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Middle School

Handbook Tower Hill School 2011 - 2012

Many Things  Done  Well


TABLE OF CONTENTS Codes of Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Progress Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marking System, Failures and Summer Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 4 4 5 6

Physical Education and Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 General Information Absences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Advisors and Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 After School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Athletic Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Athletics (Return to After Injury, Illness or Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 11 Cell Phones/ Pagers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Chapel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Class Advisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Class Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Computers (Responsible Computing Policy 2011-2012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Conduct, Kudos and Disciplinary System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Dress and Grooming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Drop In Center (see After School, page 10) Early Morning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Electronic Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Extra Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Extended Time on Tests and Exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Field Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Homework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Honor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Illness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Illness, Notification to School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Laptops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Medications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Middle School Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Parent Coffees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Parent Representatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Phone Calls to Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Physical and Health Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Release of Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Snow Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Social Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Sportsmanship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Student Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

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Study Organizers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Telephone Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Testing Program (ERB-CTP 4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Tutoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Advice for Middle Schoolers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

TOWER HILL MIDDLE SCHOOL CODES OF CONDUCT Tower Hill provides an enriched and challenging program in which each student’s abilities and talents are recognized and respected. The Tower Hill community places honesty as its highest value and feels that a community of trust must be maintained through the effort of students, faculty, administrators and parents. HONOR CODE All work that is to be done for a subject should be the work of only that student, unless the assignment is a group project or one on which collaboration (working with peers, family members, and other outside help) has been specifically required, suggested, or permitted by the teacher. This includes all exams, tests, quizzes, class work, and homework. Students are not to communicate unannounced quizzes or tests or the contents of quizzes or tests to students in other sections. Copying another student’s homework is always an honor code violation. CIVILITY CODE Tower Hill is committed to perpetuating a school community founded on personal integrity, mutual respect, and collective responsibility. We recognize, understand, and respect the distinct identity, dignity, and individuality of each member of the community. To maintain the environment, we expect that every member of the community show the following characteristics: Honesty Kindness Respect of each other and Responsibility for our surroundings Students should act on any violation of the codes of conduct that comes to their attention. Some suggestions of how to do so are noted below. Any violation of the honor code or civility code is a serious offense, and the school will respond accordingly. We all recognize that being confronted with a situation in which a peer is violating either the honor or civility codes is very uncomfortable. The problem is that taking no action simply increases the likelihood that the violator will break the honor code again. You need to do something, both to help the individual and to maintain the strength and trust of the community.

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Suggested responses when students witness others violating the codes of conduct include: 1. 2. 3.

Confronting the individual as soon as you can, telling the student you saw what happened and asking the person to turn him/herself in to the teacher most connected to the situation Reporting the student to a teacher yourself Letting your advisor or parent know what has happened and seeking advice from her/him about the best thing to do in that particular situation

TOWER HILL SCHOOL MIDDLE SCHOOL HANDBOOK The Middle School We recognize the great diversity of developmental levels within our students. We seek to provide a comprehensive educational program that stimulates, challenges, motivates, encourages, exhorts, nurtures, organizes, disciplines, and develops each of our students to the best of his or her potential. We are part of a strong school. Much of our role is to prepare our students for the rigors of a challenging secondary school curriculum. Our goals include having students entering the ninth grade enthusiastic about learning, literate and able to compute easily and accurately, and possessing the skills necessary to cope with the many demands that will be made upon them. We want our students to be forthright and honest, to be able to work independently, to be able to contribute to a group effort, and we hope to see them grow and become selfconfident individuals. Our job is to help our students reach toward these goals, recognizing that each is unique and is at a different point of personal development, physically, intellectually, emotionally, and socially. The Honor Code is an integral part of the reinforcement of essential core values. Our rigorous program is designed to foster the development of the individual, helping each student to become increasingly independent yet able to function well in a group. Through a variety of courses, field trips, class projects, and other activities, we seek to provide each student with the maximum opportunity for individual growth and expression. It is our hope that the process of learning will be a rich, joyous and rewarding experience. Because our program is rigorous, students are asked to make a concentrated commitment of time and energy to their lives at school. We believe that those who propel themselves thoughtfully, creatively, and energetically into the program will be rewarded with personal growth and satisfaction. Succeeding in society today requires such essential qualities as consideration for others--for their person and for their feelings. All of us make mistakes and therefore need to forgive and to be forgiven by others. In many ways the Middle School years are years of second chances, and we all need to be willing to give others a chance to try to "do it better the next time."

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Toleration of personal differences is an essential cornerstone of a vibrant, healthy learning community. Any sort of intimidation, bullying, or harassment whether written (in note form, in I-Ms, on the Internet), verbal, physical, or sexual in nature will not be tolerated and may be grounds for dismissal from school. Academic Information Tower Hill's Middle and Upper School have a ten-day repeating schedule. While some courses meet each day of the cycle, most courses do not, and a student's schedule usually varies slightly each day. Fifth graders will take English, Reading, Math, Science, History, Spanish, Art/Shop, Music, Band and/or Chorus, and Physical Education. All fifth graders must learn to type without looking at their fingers by completing 25 lessons of our Type to Learn Program, and then passing a test at school. This year, the typing program may be done at school, and/or at home. Sixth graders will take English, Reading, Math, Science, History, Foreign Language, Art, Music, Band and/or Chorus, and Physical Education. There is a typing requirement in the sixth grade as well, and that can be done at home and/or at school. Seventh graders will take English, Reading, Math, History, Foreign Language, Science, Art/Shop, Music, and Athletics. All seventh graders are required to take the disABILITIES course, a six-week class designed to build our children’s awareness of and increase their comfort level with those with physical, mental and cognitive disabilities. Eighth graders will take English, Math, History, Foreign Language, Science, Art, Communications, Music, and Athletics. Also, all eighth graders are required to take a six-week class called TEENS. In it, students learn good decision-making techniques for dealing with current teen issues such as date rape, sexual pressures, alcohol and illicit drugs, and eating disorders. Progress Reports There are several ways in which the student's progress is monitored and reported upon in the Middle School. 1. Informally: Advisors and teachers are encouraged to notify students and parents at any time difficulty is encountered or whenever particular success is achieved. This can be done through a note, email, or phone call. Parents are encouraged to contact individual teachers when they become aware of a particular difficulty. 2. Conferences: The advisor meets with the parents (and when arranged, the student as well) of each of his/her advisees at the end of November. This is an excellent time for parents and teachers to share and compare their perceptions of a youngster's progress. School is closed at this time, and parents are strongly encouraged to meet this appointment. Please bring your calendars to our Parent Night on September 22 to sign up with your child’s advisor for

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your conference meeting. Additional conferences, arranged by the parent or the teacher, are readily available. To set up a time, please call Mrs. Brown, the Middle School secretary. 3. Weekly Progress Report: Each week teachers use a computer-generated rubric to indicate students who are improving, who are declining in performance, who owe them work, or who are experiencing difficulty in their subject, as well as basic information about deportment for the week. Each advisor receives a copy of the list. When a student has done exemplary work in two or more subjects in a one-week period, or when a student has been unprepared or is in difficulty in any subject, an email is sent home to parents. When a student has been given a kudo, a demerit, or a detention, that information will be emailed to the parent. 4. Trimester Reports - are written three times a year (in November, late February, and June). In addition to the achievement marks, these include narrative reports of how the student is doing in each course. In all academic subjects a reference to the student's effort will appear. 5. Interim Reports - All interim reports, including the first of the year, will be written for students who: (1) are doing extremely praiseworthy work; or (2) are having any kind of difficulty in a course (a C- or lower average, for example). Students new to Tower Hill will receive interims in all academic subjects in the first trimester. The Marking System and what it means: At Tower Hill, the fifth grade is the first time in the academic life of a student that achievement marks are given in addition to narrative comments from each teacher. At the end of the year, the report card will show the trimester marks, the exam marks (for th 7 and 8th graders) and the cumulative marks in each subject. The cumulative mark consists of an average of the three trimester marks plus an exam percentage. For seventh and eighth graders, the exam will count 20% of the final grade. Tower Hill has a rigorous marking policy. A "C" represents satisfactory achievement throughout the Middle School. Achievement Marks and Their Numerical Equivalents A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF

97-100 93-96 90-92 87-89 83-86 80-82 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 63-66 60-62 0-59

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Effort In each narrative report the student's effort will be commented upon. We consider a student’s effort to be just as important as his/her grade. Failures and Summer Work In the event a course is failed, the school will recommend summer work and, when required, a re-examination. Final exams are given in English, mathematics, history, science, and foreign language. Any student who earns less than a 50% on his/her final exam, regardless of his average prior to the exam, must be reexamined in order to pass the course. Prior to the re-examination, it is customary for the student to get extra help as determined by the teacher of the course. If the student earns a 50% or higher on the re-examination, s/he will pass the course for the year as long as his/her average was at least a 62 going into the final exam. The exception to this policy is in the 7th grade foreign language courses where a student may be advised to drop the foreign language course in the 8th grade instead of making up the work over the summer. S/he will then re-begin foreign language study in the 9th grade. Eighth grade students failing a course will be required to make up the failure before entering the 9th grade. Occasional exceptions may be made in the cases of students taking the accelerated math course or those in a foreign language course. The status of any student failing a course or showing poor effort will be reviewed carefully by the Middle School faculty to determine whether that student should continue at Tower Hill. Students failing two or more courses for the year, or failing a core curriculum course without making it up during the summer, are normally not invited to return to school in September. Parents of students having extreme difficulty in any course will be notified well before the end of the academic year, when possible, in order to make necessary summer plans. Although D or D- are the minimal passing marks, students completing a year of work in major academic subjects at those levels are considered to be at considerable risk in those subjects for the coming year. We, therefore, may require summer work for students whose understanding and achievement reveals major gaps in important basic skills. The Division Head and Head Class Advisors can offer specific guidance on where to find tutorial assistance or summer programs. Physical Education and Athletics Fifth and sixth graders will participate in a physical education course that will meet during the fifth period every day. Boys and girls are separated. The objectives of the class are: a) to help young people become/remain physically fit b) to provide physical development through outdoor and indoor games c) to introduce the team sports that the children will be asked to participate in when they become seventh and eighth graders. d) to develop an understanding of good sportsmanship – the demonstration of appropriate conduct, honest rivalry, and graceful acceptance of the outcome

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Seventh and eighth graders will participate in athletics which takes place at the end of every school day. The program emphasizes teamwork, cooperation, sportsmanship, and the development of individual skills. Interscholastic competition is featured in many aspects of the program. Students are placed on teams compatible with their skill development. Participation in athletics is required. We will consider an exemption from the program for a trimester if a child is involved on a daily basis in a sport that we don’t offer. Proposals for exemptions should be directed to Jack Holloway. Athletic Offerings for Boys: Fall: soccer, football, cross country Winter: basketball, wrestling Spring: baseball, lacrosse, track, tennis

Athletic Offerings for Girls: Fall: hockey, cross country, volleyball Winter: basketball, self-defense, exercise program Spring: soccer, lacrosse, track, tennis Note: The self-defense, exercise program is not a team, and the children who take it are not required to attend any games. All of the other offerings are teams which require game attendance. In order to represent the school in an interscholastic game, a student must have been in the school for the entire academic day.

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General Information Absences, Parents Parent absences or illness can be disturbing to a student and may affect his/her performance in school. The school would appreciate knowing of any unusual circumstances (extended trips, illnesses, etc.) at home. Absences, Students In the event that a student will be absent, parents are to call Flo Brown, Middle School Administrative Assistant, at the school between 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. Homework will be posted on TowerNet. Please let Flo Brown know if it is not. Absences We ask parents to think long and hard about taking their children out of school for any but absolutely essential family events (funerals, graduations, or weddings). Since much learning at school is hands-on, collaborative, and experiential, it is virtually impossible for some work to be made up after an absence. In the event that a request for absence (made at least two weeks before the anticipated date(s)) has been approved by the Middle School Head, the following procedures will be followed: 1. Teachers will be notified that the student has been granted an excused absence for the days noted. 2. A week before the student departs for his/her absence, the student is to meet with each of his/her teachers to get assignments and to arrange for make up tests (if any) to be taken. In some cases it may be possible for the student to take some or all of these tests before the absence. The initiative to do this needs to come from the home and from the student; while teachers may remind students of their responsibilities, it is up to the family and the student to get the necessary information from the teachers. 3. In general such absences are treated like illnesses; teachers will allow the student time to assimilate material before testing the child on it. Excusing students from school is an unusual occurrence; it is very important for families to recognize the importance of getting assignments ahead of time. When teachers have to take extra time to help students make up work they have missed, it takes away time that could have been spent on preparing materials for the students who are present. Absences, Unexcused No matter how carefully the calendar is planned, vacations fall at times which are inconvenient for someone. Nevertheless, parents are advised that if they withdraw their child early for a vacation or return him or her late after a vacation, they are placing their child in a difficult position. Teachers will not provide extra help or make-up time for such absences. Tests and quizzes given during unexcused absences need to be made up on the day that the student returns to school or before the student leaves. There may be some highly unusual circumstances involved. If so, parents should contact the Middle School Head AT LEAST TWO WEEKS IN ADVANCE.

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We urge strongly that parents not place their children in a very awkward position by taking them out of school on seventh and eighth grade game days or for any band or chorus performances. Team commitments need to be strong, and the absence of a player for a game or concert can have a most demoralizing impact on his/her teammates.

Advisors and Advising Each year in the Middle School, students are assigned advisors, usually one of their classroom teachers or their homeroom teacher or coach. The advisor's function is to try to get to know his advisees as well as s/he can, meeting with them regularly just to talk, monitoring their academic overall progress, contacting parents whenever appropriate. The advisor tries to be available as often as possible to his/her advisees. Students should always feel free to talk to their advisors, no matter how minor the question. Parents are encouraged to contact their child's advisor whenever they have a concern. Extraordinary events at home are worth communicating to the advisor, and if information from school is needed, the advisor can usually provide it. After School Once classes have been dismissed (for grades five and six), and athletics have been completed (for grades seven and eight), school is ended. Parents are requested to make arrangements for their children to leave school at the specified time as we do not have the place nor the supervision to manage large numbers of students. Fifth and sixth graders: 1. Complete hall cleanup as assigned. 2. Students taking city buses report to Rising Sun and 19th Street. 3. Students taking the Pennsylvania School District buses or other buses leave immediately from the front of school on 17th Street. 4. Students remaining for extended day report immediately to the area in front of Mrs. Brown’s office so that they can be walked over. 5. Students walking home are to leave immediately for home. 6. Students staying in their parents' classroom should report there immediately after school. 7. All other sixth grade students should be picked up on the underpass side of the theater entrance, directly across from the music building. (Drive in to the underpass and stay to the left.) All other fifth grade students should be picked up in front of the theater entrance where they should assemble and sit against the wall. (Make a left as you go into the driveway and wind around to the theater entrance.) a. Students who are not picked up by their parents by 3:20 will be escorted by the teacher in charge to Flo Brown's office. If you arrive after the children have been taken up, just give Flo a call and she will send him/her down. Students who are going to watch an athletic contest are to be picked up at the underpass by their parents and taken to the game.

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Seventh and eighth grade students who are unable to leave school immediately following athletics are to report without fail to the Drop-in Center which operates in a room immediately adjacent to the Underpass driveway at the curve. Snacks are available for sale, and students may sign out to watch games. They are not to loiter in the front hall, the entrance to the gym, or in any other parts of the building. Students who must use the program are expected to behave appropriately and any that abuse this service will be subject to receiving detentions and will lose the privilege of staying at school after athletics. The first infraction will result in a detention; subsequent infractions will mean suspension of the use of the drop-in for a minimum of two weeks. The Drop-in Center is not a social hang out. Only children who cannot be picked up or supervised after athletics should use it.

Appointments (Dismissal for doctor, dentist, orthodontist appointments) Whenever possible, schedule appointments for after school. Otherwise, the student in Middle School is to present to Flo Brown a note from the parent/guardian indicating time to be dismissed and reason. Athletic Equipment The Green and White Club has launched a new web store with physical education clothing for fifth and sixth graders and clothing and sports gear for seventh and eighth graders. While the majority of parents will find purchasing from Kelly’s Sports a convenience, students are not required to wear Tower Hill imprinted clothing, as long as clothing meets the guidelines below. • • • •

Girls are required to have dark green shorts of appropriate length, white shirt, white socks, and sneakers. Girls will also need a heavy sweater or sweatshirt and a pair of long pants or sweatpants to wear in cold weather. New this year: “Soffe” type cheerleading shorts are not acceptable attire. Take a look online at Kelly’s Sports (the link is on our website) to view appropriate shorts. New this year: Seventh and eighth grade girls may order a sleeveless dark green shirt from Kelly’s Sports. New this year: All boys are required to wear dark green shorts, white or dark green Tshirt, athletic socks, and sneakers. Seventh and eighth graders are allowed to wear black or gray shirts if the shirt is school or team related. Sweatpants and shirts are advisable for cold weather. All 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th graders will need a combination lock. Use of combination locks in the locker rooms is extremely important as those areas are open and unsupervised throughout much of the school day.

The school does not furnish athletic footwear. It is recommended by the Athletic Department that any shoes purchased for field sports, such as football, soccer, baseball, baseball, lacrosse or field hockey be of the molded-sole type, preferably with cleats at the center of the sole as well as around the perimeter as these are easier on the knees and ankles (the same shoe can be used for

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all three sports). All shoes with metal, metal-tipped, hard plastic, or replaceable cleats of any type are banned in the DISC conference. Grades five and six may use sneakers outdoors. Please provide your child with tie sneakers. Please note: Boys and girls need to supply their own towels. As with other gym clothes, regular cleaning is necessary. Use of keyed combination locks in the locker rooms for all grades is extremely important as those areas are open and unsupervised throughout much of the school day. Athletics - Return After An Injury, Illness or Surgery Temporary excuses from physical education/athletics for minor illness and injury may be issued by the school nurse for up to three consecutive days. A note from the physician may be required after three days at the discretion of the nurse. Following serious illness or injury, a note from the physician will be required before the student is permitted to participate in physical education/athletics. In order to represent the school in an interscholastic game, a student must have been in the school for the entire academic day (exceptions are scheduled visits to doctors, orthodontists, and dentists).

Attendance Attendance is taken in homeroom at 8:05. Students coming in late must sign the late attendance sheet in Flo Brown’s office with the reason for their lateness. There will be consequences for children who are consistently late for school. We feel that it is very important for the children to be on time for homeroom so that they can have time to organize themselves for their day, and so that they can be a part of homeroom business and activities. Books Book are available online via the link MBS Direct on TowerNet. Parents are welcome to order an extra copy if they desire them. Cell Phones/Pagers In the past several years, we have found that cell phones cause an incredible amount of distraction for our children for a variety of reasons. With phones in each teacher’s classroom, with Flo Brown, as well as a central switchboard, and with each teacher carrying a cell phone, there is ample means to get messages to students and for students to call parents during the day. Therefore, the children are not allowed to have cell phones at school. If a parent feels that his/her child will need a cell phone after school, he/she may send the child in with his/her phone and a note stating why the phone is needed (that could be a standing note for the year. Then, the child should give the phone to the Head Class Advisor to hold for the day. After school, the child may pick the phone up from the HCA. If a student is found with a cell phone on his/her person, in his/her locker, or in his backpack during the day the phone will be confiscated, a detention will be given, and the phone will not be given back until the child serves the detention.

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Chapel On most Tuesday mornings, the Middle School assembles for chapel. A long-standing tradition at Tower Hill, chapels are designed to offer students an opportunity to present and mull over important values. The themes for Chapels in 2011-12 will be connected to our Signature Strength program. Emphasis on Signature Strengths will correspond to each trimester: Trimester 1 - Integrity Trimester 2 – Open Mindedness Trimester 3 - Humility Parental participation in the program is welcome. If you know of someone who might be available to give a short, inspirational talk at 8:10 on a Tuesday morning, please call Flo Brown. Class Advisors, Head Grade 5 – Jennifer Houston Grade 6 - Kathryn Reese Grade 7 – Stacy Bazzana Grade 8 - Megan Cover Class Meetings Each class meets together several times a month under the leadership of the Head Class Advisor. These meetings are designed to foster communication and effective ways of relating within a class and to allow students and teachers together to discuss issues of importance to the class as a whole. Sometimes these meetings focus on upcoming events and how to approach them in the most positive way possible. Issues which include friendship, peer pressure, the honor code, how to study effectively, and many others are discussed. Community Service In the Middle School, community service opportunities exist in a number of ways. Each class is responsible for policing its locker areas; there is a middle school community service club; sometimes, grade levels work on ways of providing service to the community beyond Tower Hill, and the Middle School plans, sets up, and operates a fair for Lower School students. Computers Middle School Responsible Computing Policy 2011-2012 Overview The computing facilities at Tower Hill are designed to support the educational program of our students. All computer users are expected to use the computing and information resources responsibly, respecting the rights of other computer users, protecting the integrity of the computing resources, following all licensing agreements, and applying the principles of the Honor Code and proper behavior to all activities. The school's computer system should not be used in any way that is harassing, offensive, intimidating, or discriminatory. In addition, students who are found to have openly disparaged Tower Hill, or members of its

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community in a libelous or harassing manner in a public Internet forum—Facebook, Formspring, etc.—may face disciplinary action, comparable to if the offense occurred in school. Students are expected to use the technology resources to support their educational program. Students should always be able to justify their use of the technology resources by explaining how their actions are connected to their Tower Hill program. All students will be issued logins and passwords that will allow them access to most Tower Hill computers on campus. Additionally, all middle school students will be given accounts on TowerNet and TowerApps, which will provide them with an email account powered by Google Mail, shared documents accessible both at school and at home, a shared calendar, and all course pages and homework assignments. Computer users should be aware that the school computers, server storage, TowerApps and TowerNet accounts, and Internet use may be monitored at any time. There should be no expectation of privacy using the school's computer system. The following guidelines, although not all-inclusive, apply the principles listed in the overview to specific situations. These policies and guidelines apply to students using Tower Hill computing resources, using their personal technology device or other technology devices at school, or using their TowerApps or TowerNet account from home or through the web. Educational Guidelines * Always use a headset when accessing technology that involves sound. * Do not use the computer resources for commercial, political, or non-Tower Hill-related purposes including games. * Do not participate in chatrooms or similar activities, unless the chat is part of a class. * Do not download audio or visual files (MP3s, music videos, sports clips, etc.), unless they are a part of an academic project. * Do not use any electronic mail account other than your TowerMail account. * Use the Internet only for Tower Hill-related activities, avoiding sites that are pornographic or otherwise inappropriate or sites that hinder overall network performance (videos or streaming music, for example). * Do not violate the privacy or property rights of others. Personal & School Safety Guidelines * Do not disclose personal information over the Internet. Do not reveal your real name, telephone number, address, password, credit information, school or other information. Do not give out such information about anyone else. * Do not use the Tower Hill computer resources for any monetary or financial transaction (shopping, auctions, purchases, banking, etc.). * Do not give out your password or let anyone else use your account. * Do not create, send or forward documents or messages that are inappropriate, malicious, pornographic, harassing, wasteful, or annoying (chain letters, for example). * Do not access, copy, delete, or alter information or files that are not your own. Administrative Guidelines

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* Do not attempt to acquire a password. * If a student learns a password or becomes aware that someone without authorization has obtained a password, the student should notify a member of the computing faculty or school administration. * Scheduled classes take precedence over general use. * Computer users should be aware that the school computers, server storage, TowerApps and TowerNet accounts, and Internet use may be monitored at any time; there should be no expectation of privacy using the school's computer system. * Follow any special rules established for each computer area in the school. * Report broken or malfunctioning equipment. Responses to Violations Any accessing of technology either through school or personal devices that becomes problematic because it is inappropriate in its content, disruptive to others or negatively impacts a student's academic performance will not be permitted and may be subject to disciplinary action. Access to Tower Hill's technology facilities is a privilege granted to members of the Tower Hill School community and may be revoked or limited for violations of the policies outlined in this document. Depending on the violation, Tower Hill students may also be subject to further disciplinary action under the guidelines established in the student handbook, and in some cases to criminal charges by local, state, or federal authorities. Students should be aware that the use of Tower Hill's technology facilities and their TowerApps and TowerNet accounts may be necessary for their school work; therefore, any revocation or limiting of their privileges may have academic implications as well. Responses to violations may include, but are not limited to, the following depending on the nature and frequency of the violation: dismissal from the computer lab or library, a warning, detention, suspension/limitation of technology privileges for a set number of days, meeting with the students advisor, Division Head and/or the student’s parents. Conduct, Kudos and Disciplinary System Tower Hill has high standards of performance in all areas, including personal conduct. Students are expected to be on their best behavior whether in classes, at assemblies, in the dining room, in the halls, on the athletic fields, on field trips, and even after school! Students are, at all times, ambassadors of their school as well as of themselves and their families. Proper table manners, good dress and grooming, appropriate use of language, courtesy toward others, and concern for others' property and person are important factors in establishing a healthy atmosphere which nurtures the growth and development of each student. Academic Honesty is an important quality that is expected of each student and reinforced constantly by the faculty. By this we mean that each student is expected to turn in work which only s/he has done, unless a group project has been assigned. Copying the work of others, either on homework assignments or on quizzes and tests, is misrepresenting one's work, and will be treated as a form of dishonesty. While the school is not responsible for the behavior of students on parent-led trips, appropriate student conduct is expected. Respect for the possessions of others is essential. Stealing will not be tolerated.

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Using, being under the influence of, or distributing any form of tobacco, alcohol, or illegal drugs while on school property or while attending any function sponsored wholly or partly by the school will not be tolerated. The Goals: To encourage high standards of conduct while creating a more specific system of response to various levels of infractions, when they occur. In conjunction with the already-existing Kudo program, there will be incentives for those students who (1) consistently exhibit good conduct and high standards of civility; and (2) go out of their way to do acts of helpfulness and kindness for others. Kudos are typically awarded to students for: Particularly exemplary classroom conduct Specific acts of kindness toward another student Outstanding contribution to a class or classroom activity Assistance on a field trip Exceptional leadership in athletics Support of another student (providing extra help) Excellent sportsmanship Community service and outreach Infractions and responses: 3 demerits = after school detention 6 demerits = after school detention 9 demerits = early morning detention 12 demerits = Saturday morning detention (Served from 8-9 a.m. at school) 15 or more demerits = suspension Single demerits are assigned for the following types of behaviors: Class disturbance Use of inappropriate language Dress code violations Misuse of gum, candy, or food in the hallways Running inside the school building Lateness (to school, classes, assemblies, athletics, etc‌) Snowballing (first offense) Failure to meet routine deadlines (octave sheets, overdue books, etc.)

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Multiple demerits (2 or more which could include assigning a detention, suspension, or expulsion), depending upon the seriousness of the infraction, are assigned for: Defiance toward or disrespect to school personnel Disrespect toward, fighting with, or harassment (verbal, physical, sexual, or via the telephone or internet) of fellow students Deliberate damage to school or personal property and/or misuse of equipment Stealing Cheating (copying from another student, plagiarism, giving answers, homework to another student) Use of tobacco, alcohol, other students’ prescription drugs, or any form of narcotic on school property, or being under the influence while on school property When teachers assign two or more detentions, they do so after consultation with the Head Class Advisor. Parents are advised of both new kudos and new demerits earned on a weekly basis via e-mail, along with the weekly progress report update (WPR) when their child is either commended or unprepared or in difficulty. Counseling One of the primary goals we have for our students is to encourage them to work cooperatively and interdependently, developing skills of effective communication, and fostering an atmosphere that develops into respect for one another. We are convinced that this objective is important enough to warrant a place in the Middle School curriculum and that the earlier in a student's life such a program can be begun, the better. Fran Henkel and Amy Cuddy, our psychological consultants, work closely with teachers, parents, and students to help them deal with both learning and social issues. The consultant is readily available to any parent or student who desires consultation. As issues arise, appropriate groups will be convened to help identify solutions. Dress and Grooming The purpose of the revised Dress Code is to create unity and a sense of community within the Middle School. This revision is designed to make the costs of outfitting a student less expensive, to make the guidelines much less ambiguous, and to make enforcing the dress regulations at home and at school less subjective. Another goal is to minimize outside distractions and to help students focus on the important things of school life, such as academic, artistic, athletic and social growth. Teachers always reserve the right to cite a child for being out of dress code. Clothes may be purchased from any store as long as they are of the style and colors approved. Changes in the dress code are noted in italics. Boys: BOTTOMS

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Slacks/Pants Shorts (Before Dec 1 and after March 1) Colors: Any solid color or plaid with belt loops, appropriate length Fabric: Cotton, khaki, wool, blend or corduroy khaki style pants Belts must be worn and must be visible TOPS Collared Polo type shirt or collared dress shirt, long or short sleeved Turtlenecks, long or short sleeved No logos bigger than a silver dollar Shirts must be tucked in at all times Sweaters and vests: crew, v-neck or cardigan Tower Hill sweatshirts Fleece vests with Tower Hill logo Sweaters, Tower Hill sweatshirts, Tower Hill vests, if worn, must be worn over a collared shirt SHOES AND SOCKS Types of shoes: appropriately laced sneakers (not the same pair worn for athletics); Merrills, dress shoes Girls: BOTTOMS Slacks/Pants/Capris, appropriately sized Shorts, must be no more than 4 inches above the knee and can be worn before Dec 1 and after March 1 Skirts/Skorts, appropriately sized, no more than 3 inches above the knee – can be solid color or a pattern Belts must be worn if belt loops are visible Fabric: Cotton, khaki, wool blend or corduroy khaki style pants TOPS Collared Polo type shirt or collared dress shirt, long or short sleeved Shirts must be buttoned to second button hole Turtlenecks, long or short sleeved No logos bigger than a silver dollar Sweaters and vests: crew, v-neck or cardigan Tower Hill sweatshirts ) in school colors Sweaters, Tower Hill sweatshirts, if worn, must be worn over a collared shirt Camis may be worn underneath a dress code shirt but should not be seen on the chest. * Dresses with polo style or turtleneck style collars may be worn. They may be of any appropriate color or pattern and should be of an appropriate length (4 inches above the knee). SHOES AND SOCKS Socks, peds, leggings or tights must be worn

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Types of shoes: dress shoes, Merrills, appropriately laced sneakers (not the same pair worn for athletics), clogs All Students: NON-APPROPRIATE ITEMS No cargo pants or shorts No jeans No leggings No sweatpants No blue jeans No open toed shoes No flip flops No hoodies or sweatshirts of any style or fabric unless they are Tower Hill issued. No zippers on sweaters No athletic wear (other than selected Tower Hill sweatshirts) No tight or form fitting clothing No T-shirts, sleeveless, transparent or sheer materials No tank tops No plaid flannels No camouflage No pants with designs or embellishments ¡ No slippers DAY 10 Dress Down Day– Every day 10, students will have a Jeans Day that does not interfere with FFAS Jeans Days No pajamas should be worn on Jeans Days Skirts, shorts, or skorts should be of appropriate length Sleeveless shirts and tops should not be worn alone Jeans worn should NOT have holes in them Leggings should not be worn Dress Code Violations Students must meet the dress requirements during the academic portion of the day. Students who come to school in violation of the dress code will need to: 1. Call home for an appropriate garment 2. Be issued a warning on the Weekly Progress Report 3. Go to the dress code closet to choose an appropriate garment to wear for the day 4. Students may be assigned a demerit for dress code violations Early Morning Fifth through seventh grade students arriving at school before 8:00 a.m. are to report to the study hall room. Signs indicating sections of the room to be used by each grade will be posted. Students are not to use the faculty desk during this or at any other time. Eighth grade students may stop at their lockers to put away coats and books and may go to any one of the eighth grade homerooms.

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Electronic equipment Electronic devices such as I-Pods, Pagers, MP3’s, electronic toys, cell phones and other gadgets are not permitted in school unless permission is given by the Head Class Advisor and the Head of School. Extra Help Students are encouraged to go to teachers for extra help whenever they need it. Extra help is available: a. during fifth period study hall for seventh and eighth graders and during the eighth period study hall for fifth and sixth graders. Those times are designated extra help times, and all of the teachers should be free. b. during periods that both teacher and student are free. c. during teachers' "office hours" - times other than between 8:10 and 3:00 when teachers are available. These times will be made available to students. d. by appointment with the teacher e. by seeking help from the advisor to schedule when necessary. For students who need more assistance than the above suggestions, a tutor from outside the school community will be suggested. Parents are encouraged to contact the school (subject teacher or advisor) if they see a need for help for their child. Extended Time on Tests and Exams Students who have documented need for extra time (as stated in a psycho-educational evaluation) may use up to 50% again of the time allowed for a test or exam. Parents should be aware that such documentation needs to be provided every four years. These guidelines are essentially the same as those used by the College Board (CEEB) whose website discusses the basic guidelines we use for provision of extended time. Present standards require that documentation be updated every four years. Field Trips Field Trips are valuable “hands-on” experiences that bring learning to life outside the classroom. Flo Brown will have contact information for all field trips. If you are uncomfortable about having your child participate on a trip, please contact the Division Head about your concerns. Permission slips are provided and required for all field trips and may only be signed by the parent or legal guardian. Parents may be asked to accompany students who have severe asthma, life-threatening allergies, or other serious health conditions which might put the student at risk on a field trip. Please supply emergency medications, such as quick relief inhalers and auto-injectable epinephrine, for all field trips. Students may be allowed to carry their emergency medication on their person if deemed age-appropriate at the discretion of the school nurse, physician, and parent. Homework An important means of developing one's skills in a subject or a craft is by practice. Beginning in the fifth grade, students are required to do some homework in preparation for each

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of their academic classes. On the average, such assignments should not be in excess of twenty or thirty minutes per subject per night. (Fifth grade students will have some time to begin assignments in their classes, particularly as the school year begins.) Parents who find that their child constantly needs more time then that should contact the teacher. Conversely, parents should contact the teacher if their child never seems to have any homework. Parents: Please do not do homework for your child! If a few leading questions or hints are not enough to help, the child should see his/her teacher the next day for clarification and/or extra help. If your child seems to need help frequently, please call the teacher. Students develop good individual learning patterns best when they are able to do their own work, make their own mistakes, and learn by trial and error. "Help," either from parents or classmates, often can become a crutch. The easiest way for a teacher to diagnose a student's difficulty is to see the work of the student. The teacher can then make some helpful suggestions or re-teach particular concepts. How a child does his/her homework is often a valuable clue for the teacher. Parents who are being asked by their child to get involved with homework should let the teacher know what is going on. Parents will often need to help their children establish a consistent time for study which is both long enough and allows for occasional "breaks". Providing a well-lighted and well-organized area and a desk are essential, and students work best away from distractions, including conversations, televisions, stereos, computer games, and radios. If your child is less organized, having her/him study in the kitchen or dining room can be helpful. Another suggestion is that a student use a kitchen timer, spending from twenty to thirty minutes on each subject. Short nightly review of vocabulary for foreign language courses, even on nights when no work has been assigned, is also helpful. Students should always call or see their teachers if they have questions about assignments. Honor The short of it is that unless teachers have clearly suggested collaboration on an assignment or project, the work should be that of the student alone. Infractions of the Honor Code have serious consequences. Illness Should a student become ill at any time during the day, the health office is available. To find the health office, go down the main staircase at the front of the building to the ground floor and turn right. Questions of health and diet should be directed to Nancy Martin, the school nurse, and she should be notified if a child is ill with a contagious disease. Please have consideration for others and do not send your child to school when ill. Please do not send children to school with a fever (100Ëš F. or higher), suspected strep throat, rash of unknown origin, vomiting, or diarrhea. Students are not to return to school until they are without fever, vomiting, diarrhea, for at least 24 hours. Remember, if a student's temperature is even slightly elevated in the morning (99Ëš F. or higher) it may be a fever by afternoon. Students with suspected strep throat should remain at home until the throat culture result is obtained and/or until the student has been on an antibiotic for at least 24 hours. Illness, Notification to School

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Please inform our nurse, Nancy Martin, of any serious illness or injury, or anything of a highly contagious nature; for example, chicken pox or head lice, or an antibiotic-resistant infection such as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). It is essential that the nurse have information regarding allergies to medications or bee sting, and chronic health conditions such as seizures, asthma, or diabetes. Please remember to inform the nurse when phone numbers for emergency notification change. Laptops The use of personal laptop computers is not encouraged unless a student has documented needs. Because we have a computer room and three laptop carts available to our students, they need not bring in their laptops. Medications Whenever possible, medication should be taken at home. Ask the doctor to prescribe medication which can be given 2 or 3 times a day so it can be given at home. Students are not to carry medications on their persons or to keep them in lockers. This is for the protection of all students. If medication must be taken at school, the medication must be in the original container or prescription bottle with a note from the parent specifying the dosage, time to be given, number of days to be given and reason medication is to be taken. The nurse will not administer medication that is sent to school in plastic bags, wrapped in tissues, etc. Only properly identified medications, as explained above, will be given. When having a prescription filled, it is helpful to ask the pharmacist for two identically labeled containers. You can keep one at home and send one to school. Questions should be directed to Nancy Martin. Students with asthma or severe allergies should have extra emergency medications sent to school and kept in the health office at all times. These include quick relief inhalers and autoinjectable epinephrine. Parents should supply emergency medication for all field trips (see Field Trips).

Middle School Administration Head of Middle School – Pam Matsanka Assistant Head of Middle School – Carl Wismer Middle School Administrative Assistant – Flo Brown Head Class Advisor – Grade 5 – Jennifer Houston Head Class Advisor – Grade 6 – Kathryn Reese Head Class Advisor – Grade 7 – Stacy Bazzana Head Class Advisor – Grade 8 – Megan Cover Parent Coffees

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Thursday mornings at 8:00 a.m. beginning in October, parents, Amy Cuddy and Fran Henkel (our consulting psychologists), the Head of the Division, and other resource people get together to discuss pertinent developmental and learning-related topics. An essential guideline for these meetings is that we discuss topics and not people---teachers, other parents, and/or other peoples’ children. Agenda are set and the meetings are chaired by the parent representatives of each class. Eighth grade parent coffees meet on the first Thursdays of the month, seventh grade on the second Thursdays, sixth grade on the third Thursdays and fifth grade on the fourth Thursdays. Parent Representatives Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

Holly Lissner Carrie Wedo Toni Nash Meg Williamson Christy Fleming Lisa Acierno Cindy Cucuzzella Stacie Pettit

hlissner@comcast.net carriewedo@msn.com toninnash@aol.com megmail@comcast.net mdfcef@aol.com mlcrwe@aol.com cindycucuzzella@comcast.net smpettit@aol.com

Phone Calls to Teachers Our teachers are extremely interested in serving the needs of all students. We do request, however, that calls when possible be made to the school during the school day. If an emergency arises in the evening (that is something that needs to be handled before school the following day) and you must get in touch with a teacher or coach, please call at a reasonable hour, before 9:00 p.m. Another alternative is by voice mail or email. For voice mail, dial 657-8358 and enter the 3-digit extension number of the person you want to leave a message for. The extension numbers and email addresses of faculty and staff can be found on our website, Towerhill.org under our directory. We all appreciate your consideration. Physicals and Health Forms Physical exam forms and emergency cards are due from 5th, 7th, 8th, and new 6th grade students by August 1st. Students who have not turned in both forms will not be permitted to practice with their teams (7th and 8th graders) or to participate in gym classes (5th and 6th graders). Release of Student Records Upon written request of the parent, the School will send copies of teachers' final reports, health records, and standardized test results to outside agencies, childcare specialists, or other schools. Psychological testing results or reports of our Learning Specialist will only be released when specifically requested by the parent. The School will not release copies of Admissions testing materials or correspondence. Snow Days If we are to be closed, our “Alert Now” system will be activated, an announcement to that effect will be made on one of the local radio stations, and there will be a taped message available on the school phone number (575-0550). Our usual policy on days when the weather worsens

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progressively is not to close. On such days you may wish to pick up your child early, and that is fine. We do not allow students to call home to ask to be taken home before the end of the normal day. Social Events Though the school schedules a few social activities (the Halloween Party and one or two seventh and eighth grade dances) and class trips, most social activities are put together by class parents, as coordinated by the parent representatives to the Parents’ Committee of the Home and School Association. It is important that behavioral guidelines for all activities be agreed upon by the parents in charge and that these guidelines be made clear to the students involved. Middle School students become progressively more socially aware, and parents often ask the school for some basic guidelines about how best to entertain young people. Parties and social events can be great fun. But, in no other area of life are students' feelings more easily hurt and friendships tested. Therefore, some systematic way of inviting guests for parties, dances, or outings is suggested, especially if the guests at dances, or outings are predominantly members of a student's class at school. Boy/girl parties, especially those to which boys and girls are invited as couples, are strongly discouraged. For parties, past experience has shown that the happiest formula is to invite: 1) a small group; or, 2) the entire class (with several sets of parents organizing and chaperoning, which can be arranged in concert with the parent representatives); or, 3) an entire section of a class (about fifteen or twenty people); or, 4) all the boys or all the girls in a class or section. Students are not to issue invitations or to invite friends to parties at school! If your child is giving a smaller party, please remind her/him not to discuss it at school. The school will be happy to provide class and section lists if desired. Skating, bowling, swimming, hiking, tubing, skiing, canoeing, rafting parties, hoe-downs, square dances, picnics and other activity-centered gettogethers are excellent ideas for large group gatherings of Middle School age students. The school's facilities are available for groups of parents wishing to sponsor dances or other activities. Class representatives to the Parents' Committee are interested in helping to organize class activities. If you have an idea for an activity, please contact the appropriate person: Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

Holly Lissner Carrie Wedo Toni Nash Meg Williamson Lisa Acierno Christy Fleming Cindy Cucuzzella Stacie Pettit

302-777-4620 610-388-1983 302-654-1411 302-984-1158 302-656-5952 302-999-9764 302-777-7447 302-655-7781

While it should be obvious, the use of alcohol or other drugs at parties is completely inappropriate. It has been a sufficiently persistent issue in recent years that we would urge parents to discuss alcohol use candidly with other parents, to agree not to allow drinking at parties, and to immediately call the parents of any child found to be drinking or using drugs at a party. It is also very helpful to verify with the parents of a child giving a party that the party will

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be chaperoned! Good inter-parental communication, beginning when children are in the Middle School years, will prove extremely valuable in later years. Sportsmanship Athletic competition is an integral part of the educational and developmental process of our students and many important lessons are taught through athletic experience. Therefore, athletics are a fundamental part of the total curriculum at Tower Hill, fulfilling our motto of “Multi Bene Facta,� Many Things Done Well. The objective of coaches and teachers are identical; to help young people reach their fullest potential intellectually, emotionally and physically. Accordingly, sportsmanship---the demonstration of appropriate conduct, honest rivalry and graceful acceptance of the outcome---is as important as the full development of athletic skills. Critical to these teachings is the expectation that our community as well as our athletes will demonstrate respect for everyone involved in athletic competition. Student Council In the Middle School, students have the opportunity to participate in a Student Council. A boy and a girl from each homeroom are elected in the fall of each academic year. Eighth grade officers are elected in the spring of their seventh grade year. Under the leadership of Ms. Bazzana and Mrs. Houston, the Student Council meets on Wednesdays. The primary responsibilities of the Student Council are to work with the faculty in discussing the quality of life in the Middle School, to organize the annual fund raiser in January, to arrange dances and other social activities, and to organize the Middle School Fair for the Lower School. The Student Council decides where the proceeds from its functions are to be sent. The Student Council represents an opportunity for students to exercise responsible leadership in the Middle School, and helps to teach students the processes involved in representative government. Representatives are expected to make a report to each homeroom following the meetings. Officers for 2011-12: President: Lange Scanlan Vice-President: Sam Barrett Secretary: Lexi Butler Treasurer: Cory Mengden Study Organizers We issue student assignment books at the beginning of the school year. Please reinforce with your child the value of using this book every day. It is extremely helpful to have all assignments, upcoming tests, quizzes, and project deadlines listed in one central place. Homework can also be found on TowerNet. However, the assignment book should be what a child uses first when s/he needs to know what to do for homework. Telephone Calls Unless there is a change in pickup arrangements or dismissal time, students are not to use the phone. For parents needing to contact their child, they should call Flo Brown before noon so that the message can be delivered at lunch. Students may return calls when necessary. If

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game times or dismissal times are changed, students will be alerted to call home with the information. 7th and 8th grade students staying after school can be reached at ext. 275 in the Drop-In Center.

Testing Program Each year in the fall all Middle School students take the full battery of the ERB-CTP 4 tests. These tests do a number of things which are helpful to us at school: 1) they help us to identify how well students are doing in the basic skills and concept areas that we teach; 2) they provide a comparison of how our students are doing compared to other students in comparable independent schools across the country; 3) they give our children an opportunity to experience a multiple choice, blacken-in-the-oval test which is similar in format to the PSAT and SAT which they will take later on. You will be mailed the results of your child’s test. The results are available in January. Tutoring When usual measures of providing students with assistance (extra help sessions, etc…) have been exhausted, or when a student has missed substantial blocks of material, the school may recommend tutorial assistance. As a rule of thumb, since tutoring is a service requiring payment, we will not refer a family to a Tower Hill teacher. We can recommend people who have been effective as tutors for Tower Hill students. One of the keys to maximizing the effectiveness of tutoring is for the tutor to be in consistent, direct contact with the teacher at Tower Hill. We want tutoring to help; triage is always an important component in making it work. Advice for Middle Schoolers Eight Pieces of Social Advice from Jarvis Clutch that no one ever asked for, as revised by the class of 2009: 1. Don’t be too fake by trying to be too cool. Make sure you’re not wasting your time and energy trying to be someone you’re not. (Be yourself!) 2. Find a place where you fit in. Find groups that encourage or at least allow you to be different instead of forcing everyone to be the same. 3. Respect everyone. 4. Find someone you can talk to and trust about questions and problems you have. 5. Don’t bully, tease, or harass anyone. 6. Don’t let trying to be popular take over your life. 7. If you know someone who is not fitting in, try to help that person. Include a person who doesn’t normally fit in. 8. Respect everyone’s interests. Adapted from Jarvis Clutch---Social Spy, by Mel Levine. (Educators Publishing Service, Toronto, 2001) Pages 178-179

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/Parents%20MS%20handbook  

http://www.towerhill.org/ftpimages/213/download/Parents%20MS%20handbook.pdf

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