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Class Notes Volume 48.Numb e r 1

Tower Hill Bulletin

Spring/Summer 2011

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Rockford Tower by moonlight.


Headmaster Christopher D. Wheeler, Ph.D. 2011-2012 Board of Trustees David P. Roselle, Chair Ellen J. Kullman ‘74, Vice Chair William H. Daiger, Jr., Treasurer Linda R. Boyden, Secretary Michael A. Acierno Theodore H. Ashford III Dr. Earl J. Ball III Robert W. Crowe, Jr. ‘90 Ben du Pont ‘82 Charles M. Elson W. Whitfield Gardner ‘81 Thomas D. Harvey Pierre duP. Hayward ‘66 Michael P. Kelly ‘75 Ann C. Rose Christopher D. Saridakis Michelle D. Shepherd Matthew T. Twyman III ‘88 Lance L. Weaver Dennis Zeleny Chief Advancement Officer Julie Topkis-Scanlan Editor, Communications Director Nancy B. Schuckert

in this issue... 2............... Headmaster’s Letter

3.............. Influence Far Beyond the Classroom 4.............. Chip MacKelcan: An Incredible Journey as an Educator 10............ Orin Kerr ‘89: Author, Blogger, Musician and Teacher 11............. Michael Hyde: Making His Own Difference 12............ Founders’ Gallery: A Tribute to Our Founding Fathers 12............ Field of the Year/Ruly Carpenter Stadium: A Historical Site with National Recognition

14............ Graduation 2011 16............ Tower Hill School News

Associate Director of Advancement Kim Murphy

18............ Around Tower Hill

Director of Alumni Programs & Development Office Special Events Kathryn R. Warner

20............ Over the Years

Alumni Relations Brad du Pont ‘82

22............ Homecoming and Reunion: 2010

Database Manager Jane F. Bazydlo

24............ Homecoming and Reunion: 2011

Photography Joe Smolko Nancy B. Schuckert Valeri Stanton Steve Fisher Design/Layout Kedash Design Submissions to the Bulletin, suggestions for articles, photographs or letters are welcome. Mail information to the Development Office, Tower Hill School, 2813 West 17th Street, Wilmington, DE, 19806 or email thalum@towerhill.org. We reserve the right to edit submissions for space and content. Tower Hill School welcomes students of any race, religion, color or nationality. The school does not discriminate in its administrative policies or in the administration of its program. If you would like to submit Class Notes, check our updated sport scores or read about the latest events sponsored by the Alumni Council, please visit our web site at www.towerhill.org.

Cover: Chip MacKelcan ‘67

25............ Class Notes 32............ Alumni Events


August 2011

Dear Friends, It may be summer, but the Tower Hill campus is buzzing with activity! Over 500 youngsters from around the tri-state area are taking part in the Summer at Tower Hill sports, academic, enrichment and day camp programs. The hot and humid weather hasn’t slowed down the campers one bit. It’s so nice to see that the energy around teaching, learning and play remains positive and high even though we are technically on summer break. Inside this issue of the Bulletin, we highlight three alumni who were influenced by Tower Hill’s passion for excellence. These three have set for themselves high standards of achievement and dedication as educators. The feature article about Chip (Douglas) MacKelcan ‘67 is an excerpt from my recently published book Inside Their Headships: Conversation with Independent School Heads, a collection of 11 interviews with current and former heads of school. Chip’s 40-year journey as an educator and educational leader is compelling and poignant, and is one that has at its roots his Tower Hill experience. Another alum, Orin Kerr ‘89, became a law professor at George Washington University after receiving engineering degrees at Princeton and Stanford and a law degree at Harvard University. In addition to teaching, Orin has argued cases before the Supreme Court and has authored books and legal blogs. I know you will enjoy reading Hugh Atkins’ article on Orin. Finally, classmates Monty Hayman ‘87 and Andrew Smith ‘87 write about their close friend Mike Hyde ‘87 and his career as an educator. Mike has certainly lived up to the fine example set by his father, Steve Hyde ‘59. I hope you also enjoy reading about what Tower Hill students and alumni have been up to this past year. Don’t miss the Class Notes and updates on the regional alumni events that took place in a variety of locations this year, including New York, Boston and Washington D.C. There are two articles supporting our rich historical tradition. Read about the Founders’ Gallery, which now displays a mural recognizing our 11 founding fathers, and Ruly Carpenter Stadium, our nationally recognized baseball stadium, once St. Amour, the home of three DuPont Company presidents. Finally, I hope you will mark your calendar for Homecoming Weekend, October 1, 2011. We’d love to see you back at your alma mater to reconnect with fellow alumni, faculty and friends Tower Hill’s success is truly born of partnerships formed among many faithful alumni, parents, students, faculty, staff and friends. Thank you all for your support, service and trust. Yours for Tower Hill,

Chris Wheeler, Ph.D., Headmaster

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Tower Hill Bulletin


Alumni

in education Educators in the 21st century have been charged for educating students in a complex, interconnected world. Often their influence goes far beyond the classroom—shaping the learning community, steering its direction, affecting attitudes, setting expectations and boosting engagement. Following are articles about three Tower Hill alumni who have inspired others to achieve, serve and work together.

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Chip MacKelcan ‘67:

An Incredible Journey as an Educator By Chris Wheeler, Headmaster

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hip MacKelcan ‘67 recently retired after serving for almost 40 years in independent schools, 27 as head of school. Most recently he was the head of Sanford School in Hockessin, Delaware. Chip sat down with Headmaster Chris Wheeler in the spring of 2010 for an interview for Chris’ book Inside Their Headship, which was published last fall. The following article is excerpted from the book.

Chip, I’m very interested in talking with you about your path to headship and about your experiences as a head. How did it begin for you?

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Gosh, if you had asked me 38 years ago if I wanted to be a head, I would have told you it had never occurred to me. I thought I would be a teacher and a coach. I thought that even during my high school years, at Tower Hill School, inspired by two or three teachers in particular. I thought this was quite a good life, the opportunity to work with young people. The whole idea of a teaching and coaching life had a lot of appeal. So I think I modeled or tried to model the work that those inspirational teachers were doing and what I assumed (because of course, one didn’t know one’s teachers as people until we got

Above: The “heads” gather for Homecoming 2010 on the Tower Hill campus. Chip MacKelcan ‘67, former head of Sanford School; Malcolm Coates, Tower Hill headmaster 1960-1976; Tim Golding, Tower Hill headmaster 1986-2005; and current Headmaster Chris Wheeler.

a little older), the love those teachers showed for their work and for their students was something I could also do. I was involved with camp work for a long time. I’ve found quite a few heads have done that. This camp counseling work up in Maine was done when I was a much younger person, but I did it through college. I think that camp work was another way to confirm that, maybe,


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I had some talent, not just working with young people, but organizationally. I was given a lot of responsibility before I was even 20 to run the program. The people who were in charge of the camp were both schoolmasters; one with Albany Academy, another was the head of a school in Massachusetts. So, maybe in a subtle sort of way, there were little plants that suggested, “MacKelcan, maybe you should think about this.” Well, it wasn’t that blatant, but... So up through those early years, whether or not I would be going into education was not so much the question, but rather what path to follow after that was wide open. Everything happened really quickly for me. I started out teaching at a school in Maine. I learned fast that Maine in the winter is not like Maine in the summer! Was this right after college? Yes. After I graduated from Hobart College, I went to Maine to teach and coach and racked up the equivalent of five years experience in that first year trying to figure out how to act like an adult and be appropriate with kids and learn all their foibles. It was a good experience, other than the fact that I didn’t think the school was likely to be a launching pad for any kind of long-term career. I decided I would cast about for other opportunities. I was interviewed at University Liggett School in Grosse Pointe, Michigan. I’d never been to Michigan, but I met this young and very dynamic head of school named Ray Robbins who was trying to recruit people to come to Detroit in 1972. It was a challenge. This was four years after the riots and Grosse Pointe is adjacent to Detroit. There was a tremendous contrast between the poverty and turmoil of Detroit and the extraordinary affluence of Ford territory, which is what Grosse Point was.

Above: Pictured at an athletic event with Chip are Sanford Athletic Director Joan Samonisky and Chip Mayo, former athletic director. Right: As a member of the varsity basketball team, Chip played all 14 games during his senior year and scored 84 points.

But I was young and the opportunity looked good to teach high school history and coach—I was going to be a varsity baseball coach, which I wanted to be, after having played in college. It just looked like a terrific place. I think there were 19 young teachers hired that year, mostly from the East. One of those hired was the woman who would become my wife, Debbie. She came right out of Smith College to teach lower school music. We were a cadre of young and (some of us more than others) naïve young people who thought, “Detroit, why not?” It was a little lonely at first, probably because I didn’t actually know anyone when I got there. Debbie and I got to know each other better over time and started dating—that certainly helped make life more pleasant. Debbie actually had aunts and uncles in the area. Her father had grown up in Detroit. I loved the work. I loved the teaching, the coaching. There were some really dynamic people on the faculty who

looked after young teachers, making sure that we felt part of the community. I was saying “yes” to everything that I was asked to do. I can’t believe everything I was doing at that time. And so very quickly I got established in the classroom, and my coaching was going well. I think it was six months into my time there that the head tapped me on the shoulder and asked me to do admissions in the upper school. He said, “We’ll have you teach four classes instead of five, and you can do all the interviewing for the upper school.” I loved that work. I was also doing Senior Projects, and I was in charge of arranging upper school assemblies. The head didn’t really like getting up on his feet much. He was nervous—he wrote better than he spoke. So he gave younger people like me the opportunity to get up in front of groups of 300 upper school students and communicate, an experience that I’m not sure I would’ve gotten any other way at the time. Maybe continued on page 6

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Chip MacKelcan, continued from page 5 it was the junior speech requirement at Tower Hill that gave me the courage, I don’t know. (Laughter) Anyhow, I was given responsibility early. In my fourth year at the school I was asked to go to be the assistant head of the middle school. This seems ludicrous now... (Laughter). So anyhow, I guess I had figured out by that time that I had some skills that were viewed as transferable to leadership positions. I’m not even sure at that point whether I understood the comprehensive nature of leadership. It was more a matter of being comfortable with the pieces of the job: working with faculty, working with kids, working with parents. I like working with parents. There was always something to look forward to. There was an organizational side I found not a bother. I mean, it was something that I could do. I was always an organized person, but my personal skills, my personal qualities seem to dovetail well into the needs of the job. I think back on those times and I talk

In addition to athletics and committees, Chip was known for his immaculate locker, organization, understanding, penmanship, conscientiousness, independence, meeting schedules and his ‘54 Buick.

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about these early years because they really were formative to my sense of self and certainly to my development as a leader. I had a great sense of history. I had a sense that I was going to be part of a line of independent school leaders who could make a difference in their school. I felt that I was somebody who had some skills that could be beneficial to the Louisville Collegiate community. I think when I first accepted the head job at Collegiate I was just 31 or 32 years old—I guess I really could see myself being there for a long, long time. Of course, that model of the head staying at one school forever had largely passed into history, but I imagined being at Collegiate for a long time. I figured, I’m going to dig in, I am going to be here a long time while my kids are going through school. But things happen. Communities change. I never expected to be offered the opportunity to be head of four different schools. I joke sometimes with people who know basketball that I am becoming the Larry Brown of independent schools! But the idea of staying at one school for a long time was an assumption that I continued to have until I got a call about

five years into my time there from a certain school in Wilmington, Delaware. You know the story. I don’t. Please tell me. Tower Hill School, my alma mater, called. They were looking for a head. I was no more ready to leave Louisville, Kentucky, than to go to the moon! I loved it in Louisville, and yet I loved Tower Hill, too. So I grudgingly joined the search. Debbie would call it a halfhearted effort. The man who was leaving, David Blanchard, was a good man and was somebody whose career I had followed. He always had been very nice to me. So I put my hat in the ring and I thought all right, maybe this will just take care of itself. But before long I’m one of the two or three people that they want to bring to campus and then they sent four people out to see me at the Collegiate, including Ruly Carpenter. Things are getting serious… Right. Collegiate has to be made aware of this visit, of course, which I didn’t really want to have happen. I’d already been to Tower Hill for one visit, and I think another visit to Tower Hill

After participating in the Honor Committee during his 9th, 10th and 11th grades, Chip became the chair during his senior year. Other members of the Honor Committee included (seated) Robin Layton Mann ‘69, Gail Straub ‘67, Gil Birney ‘68, (standing) John Brechenridge ‘70, Don Bussard ‘69, Jeff Brokaw ‘69 and Frank Hassler ‘70.

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searches over two years. You never looked like you really wanted that job.” It was probably because I didn’t want it, I guess. I mean I was supposed to want it, but I didn’t. Deep down I knew I needed to be at Louisville Collegiate for a while longer. Your career was interrupted by a pretty serious medical issue.

Chip joins Sanford faculty members Tom and Beth Whipple and their daughter Riley at a school event.

I never expected to be offered the opportunity to be head of four different schools. I joke sometimes with people who know basketball that I am becoming the Larry Brown of independent schools! was already scheduled. The whole thing was nerve wracking. I felt that the day had gone very well with the visiting team. Then, at the end of the day, Ruly Carpenter came to my secretary and asked to see me. The meeting wasn’t on the agenda. The visiting team was supposed to be jumping on a plane and heading back to Wilmington. So he came into my tiny, former locker room of an office (Laughter)… (Laughter). …and closed the door. This was Ruly Carpenter! I idolized the Phillies. He sat down and he said, “Chip, you can’t leave this place.” I didn’t know how to respond to that. “They really need you here. It’s not that Tower Hill doesn’t need you, but this school really needs for you to be here.” In some ways I was immediately grateful for his insight. He

was sincere. I do suspect that Tim had basically already been tapped, but that moment with Ruly was so poignant. I mean, I never had it as a goal to become head of my alma mater, but this moment felt like a turning point. Ruly really helped put some things in perspective about the wanderlust. If you are going to go out and search for a new spot the time has to be right and the place has to be right. I hadn’t been perfectly honest with myself about that in this search. About a week later, literally an hour before we had the whole faculty to our house for a Christmas party, the call came saying Tim had been chosen. I really was relieved. I think I knew it was coming, but I was relieved to finally know for certain. Debbie was only slightly disappointed. She said, “Chip, I’ve seen you in searches. I saw you in five

That’s right. I got sick at the end of my first year at Durham Academy, not during the school year, but in the summer. I’d never been sick a day in my life. I couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me. I now know that a lot of what happened with me then was stress related. But I was suddenly really sick. It was taking forever for the doctors to figure out what was wrong. I lost a lot of weight. Finally I was diagnosed with Grave’s Disease. Before I knew it, I was on the operating table in October of my second year there, just after drafting a $20 million plan for campus improvement. When I came out of surgery, I was told I wouldn’t see out of my left eye anymore. It’s a truly bizarre medical case. They’ve only seen one other in American medical history. How terrible! The fact is I’d lost the use of one eye. There was a good chance I was going to lose the other one, too. Thank goodness Debbie stepped in and told me to get another opinion. I went to Miami to this other great, fine place, the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, which is part of the University of Miami, and they prescribed radiation to save my right eye. And so what had started out as the dream opportunity at Durham Academy changed into something altogether different very quickly. I had made some real friends and I liked most everybody on the board. It had looked like it was a great fit. But then I got sick. My son Matt was in college down the road at continued on page 8

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Chip MacKelcan, continued from page 7 that point. He spent his whole first year in college worrying about his father. Debbie had loved Durham up until then. But Debbie suddenly had to be concerned about my health, and on top of it, Debbie’s father was dying at this time. By January my time at Durham was over. I thought about maybe doing something else, you know, doing work as a consultant, that sort of thing. I see now what a good decision it was not to do that. I love this work. I love being a head and doing school work. And I realized that I hadn’t lost it. I was still the same person. So, that was the most difficult part of my life. It lasted from January to end of that school year. What came next? Well, gradually, I got healthy again. Actually, the eye radiation protocol worked more quickly than I had imagined. The medication was working on the thyroid issues, the Grave’s Disease, and I still had to have another surgery. But I was steadily getting healthy again. So I decided to put my hat back in the ring for headships. I had a couple of interviews, and then I had a call from a guy here at Sanford School who was the head of the search committee. They had already decided that for a year they would have an interim head. I looked like hell. But I was treated with incredible respect. I’m sure there was a big discussion internally about what to do. Finally it was offered to me with no promise for anything beyond that year. The interim? Yes, I was the interim. I was an interim. That experience was very humbling. I mean, you know, I had been on a pretty good trajectory throughout my career…it was difficult but...

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Chip talks with Tom Carper, U.S. Senator for Delaware.

But wasn’t it also affirming to be offered that interim? It was. It was, not only to be offered it, but to be coming back to my hometown. I knew, if nothing else, with all we had gone through as a family the previous year, that there would be people here who would look out for us. And Debbie would be closer to home in New York than she ever had been since we’d been married. I remember somebody on the search committee asking me early on, “What does an interim head do?” I said, “I really have no idea. I’m just going to be the head until you tell me to stop being the head. I don’t know how to be an interim head, but I can only try.” So anyhow, I met everybody in the summer, one on one. I liked the people very much. It felt right. I decided to put my hat in the ring for the permanent job—I had been told that I could apply for it, something that isn’t allowed in some interim situations. On October 1,

the search committee told the search consultant to stop the national search. Two weeks later the faculty was assembled together with the entire board, and I was announced as the head. It was one of the great moments of my life.... What was the faculty’s reaction? It was extraordinary I got a standing ovation. Affirmation is an insufficient word… And not everybody knew the whole story. They didn’t know what I’d gone through. It was hard not to think, at that moment, well, somebody’s looking out for me. Somebody’s looking out for me, and this day was meant to be. It was almost too good to be true. What a difference a year can make. I think I can say to you, as I can without any puffery, that I had my doubts about the world in general during that period from January to May. But I found strength in my family, I rediscovered a basic level of confidence, and I told


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myself that what had happened was ridiculous. I knew that I was good at my work and beyond that, I really loved what I do. I wasn’t going to let these people tell me that I couldn’t do it anymore. What an incredible journey. Yes, but I wouldn’t change anything. I mean, it was Sanford that needed me when I got here, and I needed Sanford in more ways than I realized at the time. I guess if you were writing a script, there’s nothing all that extraordinary about my career path. It had its ups and downs. You’ve almost come full circle… Yes. That seven year, eight year honeymoon in Louisville…

here at Sanford—her first name is Jewel. Her name is such a perfect description for the kind of person she is. She is normally very respectful and deferential to me. I was walking across the quad about two weeks after I returned from the kidney transplant surgery when I bumped into her. She said, “Chip, I figured it out.” It was that sort of an opening line. “I figured it out.” I said, “Well, that’s great, because I’m still looking for answers! What are we figuring out?” She said, “I think I know why you gave that kidney.” “Well, okay, tell me more.”

…you know, you’ve experienced it again.

She said, “Well, I know the story, and I know that the recipient’s sister was originally going to be the donor, and that you came on the scene late…but after what happened to your eye…”

Before we close would you talk a bit about the kidney you donated? I found that to be such an extraordinarily selfless act.

Even today not that many people know the story about my eye, but she did. She went on, “You had to prove you could still do something like this, didn’t you?”

I’ve been pretty quiet about it. Let me put it this way. We have a wonderful lower school music teacher

I said, “Well, you know, I really hadn’t thought about it that way, but that would make some sense.”

Yes, yes. Yes.

Chip and alum Robert Russell, Class of 1939, congratulate the Sanford Founder’s Day award winner, School Nurse Janis Kardash.

“The ultimate proof that you’re healthy is to let somebody dig into you.” And then I said, “Well, I think that’s part of the answer, but the other part of the answer is the man who received this kidney is a father with three girls, and knowing what I went through with my sons as teenagers, I couldn’t imagine those three girls going through those years without a father.” Believe me, I didn’t tell anybody down in Durham about the transplant, but somehow somebody found out. But perhaps there was a selfish bit to it on my part. Maybe this was a way to prove myself whole and healthy. Maybe there was some vindication in this act. So I said, “Alright, Jewel, you’ve given me something to think about. You’re probably right.” She was one of the faculty members present that day I was announced as head. She remembered. She remembered. Debbie and I bought a house in Florida. That was, I think, a way of saying, there is a future, something beyond school work. Although I think she worries about whether I will be able to fill my life without all of what this work does for me now. But I think I’ll be ready. It’s odd to be closer to the end than the beginning! But I’ve enjoyed this work a lot. I may write something about it someday. It feels good to have helped a lot of people along the way. That is something I’ve really enjoyed. My father is a doctor. I think this work has been a way for me to practice medicine, so to speak. A way to help people. And here I am in my hometown, closing out my career. Symmetry. Symmetry, and closure, I guess. Thank you, Chip.

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Orin Kerr ‘89:

Author, Blogger, Musician and Teacher By Hugh Atkins, English Department Chair

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hen Orin Kerr graduated from Tower Hill, his teachers had little doubt that he would be successful. We may not have predicted that his degrees in engineering from Princeton and Stanford would lead to law school at Harvard, but we knew he had the intellectual curiosity and the analytical acumen to make the most of the career he chose. That he should himself decide to teach speaks to a deep investment in his subject and a desire to share his knowledge and expertise. As Professor of Law at George Washington University and as a visiting professor at both the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania Law Schools, Orin has nurtured the talents of a generation of lawyers, and as a result of that the GW Law class of 2009 voted to honor him with the Distinguished Faculty

Service Award to mark the excellence of his teaching. Exceptional teachers exercise influence far beyond the confines of the classroom or even the institution in which they work. In Orin’s case, this influence extends to the numerous articles he has written for legal journals that have then been cited by U.S. Courts of Appeals and federal district courts. He writes for one of the most eminent legal blogs in the country, is co-author of both the leading casebook and the leading treatise in criminal procedure and the author of a law school casebook on computer crime. He is also regularly interviewed and/or profiled by major media outlets like The New York Times, National Public Radio and The Wall Street Journal, particularly for his expertise in matters pertaining to the Fourth Amendment. Last September, Below: Orin Kerr sits on the stairway at Tower Hill for the photo for his senior page in the 1989 Evergreen. The yearbook remembered him for his impersonations and playing the saxophone, predicting he was most likely to become a lawyer or jeopardy contestant.

Above: Orin Kerr with several of his students on March 21, 2011. The students arrived at 4:30 a.m. to be first in line to hear his oral argument to the Supreme Court.

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he lectured on this topic as part of the Tower Hill Forum series on The Bill of Rights—Today. The careful and articulate manner in which he guided his high school audience through his material was as telling as his argument and provided a glimpse of the qualities that stood him in such good stead when he presented to a different audience in March. In Davis v. the United States, Orin argued his first case before the Supreme Court. His confidence and composure in the face of the detailed, persistent questioning of the justices provided an admirable model of the art of argument and the science of rhetoric. His appearance in the highest court in the land exemplified how far he has come, but, even as he sparred with Justices Scalia, Kennedy, Alito et al., some of us were reminded of his willingness to engage in spirited discussion as a student at Tower Hill. His investment in his studies derived from his awareness that ideas are what you make of them and that a fruitful life is one in which we celebrate multiple points of view even as we try to formulate our own. As a jazz aficionado, Orin knows that the great improvisers are those who have first mastered the forms available to them; similarly, the great thinkers (and teachers) are those who pay attention to the details as steps on the road to new and surprising perceptions. If teaching is indeed “the profession that teaches all other professions” then we are truly fortunate and honored to have one of our own teaching us how to make sure that law and justice are as synonymous as possible.


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Mike Hyde ‘87:

Making His Own Difference By Monty Hayman ‘87 and Andrew Smith ‘87

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ooking back 25 years ago, classmates of Mike Hyde may not have seen him as a premier educator shaping the lives of children. Not because he didn’t have the capacity, patience or ability. All those qualities were evident back then. He was an outstanding athlete who was named All-State quarterback as he led the Tower Hill football team (named by The News Journal the as “team of the year”) to one of the top-ranked teams in the state and the baseball team to capture the state championship. In the classroom he was usually near the front of the class in terms of ability but near the rear when it came to accepting accolades. Frankly, no one saw him following in the footsteps of his father Steve Hyde ‘59, who was a teacher and the head coach for football and baseball, as well as an intense competitor. Like most boys, Mike wanted to be something completely different. Mike’s dedication to sports at Tower Hill led to a successful college athletic career at Williams College, where he earned a B.A. in history in 1991. After college he coached high school football, baseball and basketball before accepting a position with St. Andrew’s where he and his wife Joleen, with children Bridget and David, find their

Left: As the head coach of football and an assistant coach for varsity baseball at St. Andrew’s, Mike instills the qualities of competitive sportsmanship and confidence. Below: Andrew Smith and Mike Hyde share a page in the 1987 Evergreen yearbook.

family life intertwined with many of the students. He meets students as the assistant director of admission—a job well suited to his easy-going demeanor— and stays connected with them as teacher, athletic director and coach for football, baseball and basketball. On a number of occasions he faced his father on the Tower Hill fields. In 2001, Mike completed his work toward his master’s degree in American studies at Georgetown University.

went to school or who their friends might be; he just pursued whatever he had in common with them. Instead, he was quick to recognize and acknowledge other’s successes, whether in athletics, academics or other endeavors. Mike, like his father, takes charge in a huddle or a classroom with authority of mutual respect, far more powerful than anything forced or required. Mike is not the type of leader who makes you bring your best for him; he helps you bring your best for you.

Raised to treat all people with respect, Mike learned to be confident, without being cocky, and has a healthy dose of self-deprecating humor just to take one’s arguing points away. Since his early days at Tower Hill, Mike always had a personality that connected with people. He never cared about where a person

A fellow classmate Chris Donoho ‘87 recently announced that he was sending his daughter to St. Andrew’s. Although it seemed a little “crazy” to Chris to have her at a school with “Hydo” as we called him, it was actually reassuring to know that she would be in good hands. Mike has always had a knack for being able to connect with all levels of people, especially youth—far from an easy task today. In many ways he’s so good at it because he is still a kid at heart. The powerful gift he received from his father, Mike now uses in the most generous way he can—to educate kids who are just like we were 25 years ago.

Mike was always so passionate about sports and working as a team. He was a tremendous leader on and off the playing field, and it’s no surprise he has gone on to an excellent career as an educator. ~ Glenn Coleman ‘87

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Founders’ Gallery: A Tribute to Our Founding Fathers

Field

of the Year

By Pete duP. Hayward, Board of Trustees

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hen we officially re-opened the Field House in May 2010, the Board of Trustees commissioned a mural to acknowledge the important role that Walter S. Carpenter had played when he donated to Tower Hill the five-acre parcel on which the Field House stands.

The reaction to the Carpenter mural was very positive, and it became clear that we should look for other opportunities to celebrate the school’s history in ways that students can experience as part of their school day. Trustee Lance Weaver suggested that the vestibule area in the P.S. du Pont Arts Center represented a perfect location to pay tribute to Tower Hill’s 11 founders. Monnie Givens, the designer we enlisted to do the Field House mural, was again asked to work his magic. All the written material that appears in the Arts Center mural is the result of the research and writing of Susan Mulchahey Chase and was originally published in a book entitled Forever Green, the history of the first 75 years of Tower Hill. The history of Tower Hill is a compelling story. Now students, parents, alumni, faculty/staff, grandparents and other visitors have the opportunity to read and appreciate the work of our founding fathers.

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uring the summer of 2010, the National High School Baseball Coaches Association named Tower Hill School’s baseball field, Ruly Carpenter Stadium, as the Field of the Year for the mid-Atlantic region. In November 2010 Tower Hill competed with seven other regional winners from across the country for the National Field of the Year award. To support the competitive review process in hopes of gaining national recognition, a history was completed of St. Amour, the 40-room du Pont home where Ruly Carpenter Stadium stands today. Excerpts of the history are on the next page. Although Tower Hill was narrowly edged out of the national title by a municipal baseball complex in Wisconsin, the Hiller facility gained the highest number of votes for a high school field. In addition, our community can now better understand the significance of the historical site—like Camden Yards—which lends to the spirit and experience of watching a baseball game.

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Ruly Carpenter Stadium:

A Historical Site with National Recognition

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he land on which Ruly Carpenter Stadium stands today was once the home of three young men—Pierre, Irénée, and Lammot du Pont—who would eventually serve at different times as presidents of the DuPont Company.

In 1891 their mother, Mary Belin du Pont, whose husband had been killed in a workplace explosion, decided to move with her 10 children from Philadelphia to Wilmington, Delaware. She purchased 10 acres just outside of Wilmington on which she built a large home with accompanying greenhouses, gardens, garages and stables. She named the parcel St. Amour after a village in France where her ancestors had lived. Relatively small when built, the Victorian house in its last days had 40 rooms, including a bowling alley. When Mrs. du Pont passed away, St. Amour passed to her youngest son, Lammot, one of the original 11 founders of Tower Hill School in 1919. After Lammot and his wife passed away, the St. Amour property was gifted to Tower Hill in 1969. While the Tower Hill Board of Trustees recognized that St. Amour was a beautiful property, they knew that the maintenance and upkeep of the

house would be prohibitively expensive. Thus, the house, greenhouses and many of the outbuildings were torn down in 1972 to create athletic fields for the school. The walled St. Amour garden, the granite garage and carriage house complex remain today as beautiful surroundings for the baseball field.

Athletic Renovations In 2005 Tower Hill School kicked off the five-year $12.5 million Campaign for Athletics, an initiative to provide students with superior physical and athletic facilities, complementing the school’s excellent academic and arts facilities. Originally named St. Amour Field, the baseball field was re-graded to eliminate severe slopes. A natural turf surface with proper underground drainage systems was installed. The baseball diamond was rotated to align home plate with the St. Amour garden fountain. Once serving as a practice field for football, the field became dedicated to baseball. The enhancements were completed in 2009 and included a grass infield, warning track, new safety backstop, outfield perimeter fencing, scoreboard, dugouts, bleachers and press box.

The Stadium Today In 2009 St. Amour Field was named Ruly Carpenter Stadium, honoring R.R.M. (Ruly) Carpenter III ‘58, who excelled in baseball and football at Tower Hill and later became the principal owner and president of the Philadelphia Phillies from 1972 to 1981. Carpenter was only three years old when his grandfather, Robert Carpenter Sr., one of the founders of Tower Hill School, bought the Phillies in 1943 and gave control of the team to his father, Robert Jr. Ruly graduated from Yale in 1962, and over the next decade, helped build a farm system that became the envy of baseball. He became team president, at only 32, when his father stepped down in the 1972 season. The younger Carpenter’s tenure was the most successful in franchise history. From 1976 to 1981, the Phillies appeared in postseason play in every year but one, including the team’s first World Series win in 1980. With the advent of free agency and escalating salaries, the Carpenters sold the club to Bill Giles in 1981, thus ending a 38-year relationship. Carpenter was inducted into the Delaware Sports Hall of Fame in 1987. The 1932 Tower Hill baseball squad included Bob Carpenter, a sophomore (front row, far left). Bob pitched a no-hitter in 1933. The Carpenter name remains synonymous with Tower Hill athletics as son Ruly ‘58 excelled in three sports in the1950s and his grandchildren did likewise in the 1980s and1990s. Ruly Carpenter, in 1981, announcing the sale of the Philadelphia Phillies.

St. Amour was the home of three presidents of the DuPont Company. The house, gardens and other buildings were given to Tower Hill School. The house was demolished in 1972, and the land was used for athletics fields and play areas.

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91st Graduation Exercises I

t was a beautiful day for Tower Hill’s 91st Annual Graduation Exercises on June 4, 2011, the first held at the Hayward House. Joseph Smolko, English Teacher and Webmaster, gave the invocation, followed by greetings from Headmaster Dr. Christopher Wheeler. Class president Grace Firestone and Andrew Gates, the classes’ selected speaker, addressed the graduates and guests. After an introduction by graduating senior Brooke Kelly, John Robinson, Upper School English teacher, delivered the commencement address. The Headmaster, Board of Trustees Chair David P. Roselle and Associate Headmaster Harry Baetjer presented diplomas to members of the Class of 2011. Following the ceremony, the graduates and their guests celebrated with a reception on the grounds of the Hayward House.

Class of 2011 College Choices Mark Aboff................................................... Carnegie Mellon University Kyriakos Atmatzidis................................................. Washington College Nolan Bacchieri...................................... Franklin & Marshall College Kathleen Batman............................... Southern Methodist University Zöe Blake..................................................................... Columbia University Caroline Blatcher..................................University of Georgia-Honors Lauren Boudreaux..............................................University of Delaware Samantha Bush....................................................University of Delaware Laura Carpenter................................. George Washington University Alessandra Ceretto.............................................University of Delaware Ryan Chenault............................................................... Eastern University Noah Chodos............................................................ Columbia University Michelle Cooper.......................................................American University Elise DeDominicis............................................. Georgetown University Nikki DeShane.....................................................University of Delaware Kali DiGate.......................................................................... Tufts University John Edinger................................................................. Gettysburg College Grace Firestone.................................. University of Delaware-Honors Sarah Garland.................................................................... Duke University Andrew Gates.............................................................American University Amanda Girard........................................ University of South Carolina Harrison Greenberg...................................................... Drexel University Elizabeth Grubbs........................................ Purdue University–Honors Anne Hobbs.................................................................University of Miami Christine Ianni......................................................... Mt. Holyoke College Brett Isken........................................................................... Drew University Alexander Johnson................................... Loyola University-Maryland

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Brooke Kelly.................................................................... Haverford College Ellen Kettler..................................................................Stanford University Sonia Luther................................................................... Cornell University Michael McCloskey...........................................................Boston College Michael Mistras.......................................................... Dartmouth College William Morton....................................................................... Bates College Gregory Pape..............................................................American University Serena Pierce...............................................................Bryn Mawr College Christie Pletz.........................................................................Boston College Victor Prieto.......................................................................... Rice University Natasha Qureshi............................................................ Lehigh University Samantha Reichard................................................. Swarthmore College Charles Robino...................... University of Massachusetts-Amherst Maria Rocca.......................................................... Wake Forest University Margery Saunders......................................................Stanford University George Searle................................................................... Drexel University Christopher Sepelyak........... University of Maryland-College Park Rory Slatko..................................................................American University Eleanor Smith.......................................................University of Delaware Andrew Sommers................................................University of Delaware Christopher Stott............................................................... Oberlin College Abbey Thompson.................................................University of Delaware Devin Tracy............................................. Pennsylvania State University Taylor Van Sickle....................................................... Syracuse University Tyler von der Luft.......................................................... Lehigh University Margretta Willemin.....................................................Colgate University Basil Williams.............................................................Villanova University


Awards Ceremony—Friday, June 3, 2011 Cum Laude Society–New Inductees Elise Nicole DeDominicis Grace Genevieve Firestone Ellen Bess Kettler Natasha Shaukat Faye Qureshi Maria Iolanda Rocca Cum Laude Society Inducted beginning of senior year Kyriakos Atmatzidis Zoë Blake Noah Benjamin Chodos Sarah Ann Garland Sonia Kiran Luther Margery Mays Saunders          Haon Award in Art Maria Iolanda Rocca Certificate of Honor– Samantha Lyn Bush David E. Scherer Dramatics Award Rory Michael Slatko Brooke Alexandra Kelly Algard Mathematics Award Sonia Kiran Luther Certificate of Honor– Sarah Ann Garland Frank C. Ashby Foreign Language Award Noah Benjamin Chodos  Sarah Ann Garland

P. Edward Hughes History Award Rory Michael Slatko Certificate of Honor– Sarah Ann Garland Crichton Science Award Noah Benjamin Chodos William J. Carveth Music Award Mark Eric Aboff Alison Arsht Leadership Award Grace Genevieve Firestone Tower Hill School Community Service Award Margretta Lorraine Willemin Tower Hill School Athletics Awards Ryan Matthew Chenault Grace Genevieve Firestone Spiller Achievement Award Gregory Andrew Pape Trustees’ Award for Service Noah Benjamin Chodos Rory Michael Slatko Trustees’ Award for Academic Excellence Margery Mays Saunders

Faculty Awards Faculty Chair in Fine and Performing Arts Sara F. Bush Faculty Chair in History Dr. Ellis A. Wasson Faculty Chair in Mathematics Jack S. Smith Jr. Faculty Chair in Languages Oremia P. Caimi

Special Award

Parent John Edinger was recognized for his dedication, service and leadership as the adviser of the Tower Hill Mock Trial team for the past 15 years.

From left, clockwise: Headmaster Chris Wheeler and Head of Upper School Dan Hickey prior to the graduation ceremony. / Sarah Garland and Basil Williams accept congratulations in the receiving line. / Victor Prieto is ready to take the world in stride. Congratulations to the Class of 2011! / Class President Gracie Firestone spoke about the remarkable environment and the quality of student life at Tower Hill. / John Edinger gets “prepped” for the graduation ceremony. / Diplomas in hand, the Class of 2011 departs from the graduation ceremony.

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Tower Hill School News lower School By Jacquelyn Hamilton

There is much that each of us, as Lower School educators, loves and cherishes. Among them is the joy that comes from a class well taught, and the sense of wonder that comes from witnessing students making sense of their world. Understanding that children learn best through exploration, discovery and experimentation, we focus on creating a curriculum and spaces where learning is honored and children thrive. This is the Tower Hill experience!

and “Portraits of Partners” created by the first and second grade children, respectively. First grade students learned about the horizon line and how to draw trees with overlapping branches. The cast shadows really made them look three-dimensional! Second grade students learned how to construct the placement of facial features and then to draw them realistically. Since they studied the Founding Fathers in Social Studies, the children drew a partner’s portrait in an oval format, a typical shape that was used during this particular time period. These new skills learned through art were made more meaningful by connecting them to things previously learned.

Beginning in September, students learned to develop a hypothesis in science, to do the research and to conduct an experiment in order to draw an accurate conclusion. Each child created his or her own project and a storyboard. During the Science Fair, each child clearly articulated that process and the wonderful lessons learned.

The benefits of early and sustained foreign language study are well documented through educational research. We have learned that it enhances cognitive development, creativity, listening skills and memory, among other benefits. This year, Spanish became a part of the Tower Tot through fourth grade experience at Tower Hill. Our first grade class had instruction in Spanish beginning in their Pre kindergarten year. We observed that these students were willing to take risks in their language classes without hesitation and to recognize and utilize vocabulary in context.

Walking through a hallway in the Lower School, one sees “Winter Trees”

Knowing that learning extends beyond the formality of the lessons that we

The excitement in the 1919 Auditorium was palpable as our fourth grade scientists shared the lessons learned in science during our Third Annual Science Fair in March.

MIDDLE School By Pam Matsanka

This year the Eighth Grade really “stepped up” as leaders of the Middle School. As individuals and as a group, they proved themselves positive leaders. One of those leaders is Carolyn Ward. She had a wonderful idea for a community service project after hearing about the genocide in Rwanda from her cousin who was involved

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with an IMPUHWE group in Seattle. IMPUHWE (Inspiring and Motivating Powerful Undiscovered Hopeful Women with Education) is an organization that raises money for girls’ education in Rwanda. Carolyn decided to found a Delaware chapter of IMPUHWE. With help from her very supportive parents and a couple of teachers, Carolyn persuaded 36 eighth grade students to join. She describes her work below: …This year in the Delaware Chapter, our goal is to spread the word to raise money to educate four Rwandan girls. We hope to experience what it is like to bond with other students and bond with people outside our daily lives in order

teach, we have worked to define the learning opportunities in Character Development. We believe that this work with the curriculum and beyond the curriculum permeates all that we do in the best interest of the children. We have done research of current practices for curriculum development and review progress reports to determine how we assess character through students’ social development and work habits. We have also created an inventory of character-based literature and documented information on important character traits to teach and to reinforce. These efforts place emphasis on creating explicit, developmentally appropriate character instruction and quantifiable student growth. This past year, we welcomed guest speakers from the Tower Hill community to present a Meaningful Monday Message on this year’s theme, “What do you stand for?” As the year has progressed, Fourth Graders have taken over the responsibility of delivering the weekly messages, helping our younger students to become more aware of the importance of good character and personal conduct in and out of school. As a Lower School faculty, we continue to discover ways to guide the learning process, to cultivate an awareness of community, and to “fire” the thrill of exploration, discovery and experimentation in the children placed in our care.

to connect with the world….When people are given the opportunity to do something worthwhile, it brings out the best in them. We have already written letters to the four girls we are funding this year. One of my friends told me that it is so nice to be part of something that opens up her mind to the world… Through IMPUHWE, we plan to give these girls an opportunity they could not experience before by revealing the true power of education. In late February, eighth graders Derek Dubner, Jack Guan and Alex Xu were selected as 2011 Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision Awards Honorable Mention Winners. Last spring, the boys


Tower Hill School News MIDDLE School, cont. decided to enter the science competition that encourages students to work in groups to simulate real research and development teams. They selected their technology, imagined and explored what that technology could be like in 20 years and prepared an in-depth report. Chemistry teacher Leigh Thompson worked with them throughout the summer and fall. The project was entitled “Marine Current Turbines.” Alex, Derek and Jack wanted to create and study a turbine that would harness the ocean’s currents to create energy for human use. The team’s project was

UPPER School By Dan Hickey

Each year when I begin to write this article, I ask the Upper School faculty for feedback. This is primarily because there are so many unique and memorable learning opportunities that occur in the Upper School each year that stand out in the minds of our faculty. The following represent some of the responses to the question, “What stands out in your mind as memorable learning experiences for our kids this year?” Our fall play, The Balkan Women, provided a gripping dramatic account of the war in Bosnia. It entertained and informed our students about how this recent historical conflict, and war in general, impacts the lives of individual citizens. The musical West Side Story followed in the spring. With a full pit orchestra, dance choreography from the original play and outstanding vocals, the production was both a momentous effort and a lesson about diversity. Senior DNA classes visited alumnae Melissa Martinenza Newell ‘99 at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner to learn about DNA’s role in forensics.

among the top 10% of all ExploraVision entries from across the country and the only winner from Delaware. Another incredible leader is Kelly Kollias. Early in the year, Kelly initiated a class project called the “Community Canvas” where eighth graders had a free space to just have fun and paint on six canvases during a free period. Retired teacher Gale Flynn had previously taught the class that their words mattered, and with her help, the class voted on the popular song Firework, by Katy Perry, which is about being true to oneself, for the theme. The canvases were displayed on Moving-Up Day and

Also, DuPont scientist and Tower Hill parent Susan Knowlton visited to teach junior biology classes about genetic engineering, development, and sales of Plenish, an improved soy oil. Among our other athletic successes this year, the boys’ soccer team made the state tournament after losing 17 seniors the previous year. Mr. Bryan Stevenson was considered by many to be one of the most engaging Forum speakers in the history of the lecture series. Mr. Stevenson is a recipient of the MacArthur Genius Award and Executive Director and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, which provides legal representation to indigent defendants and prisoners who have been denied fair and just treatment in the legal system—especially those sentenced to the death penalty or to life in prison without parole. In February, students from seven area high schools joined community leaders for the Second Annual Leadership & The Press Event, hosted our Jefferson Awards Students in Action Committee. Senator Chris Coons, Congressman John Carney, State Senator Mike Katz, Jefferson Awards Founder Sam Beard, News Journal Executive Editor David Ledford, State of Delaware Director of Economic Development Alan Levin, Photographer Elisa Komins Morris and

may be donated in the future to A.I. DuPont Hospital. Finally, every eighth grader should be cited for his/her dedication in producing the best eighth grade show in many years. The show, entitled Spies R Us, had a spy theme and involved four tenminute plays that were hilarious. The final dance number to the tune of the famous James Bond movie Thunderball was quite stirring. What a treat to watch such a funny, creative, finely-acted eighth grade show! When the eighth grade class is strong, the Middle School usually has a good year. Obviously, this was a VERY good one!

CEO of GSI Commerce Chris Saridakis made up the panel of community leaders who engaged in an insightful discussion of the importance of civility. From the keyboard of Kirby Smith, Art Department Chair: “In Art Foundations, students designed and constructed fullscale motorcycles, storefront windows, and massive marionettes including an elephant, from cardboard! This was not an easy task. In every event the most intricate and subtle architectural and engineering skills were summoned and delivered. With gravity, always an element of force to deal with, design necessarily had to consider structure, stability, endurance and balance. Because many pieces involve moving parts, friction, momentum and energy transference had to be accounted for and...wait! Is this physics?! Well, yes. It is the art of engineering, physics, math and architecture as well as the elegant aspects of pure visual art. The kids loved it!” This small sample represents the type of learning opportunities our students experience each year—representing service, the arts, athletics, academics and more—that help to make this institution so unique. As we constantly seek to improve how we educate, creative and memorable experiences will continue to be a part of what we do to inspire our students.

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AROUND TOWER HILL

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AROUND TOWER HILL 1. In February the First and Second Grades performed the The Araboolies of Liberty Street. The story, adapted by Lower School music teacher Sara Bush, centers on themes of tolerance, diversity and freedom. Author Sam Swope visited the school for the performance, book signing and student workshops. 2. Kindergarten teacher, Lindsay Tonderys ‘96, leads her class through the main hall of the school for the Lower School Halloween parade. 3. Senior Ryan Chenault lifts Max Kelleher at the 82th annual Tree Trim on December 6, 2010. 4-5. On September 11, 2010, the Board of Trustees and Headmaster Chris Wheeler held a reception at the recently renovated Hayward House. Tower Hill purchased the Harrington property in 2009 and renamed it in memory of Rosa Laird Hayward McDonald, a generous benefactor to the school. 4. Former parent Mrs. William Bours returns to Tower Hill to reconnect with the community. 5. Pictured outside the Hayward House are Headmaster Chris Wheeler, Tina Hayward, Pete Hayward ‘66, Lisa Harrington Foote ‘72, Erin Harrington and David Harrington ‘81.

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6. Martha Minow, Dean of the Harvard Law School, one of the Forum speakers meets with members of the Upper School Forum Council – Sarah Garland, Madeleine Durante, Noah Chodos and Rory Slatko. The Tower Hill Forum speaker series focused this past year on “The Bill of Rights – Today,” the role the first ten amendments of the Constitution play in contemporary American life. In its 13th year, the Forum has been made possible by the generosity of the Rappolt family in honor of Gabrielle ‘93, Sarah ‘96 and Bill Rappolt ‘99, and in recognition of the dedication, scholarship and professionalism of the Tower Hill faculty. 9

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7. Technology continues to play a major role in transforming the learning process for Tower Hill students at all levels. In addition to computers and SmartBoards®, students have begun to use iPads in the classroom for research, notes, presentations and special projects. 8. Senior Faith Lyons (center back row) was recognized for her essay at the Common Wealth Awards in April with the four Common Wealth 2011 honorees: novelist Russell Banks; columnist George Will; human-rights lawyer Cherie Blair; and ex-governor of New Mexico, Bill Richardson.

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9. 9th Grader Alex Xu and his Science teacher Sharon Reynolds were honored in October by President Obama during the first ever Science Fair at the White House, which was part of the Administration’s Educate to Innovate initiative. Alex, who wrote an essay on algae as a sustainable biofuel, was one of two students from across the country who won the DuPont Challenge Science Essay Competition. 10. Senior Vivian Prietro, as Anita, and Critter Stott ‘11, as the Jet leader Riff, pose in the Upper School musical West Side Story in April. The major production included students, faculty and a live pit orchestra. A great majority of the original choreography was maintained. The cast rose to the challenge serving up a Multa Bene Facta production of acting, singing and dancing! 11. The boys’ lacrosse team and Tower Hill supporters participated in the 13th Special Olympics Delaware/Delaware Air National Guard Airplane Pull. The event pitted teams against a C-130 aircraft in a battle of strength, stamina and fun! The boys’ lacrosse team captured 1st place in the high school division. Our second team, the Green & White Hillers led by Headmaster Chris Wheeler and comprised of coaches, parents, boosters and friends of Tower Hill, turned in the 8th best time of the day.

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12. The Jefferson Awards Team “Dunks for Diabetes/Japan Relief” event raised over $1,300. Middle School students participated with face painting, handmade jewelry, cup cakes and a 50/50 raffle. The main event, a basketball game between the students and faculty/alums, ended with a 55-52 student victory, after the three-point buzzer beater by Monty Hayman ‘87 was close but didn’t go in the basket.

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Over the Years 1. Elinor McCormick Mills ‘38, Biz Schoonover Cobb ‘36, Jean Lytle Reynolds ‘38, Carolyn Elley Long ‘36 and Coach Ellen (Baldy) Baldwin in the center. Identified by Margaret Porch Lounsbury ‘37 and Julia Ann Patterson McKay ‘39. 2. Class of 1960 Kindergarten picture. First Row: Bobby Brownell, Howard Henry, Howard Viden, Coo Carpenter Murray, Paul du Pont, unidentified boy, Sallie Turner Bell, Susie Yerkes Krewatch, unidentified boy. Second Row: Pammy Theisen, Lisa Newell Dawson, unidentified girl, Lucy Wise Iliff (partially hidden behind Howard Viden), Ann Elliott Blanchard, Susan Bissell Parker, Alice Browning Rose, Gail Rothrock Trozzo, Lois Sorthard, Catherine Wheelock Johnstone. Third Row (which starts behind Lucy Wise Iliff): David Genereaux, Jack Giles, Linakill Ehart, Philip Houghton, Peggy Riegel Weymouth (behind Gail), Jack Lockwood, Brad Reynolds, Bill Krewatch. Back Row: Linda Cooper, Peter Flint, B. Tilghman, Cynthia Burdick Patterson, Susie Speakman Sutch, Penny Elliot, Adrienne Arsht, Ford Draper, Ellen Corroon Petersen, unidentified boy (Charlie Weiner?), Chip Schutt. Identified by the Class of 1960 reunion committee. 1

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AT TOWER HILL Recognize yourself or classmates in these photos? We would enjoy hearing any details from our alums. Your input will also enable us to keep our archived records updated. Thanks! Contact Kathy Warner at 302.657.8358 x 235 or thalum@towerhill.org.

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Homecoming & Reunion 2010

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illers from as far away as Japan and Hawaii returned to Tower Hill School for 2010 Homecoming/Reunion. Many reunion classes gathered for welcome back dinners at private homes and restaurants in the Wilmington area on Friday evening, while the school community cheered on the volleyball teams here on campus. On Saturday morning about 80 people participated in the 5K Run/Walk and the Alumni Games that were sponsored by the Alumni Council. These events were followed by a tour of the school, the picnic lunch under the homecoming tent and a full schedule of athletic contests. A bench near the Alumni House, that provides a full view of the football field, was dedicated to John Pierson ‘59 (1941-2009), coach and English teacher from1968-2006. Former Headmaster Tim Golding spoke about John’s dedication to Tower Hill and many family members, faculty and alums were on hand to celebrate his long history with the school. Later that day the Alumni House terrace was dedicated to Jim H. Straub, shop teacher and coach from 1952-1974, and Jim W. Straub ’62, coach and math teacher from 1989-2005. Bob Bird ‘62

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and Joan Straub McLean ‘68 spoke about their commitment to Tower Hill and its students. Halftime of the football game provided a little trip down memory lane. Members of the Class of 1960 were honored including Dr. Richie Cussler, Chris Pechin, Dick Rogers, Terry Collison and co-Captains Dr. Dave Ness and Dr. Bill Mullis. This group of Hillers was undefeated their senior year with an 8-0 record—Tower Hill’s last undefeated football team. Under Coach Bob DeGroat they had an unbelievable run of 30 victories and one defeat in a span of four years!

That evening reunion classes ending in “0” and “5” joined Headmaster Wheeler at the Hayward House for the reunion reception. The turnout was wonderful, and many commented on the large number of alums attending the event. Everyone enjoyed seeing the Hayward House, as well as reconnecting with old friends, classmates and teachers.


50th Reunion for the Class of 1960

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By Bill and Linde Mullis, Chairs of the Class of 1960 50th Reunion

th anniversaries are exciting. But the 50th anniversary of a high school class is especially exciting as it is usually the first in a long line of 50th celebrations. The 50th reunion of the Tower Hill Class of 1960 was no different. With eager anticipation, planning commenced in the spring before the grand event. Emails, contacts, searches, questionnaires and event planning filled the summer months. Every contact conjured up the thrilling days of the late 50s. Stories, talks and reminiscences filled email inboxes. Leaders and committees emerged, a class gift was planned, old friendships were kindled and memories were resurrected. But it was not until the first day of the weekend that the reunion

of the Class of 1960 took on a life of its own. Thank God for nametags!!

school’s remarkable collection of Frank Schoonover American oil paintings.

Thirty-seven classmates returned. So what if we were a bit fatter, balder, grayer and slightly wrinkled? The people were the same, and it was great to see the hugs, the exclamations and the smiles as the class melded. As we shared family news, professional careers, accomplishments (and disappointments), all agreed that Tower Hill had set our sails for intellectual growth. A highlight of the weekend was the return of Malcolm Coates, who was revered by all. We were the first class to graduate under his headmastership.

Tower Hill’s growth in the last 50 years is truly amazing, only exceeded by the citizens it has produced, fulfilling the school’s motto, Many Things Done Well. We are proud and grateful to be a part of the Tower Hill school community, then and now.

As a token of our appreciation for all Tower Hill has meant to us, the Class of 1960 gave as our class gift the illumination and display of the

Having such fun reconnecting, the Class of 1960 made plans to get together again, but sadly, the full group that gathered over Reunion Weekend will be unable to fulfill that plan. Terry Collison, a class leader in the ‘50s and ‘60s, and the heart of this year’s reunion, passed away after a courageous battle against cancer in March. The class is grateful for the wonderful time they had together and the reunion remembrances they shared.

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Homecoming & Reunion 2011 September 30-October 1 For the most current schedule of events, go to www.towerhill.org and click on Alumni.

Homecoming & Reunion Registration Saturday, October 1 Name/s Class of Home Phone Email _________________________ ______ ________________ ___________________ _________________________ ______ ________________ ___________________ _________________________ ______ ________________ ___________________ _________________________ ______ ________________ ___________________ How many will be joining us for lunch (12:30-2:30 p.m.)? ___Alumni/family ___Students ___Parents ___Grandparents ___Faculty/staff ___Friends Will you be joining us for the cocktail reception at 5:30 p.m. at the Hayward House? Name/s HOMECOMING 5K RUN/WALK—8:00 a.m. Registration; 8:30 a.m. Start Time Name/s Run/Walk Relation to THS Age T-Shirt Size (S/M/L/XL) (Youth/Adult)

______________________ _______ ________________ _____ _______________ ______________________ _______ ________________ _____ _______________ ______________________ _______ ________________ _____ _______________ ______________________ _______ ________________ _____ _______________ ALUMNI GAMES: FIELD HOCKEY, SOCCER, FLAG FOOTBALL—10:00 a.m. Former field hockey players join Wiz Applegate. Family and friends are welcome to join the Alumni Council and Monty Hayman for soccer or flag football. Name/s Event ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________

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Waiver for 5K and Alumni Games In consideration of this entry being accepted, I, intending to be legally bound, hereby for myself, my heirs, executors, administrators, waive and release any and all rights I may have against the organization holding this event, its agents, representatives, successors, and assigns for any and all injuries suffered by me at said event.

_____________________________________________________ _______________ Signature (parent if participant is under 18) Date Mail or fax this completed registration form to: Tower Hill School, 2813 W. 17th Street, Wilmington, DE 19806 Phone: 302.657.8353 Fax: 302.657.8373 Or register online at www.towerhill.org. 24

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Class Notes Births It’s a Boy 1983 Marcus Kalaki Lee Brumskill to Tracy and Lt. Col. USAF Eric Brumskill on April 10, 2010 1988 James Coldwell Bourell to Dr. Brooke Bailey and her husband Todd Bourell on April 15, 2009 1994 Jackson David Fink to Jennifer and Gregg Fink on July 20, 2010

1995 Jane Charlotte Kiec to Kate Smolko Kiec and her husband Chris on March 13, 2010

1996 Madeline Grace Carmine to Lindsay and Andy Carmine on February 5, 2010

1995 Harper Margaret Griffin to Layton Skelly Griffin and her husband Aron on August 12, 2010

1996 Whitney Louise Mudd to Paige Akin Mudd and her husband Brian on February 27, 2010

1996 Elia Felicia Lichterman to Jessica Berlin and her husband Russ Lichterman on December 29, 2009

1997 Isabella Logan Prezzano to Caroline Gee Prezzano and her husband Doug on February 19, 2010

1996 Eloise Sloan to Lindsay Wise Tonderys and her husband Josh on February. 1, 2010

Deaths P. Terry Collison ‘60 on March 30, 2011

1996 Benjamin Ethan Naus to Laurie Prober and her husband Curt Naus on June 25, 2010

John G. Craig, Jr. ‘50 on May 26, 2010 Sallie Curtis McCoy ‘31 on August 10, 2010 Walter S. Edgar ‘76 on September 22, 2010

It’s a Girl

James A. Fairbrother ‘73 on December 27, 2010

1990 Ariana Elizabeth Altschuler to Shana and Ashley Altschuler on February 23, 2011

Elizabeth A. Garrigues ‘45 on January 15, 2011

1990 Endsley Alice Gummey to Stacey and Michael Gummey on June 20, 2010

Donald Harting ‘40 on January 2, 2011

1992 Olivia Catherine Gittings to Jayme Murray Gittings and her husband Michael on November 29, 2010 1993 Maria Helen Pappas to Stephanie and Dimitri Pappas on July 22, 2010

Elizabeth Hering Gardner ‘44 on November 23, 2010 Tylor D. Hicks ‘13 on September 25, 2010 Ashley Altschuler with his new daughter Ariana.

George A. Hyde, Jr. ‘44 on January 16, 2011 Henry T. Irwin III ‘61 on October 15, 2010 Linda L. Lang ‘70 on June 8, 2010 Marion Mahony Manning ‘33 on November 17, 2010 Theodore H. Marvin ‘71 on February 5, 2011 Marie L. McHugh ‘45 on August 17, 2010 John H. Nickle, Jr. ‘65 on January 7, 2011 Richard Reese, Jr. ‘31 on August 6, 2010 Henry B. Robertson, Jr. ‘61 on November 12, 2010 Caroline Schutt Brown ‘56 on July 7, 2010 Jane Scott Garnett ‘44 on May 20, 2010 Thomas S. Smith, Jr. ‘43 on February 7, 2011 William W. Spruance ‘34 on January 15, 2011 Maude Urmston Chilton ‘53 on January 23, 2011

Eloise and Lucy, daughters of Lindsay Tonderys ‘96.

Willard T. White, Jr. ‘45 on August 29, 2010

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Class Notes 1940

1957

Eleanor Thompson Pease reports that she was sorry she was unable to attend her 70th reunion last fall but sends her love to all.

The Honorable Michael N. Castle was awarded the Josiah Marvel Cup in January. The Marvel Cup Award was established in 1951 to honor a Delawarean who has made an outstanding contribution to the state, community and society. Carol Kitchell reports that Phyllis Coerver Jones’ husband, Pete Bernard Jones, passed away in March in Crozet, Virginia. Her address is 2271 Whitehall Road, Crozet, VA 22932.

1943 David E. Rayner writes his sad news from Texas that his wife passed away last July.

1947 Since retiring from the Princeton University faculty four years ago, Robert Jahn has busied himself with an extensive archiving of the results of some three decades of his Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) program. Most recently, his longtime colleague, Brenda Dunne, and he have completed a comprehensive summary of the empirical evidence, theoretical models, cultural and pragmatic implications and personal interpretations of their 30 years of work in this field.  Entitled Consciousness and the Source of Reality: The PEAR Odyssey, the book is available from Amazon and Barnes and Noble, and a copy has been placed in the Tower Hill library.

1948 John Hyde shares that 2010 was a year of celebrations. In June he celebrated his 80th birthday with two parties—one in Delaware with family and friends of his youth and the second in Williamstown, where he has lived for more than half a century. John comments that the latter was a “large gathering including friends and colleagues ranging in age and profession from men who were on the Williams’ faculty when I was an undergraduate to a younger generation of townspeople, athletic coaches, and faculty colleagues—some of whom I had hired including the acting president of the college!” Right: John Hyde celebrates his 80th birthday with family and friends. Above: Karen, daughter of George Hyde ‘44; Abby, daughter of Elizabeth “Biddy” Hyde Eaton ‘46; John Hyde ‘48; Michael Hyde ‘87, son of Steve Hyde ‘59 and Becka, daughter of Art Hyde ‘52. Below: Heather Hering Brown ‘78; John Hyde ‘48; Anne Klutely Aquadro ‘48; George Hering ‘49 and his wife, Fairfax who is a former Tower Hill faculty member.

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Attending the presentation of the Josiah Marvel Cup to Mike Castle ‘57 were Congressman John Carney, DSCC President and CEO Jim Wolfe, DSCC Board President Tommy Cooper, the Hon. Ted Kaufman, U.S. Senator Tom Carper, Jane Castle, Mike Castle ‘57, the Hon. Pete du Pont ‘52, U.S. Senator Chris Coons ‘81, Governor Jack Markell and the Hon. Hal Haskell ‘39. Photo by Dick Dubroff/Final Focus.


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Class Notes 1958 Members of the jazz band “The Mystics” had a mini-reunion weekend in November. Dave Nichols travelled from Bellingham, Washington, and Lavern and Bill Robertson from Green Pond, New Jersey, to Larry Beck’s home in Hillsboro Beach, Florida. The group drove to Clearwater to attend and participate in the three-day Suncoast Dixieland Jazz Festival. They had a wonderful weekend of singing, playing, listening, reminiscing and renewing close friendships.

1959 Christopher Getman and his wife hosted Sally and Steve Hyde at their home in Hamden, Connecticut. Chris comments,“They are a lot of fun. Steve is as ugly as ever!”

Joan Beck, David Nichols, Larry Beck, Laverne Robertson, Bill Robertson at the Suncoast Dixieland Jazz Festival.

Larry Beck, Bill Robertson and Dave Nichols reminisce during their mini reunion.

1963 Tibbie Hoopes Field writes that last year was a “Tower Hill Reunion Year” for her. While in Arizona for a conference in April 2010, she had a surprise meeting with Alice Flint Roe who now lives in Tucson. While visiting the Green Fields Country Day School where her uncle Charlie Snowdon and later her brother Toby Hoopes ‘61 had attended, Tibbie was spotted by Alice, whose husband Bill had been on the school’s board and whose children had attended the school. “Since neither of us had aged (ha,ha), we recognized each other immediately!” The other reunion was at Charlie and Abby Diemar’s wedding on July 17, 2010. Charlie is the son of Eleanor Griggs Diemar ‘62. Of the many guests at the wedding, 11 had attended Tower Hill. Last August March Wier Pepper and her husband Perry stopped by on their way to Maine. Tibbie, who is now involved in historic preservation, and her husband Bob, who is a lawyer, would love to show the beautiful New Hampshire seacoast to other Hillers. Contact Tibbie at123 Mill Road, North Hampton, NH 03862 or 603.964.8763.

Tibbie Hoopes Field ‘63 with Alice Flint Roe ‘63 in Tucson, Arizona, in April 2010.

Center: Hillers attending the wedding of Charles Diemar, son of Eleanor Griggs Diemar included Carlye Griggs ‘83, Jane Hobbs Griggs ‘68, John Griggs ‘67, Jenna Griggs ‘83, Ted McLean ‘65, Abby and Charles Diemar, Eleanor Griggs Diemar ‘62, Shirley Griggs Bradley ‘64, unidentified guest and Tibbie Hoopes Field ‘63. Attending but not pictured were Pam and Hank Abernathy ‘62.

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Class Notes 1964

1972

We are sorry to hear that Alan Nichols has a brain tumor and his vision has been severely compromised. He is living with his sister in Atlanta, Georgia, and welcomes hearing from any Tower Hill friends. He can be reached at sftspike@aol.com, his sister’s phone 404.931.3011 or at 1150 St. Charles Place, NE, Atlanta, GA 30306.

Ellen Cannon started a new job as editorial director for financial services web sites at QuinStreet, which is based in Foster City, California. Ellen spent the summer there getting to know her new colleagues and the job. Now she is back in Palm Beach Gardens working remotely. “It’s a new challenge since I never worked from home—a big change from years of working in newsrooms. So far, so good!” She will be going to the Bay Area several times a year and hopes to catch up with other Hillers. She comments, “And of course, I’d love to connect with alumni in the Palm Beach area anytime!”

1966 Anne Oldach was a featured artist at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts this past March. Anne also reports that she recently had lunch with Sheila Canby Voss and Margaretta Bredin Brokaw in NYC where they visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Sheila is Curator of Islamic art at the Met.

1967 Margaret Flook Lisberger is proud to announce that her son Carl Lisberger was recently accepted at Harvard Law School and will be attending in the fall. This is especially gratifying for her since both of her parents graduated from Harvard. Her other news is that after 28 years TRON: Legacy, the sequel to her husband Steven’s original film TRON, was released in December 2010.

1969

1974 Ellen Jamison Kullman spoke at Fortune Magazine’s Most Powerful Women Conference in Washington. Ellen weighed in as No.18 on the magazine’s list. President Obama appointed Ellen, who is CEO of DuPont, to a two-year term on the U.S.-India Forum last year. She will cochair the World Economic Summit in New Delhi. Martin Bond and his wife Mary Fuller Bond ‘76 have moved to their “empty nester” house in Radnor, Pennsylvania. Martin continues with Tactix Real Estate Advisors also in Radnor. Their daughter Louise graduated from Hollins College and is working in Blacksburg, Virginia, and

Taken backstage after a taping for the February 23, 2011, Dr. Oz Show; his sister, Seval Oz Ozveren ‘79, Kemi Lickle O’Donnell ‘79, Dr. Mehmet Oz ‘78, Lisa Ashley ‘79 and Ann Barlow Ashley ‘79.

the younger daughter Anne is a sophomore at Lafayette College. Virginia Seitz, a speaker at the Tower Hill Forum speaker series in October 2009, was nominated in January by President Obama to serve as the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel in the Department of Justice, a position that became famous for approving waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods in the Bush years.

1975 Jim Ehret writes that his family is doing great with his wife now working at Ehret Construction as Vice President of Marketing/Business Development. Their daughter attends Tulane, and their son will likely go to the University of Delaware.

Robin Layton Mann was elected president of the Sierra Club nationally. Robin has a long history as an environmental activist and as a great mediator inside the Sierra Club.

1971 Madelyn Yelton reports that her place in Maryland, Rebel Ridge Farms, continues to excel as a kennel facility as well as a training facility. Two of their retrievers qualified for the 2010 National Amateur Retriever Championship, which was held in Oregon. One of the two was a finalist.

Leslie Harvey Lemonick, Jim Ehret, Joan Gamble and Carol Sullivan Taylor were among the attendees at last fall’s reunion party for the Class of 1975 at Jim Ehret’s house in Wilmington.

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Class Notes daughter Sophie is three years old, and they were expecting a baby this past spring. Eric and his wife Jen recently moved to Malvern, and he is still with Comcast in New Castle, Delaware. Dr. Jean Hoffman-Censits writes that she is enjoying her job as a genitourinary medical oncologist at Jefferson in Philadelphia. She and her husband David were thrilled to welcome their adopted son Liam to the family in October.

1992

Members of the Class of 1985 attended a reunion party last October hosted by Rob Maroney. The group was thrilled with the turnout. The prize for the farthest distance traveled went to Maurice Holden who came from Japan. Class of 1975 attendees: Allison Crowe Stautberg, Jack Morton, Nell Hyman Kelley, Laura Hoopes Nilsen, Kirsten Poole, Tracey Twyman, Holly Mitchell, Cydney Louth Gilbertson, Ian Bunch, Lee Leonard Podolsky, Mark DeSimone, Maurice Holden, Amy Gordon, Steve DiSabatino, Rebecca Darling Spencer, Doug Brown, Tim Alabashi, Randy Williamson, Cyndi Biondi Burt, Elizabeth Mell, Missy Jolley Damon, Lynne du Pont Solacoff, Ann Sawyer Chilton, David Owens, Laura LeRoy Travis and Rob Mallouk. Photo provided by Allison Crowe Stautberg.

1982 Tuck Rickards writes that his family has moved to San Francisco where their oldest son, Andrew, is a freshman at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Katie is a junior and Matt is a freshman in high school. Tuck enjoyed seeing other Hillers at the Tower Hill Boston reception where he saw Brad du Pont, John Black and a few other ‘82 classmates. Tuck reports that he recently saw Susan Williams who is on the Board of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear that Tuck recently joined.

1985 David Nowland writes that after nine years in Europe—Spain, Denmark and, most recently, Poland—he and his family are moving across the Atlantic and the equator to Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he will continue his career with The CocaCola Company. As IMC Director for the South Latin Business Unit, he will be responsible for advertising, media, digital marketing, sponsorships and design for all of the company’s brands in Argentina, Chile,

Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. While he, his wife Cici, and his two sons Henry and Jack are a bit sad to be leaving friends and favorite places in Europe, they are “excited about the opportunity to live in such a vibrant city as Buenos Aires and to explore a new continent.”

1987 Mary Foulk is living and working in Portland, Oregon. She is married and has two beautiful children.

1989 Orin Kerr was a Forum speaker at Tower Hill in September 2010. As part of the series on “The Bill of Rights—Today,” he spoke about search and seizure rights applicable to the students’ daily lives. See the article on page 10.

1990 Eric Hall writes that he was sorry to miss everybody at Homecoming. It was his daughter Ava’s second birthday on November 23. Their

Since the last Bulletin update, Nick Newlin reports that he and his wife have moved to Boston and have three children—a son born in October 2008 and twin girls born March 2010. In December Nick started a new job at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt as director of product management working with consumer educational products to help elementary school students and their parents.

1993 Charles Page is pleased to announce the adoption of twins, Ingrid and Marguerite, born September 2009. The girls arrived at the Page home in NYC in September 2010.

1996 Lindsay Wise Tonderys has become our resident reporter for all the wonderful news about new babies born to fellow Hillers. Lindsay continues to teach Kindergarten at Tower Hill and has two daughters, Eloise and Lucy. See photo on page 25. Emily Samson Tepe met informally with the Upper School Chorus in October. Emsy talked with the students, answered questions about her recent experiences as a professional musician and performed two numbers in sharply contrasting styles. After completing her postgraduate studies on a Fulbright scholarship in Sweden, she remained there for several years, pursuing a career in opera, including appearances with the Swedish Royal Opera Company and a parallel career as a pop music star under the name IVA. She has recently returned to the U.S. and is performing and doing recording projects.

1999 Meredith Holzman was in the off-Broadway play After the Revolution.

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Class Notes 2000 After the earthquake in Japan, Stacy Palmer, Tower Hill’s Administrative Assistant, contacted 1st Lt. Ariel Kayne about his relatives in Japan. Ari’s family in Japan was reported to be safe save some property damage. Ari wrote back that he appreciates our concern and commented, “It’s been a sad week for us as we’ve watched this tragedy unfold.” Ari is currently deployed in Kyrgyzstan where he flies combat missions.

2006 Marta Drane graduated from Denison University with a major in communications and is spending this year working as an au pair with a family in Munich, Germany. She completed her Division III tennis career at Denison with her selection in her senior year as an All-American in singles and doubles and was named North Coast Athletic Conference Player of the Year. Marta was also selected as an All-American in doubles during her sophomore and junior years, and she and her doubles partner reached the final or semi-final of the Division III national championships four times. During her tennis career, Denison finished the season as high as third in the national rankings.

2008 Garrett Lyons continues with his volunteer work at the University of Virginia. He works with a volunteer group, Bridging the Gap, which helps refugee children adjust to life in the United States. University of North Carolina junior Caitlin Van Sickle was named a 2010 first-team AllAmerican by the National Field Hockey Coaches Association. Caitlin was also named the Atlantic Coast Conference field hockey Defender of the Year. While Caitlin excels on defense, she tied for second in scoring. This past spring she travelled to Europe with the U.S. National Field Hockey Team.

2009 University of North Carolina sophomore forward Meghan Lyons played in 10 field hockey games this past season. Lyons earned first-team AllState honors at Tower Hill in field hockey and lacrosse. Justin Hicks made quite an impact on Bucknell record books by running the second fastest 300 meter time in program annals,

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crossing the line in 35.43 seconds At the IC4A and ECAC Championships at Princeton, he became the second Bison in men’s history to be named All-East in two events at the same championship. Mary Hobbs, a sophomore at Haverford College, was named to the academic all-area squad in field hockey. After two seasons, she ranks second in all-time goals for the school. She was named the athletic department’s 2010 MacIntosh Award recipient presented to the top scholar-athlete. In addition to field hockey, Mary played basketball this year and was a member of Musicool, a student-run theater group. Field hockey fans may also have heard her singing the national anthem before a game.

Caroline Holliday ‘10 and Katie Applegate ‘10 after the Tufts/Amherst lacrosse game, joined by Wiz Montaigne Applegate ‘79, Tower Hill teacher, coach and parent.

2010 Emily Schuckert was named to the National Field Hockey Academic Squad. As a freshman on the Yale Bulldog field hockey team, she played in all seventeen games, starting in seven of them. She was also awarded the Senior Award, given to the freshman team member who reflects positive contribution to the team’s philosophy and whose individual character encourages the future direction and excellence of Yale Field Hockey. Katie Applegate and Caroline Holliday, who were captains of the Tower Hill girls’ lacrosse team, competed against each other this past spring representing Tufts and Amherst, respectively. During their senior year at Tower Hill, Katie was an All-American and First Team AllState, and Caroline was First Team All-State. Tufts won 14-13 win over Amherst in the season opener for both squads.

Faculty Ellen Dolmetsch, Lower School Librarian, attended the Pennsylvania School Library Association annual conference. In addition, as a hobby she has been studying with various teachers to learn the art of primitive and traditional rug hooking, an art form that originated in Atlantic Canada and Maine. The Tower Hill wrestling community turned out on March 12, to honor Athletic Director Jack Holloway at his retirement as Head Wrestling Coach. The reception was held in and around the “Holloway Wrestling Room,” a space that was dedicated in his honor last May following the completion of the Carpenter Field House renovations. The event was highlighted by personal remarks from returning alumni and current wrestlers. Matthew Sanyour ‘07 summarized the feelings of all those present by commenting, “Thank you, Coach Holloway, for making us both better athletes and better young men.” Jack is a legend in Delaware wrestling, coaching for a total of 35 years and achieving many notable honors including seven-time Delaware Coach of the Year, National Scholastic Wrestling Coach of the Year, and induction into the Delaware Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2003 and the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame in 2008. College Counseling Director Jill Lauck was featured in the January 2011 issue of Martha Stewart Living in an article about a group of crafters who get together to create, share, try something new and have fun. Jill dedicates her spare time to making cards under the name Cherry Blossom Paper. Her website is www.etsy.com/shop/jilllauck.  The Mellen Press has published a collection of nine scholarly articles by History Department Chair Dr. Ellis Wasson, stretching back over three decades. The title is the book is The Role of Ruling Class Adaptability in the British Transition from Ancient Regime to Modern State: The Open Elite of Britain and Ireland from the Middle Ages to the Second World War (Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY, 2011). He also has two more books on the verge of


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Class Notes publication. Headmaster Chris Wheeler and Language teacher Kevin Ruth were listed in the “Top 100 School Administrator Blogs” for blogs most read by administrators, superintendents and heads of school. Wheeler’s blog, “Aspiring Heads - Inspiring Headships: A blog for aspiring heads of independent schools and others interested in independent school leadership,” is packed full of educational videos, guest posts

and book recommendations and builds on his recently published book Inside Their Headships: Conversations with Independent School Heads, a collection of interviews with eleven current and former heads of school. Ruth’s blog “Introit” is about the life and culture of independent schools, covering topics from teaching to governance. Introit has been running for over two years and has readership on six continents.

Tower Hill School Directory Update As many of you know, we have partnered with PCI (Publishing Concepts) to bring our community an updated printed alumni directory. This new directory will be in addition to the online directory available today on the Tower Hill website. PCI is a well-established company, and you can rest assured that your personal information will be secure and used solely for our records. At this time, you should have received a postcard mailing and an email requesting updated information. Do not feel obliged to purchase a directory, but we do hope you will cooperate with PCI’s request for information as we update our records.

The featured artists in the Founders’ Gallery for March 2011 were the Tower Hill Art Faculty, including Gabe Rothwell, Navanjali Kelsey, Kirby Smith, Rowena Macleod and Rich Pierce.

If you have any questions about the directory, please contact Kathy Warner at kwarner@towerhill.org or 302.657.8358 X 235.

In Memoriam

Jim Ten Broeck . January 13, 1926-June 16, 2011

By Harry Baetjer, Associate Head of School

J Known for his warm smile, Jim Ten Broeck was a favorite of students and faculty.

im Ten Broeck, in the immortal words of his late friend, Ernie Savage, was “one of the great ones.” From his arrival in 1966 until he left Tower Hill in 1988, Jim made huge contributions to the school and its students. He was a demanding history teacher who loved history and wanted his students to question him and to challenge the ideas that were presented. This desire led him to regularly offer students the opportunity to prepare for the American History AP exam, and in one case, to tutor one student who wanted to prepare for the AP exam in European History. (Chris Coons, United States Senator from Delaware, was that student.) Additionally, he was, at various times, chair of the History Department, dean of students, director of studies, as well as the director of college guidance. Jim also reached beyond Tower Hill as the vice-president of the Independent Teachers Association of Philadelphia and president of the Delaware Council of Social Studies and the Potomac and Chesapeake Association of College Admissions Counselors. He also served on the vestry his church and the board of SODAT and Pacem in Terris. All these contributions Jim lived as part of his ideals of being a life-long learner, of encouraging others to be as well, and of finding ways to give back to the community.

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Alumni Celebrate

the History They Helped Create Wilmington Receptions

New York Reception

Below left: Alumni gather on February 10, 2011, at Klondike Kates in Wilmington. Kathlyn Gamble ‘07, Samir Yezdani ‘09, Nate McDonald ‘09, Kyle Anderson ‘09, Max Timmons ‘09, Andrue Smith ‘09, Gina Paladinetti ‘08. Below right: Alumni holiday get-together on December Friday 17, 2010, at Kelly’s Logan House in Wilmington. Mary Ann Kelly MacDonald ‘79, Wiz Montaigne Applegate ‘79, Dennis Salter and Beth Carney Salter ‘82. Over 60 alums gather at the NYC Princeton Club on April 6, 2011, to renew friendships and talk about old times. Above left: Russell Lewis ‘01, Greg Kauffman ‘96, Chris Casscells ‘02, Jennifer Bayard ‘02 and Corbin Director ‘03. Above right: Brad du Pont ‘82 and Sunny Hayward ‘60.

Washington Reception Alumni Lacrosse Game In March alumni returned to Tower Hill to scrimmage the varsity lacrosse team. The old guys proved they still have it, beating the varsity team 10-4. Pictured below: Derrick Schmidt, former assistant coach; Chris Aitken, assistant coach; Nick Wingate ‘04; Jon Livadas ‘05; Matt Moyer ‘05; Nick Jacobs ‘05; Nick Casscells ‘04; Anthony Hidell ‘03; John Mongan ‘04; Sean Baetjer ‘05, assistant coach; Tim Reed ‘04; Greg Mackenzie ‘06; Scott Singer ‘06; Thomas Martel ‘07; Sean Snyder ‘08; Stephen Chehi ‘07; Grant Firestone ‘06, assistant coach; Ian Lonsdale ‘07; Ripley Nielsen ‘10; Max Timmons ‘09; Brad du Pont ‘82, head coach.

Alumni gather in Washington, D.C. on February 24, 2011. Below: Jamie du Pont MacKenzie ‘70; Dan Hickey, head of Upper School; Raisa Shulkov ‘06; David Lazar ‘06; Will Carey ‘06; Logan Weaver ‘10; Sarah Kreshtool ‘08; and Harry Baetjer, associate head of school.

Alumni Care Packages Members of the Alumni Council assemble care packages in February for our college alumni. Jennifer Sinex Abramczyk ‘86 and Doug McCoy ‘82.

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Above: Carol Rendall ‘40, Ginger Smith ‘66, Brad du Pont ‘82 and Casey Owens ‘01.


We nurture each student’s talents, passions, dreams and pursuits.

When you give to the Annual Fund, you join others in being stewards of an educational experience that is distinctive to Tower Hill. Â Give today by visiting www.towerhill.org, calling 302.657.8358 ext.252, or mailing your gift to Tower Hill School Annual Fund, 2813 W. 17th Street, Wilmington, DE 19806.


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Please keep us informed with all updated addresses.

Aerial view of the Tower Hill School campus, May 2010.

Tower Hill School Bulletin - Spring/Summer 2011  

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Tower Hill School Bulletin - Spring/Summer 2011  

http://www.towerhill.org/ftpimages/213/misc/misc_101623.pdf