $618

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $637

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $656

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $675

Not-for-profits + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours

60 0 30 30

5%

63 0 30 93

5%

66 0 30 96

5%

69 0 30 99

5%

73 0 30 103

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

Classroom

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1

% Change

4 $750

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

30 0 30 60 8 $2,250

All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

390 0 150 420 53 $3,600

Year 2

% Change

12 $2,395

5%

32 0 30 62 8 $2,375

Year 3

% Change

12 $2,550

5%

425 0 150 515 64 $5,388

33 0 30 63 8 $2,509

Year 4

% Change

Year 5 13 $2,896

5%

36 0 30 66 8 $2,805

12 $2,717

5%

462 0 150 552 69 $5,696

35 0 30 65 8 $2,652

503 0 150 593 74 $6,025

549 0 150 639 80 $6,377

Town Use: Art Classes + Outreach Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

100 0 30 130 16

5%

105 0 30 135 17

5%

110 0 30 140 18

5%

116 0 30 146 18

5%

122 0 30 152 19

Town Use: Other Classes + Events Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

100 0 30 130 16

5%

105 0 30 135 17

5%

110 0 30 140 18

5%

116 0 30 146 18

5%

122 0 30 152 19

Internal Days of Use

33

Rentals Residents/School Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours

0 0 30

34

5%

0 0 30

35

5%

0 0 30

36

5%

0 0 30

38

5%

0 0 30

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

Lobby

Webb Management Services, Inc.

Year 1

% Change

30 4 $600

Year 2

% Change

30 4 $618

Year 3

% Change

30 4 $637

Year 4

% Change

Year 5 30 4 $675

30 4 $656

Not-for-profits + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

60 0 30 30 4 $750

5%

63 0 30 93 12 $2,395

5%

66 0 30 96 12 $2,550

5%

69 0 30 99 12 $2,717

5%

73 0 30 103 13 $2,896

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

30 0 30 60 8 $2,250

5%

32 0 30 62 8 $2,375

5%

33 0 30 63 8 $2,509

5%

35 0 30 65 8 $2,652

5%

36 0 30 66 8 $2,805

All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

290 0 150 380 48 $3,600

305 0 150 455 57 $5,388

320 0 150 470 59 $5,696

336 0 150 486 61 $6,025

352 0 150 502 63 $6,377

Town Use: Art Classes + Outreach Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 30 30 4

Town Use: Other Classes + Events Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours

0 0 30 30

0 0 30 30

0 0 30 30

0 0 30 30

0 0 30 30

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Days Equivalent

Webb Management Services, Inc.

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

8

Rentals Residents/School Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

0 0 0 0 0 $0

Not-for-profits + Clubs Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 30 30 4 $1,500

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $1,545

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $1,591

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $1,639

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $1,688

Commercial Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibition Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 30 30 4 $2,250

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $2,318

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $2,387

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $2,459

5%

0 0 30 30 4 $2,532

All Users Rehearsal/Instruction Hours Exhibit Hours Meeting/Event Hours Total Hours Days Equivalent Total Rent Paid

0 0 90 90 11 $3,750

Internal Days of Use

ESCALATION RATE

Year 1

0 0 90 90 11 $3,863 3%

0 0 90 90 11 $3,978 3%

0 0 90 90 11 $4,098 3%

0 0 120 120 15 $4,221 3%

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE

Year 1 Pre-opening Year

REVENUE Rental Fees

CONTRIBUTED INCOME

Webb Management Services, Inc.

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

% Change 32,500 9,600 8,036 3,600 3,600 3,750

39,269 10,382 8,277 5,388 5,388 3,863

41,143 11,229 8,525 5,696 5,696 3,978

43,130 12,144 8,781 6,025 6,025 4,098

45,239 13,133 9,044 6,377 6,377 4,221

Equipment Rental Rental Staff Cleaning

3,054 3,054 6,109

3,628 3,628 7,257

3,813 3,813 7,627

4,010 4,010 8,020

4,220 4,220 8,439

Membership Classes Camps Equipment Rental Dance, Acting + Wellness Classes Other Events + Classes Arts Classes + Outreach Exhibitions (suggested donation) Total Revenue

5,000 10,000 2,500 7,500 4,800 4,200 4,500 1,000 112,803

5,665 11,330 2,704 8,111 5,438 4,620 5,021 1,050 131,019

6,418 12,837 2,924 8,772 6,162 5,084 5,606 1,103 140,426

7,272 14,544 3,162 9,487 6,981 5,597 6,261 1,158 150,706

8,239 16,479 3,420 10,260 7,910 3,951 6,996 1,216 159,738

Media Lab

Local Government Support Provincial Support Federal Support Sponsorships/Individual Giving Foundation Grants Total Public Funding + Grants

TOTAL REVENUE, PUBLIC FUNDING + GRANTS EXPENDITURES Full-time Personnel

Year 2

Multipurpose Room Movement Studio Gallery Studio Classroom Classroom Lobby

User Fees

Program Fees

% Change

Building Manager Salary Sub-Total Benefits Sub-total

0 37,500

0 0 37,500

75,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 155,000

37,500

267,803

22,500 22,500 6,750 29,250

45,000 45,000 13,500 58,500

5%

5% 5% 5% 50% 50%

78,750 21,000 21,000 30,000 30,000 180,750

5%

5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

311,769

5%

47,250 47,250 14,175 61,425

82,688 22,050 22,050 31,500 31,500 189,788

5%

5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

330,213

5%

49,613 49,613 14,884 64,496

86,822 23,153 23,153 33,075 33,075 199,277

5%

5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

349,983

5%

52,093 52,093 15,628 67,721

91,163 24,310 24,310 34,729 34,729 209,241 368,979

5%

54,698 54,698 16,409 71,107

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE

Year 1 Pre-opening Year

Part-time Personnel

Programming Costs

Administration

Occupancy Costs

Administrative Assistant Media Center Manager Event Staff Custodial Sub-total Benefits Sub-total

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

% Change 5% 5% 5% 5%

15,750 26,250 26,250 21,000 89,250 26,775 116,025

5% 5% 5% 5%

16,538 27,563 27,563 22,050 93,713 28,114 121,826

5% 5% 5% 5%

17,364 28,941 28,941 23,153 98,398 29,519 127,918

5% 5% 5% 5%

0 0 0

15,000 25,000 25,000 20,000 85,000 25,500 110,500

18,233 30,388 30,388 24,310 103,318 30,995 134,313

5% 5%

10,500 2,625 13,125

5% 5%

11,025 2,756 13,781

5% 5%

11,576 2,894 14,470

5% 5%

0

10,000 2,500 12,500

12,155 3,039 15,194

250 1,000 1,000 1,250 2,500 1,000 7,000

500 2,000 2,000 2,500 5,000 2,500 14,500

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

515 2,060 2,060 2,575 5,150 2,575 14,935

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

530 2,122 2,122 2,652 5,305 2,652 15,383

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

546 2,185 2,185 2,732 5,464 2,732 15,845

3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

563 2,251 2,251 2,814 5,628 2,814 16,320

Utilities Repairs and Maintenance Service Contracts Building Supplies Cleaning Supplies Technology Services Trash Hauling Security System Sub-total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

11,655 7,770 3,885 3,885 3,885 10,000 2,000 25,000 68,080

Total Expenditures

36,250

264,080

281,072

293,316

306,118

319,503

Operating Result

1,250

3,723

30,697

36,897

43,865

49,476

1,250

3,723

30,697

36,897

43,865

49,476

Direct Costs of Exhibitions Programming Supplies

Postage Telephone Advertising + Public Relations Insurance Supplies Miscellaneous Sub-total

3% 3%

12,005 8,003 4,002 4,002 4,002 10,300 7,500 25,750 75,562

3% 3% 3%

12,365 8,243 4,122 4,122 4,122 10,609 7,725 26,523 77,829

3% 3% 3%

12,736 8,490 4,245 4,245 4,245 10,927 7,957 27,318 80,164

3% 3% 3%

13,118 8,745 4,373 4,373 4,373 11,255 8,195 28,138 82,569

Contribution to Capital Reserve Final Result

Webb Management Services, Inc.

3/22/12


Pro-forma Operating Budget : Downtown Arts Centre

MULTI-YEAR PRO-FORMA ACTIVITY FOR DOWNTOWN ARTS CENTRE Revenue as % of Expenditures

Year 1 Pre-opening Year 0%

RATIOS AND FORMULAS Escalation Rate

% Change

Year 2

% Change

Year 3

% Change

Year 4

% Change

Year 5

% Change 43% 3%

47% 3%

48% 3%

3%

3%

Technical/Event Labor Equipment Rental/Maintenance Event Staff Event Cleaning

5% 5% 5% 10%

Media Lab

Media Lab Memberships Sold Average Price

100 $50

10% 3%

110 $52

10% 3%

121 $53

10% 3%

133 $55

10% 3%

146 $56

2,000 $5

10% 3%

2,200 $5

10% 3%

2,420 $5

10% 3%

2,662 $5

10% 3%

2,928 $6

1,000 $2.50

5% 3%

$1,050 $2.58

5% 3%

$1,103 $2.65

5% 3%

$1,158 $2.73

5% 3%

$1,216 $2.81

500 $15.00

5% 3%

$525 $15.45

5% 3%

$551 $15.91

5% 3%

$579 $16.39

5% 3%

$608 $16.88

3%

352 299 325 $15

3%

387 319 352 $16

3%

426 341 382 $16

Media Lab Camp (hours delivered) Average Fee/Hour # Equipment Items Rented Average Rental Rate Town Programming

Dance, Acting + Wellness Classes (hours) Other Events + Classes (hours) Arts Classes + Outreach (hours) Net per hour

Benefits

Benefits as a % of Salary

Occupancy Costs

Total Gross Square Footage Direct Costs/Square Foot Utilities Repairs and Maintenance Service Contracts Building Supplies Cleaning Supplies

Webb Management Services, Inc.

320 280 300 $15 30% 18%

5% 5% 5% 10%

50%

User Fees as a % of Rent

Media Lab Classes (hours delivered) Average Fee/Hour

5% 5% 5% 10%

49%

5% 5% 5% 10%

5% 5% 5% 10%

3%

469 234 414 $17

30%

30%

30%

30%

30%

15,540

15,540

15,540

15,540

15,540

$0.75 $0.50 $0.25 $0.25 $0.25

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.77 $0.52 $0.26 $0.26 $0.26

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.80 $0.53 $0.27 $0.27 $0.27

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.82 $0.55 $0.27 $0.27 $0.27

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$0.84 $0.56 $0.28 $0.28 $0.28

3/22/12

Performing arts centre feasibility study final (1)  
Performing arts centre feasibility study final (1)  
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