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You’ve Reached Your Destination

2015/16 Tourism & Relocation Magazine

T & R Magazine


You’ve Reached Your Destination

2015/16 Tourism & Relocation Magazine

T & R Magazine


Ravalli County Bank Need a Loan? We’ve got you covered! Construction

Mortgage

Home Equity

Vacation

Auto

Come see one of our friendly Loan Officers today! 224 W. Pinckney St., P.O. Box 150, Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-1222 • www.familyofbanks.com Voted by the Ravalli Republic

“The Bitterroot’s Best”

Outdoor Dining Server l Bartender l Sports Bar l Place for a first date l Business Lunch l Bloody Mary l Wine List l l

hamilton

Wine & Liquor

For your enjoyment l

Patio Dining Trout Pond l 12 TV’s

l

Our Steaks, seafood, pasta, salads, soups are made fresh daily

FOOD • DRINKS • SPORTS HAMILTON, MONTANA

Outstanding Selection of Wines with Monthly Tastings

140 Bitterroot Plaza Dr - Hamilton MT 59840 - (406) 375-0007

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T & R Magazine


Community Information County Commissioners, City Mayors Four (4) Incorporated Towns Number of Volunteer Fie Departments Personnel - 158 Number of Law Enforcement Officers 42 Land Ownership: Public 74% Private 26% 25 Miles Wide - 96 Miles Long 2,394 sq. miles

ngler’s odge & abins 815B US Hwy 93 S - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-0980 www.anglerslodgemt.com www.visitmt.com

Tax Rate: Per capita taxes: 43% of US Avg. Real Property - Approximate 105 1.32% of Market Calue Business Equipment 1.2% of Mkt. Value Median Household Income 2011 $43,512 Average Household Income 2011 $36,024 Per Capital Income 2011 $24,641

Features beautiful, completely furnished individual lodges overlooking our own private lake and the Bitterroot Mountains. Rentals By: Day - Week - Month

NO SALES TAX

Housing - Median Reported Sales Price: Single Family: $213,500 Median House Rental $588 Commercial $1.00 Retirement Centers 7 Climiate Avg. Min Jan. 17.6 Degrees April 32 Degrees July 50 Degrees Oct. 31 Degrees

Avg. Max 33 Degrees 60 Degrees 83.7 Degrees 61 Degrees

Open Year Round!

Great for: l Weddings l Family Reunions lCorporate Retreats l Vacation Rentals l Romantic Evenings

Average Rainfall: 12-15 Inches Growing Days: 130-150 Days

Population Projections: 2015 2020 2025 2030

T & R Magazine

50,860 56,540 62,370 68,360

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Welcome to our Beautiful Bitterroot Valley The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce would like to extend our heartfelt welcome to you and your family. We invite you to visit us and enjoy our lifestyle. Please let us know if we can be of further assistance as you explore our valley ‘From River To Ridge’™ Our valley - 96 miles in length and 25 miles wide - is nestled between the Bitterroot Mountains on the west and the Sapphire Mountain range on the east. This natural setting creates a sublime year-round climate and has earned us the reputation as the “Banana Belt of Montana”. The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce is comprised of six (6) distinct communities with a modest population of only 40,212. Each community is unique and has its own story to tell. Join us as we present to you our communities, our culture, our way of life and the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. We extend to you an invitation to visit the Bitterroot Valley Chamber - Come see us, learn more about our valley and the many grandeurs of Glacier Country and Western Montana.

Enjoy your stay!

105 East Main - Hamilton MT 59840 - (406) 363-2400 localinfo@bvchamber.com www.bitterrootchambercom

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Al Mitchell Chamber Director

Pat Easley Editor/Office Manager

T & R Magazine


Index of Advertisers We would like to thank all of the following who helped make this publication possible A Lil' Bit of Heaven - page 75 A2Z Personnel - page 19 Alta Ranch - page 75 Angler's Lodge & Cabins - page 3 Bitterroot Dancers - page 73 Bitterroot River Inn - page 62 Blacksmith Brewing - page 46 Bradley O's - page 37 Brewfest - page 24 Bruce Gould - page 72 Canyon View Dental - page 75 City of Hamilton - page 29-30-31 Copacetic Woodflooring - page inside back cover Craig Siphers - page 74 Daly Mansion - page 52 Edward Jones - Willa Carr Lande - page 39 Farm Bureau Financial Services - page 37 First American Title - page 37 First Interstate Bank - page 19 First Security Bank - page 53 Habitat for Humanity - page 59 Hamilton Assembly of God - page 59 Hardtime Bluegrass Festival - page 63 Higherground Brewing - page 49 Iron Horse Athletic Club - page 38 Kinetico Quality Water - page 23 Langford Drafting - page 74 Legacy Phone Directory - back cover Lost Trail Powder Mountain - page 65 Marci Almond Realtor - page 33 Marie Christopher - page 34 Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital - page 55 Merchants Moving & Storage - page 33 Mikesell's Fine Jewelry - page 73 Milton Development LLC (Grants Meadow) - page 23 Missoula International Airport - page 6 Montana Westgate - page 70 Morrison-Maierle Inc - page 67 NorthWestern Energy - inside back cover Osprey Outfitters - page 74 Paper Clip - page 33 ProTravel International - page 73 Ravalli County Bank - inside front cover Ravalli Electric Co-op - page 27 REMLC - page 61 River to Ridge Magazine - page 82 T & R Magazine

Sapphire Lutheran Home - page 33 Sapphire Studios - page 61 Schrock Construction - page 57 Sears of Hamilton - page 37 Smoke ‘EM’ Staining - page 27 St. Mary's Historical Mission - page 9 Stewart Title of Ravalli - page 71 The Catered Table - page 63 The Edge - inside front cover The Montana Chocolate Co - page 69 Tin Cup Lodge - page 39 TownHouse Inn of Hamilton - page 39 Travellers Rest Cabins - page 70 Valley Drug - page 37 Valley Mini Storage - page 62 Valley View Estates - page 76 Western Montana Clinic, Lolo Family Practice - page 76 Western Montana Clinic, Lolo Family Practice - page 56 Wilderness Spirit Cabins - page 73 Windermere Real Estate - page 59 Your Outdoor Living Market - page 77

Table of Contents: Visit the Bitterroot Valley - Travel Information Page 6 Communities u Darby Page 32 u Hamilton Page 31 u Corvallis Page 28 u Victor Page 10 u Stevensville Page 8-9 u Florence Page 7 n Accommodations (Lodging) Page 11 n 108 Things To Do Page 12 n Brewery & Wine Trail Page 44 n Valley Map Page 45 n Calendar of Annual Events Page 20 n Fishing Page 35-36 n Biking in the Bitterroot Page 29-30 n Sightseeing Page 42-43 n Historical Page 52-53 n Real Estate Page 79-80 n Seasons in the Valley Page 57-61 n Community Information Page 62-64 n Dining Page 80-81 n Medical Services Page 54-56 n Prehistoric Page 62-63 n Arts & Culture Page 76-77 n Camping/Hiking/Birdwatching Page 60 n Community Information Page 72 n n

Photos: Patrick Chaplin - Eric Elander - Marie Christopher - Scott Watters - Nathan DeBoer - Ann Bethea Chase Cooper - Nici Wallner Contributing writers: Chuck Stranahan and Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital

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TTheravel Information Missoula International Airport is the Gateway to Western Montana. It is conveniently located within 1 mile of the busy shopping district of North Reserve, ten minutes from downtown Missoula and the University of Montana and just 45 miles from Hamilton. Four airlines - Alaska, Allegiant, Delta, and United - have operations at the airport and serve twelve nonstop destinations: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Oakland, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, and Seattle. Two gift shops, rental cars, a travel service, a real estate rental office, and two restaurants are on-site. Missoula International Airport is also home to the largest aerial firefighting depot in the U.S., the base of operations for the legendary 'Smokejumpers,' the Museum of Mountain Flying, Aeronautics, Homestead Helicopters, and two Fixed Base Operators: Minuteman Jet Center and Northstar Jet. www.flymissoula.com

Bitterroot Airports The Bitterroot Valley has two airports. Stevensville Airport is on the north end of the valley at an elevation of 3,620 feet. The hard surface runway is 3,800 feet in length. The Hamilton Airport is in the middle of the valley and at an elevation of 3,638 feet. The runway is 4,200 feet in length and is paved and lighted.

Mileage from Hamilton Missoula 45 miles Glacier Nat. Park 184 miles Spokane 249 miles West Yellowstone 314 miles Billings 383 miles Boise 420 miles Salt Lake City 465 miles To Missoula

Florence 22 Miles Unincorporated Community

Stevensville

Population ~ 765

Florence Elevation 3,218 10 Miles

Victor Unincorporated Community

Population ~ 1,815

Stevensville Victor

Population ~ 745

7 Miles

96 Miles

City - 206 Buck Ave All Offics - 406-777-5271

Hamilton 4 Miles City - 223 South Second St All Offices - 406-363-2101

Elevation 3,370

Corvallis

Elevation 3,477

Hamilton

Elevation 3,572

18 Miles

Population ~ 4,363

Grantsdale

Corvallis Unincorporated Community Population ~ 976

Darby County Offices

Darby

205 Bedford - Hamilton Assessor - 406-375-2700 Clerk/Recorder - 406-375-6555

Elevation 3,887 8 Miles

Vehicle Registration - 406-375-6585 Conner Drivers License - 406-777-4388 102 Main Street in Stevensville

City - Tanner Street All Offices - 406-821-3753 Population ~ 722 11 Miles

Sula

Lost Trail Visitor Info. Center Elevation 7, 014

To Salmon, ID

Gateway MISSOULA

TO WESTERN MONTANA

flymissoula.com

DIRECT FLIGHTS

to twelve major markets.

CONNECTING FLIGHTS

to thousands of destinations. Nonstop service to:

• Las Vegas, Los angeLes, oakLand, Phoenix-Mesa • MinneaPoLis, saLt Lake City • atLanta, ChiCago, denVer, san FranCisCo • PortLand, seattLe

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T & R Magazine


Community of

Florence

Things To Do Around Florence Threemile Wildlife Management area encompasses 6,050 acres. The area may be accessed by two-wheel drive vehicles between May 15 and December 1. The area lends itself to mountain biking in the summer motorcycles and ATV’s are not permitted in this area. The primary goal is to provide winter range for elk and compatible recreational opportunities for the public. Threemile provides a mixture of motorized access and walk-in hunting opportunities for elk, mule deer, grouse and black bear. Regulations for hunting district 204 apply to Threemile. Few elk inhabit this area during the summer months, but are often observed nonetheless. Most likely are songbirds and raptors. Activities offered are: Bicycling, Big Game, Bird Watching, Bird hunting, Bow Hunting, Deer Hunting and Camping. Threemile Wildlife Management area is located 9 miles east of Florence. Call 406-542550 for more information.

T & R Magazine

The bike trail begins in Lolo and runs all the way to Hamilton. This trail was completed in 2012 with the completion of the four-lane of Hwy 93 in Victor. Bikers, walkers and joggers alike take advantage of the trail as a safe and fun-filled family outing. Hideout Mountain is a playground that your kids will want to stay all day with many surprises! Farmers Markets are a weekly event during the summer months, flowers to fruits, vegetables and local crafts. If you like walking, biking or riding, Florence has great trails. Along Highway 93 you can go north to Lolo onto Chief Looking Glass Campground (on the Bitterroot River) or you can go south to Stevensville Bass Creek Campground or Poker Joe River Access - bicycling is encouraged! The Doug Vulcan trail runs from Florence to the Bitterroot River where Fish, Wildlife & Parks maintains river access. On the west side of the Bitterroot River, you can follow the Lewis and Clark Trail where Capt. Clark and his men returned from Oregon in 1806. Get Outdoors Day in Florence is held in June and begins early with a run, then demonstrations, exhibits, an old pick-up show, great music and some great old fashioned fun. There are fly fishing demonstrations, bike repair booth and free pony rides to keep young and old alike entertained. Florence also hosts many golf tournaments and the second Saturdays they host a free pancake breakfast at the Fire Department from 8 am to noon. There are also seasonal bazaars, crafts and quilt shows.

History of Florence Its earlier settlers called the town ‘One Horse’ for the little creek that drains through it from the Bitterroot Mountains. In 1880, the town was renamed Florence for the wife of A.B. Hammond. Mr. Hammond was instrumental in opening the Bitterroot Valley for lumbering, and brought the railroad to the Bitterroot to transport timber. He set up a sawmill in the center of one of the Bitterroot’s best logging areas, and this site became the town of Florence in 1888. There was a town to the north called Carlton, which merged with Florence, thus the school name of Florence Carlton. Around the turn of the century, Florence had a post office, railroad depot, hotel, catholic and disciple churches, I.O.O.F. Hall, blacksmith shop, livery stable, school, several stores, a small creamery and, of course, saloons.

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Montana’s first permanent settlement is thriving as a great little community - overflowing with small town charm. The Stevensville Main Street organization, working with all of the community businesses, strives to ensure that the community grows and prospers. The first Friday of every month residents and visitors enjoy ‘First Friday’ when the Main Street Businesses stay open late and show you their Stevensville hospitality. In the summer there are many community events, including Western Heritage Days, the Creamery Picnic, Scarecrow Festival, plays, and their Annual Christmas Celebration the first week in December.

Community of

Stevensville

History Historic St. Mary’s Mission “Where Montana Began” - 48 years before Montana attained statehood! On September 24, 2016, St. Mary’s Mission and Montana will celebrate the 175th anniversary of the first pioneer settlement in Montana. All are invited to see the reenactment of the Salish Indians welcoming the Blackrobe Missionaries. Learn more about the settlers who helped shape the early beginnings of Montana before statehood. During the decade 1831-1841 four separate delegations of the Salish and Nez Perce Indian tribes traveled to St. Louis to petition for “Black Robes” to live among them. Belgian Jesuit, Fr. Pierre Jean DeSmet, along with 5 missionaries were sent in response to the requests. On September 24, 1841 St. Mary’s Mission established the first church in the Pacific Northwest and the first settlement in Montana. In November of 1845, Fr. Anthony Ravalli, S.J., arrived at St. Mary’s after being recruited from Italy by Fr. DeSmet. Fr. Ravalli was a true renaissance man in addition to being a Jesuit priest. He was Montana’s first physician, surgeon and pharmacist. Fr. Ravalli was an architect, artist, sculptor, and built the first grist mill and sawmill. He was assigned to St. Mary’s during 1845-1850 and again from 1866 until his death in 1884. Ravalli County was named in honor of Fr. Ravalli in 1893. Historic St. Mary’s Mission truly is “Where Montana Began” 48 years before Montana became a state. The photo gallery in Chief Victor’s Cabin, circa 1861, brings a sense of the 19th century when the Indian and European cultures merged. The Chapel, Fr. Ravalli’s log cabin and pharmacy are all restored to the 1879 era, furnished with items handmade by Fr. Ravalli. The Salish encampment represents the native homeland of the Bitter Root Salish, while St. Mary’s Chapel represents the first pioneer settlement in the Montana. Historic St. Mary’s Mission is the story of remarkable people in a turbulent time, and the assimilation of two very different cultures against the backdrop of the American Frontier. Walk through history and see, touch and hear this fascinating, controversial, and important chapter of this nation’s past.

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“Fair-skinned men wearing long black robes will teach us a new way of praying and a new moral law. The Black Robes will bring peace, but their arrival will mean the beginning of the end of all the people who inhabit this land ...” Shining Shirt, Salish Medicine Man & Prophet

T & R Magazine


Stevensville where Montana began

Stevensville was recently named as one of the most beautiful towns in Montana to visit!!!

St. Mary’s MISSION

West End of 4th Street in Stevensville saintmarysmission.org stmary@cybernet1.com

GUIDED TOURS: April 15 - October 15 Tuesday - Friday 10 am to 4 pm Saturday 11 am to 3 pm (406) 777-5734 GIFT SHOP: April 15 thru October 15 10 am to 5 pm Museum & Gift Shop located in the Visitor Center

Stevensville, MT - Where Montana Began Group tours by appointment Length of guided tour: 1:15 hour

“First in Agriculture, Education, Medicine and Religion” T & R Magazine

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Community of

Victor

Welcome to Victor - Located in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. The 100 square mile unincorporated town has a population of about 2,500. Victor is nestled between the Bitterroot Mountain Range, Bitterroot River and the Sapphire Mountain Range. This positions the community of Victor for some of the most breath-taking panoramic views in this valley. The warmth and charm of Victor provides you with small community traditions and the ability to experience nature out your back door. With mountain corridors and the river close by, there is an abundance of wildlife and fowl. You’re just minutes away from a labyrinth, corn maze, float trip down the Bitterroot River, hike or horseback ride from one of the many trailheads. You can unwind at one of Victor’s vacation rentals, lodges or Bed and Breakfasts. Enjoy fantastic dining at Victor’s restaurants - known to be some of the Valley’s best! For larger groups, choose from one of the privately owned event destination centers - each having a unique landscape and charm. The town has a variety of businesses, with over 120 small businesses spread throughout the community. Victor’s school has over 300 students from K-12, including the new Mary Stuart Rogers Performing Arts Center with a capacity of 270. This new venue, with state-ofthe-art equipment, was opened in 2009. Like most small Montana rural communities, Victor is close knit, helping and enjoying the town they live in. Events such as Victor Heritage Museum Annual Chocolate Tasting (the first Monday in December) or the ‘Field of Screams’, Western Montana’s #1 Haunted Attraction, shows how this community takes pride in their town!

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History of Victor

Timbered Bitterroot Mountains to the west and meadows with tall grasses flowing in the breeze. Bitterroots, camas bulbs and other native crops scattered along the foothills, cold crisp mountain streams finding their way to the river. Visualize numerous Salish sweat lodges along Sweat House Creek . . . Salish campsights arranged in a circle on Indian Prairie Loop and Chief Victor Camp Road are just a few locations where the Salish tribe used to camp and hunt. The people of the Red Willow (the Salish), a nomadic tribe, occupied the Bitterroot Valley including Victor before the earliest trappers and explorers came. Plenty of Horses christened as Victor, was chosen as chief of the Salish tribe. Chief Victor died in the summer of 1870 on a hunt near Three Buttes in eastern Montana. In the mid 1860’s, A. Sterne Blake and his Shoshone wife came to the valley and were among the original founders of Victor. Mr. Blake was also the first elected State Legislator from Missoula County, which at that time Victor was a part of. Founding of the townsite, originally named Garfield after President James A. Garfield, was August 20, 1881. It was later discovered when applying for a post office destination for the town, the name ‘Garfield’ had already been taken. The name Victor was made official December 12, 1881. Shortly after, Victor experienced the railroad and silver mining boom along with prosperity in lumber and agriculture. For more information on the Victor community visit us at www.victormt. com.

Labyrinth photo

T & R Magazine


Accommodations

u MOUNTAIN SPIRIT INN - Hotels/Motels 308 South Main St Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-3405 info@mountainspiritinn.com www.mountainspiritinn.com

u A LI’L BIT OF HEAVEN - Vacation Rental 7987 Hwy 93 South Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3433 mtlilbit@earthlink.net www.alilbitofheaven.com

u REMLC CITY CENTER - Hotel/Motel 415 W Main St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-1651 remlcvs1@aol.com www.remlcsportsmanslodging.com

u ALTA RANCH, LLC - Lodges 9203 West Fork Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 349-2142 info@alta-ranch.com www.alta-ranch.com

u RYE CREEK LODGE - Lodge 458 Rye Creek Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-3366 ryecreek@hughes.net www.ryecreeklodge.com

u ANGLER’S LODGE & CABINS - Lodges & Cabins 815B Hwy 93 South Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-0980 anglerscabins@gmail.com www.anglerslodgemt.com

u SULA COUNTRY STORE & RESORT - RV Park 7060 Hwy 93 South Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3364 sularesort@montana.com www.bitterroot-montana.com

u ANGLERS ROOST - RV Park 815 Hwy 93 South Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-1268 anglersroost@montana.com www.anglersroost-montana.com

u TIN CUP LODGE - Lodge 582 Tin Cup Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-1620 tincuplodge@aol.com www.tincuplodge.com

u BITTERROOT CABINS - Cabins 1967 North First Street Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-2258 info@bitterrootcabins.com www.bitterrootcabins.com

u TOWNHOUSE INNS OF HAMILTON - Hotels/Motels 1113 North 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-6600 mariec@townpump.biz www.townhouseinnhamiltoncom

u BITTERROOT RIVER BED & BREAKFAST LLC 501 South Ave. Stevensville, MT 59870 - (406) 777-5205 gonefishin@bitterrootriverbb.com www.bitterrootriverbb.com

u TRAVELLERS REST CABINS AND RV PARK 601 North Main St Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-3282 goldcreek@gci.net www.travellersrestmt.us

u BITTERROOT RIVER INN - Hotel/Motel 139 Bitterroot Plaza Dr Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 375-2525 brinn@cybernet1.com www.bitterrootriverinn.com u BITTERROOT RIVER RANCH 4301 West Fork Road Darby, MT 59829 - (509) 531-4934 bitterrootriverranch@gmail.com www.bitterrootriverranch.com

u TRIPLE CREEK RANCH - Ranch 5551 West Fork Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-4600 info@triplecreekranch.com www.triplecreekranch.com u WILDERNESS SPIRIT CABINS, LLC - Cabins 472 Woodcrest Lane - Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 271-4450 tracyrosemoyers@gmail.com

u BLACK RABBIT RV PARK - RV Park 2101 North 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-3744 brabbit@bigsky.net www.blackrabbitrv.com u BROAD AXE LODGE, INC. - Lodge 1237 East Fork Rd Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3878 tamarack@bigsky.net u DEFFY’S MOTEL - Motel 321 South 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-1244 deffysmotel@qwestoffice.net u EAST FORK HOUSE - Vacation Rental 1969 East Fork Rd Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3559 tlw@nv.net www.eastforkhouse.net u HARLAND CABIN, THE - Cabin 2262 Old Darby Rd Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-6265 theharlancabin@gmail.com www.harlancabin.com

T & R Magazine

TRAVEL AGENTS . . . u BIG SKY TRAVEL 300 B Main Street - Stevensville, MT 59870 (406) 777-6934 info@bigskytvl.com www.bigsky-travel.com u PROTRAVEL INTERNATIONAL 405 Charlos Street - Stevensville, MT 59870 (619) 453-0559 connie.thompson@protravelinc.com www.protravelinc.com

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108 Things To Do

In The Bitterroot Valley the Bitterroot’s Bucket List . . .

The Bitterroot Valley is full of activities for every outdoor enthusiasts. Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains, open valleys, pristine streams, and miles of unsurpassed scenery and wildlife. No matter which direction you take, you will be sure to find what you are looking for right here in the Bitterroot Valley .... come, sit back and enjoy everything we have to offer.

1. HIKE THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS

The Bitterroot Mountain Range runs most of the border between Montana and Idaho and is one of the valley’s beautiful scenic points. With numerous hiking trails up and down the valley and with varying degrees of hiking challenges, you will not be disappointed with any you choose. Stop by the Chamber to pick up a brochure or visit any Forest Service location at www.fs.usda.gov/ bitterroot for locations and descriptions. Bitterroot Valley’s local bookstores also carry guidebooks on local hiking trails.

2. RIDE A HORSE INTO THE WILDERNESS

There are 1,340,000 acres in the Selway-Bitterroot, located in Ravalli County, Montana and Idaho County, Idaho. It is the third largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states. You will experience some of most scenic views and have time to let your mind wander and experience what it used to be like in our Montana wilderness.

3. CAMP IN THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS

Camping in the Bitterroot Valley is an experience you will not forget. There are 26 developed campgrounds and 1,500 miles of access to trails, fishing, boating, biking and much, much more. Sleeping under the Big Montana Skies you will see a blanket of stars with a beauty only found in Montana. Visit www.fs.usa,gov/ bitterroot for more information regarding camping in the valley.

4. EXPLORE BIRDING/NATURE TRAIL

From Lolo to Lost Trail Pass, you can see 25 prime birding and nature viewing sites. Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, located in Stevensville, MT, is a good place to begin your adventure. For a map and other information on birding in the Bitterroot Valley go to www.montanabirdingtrail.org

5. VISIT LEE METCALF NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Driving or walking through Lee Metcalf Refuge, you will be able to view the wonders of wildlife in a single 2½ mile stretch of nature trails. You can also stop by their information center and view all the exhibits they have as well as ask questions regarding the refuge. Call 406-777-5552 or visit www.fws.gov/leemetcalf.

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6. HIKE BLODGETT CANYON

Blodgett Canyon is a glacially carved canyon. This canyon has vertical cliffs and is home to herds of mountain goats as well as several species of birds. Hiking this canyon is a must when visiting our valley. Call 406-363-7100 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/ bitterroot.

7. ROCK CLIMBING IN THE BITTERROOT CANYONS

This sport has become increasingly popular as a climbing destination. Many canyons on the west side of the Bitterroot Valley offer rock climbing at its very best. Visit www.bitterrootclimbers.org for more information regarding this sport.

8. SWIMMING AT LAKE COMO

Lake Como waters are fed by snow-covered peaks 10,000 feet above the lake. There is a sandy beach roped off so adults and kids alike can enjoy the stunning view as well as enjoy a more relaxed atmosphere. For information regarding usage www.fs.usda. gov/bitterroot.

9. BOATING AT PAINTED ROCKS RESERVOIR

Painted Rocks State Park is located on the West Side of the Bitterroot River up the West Fork. It offers boating as well as fishing in a quiet and secluded setting. There are 25 campsites with grills, fire pits, tables, boat ramp and dock, as well as drinking water. Visit www.fwp.mt.gov/parks/visit for more information.

10. VISIT OUR STATE WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS

Threemile and Calf Creek Wildlife Management Areas were created to provide winter range for elk and recreational opportunities to the public. Threemile, which is located east of Florence, offers 6,089 acres and Calf Creek, east of Hamilton, has 2,333 acres. Threemile is a mixture of motorized and walk-in. Calf Creek is by foot, horseback or mountain bike. Call 406-5425500 or visit www.fwp.mt.gov.

11. FLOAT THE BITTERROOT RIVER

Abundant wildlife and rooted deep in history, the Bitterroot River winds its way north between the Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains. You will see a wide range of birds as well as wildlife along its banks as you enjoy a quiet, relaxing float trip down this beautiful river. For information on a listing of local outfitters, call the Chamber at 406-363-2400 or visit bitterrootchamber.com.

12. FISH BLUE RIBBON TROUT STREAM

The Bitterroot River flows north for almost 100 miles. It is known for its aquatic insect hatches and is a place to fish for big trout. Catch and Release fishing is practiced. To receive a copy of the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Park’s current regulations call 406-5425500 or visit any local fly shop or visit www.fwp.mt.gov.

T & R Magazine


13. HUNTING FOR BIG GAME

With 1.6 million acres of public land in the Bitterroot and Lolo National Forest, the Bitterroot is a hunter’s paradise. From elk, moose, deer, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, black bear and mountain lion, hunters come to the Bitterroot for an experience that will last them a lifetime. Call the Chamber for information or visit www.bitterrootchamber.com.

14. OBSERVE WILDLIFE AT THE TELLER REFUGE

The Teller Wildlife Refuge maintains 1,200 acres of farmland and river bottom dedicated to the conservation of native riparian habitat. Approximately 40 acres are open for the public to enjoy. Call 406-961-3507 or visit www.theteller.org.

15. BIKING IN THE BITTERROOT

No matter what kind of biking enthusiast you are or what age group you are in, the Bitterroot Valley has a trail for you. From mountain trails to our newly paved bike path that parallels US 93 for 45 miles from Lolo to Hamilton. If you did not bring your bike, no problem, we have local bike shops here to accommodate your every need. Valley Bicycles rents mountain bikes and they will be more than happy to fit you with a bike for your bicycling adventure, Call 406-363-4428 or email valleybicycles@yahoo. com.

21. PICNIC PLACES IN THE BITTERROOT

The Bitterroot has numerous places in which to relax and enjoy the beauty of our valley. Call the Chamber for more information on places to spread your blankets and relax. 406-363-2400.

22. SKIING AT LOST TRAIL POWDER MOUNTAIN

Lost Trail Powder Mountain features over 50 marked trails and 1,800 acres. Its longest run is 2.5miles and they have some of the best snow in Montana with over 300 inches annually. Visit www. losttrail.com.

23. CROSS COUNTRY SKIING IN THE BACK COUNTRY

You can begin your adventure at any Forest Service road or trail head. Chief Joseph trailhead is a beautiful place to begin your journey into the wilderness. Maps are available at the trailhead for your convenience as well as at your local Chamber and other businesses in the valley. Visit www.bitterrootxcskiclub.net for more information regarding this adventure.

24. SNOWMOBILING TRAILS

The Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains of our valley offer snowmobilers their destination for this activity. Explore areas that can only be seen during the winter by snowmobiling across vast acres of our beautiful mountain trails.

16. RIDE THE TRANSAMERICAN BICYCLE TRAIL

25. TRAVEL THE SAME TRAIL AS LEWIS & CLARK

17. PHEASANT HUNTING IN THE BITTERROOT

26. NEZ PERCE HISTORIC TRAIL

Between April and September, hundreds of cyclists across the country ride the 75 miles between Lost Trail Pass and Florence along Hwy 93, just one small portion of the 4,250 miles of the TransAmerican Bicycle Trail. Taking the same path that Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery took while traveling through the Bitterroot Valley. For a map of the trail, go to www.adventurecycling.org/routes/transamerican.cfm. Pheasant as well as other upland game bird hunting on 800 acres of prime upland habitat is where the Fetch Inn Lodge offers quality hunting. The lodge sits at the edge of the largest wilderness in the lower 48 states. Call 363-5111 or visit www. fetch-inn.com.

18. RIDE ATV’S IN BACK COUNTRY OF THE BITTERROOT

A great way to see our the beautiful scenery and wildlife is by four-wheel vehicles. There are two designated ATV trails, Overwhich Falls Trail and Chain of Lakes Trail. You will be able to view a wide range of wildlife and superb scenery. Rye Creek Lodge offers guided tours for this adventure. Call 821-4844.

19. GOLFING IN THE VALLEY

The Hamilton 18-hole Golf Course in Hamilton was designed by Gary Jacobson and has 6,545 yards of golf. Listed as one of the best public courses in the northwest, it was established in 1924. In Stevensville there is a 9-hole, Whitetail Golf Course. It features 2,859 yards of golf and this course was designed by Jason Allen.

20. TRAP SHOOTING

The Hamilton Trap Club has an excellent Five-Stand range. It is open Sunday and Wednesday afternoons. It is located on the Hamilton Airport Road in Hamilton, Visit www.hamiltontrapclub. com. The Whittecar Rifle Range is west of Hamilton and has six shooting ranges open to the public Wednesday through Sunday.

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Lewis and Clark entered the valley near Lost Trail Pass in September of 1805 where they came across the Salish Indian tribe. The Indians helped sustain the travelers with food and fresh horses. On their return trip in July of 1806, they once again traveled through the Bitterroot. For information on this epic event visit www.edgate.com/lewisandclark/expedition or stop by the Chamber for a brochure on their epic journey. The Bitterroot Valley is rooted deep in history and one of the historic stories was the Nez Perce Indians on their flight from the US Army in 1877. Hundreds of Nez Perce men, women and children, along with their livestock, traveled over 1,170 miles on a four-month journey in search of a new home after being forced to flee from their homeland. For more information on this story visit www.nezpercetrail.net.

27. VISIT HISTORIC ST. MARY’S MISSION

In 1841, Fr. Pierre Jean DeSmet, at the request of the Salish and Nez Perce Indian Tribes, established St. Mary’s Mission, making it the first church and pioneer settlement in the Pacific Northwest. Another Jesuit missionary, Father Anthony Ravalli, arrived in 1844 to be Montana’s first physician and pharmacist. For more information on this unbelievable story, call 406-777-5734 or visit www.saintmarysmission.org.

28. FORT OWEN STATE PARK

Parts of this 250x125 foot adobe and log trading post, stand steeped in history. In 1850, Major John Owen established the fort as a regional trade center. Period furnishings and artifacts are displayed in the restored rooms of the east barracks. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Call 406-542-5500 or visit www.stateparks.mt.gov/parks/visit/fortowen.

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29. VISIT THE DALY MANSION

In 1886 Copper King Marcus Daly and his wife, Margaret, purchased the original homestead here in the Bitterroot Valley, where they built a Queen Anne style Victorian summer home. It has over 56 rooms, 25 bedrooms, 15 bathrooms and 7 fireplaces. The three-story, 24,000 square foot home is surrounded by 50 beautifully landscaped acres. Tours are available during the summer months from May through October. Call 406-363-6004 or visit www.dalymansion.org.

30. RAVALLI COUNTY MUSEUM

Designed by A.J. Gibson in 1900, this historic brick building served as the county’s courthouse until 1979. Now it is the home of numerous exhibits from Natural History Room, Military Room, A Walk through the Bitterroot and the Lewis and Clark Discovery Rooms. Rotating exhibits as well as traveling exhibits are on display. Located at 205 Bedford Street in Hamilton, the Ravalli County Museum is a must stop while in the Bitterroot. Call 406363-3338 or visit www.brvhsmuseum.org.

31. ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Marcus Daly promised land for the church’s construction and this English Gothic structure was built. Today it still stands much like it was back in the late 1800’s. Margaret Daly was a devout Episcopalian and a patroness of the church. Tours are available and can be scheduled by calling 406-363-3025 or visit www. bitterrootepiscopal.org.

32. STEVENSVILLE MUSEUM

Preserving the early growth of the Bitterroot, the Stevensville Museum displays numerous artifacts and pictures so you can turn back the clock and see what it was like in the early years of the valley. They are located at 517 Main Street in Stevensville, call 406-777-1007 or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com for more information.

33. VICTOR HERITAGE MUSEUM

The Victor Museum is housed in what once was the Victor Depot. The museum hosts numerous relics and a vast array of articles from days gone by. The museum is located in downtown Victor or give them a call 406-642-3997 for more information. Also visit www.victorheritagemuseum.org.

34. DARBY PIONEER MEMORIAL MUSEUM

The Darby Museum houses a rare collection of home and business artifacts, which were donated by many pioneer families of the area. It was one of the first hand-hewn homestead cabins built in the area, and a photo of the cabin at its original site is on display. The museum is located on Main Street in Darby. For more information call 406-821-3753.

35. HISTORIC FOREST AND GUARD STATIONS

The Alta Ranger Station, which was built in 1899, is the oldest surviving Forest Service Ranger Station and is located on the West Fork of the Bitterroot River. The East Fork Guard Station near Sula, a cabin on the East Fork of the Bitterroot River. The lookouts provide beautiful views of the Sapphire, Bitterroot and Pintler mountain ranges. For more information on how to rent the lookouts or cabins, call 406-363-7100 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/ bitterroot.

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36. DRIVING THE HISTORIC EASTSIDE HIGHWAY

If you are looking for a relaxing drive through the Bitterroot Valley, the Eastside Highway from Florence to Hamilton will provide you many historic sites and unsurpassed beauty of the valley. This roadway was the primary road before US 93 was constructed. Stop by the Chamber to pick up a brochure to make sure you see all the historic stops along the way.

37. VISIT THE ART GALLERY

The Bitterroot Valley has a galley of various artists and craftsmen. The valley is a paradise for local artists - it seems to bring out their creative juices. You will enjoy browsing through galleries and see the variety of talents we have right here in the valley.

38. ENJOY THE PERFORMING ARTS

Artists perform in a wide range of entertainment. Hamilton Performing Arts, Hamilton Players, Stevensville Playhouse, MAPS Media Institute, and the schools up and down the valley put on plays with exceptional talent. Call 406-363-7946 or stop by Chamber for information regarding the many varieties of performing arts to enjoy here in the valley.

39. ENJOY MONTANA A CAPPELLA CHOIR

The Montana A Cappella Society is a vocal choir from the Bitterroot Valley. They perform at various functions without instrumental accompaniment. The group has received international recognition and the society’s been invited to the prestigious International Choral Festival in Cork, Ireland. For more information as well as available CDs, go to www. montanaacapella.org.

40. LIVE THEATER AT HAMILTON PLAYHOUSE

For over 30 years, the Hamilton Players have brought entertainment to the Bitterroot. They provide several full scale productions each season as well as children’s workshops and numerous off-site special events. The Playhouse is located at 100 Ricketts Road in Hamilton, call 406-375-9050 or visit www. hamiltonplayers.com.

41. ENJOY SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK

The Hamilton Players bring Shakespeare in the Park to the Bitterroot every year with a different touring performance. It is the only professional touring theater program in the state that produces Shakespeare’s plays and they are free to the public. Call 406-375-9050 or visit www.hamiltonplayers.com.

42. ARTIST ALONG THE BITTERROOT

The vast beauty of the valley seems to draw artists here to make their home. Beautiful and unique pieces of art can be found up and down the valley. Artists Along The Bitterroot hosts an Open Tour Studio in the spring and these events are free to the public. Call 406-531-0853 or visit www.artistsalongthebitterroot.com.

43. MONTANA PROFESSIONAL ARTISTS ASSOC.

The Montana Professional Artists Association hosts a Show and Sale every June at the Bitterroot River Inn in Hamilton. This show features artists from all over Montana. Admission is free call 406-961-3887 or visit www.montanaprofessionalartists.com.

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44. BREWERY TOURS IN THE BITTERROOT

The Bitterroot Valley boasts of five breweries right here in the Bitterroot Valley. Bitter Root Brewing and Higherground Brewing are both located in Hamilton. Blacksmith Brewing and Wildwood Brewery are located in Stevensville and Bandit Brewery is in Darby. See page 44 for more information on our valley breweries.

45. TOUR OF WINERIES AND HARD CIDER

Six businesses right here in the Bitterroot Valley are the home of some of the best wines, meads and hard cider you will find. Trapper Peak Winery and Montana Cider Work are both located in Darby. Blodgett Canyon Cellars and Swanson’s Mountain View Distillery are in Corvallis and Hidden Legend Winery in Victor. See page 44 for more information on our valley wineries.

46. VISIT HULS DAIRY

Very few dairies are left here in the Bitterroot Valley, but Huls is one of them. A family operated dairy since 1908 with state of the art processing technology. For a tour and directions call 406-9618887 or visit www.hulsdairy.com.

47. LIFELINE FARMS VISIT

With a herd of around 400 Brown Swiss Cows, sheep, lambs, pigs and an array of vegetables, herbs and flowers, Lifeline Farms is an agricultural wonder. Selling their own organic beef, pork, cheese and milk, makes them special to our valley. For a tour and directions call 406-642-3873 or visit www.lifelinefarm.com. This is a stop you do not want to miss while you are here in the Bitterroot Valley.

48. MUJUICE DAIRY & BY-PRODUCTS

Taking a vacation is something this family never has the luxury of doing. Jeff Lewis’s father, Rollie, began milking back in 1979 and passed the business to his son Jeff, who continued to developed the dairy. Jeff began to look at options in which to use some of their resources. Besides producing his MuJuice - he also developed another revenue stream called Moo-Poo, a great compost to help everything come up green!! Jeff and his family have deep roots here and they are just another reason why our community is a great place to live. To get more information call 406-360-1828.

49. HISTORICAL FEED MILL

Lakeland Feed & Supply has been in this same location since the 1930’s. This tour is great for kids as well as adults to learn how traditional methods are combined with the latest scientific knowledge. Visitors are welcome to tour this facility. Call 406-363-2334 to schedule a tour or visit www.lakelandfeeds.com.

50. ALPACA TOUR

Looking for something special - learn about one of the newest livestock industries in the Bitterroot. These animals furnish a wonderful, warm, lightweight, hypoallergenic fiber, that is turned into socks, garments and accessories of all kinds. For more information on these wonderful animals call 406-381-0409.

51. VISIT AN EMU RANCH

Wild Rose Emu is one of two Emu Ranches in Montana. Clover Quinn is a remarkable woman as she has approximately 120 emus she takes care of. Emus are a prehistoric bird originating in Australia, they have no wing muscles but can run 35-40 miles

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per hour for short distances. 95% of the emu is a usable bird ... their meat, oil for your skin, supple leather, their feathers and their dark green eggs. Ranch is located at 284 Rose Lane in Hamilton and Clover welcomes visitors. Call 406-363-1710 or visit www. wildroseemu.com.

52. HORSE RANCHES IN THE VALLEY

Horses have always been a part of Montana, and the Bitterroot is blessed to have several organizations here that use horses as a healing process between men and animals. You will find a listing of these places by contacting the Chamber at 406-363-2400.

53. LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS

When spring comes to the valley, Farmers Markets from Darby to Florence begin their weekend markets. From locally grown produce, plants, flowers, baked goods and handcrafted items, these markets are packed every weekend with people wanting to take home something special from the Bitterroot Farmers Markets. Check the Calendar of Events to see starting dates and locations.

54. VISIT OUR FARM STANDS OR ORCHARDS

Several farm stands and orchards in the valley are open seven days a week during the growing season. You will find the best of the Bitterroot right here in our valley. For more information on our local food producers visit www.bitterrootvalleyfood.info/ producer%20directory.html.

55. WESTERN RESEARCH CENTER

MSU’s Western Research Center is located at 580 Quast Lane NE of Corvallis. The center addresses agricultural needs for its area of the state. To find out more information call 406-961-3025 or visit www.ag.montana.edu/warc.

56. GET OUTDOORS

Florence’s Hideout Mountain sets aside a day in June for National Get Outdoors Day. There are activities of all kinds for kids and adults to enjoy. Hiking, biking, fishing, tennis and girding are just some of the great activities designed to get you outdoors and enjoy what the Bitterroot has to offer.

57. PARSONS PONY FARM FOR KIDS

What a great time kids have, whether they are experienced or it is their first ride. They are all assisted by an experienced wrangler and fitted with a helmet for their safety. Make sure you bring your camera to preserve the moment. Visit www.parsonsponies.com.

58. TAKE A TOUR OF THE DOLL MUSEUM

Located on the Eastside in Florence, this unique treasure showcases more than a thousand dolls. There is a variety of different dolls from Germany, Japan, New Zealand and Canada, with some being nearly two centuries old. Call 406-273-6332 for more information.

59. STARS SHINE AT THEATRE SCHOOL

The Hamilton Players offer three theater schools for students K-12. They focus on fundamental performance skills, improvisation, introductory theater etiquette and technical skills. Call 406-375-9050 or visit www.hamiltonplayers.com for information on dates.

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60. YOUTH HISTORY CAMP

The Daly Mansion hosts this event in June. Some of the activities include 19th century lawn games, participation in historic reenactments, all with hands-on activities. This camp is geared to kids from 4th grade to 8th. Call 363-6004 ext. 3 for more information.

61. SUMMER READING PROGRAMS AT THE LIBRARY

The Bitterroot Public Library in Hamilton offers a Summer Reading Program beginning in June. Libraries up and down the valley offer various programs for kids and adults of all ages to keep them interested in reading. Contact the Chamber for more information on the various programs offered.

62. CAMP INVENTION SCIENCE

A week-long summer enrichment program for children entering grades one through six. The Camp Invention program instills vital 21st century life skills such as problem-solving and teamwork through hands-on fun!!!! Held at the Middle School in Hamilton at 209 South 5th St or visit www.campinvention.org.

63. DANCE STUDIOS

There are several dance studios located in the valley to develop the talents of local children; Bitterroot Dancers, Ballet Bitterroot, Dance EFX, Groovz Studio and River Street Dance Theatre. Call the Chamber for more information regarding these studios 406363-2400.

64. GLAMPING IN THE BITTERROOT

Glamping is the newest trend for camping. You can enjoy warm, comfortable sleeping accommodations, gourmet meals, guided tours, fishing, hiking, horseback riding and more, or just sit back and relax and enjoy the beautiful scenery. Call 406-821-3115 or visit www.glamourcamping.net.

65. MONTANA WEDDING

You could not ask for a more romantic place for your wedding than right here in the Bitterroot Valley! Several unique settings, as well as charming lodges and cabins, make the valley the perfect spot for that special event. Call Creative Solutions, 406-546-7727, or stop in at your local Chamber for more information.

66. TAKE IN A HORSE SHOW

Five nationally sanctioned Cutting Horse Competitions are held in the Bitterroot Valley. These events are held at the Sapphire Event Center located at 1750 Eastside Hwy near Corvallis. Visit www. sapphireeventcenterllc.com.

67. UNIQUE OUTDOOR PAINTING EXPERIENCE

You can enjoy a unique outdoor painting experience in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. Guests will be treated to a day of oil painting with award winning American Impressionist, Tricia Bass. Your day will include the use of an original French plein air easel,oil paints, brushes and canvas. Your paintings are yours to keep for an unforgettable Montana experience here in the Bitterroot Valley.

68. WHAT’S COOKIN’

The Taste of Home Cooking School is held at the Performing Arts Center in Hamilton in September. This event is usually a sell-out,

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and the culinary specialists give a step-by-step instruction on how to make some very special recipes. You receive a gift bag and a Taste of Home cookbook. www.tasteofhome.com/cooking-schools.

69. A DIFFERENT KIND OF GOLF

Disc Golf . . . when you play on this course, it has baskets and ‘tones’ instead of holes. You do not need to bring your clubs but you will need a Frisbee. Spiritwood is a private 22 hole Disc Golf course. Kids and adults will enjoy this ‘Montana’ way to golf. Visit www.spiritwooddiscgolf.com or call 406-531-2707. For something different for the whole family, make sure you make this a stop.

70. FIND INNER PEACE BY WALKING THE LABYRINTH

The Redsun Labyrinth is an 800-year-old pattern. Labyrinths have been used for 4,000 years as a spiral design pattern. The walk takes approximately ½ hour and can also be used for ceremonies. Call 406-642-6675 or visit www.redsunlabyrinth.com.

71. CANDY IS DANDY IN THE BITTERROOT

With three candy stores in the Bitterroot Valley, there is no shortage of ways to satisfy your sweet tooth. All feature locally owned, homemade recipes of some of the best sweets you can imagine. Big Sky Candy, at 319 West Main in Hamilton - www. bigskycandy.com; Old West Gallery & Antiques, located at 202 South Main Street in Darby - www.montanaoldwestgallery. com; The Montana Chocolate Company, at 755 Main Street in Stevensville - www.mtchocolatecompany.com, offer you true Montana sweets that will keep you comin’ back for more.

72. KEEPING FIT

There are a number of fitness centers in the valley which offer passes for our visitors at every level of fitness. The Canyons Athletic Club - www.thecanyonsathleticclub.com; Iron Horse Athletic Club - www.ironhorseathleticclub.com; Right to Bear Arms www.rtbamt.com, all offer our visitors a way to keep up with their regular routines while visiting our valley.

73. HOT SPRINGS OFFER RELAXING RELIEF

Lolo Hot Springs was well know to the Indians long before the arrival of Lewis and Clark, and you can visit them at www. lolohotsprings.com. Lost Trail Hot Springs is another spot in the valley, which is just south of Sula. You can visit them at www. losttrailhotsprings.com. Both hot springs offer lodging where you can relax and enjoy your beautiful surroundings.

74. ENJOY A NIGHT OUT

There will be no shortage if you are looking to dine out in the Bitterroot. A number of excellent and unique cuisines are offered by our local restaurants. From sushi to mouth-watering sandwiches, you won’t be disappointed at the variety of excellent choices to choose from. Check with the Chamber for a listing of some of our finest restaurants in the valley at www.bitterrootchamber.com.

75. ATTEND MONTANA MULE DAYS

The Bitterroot hosts Montana Mule Days in June, and this show has over 100 classes including log pulling, driving classes, western pleasure, trail class, team penning and costume classes. The event is held at the Ravalli County Fairgrounds in Hamilton. Call 406-363-3411 or visit www.montanamuledays.com.

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76. HERITAGE DAYS IN STEVENSVILLE

Stevensville’s Western Heritage Days is a step back in history. Wagon rides, barnyard games, Chuck Wagon Cook-off, vendors with handmade items, tours of Montana’s first settlement, music, beer and lots of great food. Call 406-777-3773 or visit www. mainstreetstevensville.com for more information.

77. SENIOR PRO RODEO

Cowboys from across the country come to compete in the National Senior Pro Rodeo held in Hamilton and Darby. All competitors are over the age of 40 and give the audience their money’s worth. From bull riding to barrel racing, this event has everything you want to see at a professional rodeo. Call 406-363-3411 or visit www.seniorrodeo.com.

78. ELITE BULL CONNECTION

Darby brings in professional bull riders for this event to ride some of the best bulls found anywhere. Eight seconds can seem like a life time to try and stay mounted on a thousand pounds of pure muscle and meanness. An event that is dubbed as “the most dangerous eight seconds in sports”, is an event you will want to see, and it is happening right here in our Bitterroot Valley in Darby. Visit www.southvalleyevents.com.

83. BITTERROOT CHAMBER’S MICROBREW FESTIVAL

This event, sponsored by the Bitterroot Valley Chamber the fourth Saturday in July, offers the best microbrews, wine and meads Montana and the Northwest have to offer. With food, great music and a relaxed atmosphere, people come from all over to partake in the Annual Microbrew Festival held in Hamilton. You will return year after year to this event, which has been dubbed as Bitterroot’s Best Event! Call 406-363-2400 or visit www.bitterrootchamber.com for more information regarding this festival.

84. LAKE COMO TRIATHLON

If you are up for a challenge, then the Lake Como Triathlon is what you are looking for. Lake Como is the perfect setting for this event and is limited to 100 racers. Swim, bike and run in one of the most scenic places in Montana. Visit www.lakecomotri.com.

85. BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL IS HARDTIMES

If you like Bluegrass - you will not want to miss the Annual Hardtime Bluegrass Festival, which is located 10 miles south of Hamilton. This three-day event has some of the best bluegrass bands from all around the Northwest. Bring your lawn chairs and sit and listen to music that will have your feet stomping. Call 406821-3777 or visit www.hardtimesbluegrass.com.

79. RIDE DE ROOT IN THE BITTERROOT

86. STEVENSVILLE CREAMERY PICNIC

80. TOUR OF THE BITTERROOT

87. BIG SKY RENAISSANCE FAIRE

Beginning in Darby, riders will meander their way through the beautiful back roads on the east side of the Bitterroot Valley, skirting the towns on Hamilton, Corvallis, and Victor, while enjoying breathtaking views of the Bitterroot mountains. Bikers can experience one of the most beautiful rides of their life during this event. Call 406-529-7887 or visit www.ridederoot.com. The Bitter Root Land Trust sponsors this event to focus on getting people out biking and enjoying our beautiful Bitterroot Valley. This event is for all bikers no matter what your level of expertise may be. An event for the whole family to participate in - call 406375-0956 or visit www.tourofthebitterroot.org.

81. ENJOY DARBY LOGGER DAYS

Timber sport competitions ranging from log rolling, pole climbing, saw cutting and axe throwing ... all in celebration of those who work in this time honored tradition of logging. There is music, vendors, food and lots of fun. This event is held at Connor Field in Darby. Call 406-381-5114 for more information regarding this event.

82. DALY DAYS IN HAMILTON

Celebrating Daly Days in Hamilton is a two-day event that has a host of activities for young and old alike. The Daly Mansion has activities and demonstrations for everyone to experience what it was like back in the early 1900s. Downtown Hamilton has events, vendors, games, music, food, and a good old fashioned street dance. Car Show, Dutch Oven Cookoff and a Kiss the Pig Contest are just a few of the activities that happen during this two-day event. Hamilton is the place to be the fourth weekend in July - so don’t miss this celebration. Call 406-375-1900 for more information or visit www.hamiltondowntownassociation.org.

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When a fire destroyed the creamery in 1911, the manager told the community if they could rebuild the business in 30 days, he would host the biggest celebration the town had ever seen. So 101 years later the Creamery Picnic has remained an annual event for the town of Stevensville. For more information regarding this event call 406-777-3773 or visit www.creamerypicnic.com. 4th Annual Renaissance Faire will be held on Highway 93, one mile from Stevensville - just look for all the colorful flags along the highway. Acres of parking and jaw-dropping family entertainment. There will be jousting, full metal combat, vendors, music and great food. You will see Robin Hood stealing from the King and Queen to give to the patrons and games of chance with the gypsies. Call your local Chamber for more information 406363-2400.

88. BITTER ROOT RIVERFEST EVENT

Bitter Root Water Forum hosts this event to help educate children and family alike to the importance of our local riparian area. Lessons on the dynamics of a watershed are hands-on, where you can learn by experience. What better way to help our kids understand the importance of where they live and how to take care of the land and water. Visit www.brwaterforum.org for more information.

89. CELTIC GAMES AND GATHERING

Held on the Daly Mansion grounds, this festival brings in clans from all over. The two-day event has traditional Scottish and Celtic music, bagpipes, dancers, Highland competitions, authentic Scottish and Irish food, wares and cultural demonstrations. This unique event is one you won’t want to miss. For more information call 406-274-8886 or visit www.bitterrootscottishirishfestival.org.

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90. RAVALLI COUNTY FAIR

Featuring exhibits, carnival rides, vendors, agricultural displays and nightly entertainment, the Ravalli County Fair is something everyone looks forward to. The fair is an exciting time for those who look forward to entering their homemade, home grown or home raised entries for a chance to win a ribbon and/or money for their hard endeavors. Don’t miss the Ravalli County Fair right here in Hamilton in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. 363-3411

91. SCARECROW FESTIVAL IN STEVENSVILLE

This annual event is sponsored by the Stevensville Art and Sculpture Society and held on the first Friday and Saturday in October. The public casts their ballots for their favorite scarecrow with cash prizes being awarded. This two-day fun-filled event also includes a pumpkin carving contest, wagon rides, late night business open houses with treats for everyone. Call 406-777-3773 or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com.

92. APPLE DAY AT THE MUSEUM

Hailed as the Biggest Bake Sale Under the Big Sky, the Annual McIntosh Apple Day Festival, held at the Ravalli County Museum, has over 700 apple pies made from scratch for sale. Apple butter, cider, carmel apples and a host of fresh fall produce. There are vendors from all over the state with their arts, crafts, food and produce. Come early and stay to the end. Call 406-3633338 or visit www.brvhsmuseum.org.

93. HAMILTON’S MAGICAL CHRISTMAS

Hamilton kicks off the Christmas Holidays the day after Thanksgiving by hosting their Annual Christmas Tree Lighting at the post office in Hamilton. Stroll the streets and enjoy caroling by our own Montana A Cappella Society. Stop in and enjoy your local businesses with their unique gift selections as well as treats for the evening. Burning barrels on the corners, Santa and Mrs. Claus, lights sparkling and the true meaning of Christmas is celebrated. Call 406-360-9124 or visit www. hamiltondowntownassociation.org.

94. MONTANA’S COUNTRY CHRISTMAS

Stevensville’s is full of holiday spirit during this festive time of year. Activities from arts, crafts, Parade of Lights, Live Nativity, Santa and wagon rides are part of this annual Christmas event. Come enjoy the holiday season in Stevensville, call 406-777-3773 or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com.

95. WALK THROUGH CENTENNIAL GROVE

Just 11.4 miles from Hamilton on the Skalkaho Highway is a wonderful place to stroll. This Grove is handicap accessible and includes at least 40 varieties of flowering plants and close to 100 different plants. Stop and enjoy the sounds and beauty of nature.

96. PAN FOR SAPPHIRES

Old and young alike will love panning for their own Montana Sapphires to take home. Whether you are looking for a bag of rocks, precious Montana Sapphires, a day of family fun, a stunning jewelry piece for yourself or a gift, you can find it all right here in the Bitterroot at the Sapphire Studio. Visit www. sapphiremining.com for more information.

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97. HORSE AND CARRIAGE RIDES

There is nothing like relaxing and enjoying the beautiful scenery here in the Bitterroot, and what better way to enjoy it than in a carriage. Horse drawn trolley, surrey and wagon rides are available for weddings, family reunions, and special occasions. Call Pioneer Carriage at 406-961-3602 for more information.

98. WESTERN AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER

The center was established in 1906 to deal with the booming apple industry in the Bitterroot Valley. The center is a research center for horticulture, soil and biological control of weeds, and is located on Quast Lane on the eastside of Corvallis. The facility is open to the public -- visit www.ag.montana.edu/warc for more information.

99. CHRISTMAS IN JULY

Step back in time into the grandeur of The Brooks. Built in 1894, this beautiful Queen Ann home has been turned into a charming Christmas Showcase, which is open year around for your enjoyment. For more information visit www.robbinsonmain.com.

100. SKALKAHO FALLS

Skalkaho Highway 38 is located south of Hamilton and is one of the most scenic drives in the valley. The falls in the spring provide roaring water from the melt off and is a spectacular sight to view. Bring your camera and a lunch basket and enjoy the view from the Falls. Contact your local Chamber for information on the Falls 406-363-2400.

101. CHOCOLATE TASTING EVENT

The Victor Heritage Museum hosts an Annual Chocolate Tasting Event the first Monday in December. This festive party and silent auction features a variety of chocolate for sampling. The museum is decorated to the hilt with Holiday Trimmings and no matter where you look you will see Chocolate! Visit www.victorheritagemuseum.org.

102. HALLOWEEN PARADE

Hamilton Downtown Businesses host an annual Halloween Parade, which is held on Halloween Day, unless Halloween is on a Sunday, in which case it will be held on Saturday. This event is fun for kids and adults alike. Businesses open their doors to hand out treats for the kids, and the streets are blocked off for the safety of everyone. Call 406-360-9124 for more information or visit www.hamiltondowntownassociation.org.

103. BIG SKY FIBER ARTS FESTIVAL

This event is held every other year and will be held in June at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. There will be exhibits, fiber art showcase, fiber stash sale, skein contest, vendors, workshops, food and lots of fun. This is where life’s threads are turned into art. Visit www.bigskyfiber.com for more information.

104. FIELD OF SCREAMS

For more than 15 years the Field of Screams has been scaring young and old alike. This outdoor fright-fest is five acres in size in which dozens of employees roam the field in haunting costumes, jumping out of the corn stalks and giving everyone an evening they will not forget. Field of Screams is located north of Hamilton, right off Hwy 93. Selected as one of the ‘scariest’ around! Take place in October.

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105. DANCING IN THE BITTERROOT

Country Western Dancing here in the Bitterroot is something that everyone can enjoy, and Bitterroot Dancers have regular dances on the weekends as well as instruction. This lively group is always looking for people to join them and have fun. Contact bitterrootdancersinc@gmail.com or call 406-381-1392.

106. DARBY DOG SLED RACES

The Darby Dog Derby is a sled dog race put on by the Bitterroot Mushers. Dog sledding history dates back over a thousands years and outdates any modern vehicle. It is believed that dog sledding started in the arctic region where no transportation was possible. The first dog sled race was held in Minnesota in 1886 and has since continued to become a popular sport. Visit www. bitterrootmushers.org.

107. OUTDOOR MUSIC CONCERTS

Tuesdays at 12 at the RC Museum in Hamilton and the Bitterroot Community Band held at Claudia Driscoll Park Band Shell in Hamilton, are outdoor concerts held throughout the summer months. This is a chance to sit back, relax with friends and listen to some great local music. Call the Chamber at 406-363-2400 or visit www.bitterrootchamber.com for times and dates. Photo by Chase Cooper

108. BRONC BUSTIN’ BARREL BURNIN’ PRCA RODEO

Darby is the place to view some of the best and most exciting bull and bronc riding as well as some great rodeos. Darby is known for ‘Hang On To Your Hat’ during these events as cowboys from all over try to stay in the saddle as some of the best rodeo stock tries to plant them in the dust. So if you like rodeo’s - Darby is where you will want to be! Call Cal Rurk 544-5536

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Calendar of Events

Connecting the Communities . . .

Call the Chamber at 406-363-2400 for dates for 2016 FIRST FRIDAYS are year-round. Call the Chamber for information 406-363-2400. FARMERS MARKETS run from May through mid-October. Call the Chamber for information 406-363-2400. Hamilton Farmers Market is held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th Streets in Hamilton. Call 406-9610004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket. webs.com. Harvest Valley Farmers Market is held on the South end of Main Street in Stevensville. Contact: Roger Flats 546-8554 North Bitterroot Valley Farmers Market is on US 93 and Eastside Highway in Florence. Contact Eric or Suzanne Winegart at 777-0709. Darby Farmers Market is held in Darby every Tuesday in Darby’s Main Street Park.

Performing Arts In The Bitterroot ‘Tuesday’s at 12’ Relax in the park, enjoy great food, and listen to local music during the months of June, July and August from12:00 to 1:00 p.m. Hamilton Playhouse has five (5) Mainstage productions each year. 406-375-9050 Stevensville Playhouse produces six (6) shows a year in Stevensville. 406-777-2722 Bitterroot Performing Arts Center, located in the Hamilton High School, performances monthly. 406-363-7946

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Annual Activities Corvallis American Legion Memorial Day Parade l Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival Bi-yearly – 1st Weekend in June l Mt. Professional Artists Assoc. Show & Sale - 2nd Weekend in June l StevensvilleWestern Heritage Days In June l Darby Strawberry Festival 3rd Weekend in July l Darby Logger Days 3rd Weekend in July l Elite Bull Connetion in July th l Daly Days – 4 Weekend in July l Hardtime Bluegrass Festival 4th Weekend in July l Microbrew Festival 4th Weekend in July l Creamery Picnic 1st Weekend in August rd l Tour of Homes – 3 Weekend in August l Ravalli County Fair Labor Day Weekend l Bronc Bustin’ & Barrel Burning held in September l Apple Days – In October l Hamilton Christmas Friday after Thanksgiving l Stevensville Christmas Celebration 1st Friday in December l Victor Chocolate Tasting 1st Weekend in December l Celtic Games & Gathering in August l

CALENDAR OF EVENTS MARCH 1 Hamilton Players present ‘The Drowsy Chaperone’. Based on the book by Bob Martin and Don McKellar. Sponsored by Tia Morello/Taco De Sol. Call 375-9050 MARCH 1, 6, 7 ‘Alice’s Adventures’ at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:30 pm. Call 360-489-7114 MARCH 5 Basics of Business Law at RCEDA Building Bittterroot Business, Bitterroot College Continuing Education SeriesBasics of Business Law, instructor is Richard Weber and is from 8:30 am to 11:30 am. Cost is $25. Call 3750100 for more information. MARCH 5-7 State A Girls Basketball Tournament in Hamilton at HHS Gymnasium. MARCH 6 Hamilton Christian Academy presents their 16TH Annual Auction & Chili Feed at 601 W Main Street in Hamilton at 5:30. Live & Silent Auction, Chili Feed & Cook-Off, Desserts. Call 961-9602 for more information. MARCH 6 First Friday in Stevensville “Get Lucky In Stevensville purchase a ticket to win a Merchants March Basket. Music, refreshments, fun for the whole family. 777-3773. MARCH 6-7 Hamilton Downtown Assoc. hosts Main Street Madness for their First Friday series and continues on Saturday. Great savings – stores open late on Friday. Call 363-1279, Russ Lawrence.

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MARCH 7 Free Archery & Crafts for the whole family from 10 am until noon at the Bedford Room in Hamilton. Free for the community. Call Jesse 406-350-2360. MARCH 7 Free Family Movie Night featuring ‘The Place’ at the Bedford Room in Hamilton at 6 pm. Free for the community, free popcorn, soda, candy and nachos. Call Jesse 406-350-2360. MARCH 7 RC Friends of NRA Annual Banquet at 1st Interstate Center at 5:30 pm – Dinner and Live and Silent Auction. Call 381-0354. MARCH 7 Lakeland Feed & Supply’s Customer Appreciation Day from 9 am to 6 pm. Call 363-2334. MARCH 8 ‘Alice’s Adventures’ at the Stevensville Playhouse at 2 pm. Call 360-489-7114 MARCH 8 Hamilton Players present International Women’s Day Reader’s Theater & Bake Sale at 8 pm. Call 375-9050 MARCH 9 & 11 Auditions for ‘Dear Old Butte’ at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:00 pm. Call 360-489-7114 MARCH 11 Steve Beck is Back!! This seminar on ‘Team Building’ will be at 309 Main Street in Stevensville. There will be 2 times available for this half-day session, lasting approximately 4 hours. 8 am to 12 noon and the second from 1 to 5 pm. Sponsored by the Stevensville Main Street Assoc. and Valley Drug & Variety. Call 777-3773 MARCH 11 The Catered Table presents its next Wine Tasting on Wed., March 11 at 6:30 at The Catered Table in Stevensville … they will feature wine and food of Chili. For reservations call 7777090. MARCH 12 BR Cross Country Ski presents ‘Roadless Areas and Wilderness, Our Best Landscapes’ beginning at 7 pm at the Presbyterian Church, 1220 West Main in Hamilton. Public invited. Call Jim 363-2110 for more information. MARCH 13 Shamrock Shuffle at the Eagles Lodge in Hamilton, 25 N 2nd St. Tacos and more from 5:30 7:00. Dance at 7:30 pm to 11:30 pm. Net proceeds to benefit Shepherd’s House in Hamilton. Call 363-1113 for more information.

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MARCH 14 Community Crab Feed hosted by Hamilton Downtown Assoc. at Community Room in City Hall, 223 S Second Street in Hamilton No host bar 5:30, dinner served at 6:30. Crab n fixins, Entertainment pkg. raffle, silent auction. $30 per person 360-9124 for more information. MARCH 14 The New-Matics band is playing this Saturday night , the 14th, at 9 pm, at the Rustic Hut in Florence. They are advertising it as rock and roll, but we know the swing, right ? So if you're looking for something to do Saturday, Come join the Bitterroot Dancers 381-1392 MARCH 15 Bitterroot Celtic Society Fundraising Breakfast/ Brunch Sunday, March 15th at Sapphire Lutheran Homes 501 N. 10th Street, Hamilton from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm for an Irish Breakfast/ Gourmet Brunch to raise funds for the Bitterroot Celtic Gathering & Games. Contact Dominic in the day at 363-2800 or Gary in the evening & weekends at 360-7570 for menu items and more information. $10.00 MARCH 17 Historic St. Mary’s Parish will be serving their annual St. Patrick’s Day Dinner in the Family Center, 400 Charlos St in Stevensville from 4 to 7 pm on Tuesday, March 17.Call 777-2067 for more information. MARCH 19 Ever wondered what a darkroom looked like in the sixties? Come see what Ernst Peterson’s looked like, built by Paul Stanton and Ken McBride, using Peterson’s own equipment. Stanton generously donated the equipment to Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St., Hamilton, for our 22nd Annual Ernst Peterson Photo Contest and Exhibit. With almost 240 photo entries, including an entry from a 2 year old who already loves photography, you can vote for your favorite one. The most votes win the People’s Choice Ribbon. Join us on March 19th at 6pm for our Award Ceremony where you can meet the judges, Mark Mesenko and Perry Backus. MARCH 19 Are you at risk? One of the top three cancers for men and women is colon cancer at MDMH. MDMH Colon Cancer Class is set for Thursday, March 19 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm at MDMH Conference Room. Call 375-4675 for more information. MARCH 20, 21 Stevensville High School Drama Performance at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:30 pm. Call 360-489-7114

MARCH 21 The Barnyard Bunch 11th Annual 4-H Tack Swap from 8 am to 5 pm at Lone Rock Elementary School Gym, 1112 Three Mile Creek Rd, north of Stevensville. Call Renita 777-0404 for more details or Theresa 207-1130. MARCH 21 BR Youth Home “No Place Like Home” at 1st Interstate Center at 6:00 pm Call 541-1650 – welcome to spring in ‘rustic chic’ style! Gala will have a fully-hosted bar, dinner and live and silent auctions. MARCH 24 Be a History Detective! North Valley Public Library invites children and teens, ages 8 and up, and their families to attend “Artifacts and History for Kids”! This is a traveling program presented by the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula, and is the last of our American Civil War programs. The Museum staff will bring a trunk full of artifacts, focusing on the American Civil War, and will teach children how to analyze the artifacts and draw conclusions from them. There will be learning, playing and crafts! Come and join us! Space is limited so please sign up in advance. To sign up, contact the library at 777-5061 or email maryw@northvalleylibrary.org Date: Tuesday, March 24th Time: 4:30-5:30pm Location: North Valley Public Library Community Room – 208 Main Street, Stevensville MT MARCH 27 Red Baraat at the Performing Center in Hamilton at 8:00 pm. Call 363-7946 for more information or www.bitterrootperformingarts.org MARCH 27, 28, 29 Selway-Pintler Wilderness Back Country Horsemen will host their State Convention at the Bitterroot River Inn in Hamilton. The public is invited to attend on Saturday for “Boomtown”, which is a town of heated wall tents housing vendors and partner groups from around the valley and the state (vision of the 1800’s) Saturday from 8 am to 6 pm Sunday from 9 am to 12. *Vendors*Partner Organizations with educational material*Crosscut Competition for viewing around noon (BCH members only participating)*Mule Raffle-tickets available (mule will be in park on Saturday)*Main Raffle-tickets available*Games & Shopping. Call 363-8230 for more information. MARCH 28 The Lady Eagles Auxiliary of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Bitter Root Aerie of Hamilton is hosting a FLEA MARKET, Saturday March 28, 2015. For reservation and information call Katie at 363-8909 or 363-2316. Reservations are now being taken from vendors for 6’x2.5’ table(s). Rental proceeds to Auxiliary local charities.

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MARCH 28 Bitterroot Dancers will host a dance with the band The New-Matics at Bedford Building from 7 to 11 pm. Dancers of all levels welcomed. $8 admission. Call 381-1392 bitterrootdancersinc@gmail.com APRIL 3 First Friday ‘Gardening Theme’ displays and information stores will be open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 APRIL 3 First Friday in Stevensville. Food, fun, music – retail sales and spring planting tips. Call 777-3773. APRIL 4 Annual Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce Banquet. Great food, fun, live and silent auction. Call 363-2400 for more information. APRIL 5 Community Easter Egg Hunt at RC Fair Grounds at 10 am hosted by Eagles 363-3411 APRIL 9 Medications & Supplements for Optimal Health at MDMH from 5:30 to 6:30. 363-2211 APRIL 9 The Homeschool History Faire takes place at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton on Thursday, April 9th at 6pm. Families throughout the Bitter Root Valley participate in this event, which allows the children to assume different roles of historical figures and share what they have learned about those figures to the public. Call the Museum at 406.363.3338 for details. APRIL 11 Concert at 7:30 pm at Stevensville Playhouse. 360-489-7114 APRIL 11 Mt. Rockies Blue Grass Assoc. Festival at the Lone Rock School, 1112 Three Mile Creek Rd. Come listen to some great fiddle music. Different band playing every 30 minutes. Call 777-3773 APRIL 11 Ravalli Republic Indoor Garage Sale at 1st Interstate Center. All day – call 363-3411 APRIL 15 Historic St. Mary’s Mission opens. Tours April through October 10 am to 4 pm. APRIL 17-19 Hamilton Players Presents ‘The Curious Savage’. Written by John Patrick. Call 375-9050.

APRIL 24 4H Carnival at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. 363-3411

MAY 1-3 My Kids Closet Consignment Sale at1st Interstate Center. Call 363-3411 for information.

APRIL 24 Handsome Little Devils (Squirm Burpee Circus) at the Performing Arts sTECenter in Hamilton at 7:30 pm. Call 363-7946 for more information or www.bitterrootperformingarts.org

MAY 1-3 Hamilton Players Presents ‘The Curious Savage’. Written by John Patrick. Call 375-9050.

APRIL 24-26 Hamilton Players Presents ‘The Curious Savage’. Written by John Patrick. Call 375-9050. APRIL 25 McManus In Love Benefit for Hamilton and Victor Masonic Lodges. At 7:30 at the PAC in Hamilton. 369-7002. APRIL 25 A Musical Evening at the Museum: "On the Air with The Dillon Junior Fiddlers" takes place at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton on Saturday, April 25th at 6pm. The performance this year is in old radio show format and explores different styles of fiddle music. Tickets will be available in March. Call the Museum at 406-363-3338 for details. APRIL 30 A Living Wax Museum, with Hamilton School District #3’s Spectra students takes place at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton on Thursday, April 30th at 6pm. Press a “button” and each child, dressed in full costume, comes to “life” and acts out a scene they have created, based on a historical figure. Call the Museum at 406-363-3338 for details. MAY 1 Fourth Grade Farm Fair at the RC Fairgrounds. This event is a hands-on event for 4th Graders throughout the Valley. Call 363-3411 for more information. MAY 1 Stevensville First Friday - Pie in the Big Sky Auction. Live auction at the Rocky Mtn. Bank in Stevensville at 6:30 until pies are gone. Fun, activities, music and great pies! 777-3773 MAY 1 First Friday ‘Birds and Bird Watching’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124. MAY 2 Florence Ace Hardware Customer’s Appreciation Day from 10 am to 2 pm. Ribbon Cutting at noon! MAY 2 Annual Shriner’s ‘Shoot for the Kids’ at 8 am at the Hamilton Trap Club. Call Chuck 360-4066.

MAY 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16 ‘Dear Old Butte’ play at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:30. Call 777-2722 MAY 3, 10, 17 ‘Dear Old Butte’ play at the Stevensville Playhouse at 2:00 . Call 777-2722 MAY 2 Opening of Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ May Fest For Kids’. Call 961-0004 or visit www. hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton MAY 7 Nano: The Science of Small Exhibit, in collaboration with the spectrUM Discovery Area, opens on May 7th at 6pm at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton. Explore how small science can get by building a carbon nanotube, balance a tippy table, and more. The Science of Small exhibit will include a “Summer of Science” – with children’s hands-on science activities on Saturday mornings and Thursday night Science lectures that will cover a wide variety of subjects for the duration of the exhibit. Exhibit closes at the beginning of August. Call the Museum at 406.363.3338 for details. MAY 7 National Day of Prayer from 10 am to 5 pm. St. Mary’s Chapel will be open for prayer. Noon at the Veteran’s Park there will be prayer emphasis. Call 777-3773 MAY 9 Youth Conservation & Education Expo at Red Slack Barn, Teller Wildlife Refuge, 1180 Chaffin Lane in Corvallis. 10 am to 4 pm. Shooting, hunting, ethics and education. Call Tom 5314224, John 546-5995 or Lauren 961-3507. MAY 9 Mother’s Day Tea at the Daly Mansion. 3636004 ext 2 MAY 9 Free Cholesterol Screening at MDMH. Call 363-2211 MAY 9 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Safe’s Mother’s Day Cake Walk’. Call 961-0004 or visit www. hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton

APRIL 18 Rocky Mtn Elk Foundation Banquet at 1st Interstate Center. 363-3411

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MAY 9 Wine Fest, a wine tasting event sponsored by Hamilton Downtown Assoc. at the Community Room in City Hall, 223 S Second St from 6-9 pm. Samples of wine and food (for purchase). 360-9124 for tickets and information. MAY 15-17 Rocky Mtn Gem & Mineral Show at 1st Interstate Center. 9 am to 2 pm 381-7597 MAY 25 Corvallis Memorial Day Parade in Corvallis MT. Contact Doug Mason 546-4244 JUNE 2016 Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival. This bi-annual event features classes, vendors and fiber animal show. For exact date and information call Marty 777-2421 or spunoutnmt@aol.com JUNE 5 First Friday ‘Outdoor Recreation’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 JUNE 5 First Friday in Stevensville, western theme, music, food and fun!. Call 777-3773 JUNE 5-7 Artists Along The Bitterroot 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. Call Olive Parker 381-0284

JUNE 12-14 Hamilton Players present ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Sponsored by Ravalli County Bank. Based on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film. Call 375-9050. JUNE 12-13-14 Montana Mule Days at RC Fairgrounds. Montana Mule Days is an annual event that is great for all ages. Everyone in the family can participate; we have over 100 classes that include log pulling, driving classes, western pleasure, trail classes, team penning, costume class, plus many more. 361-0631 JUNE 12-13-14 Mt Professional Artist Assoc. Annual Art Show & Sale at BR River Inn. Reception June 12 at 6:00 pm. Event is always 2nd week of June. 961-3887 JUNE 13 TNT BBQ and Auction at Teller Wildlife Refuge. Call 961-3507 or www.tellerwildlife.org JUNE 13 35th Annual Bitterroot Day from 9 am to 2 pm. During Bitter Root Day, the Museum grounds are the setting for a beautifully crafted, large, outdoor walking exhibit centered on the history and culture of the Salish Tribe. Compete in the 3rd annual jerky contest. Call 363-3338

JUNE 19-20 Western Heritage Days & Chuck Wagon CookOff in Stevensville. Vendors, music, food and fun for the whole family. Saturday at 11 there will be a parade and events continuing downtown Saturday Night, Beer Garden, Music and a street dance. Call 777-3773 JUNE 19-21 Hamilton Players present ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Sponsored by Ravalli County Bank. Based on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film. Call 375-9050. JUNE 20 Western Heritage Day in Stevensville. Cow Pie Bingo, Salish Dancers, and Guided Tours at St. Mary’s Mission. A great time for the whole family. 777-5734 JUNE 20 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Father’s Day Gift Bag Drawing’. Call 961-0004 or visit www. hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton JUNE 22-25 Youth History Camp at the Daly Mansion. 3636004 ext 2

JUNE 12-14 Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival at the 1st Interstate Center. Call 363-3411 for more information.

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JUNE 23-24 Sr Pro Rodeo in Darby. 544-5536 JUNE 26-27 Sr Pro Rodeo Assoc. at RC Fairgrounds. 363-3411 JUNE 26-27 Big Sky Renaissance Faire just off Hwy 93, 1 mile north of Stevensville. Acres of free parking and family friendly entertainment. Food, music, games and fun for the whole family. 777-3773 JUNE 27-28 Bitterroot Quilters Guild Quilt Show at the 1st Interstate Center. Call 961-4528 or 363-3411 for more information regarding this event. Saturday from 10 to 7 – Sunday from 10 to 4. www. bitterrootquiltersguild.com JUNE 26-27 Senior Pro Rodeo held at the RC Fairgrounds in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information regarding this event. JUNE 26-28 Hamilton Players present ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Sponsored by Ravalli County Bank. Based on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film. Call 375-9050.

JULY 4 4th of July Fireworks at RC Fairground at dusk 363-3411 Sponsored by the City of Hamilton, the community Fireworks Display is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket or a lawn chair, and find yourself a spot on the grounds to watch the display JULY 4 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Friends of the Market’. Dress as non-veggies will join the Hamilton 4th of July Parade on Main Street. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton JULY 6-10 Hamilton Players presents Summer Theater School Session 1, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Jr. Production dates July 10-11. Call 375-9050 JULY 10 Relay for Life at RC Fairgrounds call 363-3411 for more information. JULY 12 Napa Car Show in Stevensville – “Stars, Guitars and Cars”. Over 70 cars, prizes, music and fun. 777-3773 for more information.

JULY 11-12 Elite Bull Connection in Darby, this event pits some of the best bovine athletes against the best bull riders in the Northwest and Canada. Call 544-5536 Cal Ruark JULY 18 Hamilton Players present Broadway and Bubbly Dinner Encore at Sapphire Lutheran Home at 7 pm. Call 375-9050 JULY 17-18 Darby Logger Days in Darby MT. Friday events begins at 5 pm until midnight. Saturday events begin at 9 am with Community Parade. Live music from 8 to midnight. Contact loggers@ darbyloggerdays.com JULY 18 The Strawberry Festival old-fashioned ice cream social. Music is provided by local musicians with vendors, raffles. This event is a fundraiser for the Darby Volunteer Fire Department, from 5 pm to 9 pm. 406-381-5114 JULY 20-24 Hamilton Players present Summer Theater School session 2. Intensive character development workshop. Grades 4-12. Enrollment limited and by audition. Call 375-9050

BITTERROOT VALLEY CHAMBER’S ANNUAL

Microbrew Festival

4th Saturday in July 3:00 - 10:00 pm

Legion Park in Hamilton $20 for 5 Tastes & A Commemorative Glass CALL FOR SPECIFIC DATES

406-363-2400

www.bitterrootchamber.com 24

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JULY 24, 25, 26 Hardtime Bluegrass Festival in the Bitterroot Valley. www.hardtimebluegrass.com for more information. JULY 24, 25 The Bitterroot Arts Guild sponsors this fine arts and quality crafts show, which features artists from throughout the state. Talent abounds and both the unusual as well as the usual craft items are offered. If you are looking for something beautiful, come to Art in the Park for a great day of fun. Call 821-4678 JULY 24-25 Daly Days Downtown Hamilton. Street vendors with crafts and food Friday and Saturday. Friday night street dance; Bitterrodders car show Saturday and activities for everyone. Events throughout Hamilton and Daly Mansion. Call 360-9124. JULY 24-25 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘Daly Days, Arts In The Park, Brewfest’. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton JULY 25 Lake Como Triathlon. Open Water Swim 0.9 mi, Mountain Bike 12.6 mi., & Trail Run 7.7 mi. This event is held at Lake Como just south of Hamilton. Open Water swim starts at 8:30 at the public beach. Registration opens March 23, 2015. 363-0514 for more information. JULY 25 Daly Days at the Mansion. Activities and fun for the whole family. 363-6004 JULY 25 Annual Chamber MicroBrew Fest on 2nd & Bedford in Hamilton. 3:00 – 10:00 pm 3632400. AUGUST 1 ‘Round Up At Riverside’ at the Daly Mansion. This is their annual major fundraiser. 33-6004 ext 2 AUGUST 7 First Friday ‘Dog Days’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 AUGUST 7-8 103rd Stevensville Creamery Picnic. Parade, Mt. State BBQ contest, crafters, music and lots of fun for the whole family. 777-3773 AUGUST 8 Bitterroot Secret Garden Tour from 9 am to 3 pm those attending will get a look at five home gardens, all south of Hamilton. Only 100 tickets will be sold. https://www.facebook.com/bitterrootsecretgardentour for more information.

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AUGUST 14-16 Hamilton Players present ‘The Odd Couple’ written by Neil Simon. Call 375-9050. AUGUST 15-16 Bitterroot Celtic Games here in Hamilton at the Daly Mansion. Call 274-8886 for more information. AUGUST 21-22 NRA Sanction Rodeo in Darby. Count on a wild rodeo weekend in Darby. Bareback, Saddle Bronc, Bull riding, Tie-down Roping and more. 544-5536 AUGUST 21-23 Hamilton Players present ‘The Odd Couple’ written by Neil Simon. Call 375-9050. AUGUST 22 Bitterroot Classic Triathlon. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Bitterroot Classic Triathlon. This year they are planning some special things for the racers and spectators. This event is held at the Bitterroot Aquatic Center on Kurtz Lane in Hamilton. First swim heat begins at 8:30. Registration opens April 20. Call 3630514 for more information. AUGUST 28-30 Hamilton Players present ‘The Odd Couple’ written by Neil Simon. Call 375-9050. AUGUST 30 Ice Cream Social Sat Victor Museum 12 noon to 3:00 pm. 363-3165 SEPTEMBER 4 First Friday ‘Midway on Main Street’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 SEPTEMBER 2 RC Fair Parade downtown Hamilton beginning at 10 am. Call 363-2400 SEPTEMBER 2-5 The annual Ravalli County Fair is over 100 years old and is the largest event in Ravalli County. Featuring a wide variety of entertainment, 4-H and open class exhibits, community food vendors, children’s activities, business and artist booths. 363-3411 SEPTEMBER 5 RC Museum presents An Afternoon of Cowboy Music & Poetry. The art of yodeling and some good cowboy pickin’ will also be heard. Refreshments available. Call 363-3338 SEPTEMBER 11 9/11 Memorial at Veteran’s Park in Stevensville at 11 am. 777-3773

SEPTEMBER 12 Bella Boutique Fall Fashion Show Benefit for Emma’s House at 1st Interstate Center from 6 to 9 pm. 363-7216 SEPTEMBER 19 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Harvest Fest’. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton SEPTEMBER 12 Bark ‘n the Park. Join the Bitter Root Humane Association at the River Park in Hamilton. A free event for dogs and their families with games, pet related vendors, agility demos, contests, food and fun! It all starts with the Pet "Paw"rade at 11:00 am. Prize for best entry! Please call Michele Craig at 210-1375 for more information. SEPTEMBER 18-19-20 Sports Connection Gun Show at 1st Interstate Center. Fri., 1-5. Sat., 9-5. Sun., 9-3. 633-2206 SEPTEMBER 19-20 Bronc Bustin & Barrel Burning in Darby – World Class Bucking Horse Association is committed to assisting the people dedicated to the professional bucking horse futurities and set the utmost standards. Watch the most elite 4 and 5 year olds saddle broncs in North America do what they do best … BUCK. Call Cal Ruark 544-5536 SEPTEMBER 20 Salish Pilgrimage at 2 p.m. at St. Mary’s Mission in Stevensville. 777-5734 SEPTEMBER 27 Founders Day Celebration at 2 pm, celebrating 174 years as a community at historic St. Mary’s Mission. Call 777-5734 OCTOBER Hamilton Players present Costume Rental TBA. Call 375-9050 OCTOBER 2-10 Scarecrow Festival in Stevensville. Enjoy incredible works of art and design. Enter the Pumpkin Carving Contest. 777-3773 OCTOBER 2 First Friday ‘Moonlight Madness’ theme – great savings, special sales, businesses open until 11 pm. Call 360-9124 OCTOBER 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17 Stevensville Playhouse presents a musical (TBA) at the Playhouse at 7:30. 360-489-7114 OCTOBER 3 McIntosh Day at the Ravalli County Museum hailed as the biggest bake sale under the Big Sky. Arts, crafts, food and produce. Hand-baked apple pies, action and music. 363-3338

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OCTOBER 3 RC Museum presents their 2nd Annual Hard Cider Event. Enjoy all the sweet and tart goodies that Apple Day has to offer, and then join us for a relaxing and refreshing evening under the stars! Sample delicious cider created by cider makers from the Rocky Mountain northwest, locally catered food, and music! For more information, contact the Museum at 363-3338

OCTOBER 23-24 Murder Mystery Dinner at the Daly Mansion – this is in partnership with Hamilton Players. 363-6004 ext 2

OCTOBER 4, 11, 18 Stevensville Playhouse presents a musical (TBA) at the Playhouse at 2:00 pm. Call 360489-7114

OCTOBER 28 Affiliate Marketing for Beginners at Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Annette O’Leary-Coggins and is from 9 to noon. Cost is $25. Call 375-0100 for more information.

OCTOBER 7, 9, 14 & 16 Microsoft Excel Basics at RCEDA Building Bittterroot Business, Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Lee Tickell and is from 6 pm to 8 pm. Cost is $65. Call 375-0100 for more information. OCTOBER 9-11 My Kids Closet Sale at 1st Interstate Center. Sat 8-3 Sun. 9-1. 363-3411 OCTOBER 10 Hamilton Players present Hamilton Players Costume Ball. 375-9050 OCTOBER 10 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Oktober Celebration of Cooperatives’. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th Streets in Hamilton OCTOBER Ghost Tours at the RC Museum from 10 pm to 3 am Become a paranormal investigator for the night, gathering evidence and exploring rooms in the Museum, that are not on the regular tour! No children under 14 call 363-3338 OCTOBER 16-18 Hamilton Players presents ‘Pride & Prejudice’ based on a novel by Jane Austen. Sponsored by Chapter One Bookstore. Call 375-9050. OCTOBER 17 – Final Market for season Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Oktober Celebration of Cooperatives’. Call Laura 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held in Hamilton OCTOBER 21, 23 Website Building 101 at RCEDA Building Bittterroot Business, Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Annette O’Leary-Coggins and is from 9 am to noon. Cost is $45. Call 375-0100 for more information. OCTOBER 21, 23 & 28 QuickBooks Basics at Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Alice Mariana and is from 6 pm to 9 pm. Cost is $75. Call 375-0100 for more information.

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OCTOBER 23-25 & 30-31 Hamilton Players presents ‘Pride & Prejudice’ based on a novel by Jane Austen. Sponsored by Chapter One Bookstore. Call 375-9050

OCTOBER 30 QuickBooks Payroll at Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Alice Mariana and is from 6 pm to 9 pm. Cost is $25. Call 375-0100 for more information. OCTOBER 31 Community Harvest Party at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Beginning at 5 pm. Food, games and fun! Hosted by the Bitterroot Calvary Chapel Church. 363-3411

NOVEMBER 11 Annual Veterans Day Memorial at the RC Museum at 2 pm. We begin our program at the Doughboy with the laying of the wreaths by Veterans Organizations and Auxiliaries. Following that there is a program in the Court Room on the 2nd floor with refreshments being served. Call 363-3338 NOVEMBER 14 Bitterroot Bounty held at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information. NOVEMBER 20-21 Bitterroot Art Guild Christmas Show and Sale at the 1st Interstate Center. Call 363-3411 for more information regarding this event. NOVEMBER 21 Festival of Wreaths At the Daly Mansion form 5:30-8:00 pm. Festive wreaths, swags, centerpieces and antique ornaments for your holiday decorating or gift giving. Cocktails and a spectacular assortment of hors d' oeuvres. Limited Seating. Please call Michele Craig at 210-1375 for more information.

OCTOBER 30 OR 31 Halloween Costume Parade at 4 pm downtown Hamilton. Lineup at Hamilton Post Office. 360-9124

NOVEMBER 27 Tree Lighting and Christmas Stroll. Enjoy caroling, tree lighting and Santa arrival. Warming barrels, free s’mores for kids in-store specials. Call 360-9124.

OCTOBER 30-31 Haunted Mansion Hayrides at Daly Mansion. 363-6004 ext 2

NOVEMBER28 Hamilton Players present ‘Forbidden Bitterroot’ a concert fundraiser, parody. Call 375-9050

NOVEMBER 1 Hamilton Players presents ‘Pride & Prejudice’ based on a novel by Jane Austen. Sponsored by Chapter One Bookstore. Call 375-9050

NOVEMBER 28 Small Business Saturday celebrate our small local businesses by shopping small at home. Special offers , no crowds, no traffic. 360-9124.

NOVEMBER 5-7 Southwest/Northwest Volleyball Tournament at the Hamilton High School.

DECEMBER 4 First Friday - Kids can help the shepherd locate his flock and win prizes in the ‘Sheep Trail’ promotion. Caroling and extended shopping hours. Call 360-9124

NOVEMBER 6 First Friday in Stevensville ‘Customer Appreciation’ Main Street Food Drive. Call 777-3773. NOVEMBER 6 First Friday ‘ArtRageous’ theme – celebrating art in all its forms, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 NOVEMBER 6-8 ArtRAGEOUS art event at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information. NOVEMBER 6-9 Holly Jolly Artisan Show & Sale at the Daly Mansion. Call 363-6004 ext 2

DECEMBER 4-6 Sports Connection Gun Show at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information. DECEMBER 4-5-6 A Montana Country Christmas in Stevensville celebration begins with Parade of Lights, caroling, Nativity Exhibit at St. Mary’s Mission, Christmas treats, lots of fun for the whole family. 777-3773. DECEMBER 5 Splendor on Main Holiday Gala in Stevensville. Wine tasting, delicious hors d’oeuvres Buffet, Auction and Raffle. Call 777-3773.

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DECEMBER 5 Stevensville Booster Club Bazaar at the Stevensville High School from 10 am to 3 pm. Call 777-3773. DECEMBER 7 Victor Chocolate Tasting Event. From 4-9 pm. Call 642-3997. DECEMBER 11 Extended shopping hours in downtown Hamilton stores. Call 360-9124. DECEMBER 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20 Stevensville Playhouse presents a ‘Greetings’ at the Playhouse at 7:30. Call 777-2722 DECEMBER 19 Community Christmas Party at the Daly Mansion. 363-6004 ext 2

Something Is Always Happening in the Bitterroot Valley

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DECEMBER 18 Celebration of Light! Celebrate the solstice with luminaria downtown, warming barrels and s’mores for kids, along with extended shopping hours. 360-9124. 2016 EVENTS FEBRUARY 17-20, 2016 13 C Girls/Boys District Basketball Tournament at HHS Gymnasium.

Ravalli Electric Co-op

FEBRUARY 24-27, 2016 Western “C” Girls and Boys Basketball Tournament at HHS Gymnasium. JUNE 2016 Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival. This bi-annual event features classes, vendors and fiber animal show. For exact date and information call Marty 777-2411 or spunoutnmt@aol.com SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 Founder’s Day at the Historic St. Mary’s Mission. 175 Years – Celebrate the founding of Stevensville at Historic St. Mary’s Mission – for more information call 777-5734.

“The Good Guys in the White Trucks”

NOVEMBER 5-7, 2016 Southwest/Northwest Volleyball Tournament at HHS Gymnasium.

Call the Chamber of Commerce 363-2400 for all of your 2016 Calendar of Events or go on line www.bitterrootchamber.com

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Community of

C o r v a l l i s

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A great place to live or to visit! Corvallis, as its name suggests, is “the heart of the Bitterroot Valley.” Visit its historic buildings, drive or bike its rural roads, explore the river as it flows through the area…..for a taste of life in the valley as it was and as it is. The annual American Legion Memorial Day Parade is a not-to-be-missed event in Corvallis. The parade was first organized by returning World War I veterans, and has continued since to honor men and women who have died in our nation’s service. This is a wonderful event for people of all ages. It is preceded by a pancake breakfast, followed by a carnival, and draws people from all over the valley. Corvallis was one of the first settlements in the valley. Some of the Bitterroot’s most fertile soils are located in the Corvallis area, and the community has a long agricultural history, which continues to this day. Corvallis is home to the Western Montana Agricultural Research Experiment Station. Numerous historic farm houses along the Eastside Highway and along back roads attest to the area’s history, as do many buildings in the town area of Corvallis. Memories Café occupies a building built in 1881 as the first protestant church in the valley. The Brooks gift store occupies the former Brooks Hotel, ordered from a catalog and constructed in 1894! A wagon train brought Elijah and Margaret Chaffin to the Corvallis area in 1864. The Chaffin homestead is now part of The Teller, a private wildlife refuge, which offers lodging in the historic Chaffin and Slack houses. In 1871, a post office was established in Corvallis and the town site was platted in 1879. Corvallis has grown along with the rest of the valley (the population of the Corvallis School District was estimated in 2005 at more than 6,500), but remains an unincorporated community. In 1867, the first public school was opened, in what was then Missoula County, and Corvallis officially became School District No.1, a designation it still carries on Ravalli County records. Most residents would agree that the Corvallis community, in many ways, is centered around and defined by its schools. The Corvallis School District currently educates approximately 1,350 students in kindergarten

through 12th grade, and is the second largest school district in the county. The Corvallis Schools have a well-deserved reputation for excellence and progressive, child-centered educational programs. The U.S. Department of Education awarded Corvallis Middle School recognition as a Blue Ribbon School in 2002. The Corvallis community is shaped by its volunteer organizations. The Corvallis School District is governed by the elected, volunteer Corvallis School Board. Through donations, the volunteer Corvallis School Foundation supports programs that enrich and enhance the academic programs of the school district. In 2007, an all-weather track, football field, soccer fields, and playground were completed on school district property through the fundraising efforts of community members who formed the Corvallis Community Events Center Foundation. The Corvallis Volunteer Fire Department offers first class service to Corvallis and recently constructed a new fire hall and meeting room along the Woodside Cut-Off Road.

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Biking B

icycling is the second most-popular form of recreation in the U.S., with half the population getting on a bike annually. The City of Hamilton has rolled out the welcome mat for cyclists, as the gateway to the Bitterroot Valley’s plentiful road and mountain biking opportunities. The Bitterroot is simply an outstanding place to ride. The valley’s abundance of highly scenic paved roads, with relatively low traffic volume, is almost irresistible, while a paved bike path runs the length of the valley, from Lolo to Hamilton, providing 42 miles of relatively level cruising. For mountain bikers, the Bitterroot offers a network of Forest

Service roads, hundreds of miles of them, suitable for casual mountain biking; more serious bikers will find miles of challenging single-track routes, some of them easily accessible and others quite remote. Organized cycling events are starting to catch on as well, for both mountain and road bikers. The “Tour of the Bitterroot” mountain bike event will take place in, benefitting the Bitter Root Land Trust. More information is available at http:// www.tourofthebitterroot.org/. The “Ride De Root” is a 100-mile road ride set also in July, starting and finishing in Darby. Information on that event is at www.ridederoot.com. In Hamilton, the city has designated well-marked bike paths and bike routes to conduct cyclists safely through town.

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IN THE

Bitterroot

Downtown sidewalks have ample bicycle parking, and the city is implementing a comprehensive bike/pedestrian plan. Check the city non-motorized plan on their web site at www.cityofhamilton.net Hamilton also offers two excellent bike shops, Valley Bicycles and Ski, at 219 S. 1st Street, and Red Barn Bikes, off Sleeping Child Road at 399 McCarthy Loop. Both have knowledgeable sales and service staff, and can direct cyclists to suitable rides regardless of their skill levels. Favorite routes among road cyclists include Sleeping Child road, the Skalkaho Highway, the East and West Fork roads, and paved routes paralleling U.S. 93 and the Eastside Highway, coursing up and down the valley. Closer to Hamilton, Westside Road, Old Corvallis Road, and Golf Course Road are great options. Various

loops, and outand-back rides, can be strung together to make your ride as long or as short as you’d like. The Eastside Highway accesses some excellent rides, but from its terminus at Florence to a bit south of Victor Crossing, it offers little or no shoulder and sometimes high traffic volume, so riders should exercise great caution if including it in their route. Mountain bikers will find a nest of trails in the Skalkaho/Rye/Sleeping Child area. Between Lost Trail Pass and the West Fork of the Bitterroot, lies another network of trails that offer access to remote country and challenging rides. Lake Como also offers a mix of trails and gravel roads that are scenic, and capable of challenging riders of any level. The Coyote Coulee recreation trail,

located up Lost Horse canyon, is a mixeduse trail that offers hikers, horseback riders, and mountain bikers a great outing on mixed terrain. It’s useful to pick up a Forest Service map to keep track of the roads and road closures, and a stop at a local bike shop for route information is helpful, as well. The Chamber of Commerce and numerous local stores sell up-to-date road maps of the Bitterroot Valley. Several informal, weekly rides take place during the cycling season, some for experienced cyclists seeking a hard workout, others are more relaxed, “nodrop” rides, where the pace is set to accommodate the slowest in the group. Inquire at local bike shops for more information on these group rides, for both road cyclists and mountain bikers. The Bitterroot Valley is on a major, transcontinental bike route, the Transamerica, developed by the Adventure Cycling Association to help guide riders traveling cross-country. More than a thousand cycle tourists pass through the Bitterroot Valley every year on that route. Adventure Cycling and other organizations sponsor cycling tours that occasionally

pass through the area, “Cycle Montana” is another organization that hosts annual rides throughout Montana. In Montana, as in most states, bicycles are considered vehicles, and cyclists have the same rights and duties as the driver of any other vehicle. Key practices for safe riding include: wearing a helmet at all times, being visible, wearing bright colors, using lights when riding in conditions of adverse

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visibility, riding predictably with traffic, signaling intentions, and riding respectfully and defensively. When riding with others, ride in single file and in a straight line. State law also requires cyclists to remain as far to the right as practical, unless passing another vehicle or turning left. Bicycles are required to have a white reflector on the front, red in back, and reflectors on the spokes and pedals.

Cycling in the Bitterroot

Cycling and the Bitterroot were made for each other!

Bicycling plans a big role in Montana’s tranporation system. Montana was named the safest state to commute by bicycle in the United States. Casual or experienced rider, a bike commuter, a bicycle tourist always be safe and responsible. Most Montanans are pedestraians at one time or another every day. Whether you are walking for exercise, recreation or just walking to work or to the store. Use the cross-walks and be on the lookout for bikes as well as cars. Share the road is an integral part of the MDT’s Vision Zero, moving toward zero deaths and injuries on Monanan’s roads. Pay attention - share the road, motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians are all responsible for safety on Montana’s roadways. Whether driving, bicycling or walking everyone must pay attention, follow traffic signs and laws and use common courtesy, The end goal - eliminate bicycle, motor vehicle and pedestrian fatalities. To find out more about Montana and our safety rules go to www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/bikeped/ sharetheroad.shuml You can stop in at the Bitterroot Chamber, located at 105 East Main and pick up your free Bicycling the Big Sky of Montana.

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Hamilton - A Hub of Activities ... Located in the middle of the Bitterroot Valley is the county seat of Ravalli. Hamilton is home to over 4,400 people and the immediate area around the town has somewhere over 12,000 people. Downtown Hamilton has several historic buildings with unique shops and restaurants. Looking west on Main Street is a beautiful view of the Bitterroot Mountains. Beautiful street scape, trees, and street lamps invite one to enjoy the unique downtown shops. Highway 93, which passes through town, also boasts a variety of shops, grocery stores, and gas stations. The Chamber of Commerce is located on the corner of Main Street and Highway 93. The city offices are located in the historic Bedford Building just across the street from the Ravalli County Courthouse. The Ravalli County Museum, housed in the old courthouse, was built in 1900. Each July, Hamilton comes alive as the entire town celebrates ‘Daly Days’ in honor of the city founder, Marcus Daly. This event includes arts, crafts, and food vendors on the streets. The local businesses hold their annual sidewalk sales, games for the kids, and just a block away in the park, the Chamber of Commerce, holds its annual Micro-Brew Festival; all this makes for a weekend of events, sharing, reminiscing with old friends, and meeting new friends. The town of Hamilton hosts a variety of events throughout the year including Apple Day, Bitter Root Day, a variety of art functions, several plays, art, and craft shows and the Ravalli County Fair. These are just a few of the exciting activities planned throughout the year. Visit www.cityofhamilton.net

Hamilton’s History Hamilton was not a pioneer village in the days it was founded. Instead, it was a planned town of wide streets and avenues, a complete economic center for an area of farms and stock ranches. The History of Hamilton began when Marcus Daly, a great finance figure of the 1880 era in Butte and Anaconda mining development, made his way into the Bitterroot Valley seeking interests other than mining. About 1887, Mr. Daly bought up small sawmills west of the present site of Hamilton and almost overnight had established a lumber making industry on the bank of the Bitterroot River. Marcus Daly’s next move was to bring two men from another state to plan and develop his dream town. They were James Hamilton and Robert O’Hara who came from Minnesota in 1890. Mr. Daly named Hamilton after James Hamilton and the town was incorporated in 1894; Mr. O’Hara was named the first mayor.

Community of

H a m i l t o n

Hamilton was recently named as one of the most beautiful towns in Montana to visit!!!

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Darby is a small town with big, bull riding, bronc bustin’ rodeos!

Community of

D a r b y

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Darby is a small town located at the southern end of the Bitterroot Valley in southwestern Montana, just one hour from Missoula and 30 miles to the Idaho border. The Sapphire Mountains are to the East and the gorgeous Bitterroot Mountains are to the West, with many recreational opportunities abounding in the Bitterroot National Forest. The Bitterroot Valley is known as Montana’s ‘Banana Belt’ for its slightly warmer temperatures than the surrounding mountains. Darby was named in 1888 by its Postmaster James Darby; and its overall architecture has a distinct western flair. Log buildings still stand as a reminder of the gold dust days. Darby’s Pioneer Memorial Museum was originally one of the first hand-hewn homestead cabins built in the area. Warm, friendly people will greet you at the unique shops, grocery store, post office, library, restaurants, saloons and lodging establishments. Visitors will enjoy the National Museum of Forest Service History located here. To pay tribute to its founding fathers, Darby hosts Logger Days each summer. Darby is a rural small town that is horse-friendly. The lifestyle is laid back. The pace is slow. There are so many activities to participate in and enjoy, because Darby is the gateway to nature’s playground. Highlights of this prime recreation area include Alta Ranger Station, Darby Pioneer Memorial Museum, Lake Como Recreation Area, Lost Trail Ski Area, Painted Rocks Lake, Skalkaho Falls, and 3.5 million acres of untouched wilderness. The first USDA Forest Service ranger station was established in Darby, and visitors will enjoy the National Museum of Forest Service History located there. This is a great place to visit for families, fourwheelers, hikers, bicyclists, motorcyclists, anglers, hunters, nature lovers, photographers, skiers, and sightseers. The incredible scenery in western Montana will revitalize you. With a population in 2007 of 853 people, the town is a quiet one with spectacular scenery and fabulous fishing opportunities. Just minutes away are the East

and the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, known for some of the finest fishing in the country. The Painted Rocks State Park and reservoir, as well as other streams and lakes, make Darby prime territory for the fishing enthusiast. With Brook Trout, Mountain Whitefish, Rainbow Trout, and Westslope Cutthroat Trout prevalent, Darby and its surrounding areas is the perfect fishing destination providing a once in a life time “Big Sky” experience. Darby is located on Highway 93, which constitutes part of the Lewis and Clark Trail. This scenic highway, going all the way from Canada to Mexico, is part of the Transcontinental Bicycle Path and is close to the Continental Divide Hiking Trail. Skalkaho Falls, just north of Darby, is one of western Montana’s “must sees.” This breathtaking waterfall can be viewed close up from the road! Lake Como Recreation Area, approximately four miles north of Darby, is a beautiful mountain lake and is one of the Valley’s most popular camping and boating sites. The six-mile loop trail around Lake Como is suitable for hiking, mountain biking and accessing the lake for swimming or picnics. The first quarter mile is wheelchair accessible. Lake Como dam was constructed in 1905 to provide late season irrigation for the Bitterroot Valley farmers and ranchers. Early Forest Rangers, Than Wilkerson and Henry Tuttle, constructed a one-room Lodgepole Pine cabin with a sod roof in June 1899. The resulting Alta cabin is the first ranger station in the United States and still stands on the West Fork Ranger District. Alta Pines are the oldest ponderosa pines in the Bitterroot Valley and can be seen before reaching the ranger station.

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Photo by Chase Cooper

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Fly Fishing in the Bitterroot

Photo by Ann Bethea

Flyfishing, for many Bitterroot Valley residents and visitors alike, is the reason they are here. The Bitterroot River draws tens of million of dollars into the local economy annually – and accounts for many more millions from those who come here to fish

Seasoned anglers return to the river for its beauty, gentle wading, and public access at points that divide the river into a series of day floats. Finding the best spot is easy. Local fly shops gather information from the river’s regulars, and share it with visiting or beginning anglers. If you go to the famous Madison or Missouri, you’ll find a big river that demands a lot from those who fish it. Family fishing

and decide to stay. And even though the river drives a significant portion of the local real estate market, its trout are totally oblivious to that reality. All they care about is their own homes in the valley’s streams and the bugs they eat. The bugs are plentiful. The Bitterroot enjoys a full slate of fishable fly hatches. The trout are all wild, many of them native. The fishing, as a former guide once put it, will “delight the beginner and challenge the expert.”

opportunities are scarce. Hiking trails along small streams where youngsters can catch their first fish are virtually nonexistent. Not so with the Bitterroot. While it must be respected, as is the case with moving water anywhere, the Bitterroot River, for the most part, is easy to negotiate. The river’s native westslope cutthroat trout, fish that average ten to sixteen inches, take the fly aggressively. And larger fish, many of them wild rainbows and browns, intrigue the serious flyfisher. There are gentle nature trails along the

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valley floor, and day treks on trails into the Bitterroot Wilderness. These trails border trout streams, where experienced anglers can hone their skills as they tease brightly colored native cutthroats into taking their flies, and those just getting started in the sport – at any age – can enjoy the thrill of catching beautiful, wild fish. The opportunities are plentiful, and include pristine wilderness lakes within range for a day hike. There are U. S. Forest Service campgrounds at wilderness trailheads and along the river’s east and west forks, and private campgrounds along the river around Hamilton. Some of the locals simply drive to these campgrounds, park, and fish. If there is a nice riffle near the campground, (there usually is) they know the trout

will be there. Which flies to offer them? How to get started in this best thing to do in the Bitterroot? How to arrange a float

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trip, as a family outing or a fishing trip with an experienced professional guide who will reveal the river’s best fishing to you? Inquire at the Chamber of Commerce, and they’ll direct you to local member fly shops. You might discover why flyfishing is at the top of so many lists, and a hundred other things you might do instead are, by comparison, pleasant distractions.

The mountain lakes of the Bitterroot Wilderness Area are treasures. A few of them are accessible by vehicle (old pickup, 4-wheeler or rental car recommended) and some are in range of a day hike. The scenery alone is worth the trip – but most of them offer fishing for beautiful native cutthroat trout fishing to the angler who is geared up for it. Trout in mountain lakes can be fickle. At times they can be almost too easy, other times they seem to turn off completely. Usually it’s somewhere in between, shaded toward the easy side. Fishing for them can require special methods, methods that aren’t beyond the reach of even the beginning angler. The spin-fisher has a special advantage on a mountain lake: the clear plastic casting bubble. There are two types I recommend: one is the torpedo-shaped float with a small screw eye on each end; the other is a round model with a plug in it, designed to be filled with water. For the torpedo model, a flyfisherman’s tapered leader attaches to the heavy end. 36

Fishing The Bitterroot River offers one hundred

and Painted Rocks Lake. Feel free to stop into one of our many fly fishing shops for the latest information on licenses, guided fishing trips, and advice on where to go and what to use.

The thin end attaches to the line coming off the reel. Then, either a small unweighted spinner or a fly goes on the business end. Retrieve slowly, with the rod perpendicular to the line. Don’t jerk when a fish hits. Let the tip cushion the strike, then raise up. The sinking bubble, when filled with water, lets you fish a fly slowly across the bottom. A quick, short set is all that is required to strike. Too much and you’ll lose fish - or flies, or both. The fly angler, whether fishing from a float tube or shore, will need a long leader. I usually begin thinking of leaders for mountain lake fishing at about sixteen feet - although it is often possible to get by with less. Long light tippets, 5X, 6X, or smaller, are usually required. A floating line will work part of the time, but if I had to choose one line for all my mountain lake fishing, it would be an intermediate. An intermediate line sinks at a very slow rate, getting below the wind chops that can generate fish activity and blow a floating line out of control across the surface. Slow retrieves with the rod tip held

just below the surface will usually produce strikes. Experiment. The strike needs to be quick but not too heroic. One of the best ways is to leave the rod tip pointed forward and separate your hands. The trout that live in mountain lakes tend to like small ants, small dark caddis variants, midges, and small dark mayflies when they feed on the surface. Most of the fishing is subsurface, however. You can fish an ant or caddis variant underwater quite successfully, along with anything small that has peacock herl on it, such as a Prince nymph or soft-hackle peacock. Pheasant tail nymphs, Bird’s nests, Trueblood shrimp and twitch-pause nymphs and something with marabou on it round out the fly selection. There are lakes within an hour’s hike from a trailhead, lakes that require an expedition of several days to reach, and lakes that offer, after a few miles on the trail, an ideal spot for an all-day or an overnight visit. Pick up a guidebook, ask around locally, pick a spot that suits you, and do some exploring. And don’t forget to bring a camera, the beauty alone is worth the trip.

miles of fishable river, 11+ fishing access sites and some of the most pristine fishing areas in Montana. The Bitterroot is famous for its dry fly trout fishing, boasting 22” plus Browns during heavy spring skwala hatches. Lake fishing is also available at Lake Como

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Staying in Shape Motivation is what gets you started ... habait is what keeps you going. So if you are tired of starting over, stop giving up!

Sometimes easier said than done, but staying in shape is something that is actually fun here in the Bitterroot Valley. We offer such a large variety of things to help you keep moving and motivated. There are several gyms located in almost every community. Some of the activities to choose from are: Aerobics, Back Packing, Ballet, Baseball, Basketball, Biking, Boating, Bowling, CrossFit, Dancing, Fishing, Football, Frisbee, Golf, Gymnastics, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Ice Skating, Jogging, Rock Climbing, Roller Blading, Running, Skateboarding, Skiing, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tae Kwon Do, Tennis, Trampoline, Treadmill, Unicycling, Volleyball, Walking, Weightlifting, Zumba and Yoga. When was the last time you tried to jump rope or Hula Hoop? Things we did as kids kept us moving and in shape, so don’t think that just because we have reached a certain age that we can no longer do certain

things. Always check with your doctor before performing any physical activity but the majority of us can still participate in some sort of activity that help keep us fit. Walking is one of the best and is a great way to begin getting back in or staying in shape. Get out and walk your dog, you will both be happy. Staying in shape should be fun, but you have to pick something that you enjoy doing or you won’t stay with it. You should also pick more than one thing that keeps you motivted and moving because there are times when the weather or other forces cause you to stop one of them, so always have a backup. One thing I have noticed when I travel anywhere - no one takes the stairs any more. Use your legs, God gave you two so use them . . . remember if you don’t use it you will lose it! Also be careful what you eat, moderation is the key. Don’t eliminate things you like, it will just make you overeat and become frustrated. Bottom line, there are so many acitivities to enjoy, let’s try something new or old. Remember it is never too late to begin, start slow and take your first step ... it won’t be your last.

Get Fit For Your Life!! There’s plenty of action at Hamilton’s Iron Horse Athletic Club! Whether it be our state of the art equipment (high end free weights, weighted machines, and high quantities of Technogym treadmills, elliptycals, bikes, etc), our large line-up of FREE (with membership) instructor lead classes, or the many happy faces every time… the IHAC is a fun, well-equipped facility help get/stay in great physical condition. Attention to detail is crucial at IHAC. Always impeccably clean, we strive to make all aspects of your gym experience good ones. Pre-written workouts, group training (above and beyond classes), personal training… we’ll get you going- and keep you motivated! If you’ve been “not a gym person” – hold on… and look at just a few examples of how we can make this FUN: ZUMBA – like to dance? Kickboxing YOGA Bootcamps (with friends!) TRX- based body resistance/core strength BoxFit

You are experienced in gyms? Well come down and check us out! You’ll like IHAC. We’re in a classy timber –framed building (from the late 1800’s)…Downtown Hamilton. A perfect spot – to get FIT FOR YOUR LIFE!

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Perfect for your vacation in the Bitterroot Valley Romantic Getaway l Amazing Views l Fishing l Outdoor Recreation l Montana Wedding l

582 Tin Cup Rd Darby MT 59829 www.tincuplodge.com

FREE Complimentary BreakfastBuffet Buffet FREE ComplimentaryDeluxe Deluxe Hot Hot Breakfast FREE High Speed Wireless) FREE High SpeedInternet Internet (Hardwire (Hardwire &&Wireless) 62 Spacious Guest Rooms 62 Spacious Guest Rooms Fitness Room Room and Fitness and Sauna Sauna Microwaves and Refrigerators Microwaves and Refrigerators Convenience Store, Store, Gas Gas Station, Station, and and Car Car Wash Convenience Wash Lucky Lil’s Casino located adjacent to Lucky Lil’s Casino located adjacent tothe theHotel Hotel

406-821-1620 adults only .... no pets

3.5” x 5” | Maximum Font Size: 36 pt www.edwardjones.com

Move your family forward. Let's talk. Willa Carr Lande, AAMS® Financial Advisor .

400 W Main Street Suite 205 Hamilton, MT 59840 406-363-1140

1113North NorthFirst First Street 1113 Street Hamilton,Montana Montana 59840 Hamilton, 59840 Free Line: (800) 442-4667 Toll Toll Free Line: (800) 442 442-4667 Phone Number: (406) Phone Number: (406)363--6600 363--6600 Fax Number: (406) 363--5644 Fax Number: (406) 363--5644 E-Mail Address:mariec@townpump.biz mariec@townpump.biz E-Mail Address:

www.townhouseinnhamilton www.townhouseinnhamilton townhouseinnhamilton.com Member SIPC

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CALL US FOR RESERVATIONS!

CALL US FOR RESERVATIONS!

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Big Skies

of Montana’s

Photo by Patrick Chaplin

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Sightseeing Skalkaho Falls ... photo by Patrick Chaplin

The most impressive attraction in the Bitterroot Valley is, of course, the breathtaking scenery. From the first glow of morning to the star studded blanket of night, the valley offers one picturesque landscape after another. Capture the delicate pink petals of the ‘Bitterroot Flower’ with a micro camera lens, or take in the whole expanse of the valley from the seat of a chartered aircraft. There are endless ways to rediscover the Bitterroot Valley. The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce is the “first best place” to gather information about the valley and sight-seeing opportunities. They offer numerous brochures from outdoor activities to a cultural tour guide to help make your visit more enjoyable and to help you make sure you don’t miss anything.

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Call 363-2400 or visit the web site at www.bitterrootchamber.com. Lost Trail Pass Visitor Information Center is the Chamber’s branch location at the top of Lost Trail Pass on the Montana/Idaho border. The center is at a state rest area and is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

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1) Mile 1.3 Bitterroot River access point 2) Mile 2.2 The Hurtt Ranch house and barn were built in 1915 by members of the Daly Ditch Project for a Mr. Lemon who lived in Chicago. He was promoting the Apple Boom at 1. Florence 2. the turn of the century in the Bitterroot Valley. Prospective buyers would arrive in Missoula and stay at the Lemon Ranch to be wined and dined into purchasing valley property. 3) Mile 4.4 Lovely View of The Bitterroot River looking south. 4) Mile 5.3 View of the Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge with the entrance to the refuge at Mile 8.1. 5) Mile 6.1 Frank Lloyd Wright Home is one of the many Bitterroot Valley homes designed 3. by Frank Lloyd Wright during the early 1900’s. 6) Mile 6.6 Townsite of Bitterroot is at the turnoff at Rathburn Lane. The only remaining improvements at the originally planned site of the town that never was, are the fire hydrants. 4. 7) Mile 7.7 St. Mary’s Peak has a popular hiking trail to the mountain’s 9,343 foot summit, which provides a magnificent view of the valley below, with the Sapphire Mountains to the 5. east and the Bitterroot Mountains to the west. 6. 8) Mile 8.1 Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge was established in 1964 and dedicated in 1979 to the memory of the last Senator Lee Metcalf. The 2700 acre refuge is a popular feeding 7. 8. ground and nesting area for migrant and resident waterfowl. Hiking trails lead to the Bitterroot River and picnic area. 9) Mile 11.6 Bitterroot Cooperative Creamery originally on this site was built by a group of 269 local farmers from the Florence area after a fire destroyed the creamery building in Florence. The farmers built the new creamery in 1907 and John G. Howe took over the management 13. in 1908. This building also burned on June 20, 1911 and was rebuilt and opened again Stevensville 12. 10. on August 1, 1911. Stevensville has an annual Creamery Picnic, which is held the first 11. 9. weekend of August, commemorating the help the local townspeople gave John Howe to 14. rebuild the creamery. 10) Mile 11.8 South Entrance of Lee Metcalf Refuge located on Wild Fowl Lane. 11) Mile 12.0 Bass Home can be seen looking south from the highway after the south entrance to the Lee Metcalf Refuge. Built by A.J. Gibon in 1909 for brothers William E. and Dudley C. Bass, the brothers resided together there with their families. Thee home is now a private residence. 12) Mile 12.1 U.S. Forest Service Headquarters 13) Mile 12.1 Fort Owen Turn right after the Forest Service Headquarters toward the Bitterroot River to the turn off for the Fort Owen Monument. The fort was established by Major 15. John Owen in 1850, who purchased it from the Jesuits who had settled in the valley in the mid 1800’s. The post was active from 1850 to 1872. 16. 14) Mile 12.5 St. Mary’s Mission was established in 1841 by Father Pierre DeSmet, who 17. came in response to requests for Black Robes by various Indian tribes of western Montana and Idaho. It was the first white settlement in Montana. Guided tours are given during the summer months. Turn west and drive to the end of the road. Victor 15) Mile 17.1 Bell Crossing connects Eastside Highway with US Hwy 93. 16) Mile 17.8 Etna School was built in 1916 and used until 1957. It is now a private residence. 17) Mile 18.1 Martin Cramer Home built in 1893, is a Mansardic Victorian structure (the only one of its kind in the Bitterroot Valley) and is one of approximately 150 remaining in the US. It was built by Erick Erickson and John Lagerquist. Located east on Groff Lane, it is now a private residence. 18) Mile 25.0 Quast Home now a private residence, was built in 1904 by John Summers. Otto Quast purchased the home and ranch in 1913. 19) Mile 25.1 Montana State Western Agriculture Research Center was established in 1906 to deal with the booming apple industry in the Bitterroot Valley. The center, which now researches in horticulture, soil and biological control of weeds, is located on Quast Lane and is open to the public. 20) Mile 26.5 Corvallis Methodist Church was built in 1890. Methodist circuit riders served the Bitterroot Valley in the 1870’s. 21) Mile 26.6 Corvallis Christian Church was established in 1884 as a mission church. 19. 18. 22) Mile 26.7 Brooks Hotel which is now a private residence, was built in 1894 as a private home, then later became a hotel noted throughout Western Montana for its home-cooked 20. 21. meals. Corvallis 22. 23) Mile 26.8 Miller Home which is now a private residence, was built in 1887 for James 23. A. Hedge, owner of the Montana Lumber and Manufacturing Co. 24. 24) Mile 27.7 Corvallis Cemetery the resting place for many early settlers of the Bitterroot Valley, was established in the 1880’s. Turn left off the highway and drive east. 25) Mile 30.4 Marcus Daly Mansion Marcus Daly came to the Bitterroot Valley in the later part of the 1800’s. He was one of three “Copper Kings” in Montana and purchased his 269 Bitterroot Valley property in 1889. In 1897 A.J. Gibson of Missoula designed the Queen Anne style mansion. After Marcus Daly’s death, his wife Margaret had the home remodeled 25. and enlarged in 1910 according to her husband’s previously made plans. The home is now considered Georgian Revival with neo-classic porticos and was the summer home of Marcus Daly and his family. The mansion is now owned by the State of Montana and is managed 27. Hamilton by the Daly Mansion Preservation Trust. It is open to the public. 26. 28. 26) Mile 31.4 Tammany Castle Marcus Daly was noted for his breeding of expensive race horses. You can see a wonderful view of his horse stables by looking up from the highway due south. 27) Mile 32.0 Lovely View of Blodgett Canyon & The Bitterroot Mountains. 28) Mile 32.5 End of Eastside Highway Scenic & Historic Drive

Historic Eastside Highway

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UN-CORK ‘n ON TAP in the Bitterroot

MBeerontana ranks 2nd nationally in craft breweries per capita. first arrived in America with Christopher Columbus. When he landed, he noted that the natives were making a brew “of maize, resembling English beer.” Beer was of major concern in the new land, even for the pilgrims. The pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock, instead of traveling further south as planned, partly because they were out of beer. l 1863 - "Gilbert Brewery" was founded by Henry Gilbert, making it Montana Territory's first brewery. l 1920. Montana Prohibition laws went into effect l 1926 - Montana becomes the first state to repeal Prohibition enforcement. The petition to lift the ban stated its purpose was "to restore constitutional rights and liberty in the state of Montana by repealing all laws relative to prohibition except those relating to minors. Efforts to reinstate the law two years later in 1928 failed. l Late in 1933, Congress passed the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, which repealed the unpopular law. l 1997 - Cabaret License created as a reaction to the fast-rising prices of regular liquor licenses. Cabaret licenses are more affordable and allow restaurant owners to sell wine and beer. Montana ranks second in the US in beer consumption per capita. Montana has an estimated 730,259 legal beer drinkers, who on average drink 40.6 gallons each. To put it in perspective, that’s a little more than 81 growlers per person.

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Wildwood Brewing Blacksmith Brewing

Hidden Legend Winery

Mtn. View Distillery Blodgett Canyon Cellars

Bitter Root Brewery Higherground Brewing

Bandit Brewing Co. Mt. Cider Works

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Stop in for a beer. We are open seven days a week, with live music most Wednesdays & Saturdays at 6:00 – Always FREE Tap Room Hours: Sunday – Thursday 2PM – 8PM ~ Friday – Saturday 12PM – 8pm.

Blacksmith Brewing Company opened on October 25th, 2008. The building that houses our brewery and taproom was built in 1908. It began as a steam laundry and later became a blacksmith shop. With every brand the blacksmith made he would then burn it into the wall to make sure it was perfect. The brands still are embedded into our walls showing those who passed this way. It took a great vision to see what it could become and a lot of hard work. Blacksmith Brewing Company is located in Stevensville, Montana. A town rich in history, a valley surrounded by beauty, and a blue-ribbon river close at hand. You will be hard-pressed to find a better place on earth, with beer this good! Open seven days a week. Stop in for a beer! Tap Room Hours: Sunday – Thursday 2PM – 8PM ~ Friday – Saturday 12PM – 8pm With live music most Wednesdays & Saturdays at 6:00 – Always FREE

BLACKSMITHBREWING.COM OPEN Sunday – Thursday 2pm – 8pm Friday – Saturday 12pm – 8pm W i t h l i v e m u s i c We d n e s d a y s & Saturdays at 6:00 – Always FREE

Our Wonderful Team! Eric Hayes - Owner, Sheldon L. Scrivner Head Brewer, Mike Kelly - Brewers Assistant & The BEST Beertenders in the Bitterroot Valley: Marissa, Darcy, Stacey, Kristina, Sylke, Oriana, Stefanie, & Amy!

114 Main Street Stevensville MT 59870

114 MAIN STREET STEVENSVILLE, MT 59870

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(406) 777-0680 406.777.0680

blacksmithbrewing.com T & R Magazine


Wildwood Brewing began as a dream in the mind of Jim Lueders, an emigrant from Chicago. The Wildwood Project -- The Wildwood project started in earnest in 2002 when Lueders bought all that was left of the Saxer Brewery from his past employer. A suitable, and affordable site was found in the Bitterroot Valley, near Stevensville, just 24 miles south of Missoula. Construction began in the fall of 2009 with the pouring of the concrete, which utilizes as much waste fly ash from the Eastern Montana coal burning power plants In Spring of 2010,the timber frame structure, salvaged from a

Wisconsin barn originally built in 1901, was put back together at its new home. The roof system was completed using metal from 100% recycled material and made in Missoula. Locally available wheat straw bales were used as exterior insulation of the frame, nearly 800 of them in total. By fall of that year the bale walls were competed and plastered. The inside of the building was finished in early 2011 and the brewing tanks and equipment started to come into the building in February. The building of the brewery took nearly a year since Lueders had to have everything a certain way and did much of the work himself. Operations began in late January 2012 with the brewing of a Mai Bock which was labeled Bodacious Bock. The first brew was a keeper. Subsequent brews were: Discerning Pilsner, Mystical Stout, White Bark Wheat, and Ambitious Lager. Wildwood opened its doors on March 16, 2012. WildWood Brewing’s driveway is about 1/4 mile north of the Stevensville cut off road, just east of where the middle Kootenai Creek Road intersects Highway 93. We are across the highway (East) from Lucky Lil’s Casino. Look for a big yellow building with a rust colored roof and three large grain silos in front about 200 yards from the highway. The tap room is presently open everyday from 4:00pm to 8:00pm, but keep posted for seasonal hours. We have many fine beers on tap and sell 64 ounce growlers to go.

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ontanan, Kevin, can trace his roots directly back to Montana’s beginnings. “My Great- Great-Great-Uncle, Nelson Story, was among the first to establish a cattle herd in Montana by famously driving thousands of cattle from Texas to the Bozeman area in 1866. Nelson was even credited with kicking the box out from under outlaw George Ives in the first Virginia City “Vigilante hanging.” Kevin has worked as a Research Microbiologist since graduating from Montana State University in 1999, fermenting his first batch of “home brew” wine not long after. “I feel that my professional training really has helped prepare me for the winemaking process” Kevin explains. “Both often involve adding some of this to some of that, then carefully measuring the product. With winemaking, I just get to personally enjoy the results a little more than the stuff I’m mixing up in the lab.”

448 Eagle Lane - Corvallis, MT 59828 (406) 360-5680 T & R Magazine

B LODGETT Canyon Cellars 47


The dream of being a winemaker became reality when Painted Rocks opened in 2001 with friends and neighbors as partners. Inspired by the Scandinavian love for honeywine, Ken chose a Viking as the logo for the Mead—and Thorvald’s legend began! The Schultz Family took over in 2005 as sole owners and delved into the business of producing the best wine in Montana. Right from the start, Ken’s honeywines captured loyal customers and consistently wins prestigious medals. He used the wonderful natural flavors that come from the surrounding hills and meadows—pure, smooth honey, tart chokecherries, sweet huckleberries and the lovable, plentiful dandelion! The natural beauty of the area, the goodness of the local folks, and the dedication and hard work of the whole Schultz family, wife Lisa and sons Joe, Patrick and David, make this an inspired place to produce incomparable wines. Hidden Legend Winery is known for the quality honeywines it has always produced but Ken continues to discover new adventures. Montana’s famous Flathead Cherries recently became Ken’s newest project—a Flathead Cherry Riesling and a Flathead Cherry Merlot-Cabernet blend.

Stop in and ask about their various blends of mead! 1345 US Hwy 93 North #5 - Victor (406) 363-6323 www. hiddenlegendwinery.com

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518 First Street - Hamilton 406-375-5204 Tuesday - Saturday: 11 am - 8 pm Sunday: 1 pm - 8 pm For Higherground Brewing co-founders, Fenn and Jasper, dreaming up a business together made perfect sense. As life long friends they spent their days traversing the mountains and rivers of the Bitterroot Valley, making it the ideal place for their dream to come to life. Higherground Brewing Co. was established in Dec. 2011 after the two graduated from the University of Montana. Higherground Brewing is home of excellent brick fired pizzas, house-made soups and fresh salads, masterful beers and a welcoming atmosphere. Families are always welcomed! Dry Fly IPA (6.0%)- An American style IPA loaded with Cascade, Willamette, and Centennial hops and a balancing malt backbone.

Hand Crafted Beer

HigherGroundBrewing Co.

Summerfoot (5.4%)- A Pale ale infused with lemongrass and ginger root zest. Moderately hopped with Cascade hops. Flash Flood Milk Stout (6.0%)- Dark, rich roastiness with a milk chocolate sweetness. Base Camp Irish Red (5.7%)- Toasted malt character, medium hoppiness with a sweet finish. l

Clear Water Crystal Ale (5.4%)- Light, crisp and refreshing. Clear Water is our sessionable, easy drinking ale. Hurruh Scotch Ale (7.2%)- Smoky, earthy aromas lead way to rich maltiness and caramel sweetness. A dark brown appearance with ruby highlights. Addional seasonal beers on at all times!

Stone Fire Pizza

Salads HighergroundBrewing.com 518 1st St ~ Hamilton, MT l Soups (406) 375-5204 l Sandwiches l

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What makes Tim Bozik and his daughter, Nicol, co-owners of Bitter Root Brewing, listen to what their customers say. They know how to make beer and run a restaurant, all spiced with good tunes on Thursday and Saturday nights.

W

hat exactly is the Last Best Brew? For Bitter Root Brewing co-owner Tim Bozik, it's a lot more than his innovative marketing slogan. It's the beers he makes - great brews and fresh food. Bitter Root Brewing is more than a microbrewery making 1,350 barrels of beer per year, they also has a full restaurant on premises, called the Brewer's Grill, where you can enjoy a great meal with your Last Best Brew.

Bandit Brewing Co is a nano brewery in Darby, MT. that specializes in small batch beers, with 10 taps and have a new release every Thursday. Established in 2014, Bandit Brewing Co is housed in a former logging workshop two blocks off I-93 that runs through Darby. A town of 733, Darby is centrally located in the south corner of the Bitterroot Valley.

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Community means everything to us at Bitter Root Brewing. We buy local and support local as much as we can. The base malt used in all of our beers is 100% grown and malted in Montana. We employ over 20 local employees and hire all local craft and tradesmen. We also provide live music every Thursday and Saturday night with a great selection of both local and traveling musicians. Great Beer, Fresh Food, and a friendly environment make us The Last Best Brew!

101 Marcus Street - Hamilton (406) 363-7468 www.BitterRootBrewing.com

We are fortunate to have great skiing, hunting, fishing, hiking, and camping in our backyard! Brewery owner, JC McDowell is a small business entrepreneur and beer enthusiast who turned his hobby, home brewing great beer, into possibly the smallest commercial brewery in Montana. Drop by for a beer and a tour of their 40 gallon brewing system.

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roots reach back to 19th century Kansas, Keith has, above all, a respect for farming and growing the best grapes. His father, Rudy Smith, started the family vineyard at Mt. St. Helena in California. In 1988, the torch was passed on to Keith to watch over and cultivate the grapes.

159 acres of world- class grapes from California, while cellaring and aging take place in the bucolic Bitterroot Valley. The results are sumptuous wines that we think you’ll agree take the fullest advantage of the California growing climate and good old Western sensibility in the winemaking process. The best of both worlds? We certainly think so.

Keith has always maintained a delicate balance between that vineyard in California and his love of the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. In 2004, Keith founded the Trapper Peak Winery, bonded and headquartered in the great state of Montana. The Mt. St. Helena Vineyard continues to produce

At Trapper Peak Winery, our mission is to produce affordable wines of impressive quality in the great state of Montana. We strive to fuse the inherent qualities of California grapes with the essence and charm of Big Sky Country. Trapper Peak is dedicated to a downto-earth approach that embraces wine drinkers from all walks of life.

A fourth generation farmer whose

Our winery is located in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana, right on the continental divide. Rising atop the valley, at an elevation of 10,157 feet, is the Trapper Peak for which our winery is named. Our beautiful valley is blessed with plentiful fertility and mild weather, perfect for cellaring the wines we enjoy so much. trapperpeakwinery.com

75 Cattail Lane Darby MT 59829 (406) 821-1964

261 Rye Creek Rd - Darby MT (406) 360-5078

Montana CiderWorks is a bonded winery located on Rye Creek Road in Darby, Montana. Their mission is to offer exceptional English-style ciders crafted from Bitterroot Valley apples and other local fruits. Traditional cider is a naturally fermented beverage made from apple juice. It was the drink of choice for Americans from Revolutionary times until Prohibition. Montana CiderWorks honors 100 years of sustainable agriculture in Montana’s orchards by offering exceptional draft ciders. T & R Magazine

Distribution Locations: In Hamilton Hamilton’s Market Place 600 S. 1st St Super 1 Foods - Hwy 93 N In Corvallis Wild Mare Restaurant - 283 2nd St In Stevensville Stevensville Super 1 Foods 39 - Stevensville Cutoff Rd

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Historical Sites Daly Mansion

The Daly Mansion, built in the late 1800’s by Marcus Daly for a summer home for his family, was originally called ‘Riverside’. Mr. Daly, an Irish immigrant, made his fortune just as copper was coming into use for telegraph and electric wire. The GeorgianRevival style mansion has 25 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms covering 24,000 square feet. After Mrs. Daly’s death in 1941, the Mansion was closed and boarded up until 1987, when it was opened to the public. Over two million dollars in restorations have been completed in the Mansion, the grounds and the outbuildings. The three-story mansion is on 50 treed acres off the Eastside Highway. Included on the mansion grounds are a tennis court, swimming pool, greenhouse, playhouse, and a laundry building. The Daly Mansion is open daily for tours and is host to special events, weddings and reunions. The Daly Mansion welcomes guests with disabilities. We have an elevator that travels from the 1st floor, 2nd floor and 3rd floor. There is handicap parking next to the house for state-issued parking permit holders. Much of the Daly Mansion is accessible to guests in wheelchairs, although some areas are not due to the historic architecture of the building.

Tours are available from Mid-May through October. Fall/Winter season tours are available - call for week day appointments 3636004. Adults are $9.00, Seniors $8.00, Youth $6.00 (ages 6-17) and under 6 are free.

Photo by Eric Elander

Visit Copper Barron Marcus Daly’s Restored Summer Home in Hamilton, Montana - Tours Daily Mid May - Mid October

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Fort Owen

Historical St. Mary’s Mission

Major John Owen’s frontier trading post and Indian Agency is located half a mile west of Stevensville. Self-guided tours are available to see the preserved structures of the original Fort. Built of adobe and logs, Fort Owen is the site of the first permanent white settlement in Montana. Father Pierre DeSmet came to the area in 1841 and established St. Mary’s Mission among the Flathead Indians. In 1850, Major John Owen arrived in the valley and set up camp north of St. Mary’s. In time, Major Owen established a trading post and military strong point named Fort Owen, which served settlers, Indians, and missionaries in the valley. Fort Owen still has permanent structures that stand today. Fort Owen is a State Park and sits at an elevation of 3,398 feet. The park has a vault toilet, a picnic table, and celebrates Fort Owen Day each 4th of July. There are no fees to visit the park but donations are welcome. It is located just north of Stevensville.

St. Mary’s Mission was founded in 1841 by Father DeSmet in response to the local Native Americans request for “Black Robes”. The chapel was built in 1866 by Father Ravalli, Montana’s first physician, surgeon and pharmacist. This versatile man also taught classes in the Native Salish language and built Montana’s first gristmill and sawmill. Mission grounds include the chapel, Chief Victor’s cabin, Father Ravalli’s residence and pharmacy, and the dove coot built by the Father. St. Mary’s Visitor Center has a gift shop, museum, art gallery and research library. It is located at the west of 4th Street in Stevensville. www.saintmarysmission.org Tours are from April 15 - October 15. Both St. Mary’s Mission and Fort Owen, a regional trade center which was established in 1850, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Healthcare Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital (MDMH) is proud to be a rural critical care hospital, committed to meeting the needs of its community. Our comprehensive medical, surgical, clinic, and emergency care services provide each patient with the highest possible level of medical care. To fulfill that commitment the hospital maintains a highly trained staff, invests in cutting edge technologies, upgrades its facilities and implements best practices to ensure the delivery of quality healthcare.

state-of-the-art conference technologies, comfortable seating and adjustable lighting. The new birthing center is a quiet homelike setting equipped with Jacuzzi tubs, space for the family and more. The new birthing center coupled with the one-onone service from the highly trained staff, makes it a perfect way to welcome a new born into this world. These new additions to the hospital will ensure that patients receive the quality of care that they are accustomed to close to home. Marcus Daly Imaging Services expanded the registration area making it more

whether it is in observation, inpatient or intensive care unit. Marcus Daly Medical Staff continues to grow; adding Joshua Pacheco, MD to the Emergency Department and Timothy Woods, MD, orthopedic surgeon at Bitterroot Orthopedics and Sports Medicine. Dr. Pacheco is certified by the American Board of Emergency Physicians and his philosophy of care emphasizes patient relations and education. Dr. Woods is certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgeons and brings 24 years of experience to the valley. His expertise includes trauma and elective surgeries, ranging from joint replacements to hand surgery to broken bones.

Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital is proud to be your award-winning hospital. MDMH 2014 Awards include: Bitterroots Best Employer Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital and Yvonne Courchesne, MD with was the first in Montana to become Corvallis Family Medicine was one of the many hospitals and voted Bitterroot’s Best Physician, healthcare providers across the Most Wired Hospital, Mountain-Panation to implement a fully integrated state-of-the-art electronic health Pictured from left to right: John Courchesne, MD, Larry Brouwer, cific Quality Health “Commitment record system. The secure electronic MD, Jennifer Feighner, MD and Mitchell Marzo, MD., four of the to Quality Award”, Hospice Honors Outstanding Award, and Home Health health record means a patient’s most MDMH Hospitalists National Recognition. Marcus Daly up-to-date medical information is comfortable and relaxing, and added a Memorial Hospital is also proud to say provided to all members of their healthsatellite x-ray location for the convenience we have an exceptionally low surgical site care team. Our patients can also access of clinic patients. New MRI technology infection rate and high customer service their health information online through was included with the expansion featuring satisfaction ratings! MyHealth. MyHealth allows patients to the MR450w wide bore, 32 channel MRI safely and securely request a prescription refill and appointment, ask about their visit, machine located in a custom GEM Suite. The new MRI provides patients with a view clinical record summaries, discharge more comfortable exam with open, flexible instructions, labs, imaging results and percoils that naturally follow the contours of sonal information online. the body. This department offers compreEmergency Adding to the many enhancements, Marcus hensive imaging and radiological services A 24/7 state-of-the-art patient centered with the most advanced Bone Density, Daly Memorial Hospital opened a new Emergency Department staffed with a comCT, Mammography, MRI, Ultrasound and Intensive Care Unit. The new patient and plete medical team, including emergency X-ray technologies, sophisticated electronstaff centric facility boasts 9,470 square medical physicians, EMT’s and paramedic medical record system, and a competent feet featuring five private patient rooms, ics, nurses, and support staff. and caring medical team! including isolation and bariatric rooms, as

Key Services at MDMH

well as sky lights for natural lighting. The facility includes evidence-based technology, strategically placed nurse stations, and comfortable waiting area, consultation rooms and much more! Patients have the space for their family, technology, natural lighting and expansive views and an experienced care team for optimal healing in the new Intensive Care Unit. Also included are three new conference rooms and renovated and decorated birthing suites. The conference rooms are designed and equipped for community education. These rooms include

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MDMH’s continually strives to meet the needs of the patients they serve. We have expanded the Hospitalist Program. Jennifer Feighner, MD, Hospitalist Program Medical Staff Director is joined by eight Hospitalists. The full-time hospitalists are Jason Cohen, MD, John Courchesne, and Mitchell Marzo, MD. The part-time hospitalists are Lawrence Brouwer, MD, Allen W. Jones, Jr., MD, Brett Heath, MD, Robert Smith, MD, and Randy Stewart, MD. This team is ready to care for you when you are admitted into the hospital

Imaging Marcus Daly Imaging Services is equipped with advanced clinical and diagnostic applications of imaging technology, including X-ray, CT Scans, MRI Scans, Mammography, Ultrasound, Bone Densitometry, and Fluoroscopy and PACS (picture archiving and communication systems).

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Laboratory The MDMH Laboratory Department is open 24hrs a day and is equipped with upto-date high-speed technology and automated instruments. This department serves over 30,000 patients and processes over 110,000 procedures annually.

FAASM, FCCP, brings 26 years of experience in sleep disorders, and is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the American Board of Sleep Medicine. The MDMH Sleep Center received program accreditation from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

Rehabilitation

Surgery

The MDMH Rehabilitation Center is specifically designed to meet the needs of both adult and pediatric patients. The rehabilitation staff is experienced in occupational, physical, and speech therapies, and includes therapists certified in orthopedics, pediatrics and hand therapy. The center is equipped with evidence-based state-of-art technology and the only HydroWorx therapy pool of its kind in western Montana.

Sleep The MDMH Sleep Center brings a new level of care to residents of the Bitterroot Valley who suffer from sleep disorders by offering the latest in medical technology and the highest quality diagnostic and treatment services. Director Rolf Holle, MD,

The MDMH Surgery Center offers Ravalli County residents the opportunity to have surgical procedures performed within minutes of their homes. The surgery center, offers a comfortable, naturally lit waiting area, friendly staff, state-of-the-art surgery suites and recovery center for outpatient and inpatient surgeries. Marcus Daly’s highly skilled board certified surgeons and surgical team, offer an extraordinary level of surgical care in a wide range of surgical specialties and focuses on minimally invasive techniques for a wide range of surgical procedures. Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital is located at 1200 Westwood Drive, Hamilton, MT, phone (406) 363.2211 or visit mdmh.org.

Our Mission

Daly Excellence our commitment to the Bitterroot Valley is quality, accessible, personalized healthcare.

Vision

The Marcus Daly healthcare team aspires to be a trusted community leader known for exceeding the expectations of those we serve. We promise exceptional care delivery by dedicated, compassionate professionals who take pride in achieving the level of satisfaction.

Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital’s Emergency Department is a patient centered state-of-the-art facility, staffed with Board Certified Emergency Physicians and an experienced and compassionate care team. “My experience in the emergency department was outstanding! I was in a room immediately and treated by compassionate medical staff. Their Orthopedic Surgeon was on-hand, and his expertise was thorough and impressive,” said David Haacke

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The Bitterroot Valley also offers numerous nursing homes and assisted living facilities which offer professional and personalized care for the aged. Health educators, medical, dental, mental health, homeopathic, eye care clinics, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, chiropractic, nursing homes, home health and hospice, and therapists all provide the latest in quality care for the whole family. Physicians, family nurse practitioners, registered and licensed practical nurses as well as certified nursing assistants, are ready

to help you with any medical need that may arise. Several pharmacies are located throughout our valley providing you with prescription needs. The Valley also offers medical and oxygen supplies. Bitterroot Imaging - Open MRI is another feature the Valley has to offer which provides greater patient comfort and a number of unique features and benefits for both patients and physicians. Walk-in clinics in the Valley offer patients fast, friendly and professional diagnosis when time is of the essence.

Assisted Living/Nursing Care

Clinics

Discovery Care Centre Sapphire Lutheran Homes Valley View Estates Health Care Center

Community Physicians Group Family Medicine Center of the Bitterroot Lolo Family Practice RM Ear, Nose & Throat

Chiropractic

Rehabilitation

Active Care Family Chiropractic Barnings Chiropractic Bitterroot Chiropractic

Catalyst Physical Therapy Hamilton Physical Therapy

Optometrist Big Sky Eye Care Clinic Ravalli Family Eye Care Rocky Mountain Eye Center

Dental Andy Kehmeier, DDS Bitterroot Valley Dental Care, Dr. Baker Canyon View Dental, PC

Pharmacies Bitterroot Drug ~ TimberRidge Family Pharmacy ~ K-Mart Hamilton Pharmacy ~ Albertsons Valley Drug & Variety

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Call 406.721.5600 or 1.800.525.5688 for appointments. Physicians are on-call 24-hours/day including weekends for emergencies.

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Wildlife Babies

Photos by Nathan DeBoer

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A Day in the Bitterroot Photo by Patrick Chaplin

A Day in Itself The Lake Como Recreation Area, just north of Darby, offers a variety of day, overnight, extended backpacking, motorized and non-motorized use. Early-day settler W. B. Harlan, who was reminded of a painting of Lake Como in Italy when he first saw the lake, coined the name. You will want to pack a cooler for lunch, take your towels, umbrellas, water toys and swimsuits. Don’t forget the sunscreen. There is an accessible day-use area, which requires Day passes for parking while using the facilities. Passes are available at several locations in Hamilton and Darby. Swimming, fishing, boating and water skiing are popular sports at the lake. The swimming area has beach access and is roped off from the rest of the lake. Lake Como is a large irrigation reservoir which lies in a beautiful canyon. During irrigation season it is drawn down

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and activities may fluctuate according to water levels. Restrooms, drinking water, and garbage removal services are provided. There is a hikers’ trail which leads along the north side to an unimproved campground above some falls at the head of the lake. A day at the lake is a great opportunity to relax with family and friends. Enjoy yourself! Take the short drive back to town for a short nap and head out early in the evening to enjoy at hearty meal at one of the great restaurants in the area.

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Springtime in the Bitterroot Springtime - when the temperatures wakens with new life. Fragrant apple blossoms abound in the foothills beneath snow-capped mountain peaks. Willows and cottonwoods sprout fresh leaves. The Bitterroot River swells with melted snow and gentle rain. Red-breasted robins punctuate warm breezes with song. Rich green-carpeted meadows, calves frolic, lambs bound, and foals try out their spindly legs. In wild woods and river bottoms, deer, elk, moose and bighorn sheep raise their young. The average temperature in April is 57.9°F with a low of 32.2°F., with average rainfall of 1.05”. Take a drive to Lee Metcalf to watch ducklings, wild swans and new fawns. Bring your

binoculars for a close-up look, and capture the beauty of spring with your camera. Farmers Markets start up in the spring in Darby, Hamilton, Stevensville and Florence. Enjoy the many choices of local vegetables and produce for sale. Afternoons are a wonderful time to spend at the golf course, or walk, bike or skate the paved paths along the roadways to the river.

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Resale of New & Used Building Materials T & R Magazine

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Boating, Canoeing & Rafting The Bitterroot River offers over 76 miles of floatable river, from six miles south of Darby to Missoula. The Salmon River is just 90 miles south of Hamilton and is a good white water rafting river. Lake Como and Painted Rocks Lake are popular spots for canoes, jet skis, fishing boats, ski boats and everything in between. Stop by the Chamber for more information regarding the many recreational opportunities in the valley, or visit our web site at bitterrootchamber.com

Bird & Wildlife Watching Summer in the Bitterroot Summer - We are blessed with over 16.5 hours of sunlight that make our summer days long and warm. This gives us all the time in the world to do all the fun things that make the Bitterroot so special. The nights are comfortably cool and make for great sleeping weather. Traveling down our back roads, the air is perfumed with the refreshing scent of the new-mown hay. You can watch the eagles soar, listen to the meadowlarks sing, and see and hear the hummingbirds hovering over the flowers. Lake Como and the Bitterroot River warm to swimming temperatures during the summer or just enjoy the solitude of a shoreline walk. During the summer season you need to be prepared for all kinds of weather. The average temperature in July is 82.8°F with a low of 49.3°F, so you may want to put on a light jacket in the evening. You don’t usually have to worry about getting stuck in a rainstorm as the valley only averages one inch during the month of July! Summertime is the perfect time to explore, enjoy and experience the valley. Each of our communities has special summer events that showcase the history, the culture and the artists of the area. From parades, rodeos, and art shows, to festivals of music and microbrews, there is something special happening for every age and interest. Throughout the summer, one can enjoy ongoing events including the monthly First Friday in Stevensville and Hamilton and on Saturday mornings there are Farmers’ Markets in Stevensville and Hamilton; Tuesday evenings in Darby. ‘Tuesdays at 12’ is a great time in Hamilton to hear local music and enjoy lunch in the park. You won’t want to miss the Ravalli County Museum’s ‘Saturday Series’ program, either. End of August and the first of September, we end the summer with a thrill. Join us for the Ravalli County Fair and Carnival! We promise you an entertaining ‘old fashion’ family experience.

Camping The Bitterroot National Forest has 28 campgrounds, many of which are open year-round. Amenities vary per site and more information is available at the Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce www.bitterrootchamber.com or any of the Forest Service information sites. We also have full hookup, privately owned campgrounds with both forest and river accesses. http://fwp.mt.gov/parks/accommodatioms/campimg/

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There are over 230 species of birds that can be found throughout the season utilizing the Bitterroot Valley and its surrounding mountain counterparts. Some of the most notable species found here are the Blue Grouse, Long-billed Curlew, Flamulated Owl, Black Swift, Calliope Hummingbird, Williamson’s Sapsucker, Black-backed Woodpeckers, Cordilleran Flycatcher, Violet-green Swallow, Pygmy Nuthatch, Rock Wren, Varied Thrush, Cassin’s Vireo, MacGallivray’s Warbler, and Cassin’s Finch. Many of these species can be found at sites along the Bitterroot Birding and Nature Trail. Wildlife is plentiful and available for viewing at Centennial Grove, 12 miles south of Hamilton on Skalkaho Highway. A selfguided trail skirted with 200-year old ponderosa pine meanders close to Skalkaho Creek. Big Horn Sheep can be viewed on the slopes of the East Fork, and west of Darby. Larry Creek Fire Ecology Trail, near the Charles Waters Campground, explores the beneficial effects of fire. The Willoughby Environmental Education Area is a one-mile interpretive trail that encompasses a wide spectrum of Montana landscape - from sagebrush to pine forests with streams located on the trail. A picnic shelter and restroom facility is located there as well - just 10 miles east of Hwy 93 off Bell Crossing. Teller Wildlife and Lee Metcalf are two refuges that are located in the Bitterroot Valley which enable our visitors to view a vast assortment of wildlife and birds. There are easy trails to follow as well as signs and benches along the way. Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, established on February 4, 1964, is a 2,800-acre refuge located in the Bitterroot River Valley of southwest Montana. The refuge is approximately 2 miles north of Stevensville and 25 miles south of Missoula in Ravalli County, Montana. Elevation ranges from about 3, 225 feet on the north end of the refuge to about 3, 314 feet on the south. This floodplain refuge provides a diverse mosaic of western mountain valley habitats including gallery and riverfront forest, wet meadow, wetlands, and grassland benches. The refuge provides opportunities for the public to enjoy compatible wildlife-dependent public use activities including hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, environmental education, and interpretation. The refuge is a very popular community and tourist destination.

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For the Younger Set

Got Kids? Check out the trout fishing pond and the Lewis and Clark interpretive trail in Hieronymus Park at the north end of Hamilton. There is also the Canyons Hideaway Playground at Claudia Driscoll Park - the perfect picnic spot for the family. Kiwanis Park has a playground and is right next to River Park, offering paved trails for biking and walking, or river access for splashing or floating. Lewis & Clark Park in Stevensville has a swimming pool, playground, and tennis courts. Victor and Darby also have city parks with playground equipment. Don’t forget to visit Darby’s skateboard park, which is located near the rodeo arena northwest of Darby. Florence has the famous Hideout Mountain, an 8,000 square-foot playground with a mountain maze, 3 slides, climbing wall and toddler area. Visit Kids First at the Westview Center in Hamilton for information call 375-3636.

ATV Tours Guided ATV tours are available through Bitterroot Adventures. Call Rye Creek Lodge at 821-3366 for package information and rates.

Photo by Nathan DeBoer

Mining America’s Precious Gems

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140 Aspen Grove Ln., Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 381-1392 www.sapphiremining.com mtlynnette@gmail.com

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Valley Mini Storage

Call Us For Your Storage Needs 2 Sizes 5x10 and 10x20

Call for lAvailability lPrice lPre-Payment Discounts

Lynn 360-5090 - Donna 369-4422 Located on Golf Course Rd & Werth Ln in Hamilton

Swimming For those lazy, hot days in the summer - we have two outdoor pools for swimming and swimming instruction. Bitterroot Aquatic Center, 59 Kurtz Lane in Hamilton, hosts an outdoor pool, indoor 90°F degree pool, lessons, open swim, water exercise and therapy classes, bathhouse, showers, and lifeguards. Call 375-8200 for more information. Stevensville also has a public outdoor pool and they can be reached at 777-5827. It includes a bathhouse and is located in Lewis & Clark Park at the end of 1st Street in Stevensville. The Canyons Athletic Center has an indoor heated pool with swim lanes, hot tub, shower, steam room and sauna. Open swim times are available. Call 363-2816 for day pass and/or membership information.

Tennis Tennis, anyone? Head on over to the Westview Center, Main and 9th Street in Hamilton, or Lewis & Clark Park at the end of 1st Street in Stevensville. Corvallis is another place where tennis courts are available. If indoor tennis appeals to you, visit the Canyons Athletic Center for a day pass and a chance to play on state-of-the-art courts located inside the air-controlled athletic center. The center is located at 472 Tammany Lane in Hamilton. Call 363-2816 for court reservations.

Hiking and Backpacking

All hiking and backpacking enthusiasts will find miles of terrific trails surrounding the Bitterroot Valley. Whether you are a novice looking for a simple day hike or an experienced hiker looking for multi-day trips into the backcountry, the majestic Bitterroots and Sapphire mountains will not disappoint you. The rugged terrain and beautiful peaks offer miles of breathtaking views and simple to challenging trails for all to enjoy. The same holds true for biking trails around the valley. Information on these hiking and biking trails can be found at any Forest Service headquarters and the Bitterroot Chamber of Commerce.

Prehistoric Wingless Birds • FREE Breakfast Buffet with Fresh Waffles • 24-Hour Indoor Pool & Spa • Free High-Speed Wireless • Pet Friendly • Conference Facility for All Occasions 139 Bitterroot Plaza Dr. Hamilton, MT 59840

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877-274-8274 bitterrootriverinn.com

For Reservations:

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Clover Quinn and her husband Joe became interested in emus in 1996 while searching for a meat low in cholesterol. Even though they knew next to nothing about the exotic birds it was love at first sight. First they wanted to see if they wintered well and when they did Wild Rose Emu Ranch began. At first the Quinns didn’t have much information on the birds and wanted them mostly for their meat, but they began to learn a lot about the oil. Refined from the fat on the back of the harvested bird, emu oil is odorless and colorless and has proved successful in treating a whole host of skin conditions. Emus yield five basic byproducts - meat, oil, eggs, leather and feathers - the oil has been the easiest for the Quinns to market and has been the most successful. Her Wild Rose Emu products are now sold in stores all over the valley, ranging from oil products, lotions, to animal shampoos.

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According to scientists the birds were never able to fly and have essentially remained unchanged for 80 million years. With flat breast bones and no wing muscles, they developed long, powerful legs and can reach speeds of 40 miles per hour. Emus are curious and easily spooked, but at the Quinn’s ranch they seem to enjoy visitors and sometimes sit down to rest. “They almost always stay outdoors,” Quinn said. “They won’t stay inside unless it’s 20 below outside.” Standing amid the 40 or so adolescents, with their shrill prehistoric cries reminding you of a Jurassic Park soundtrack, she coaxes and dodges the fleet-footed, five-foot-tall birds. Wild Rose Emu Ranch is home to approximately 120 emus, who enjoy the Big Sky and majestic view of the Bitterroot Mountain range. Emu ranching has taken agriculture to a new level, with this 95% usable bird, which provides a healthy red meat as well as a remarkable oil for the skin, a strong, supple leather, silky and bristly feathers; and 5 ½ inch dark green eggs. Long rectangular pens house the adult breeding pairs. About every three days a hen will lay an egg, which promptly gets collected and taken to an incubator. About seven weeks in the humid, 97-degree chamber, the eggs are moved to the hatcher. After placing a ready-to-hatch egg on a flat surface, Quinn uttered a few short whistles to mimic peeps made by hatchlings. Responding to the sound of siblings, the egg wobbled back and forth. It takes about six hours for a chick to hatch completely after poking the initial hole, Quinn said. In nature, the male will sit on the eggs and does not eat at all for the entire incubation period. His fat is enough for him to last up to a year with no food. He raises the babies, while the female goes off to do her own thing. Quinn welcomes people of all ages to come out and tour her emu ranch - or check out Wild Rose Emu Ranch web site - www. wildroseemu.com - the Quinn’s can be reached at 363-1710 or at wildrose@bitterroot.net.

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* hardtimesbluegrass.com Affordable Family Fun

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Winged Wonders A glittering rainbow of kaleidoscope colors fill the Bitterroot Valley sky each spring and summer as the hummingbirds return to breed and nest here in Southwestern Montana. Three distinct Bitterroot Valley hummingbird species are prevalent in this area, including the smallest breeding bird in North America, the Calliope; the feisty, rusty-backed colored Rufous; and the shy lesser seen Black-chinned. Males are quite colorful for attracting mates, where females are more gray and green to camouflage on their nests, aiding in detouring predation. Hummingbird breeding in May, and nesting in June, most abundantly occurs along the timbered Bitterroot Mountain foothills, where dense vegetation and running water creeks provide lots of small protein rich insects. Females conduct all nesting duties on their own with no assistance from the male. The tiny nest contains two eggs about the size of dried white beans. The well constructed nest is built of tiny rootlets, plant fibers, and the inside lined with soft plant down. A binding agent of elastic spider silk is utilized as a sort of glue to hold all the materials together, and attach or weld the nest to a limb securely. These tiny and highly intelligent birds frequent sugar-water feeders as they move down the valley floor and along the Sapphire Range foothills. There are many opportunities to view these migrating winged creatures in the valley while they linger to build fat reserves for metabolized fuel for the long journey south. It’s commonly believed by researchers that their average life span is 3 to 4 years, but amazingly, a nine-year old male Black-chinned hummer was captured and safely released along the Sapphire Range foothills in 2009. A recent consecutive five-year migration / breeding study yielded over 18,000 individual hummingbirds encountered in the Bitterroot Valley. To publicly view these Bitterroot feathered treasures, one may visit Skalkaho Steakhouse where there is a history of providing sugar-water feeders that host a marvelous variety of colorful hummingbirds. The place is a buzz with the small bird’s wings beating 40-80 beats per second. A few other quick facts, normal flight speed, 30 mph. Escape speed 50mph, Heart rate 250 beats per minute at rest, 1200 bpm feeding, length 2.75 3.75 inches, normal body temp. 105108 Degrees

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Bitterroot’s Treasurers Some of the most beautiful treasurers in the Bitterroot come from the four (4) legged kind. Richard and Shelley Peters, owners of Alpaca Hill Drygoods, are one of the Valley’s alpaca breeders. Once you have the fiber you need to find a way to clean and spin the cashmere-like fiber so it can be turned into a piece of artwork. They found a Kalispell mill to help them with their supply of fiber so it could be turned into works of art. Peters also turned to the alpacas’ native homeland in South America and found artists who have worked with the fiber for years – thus began Alpaca Hill Drygoods here in the Bitterroot. They showcase handiwork of South America textile artisans who create wearable art made from the soft alpaca fiber as well as Shelley’s own creations from tapestry luggage to hats. She has learned to crochet, felt, weave and embellish the fiber into beautiful, wearable items. Her love for the animals show not only in the animals themselves but in the garments produced from the fibers that are up to 12 to 14 inches long. Shelley states that every item is a relationship with a specific animal. They invite people to come and take a tour and check out the many wonderful items on display. They are located at 695 Bass Lane in Corvallis and store hours are noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Special tours can be made by appointment. For more information go to www.montanasurialpacas.com. Another alpaca breeder in the Valley is Rocking L Alpacas. Alpacas are shorn once a year, which give them relief from summer heat, and their fleece grows back by winter. The alpacas on the Lischkes’ ranch are raised for their fleece, which they send up to a mill in Kalispell. Alpaca fleece comes in 22 recognized colors and can be dyed or spun in its natural color. Aside from selling fleece, the Lischkes also sell some animals. Their love for these animals can be seen when you visit the ranch watching neighbors young and old enjoy petting the gentle animals. The Lischke’s have mastered the use of the alpaca fiber and it shows in their beautifully handcrafted items. They also offer tours and welcome people to stop by, sit, relax and enjoy. Their ranch is located at 1760 Red Crow Road in Victor - (406) 642-3085 and email address is ervandmo@wildblue.net. So if you are looking for something different to do while in the Bitterroot ... make sure you check out our Alpacas. You won’t be disappointed!

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After a long day of skiing stop at any one of our award-winning valley micro-breweries, grab a brew, sit back and listen to some local sounds. Take a break from the outdoors relax, see a movie, live theater, music, dance, and more.

Winter Wonderland

Bitterroot Valley is a Winter Wonderland sheltered between the Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains. The valley is spared much of the harsh blizzard winds and record-breaking wind chill temperatures that blanket other areas of the northwest. Although the mercury occasionally dips below zero, Bitterroot winters are usually mild, earning the valley nickname, ‘Banana Belt of Montana.’ While snow seldom accumulates more than 6 inches on the valley floor, the annual average at Lost Trail Ski Resort is 300 inches of pristine powder. Billions of stars, meteor showers and rare displays of Northern Lights adorn the deep black night skies. You need to dress warm and in layers to adjust for comfort during vigorous outdoor activity, as the high temperature in January is 34.4°F with a low of 16.8°F. Make sure you are prepared when traveling by carrying a warm blanket, a sand bag, folding shovel, cell phone and emergency food, when driving away from populated areas. Lost Trail Powder Mountain has some of the best powder to be found anywhere, and you don’t have to worry about the crowds on the 25 runs of this family-friendly ski resort! Cross country ski trails offer spectacular views at every turn on the Continental Divide, and if you get cold you can stop at the warming huts. Emergency caches are located along the 33 groomed and un-groomed trails at Chief Joseph Pass. We also have great snowmobile trails that lead to frozen waterfalls and open meadows in the East Fork, Skalkaho and Lost Trail areas. Are you ready for some fun?

Lost Trail Powder Mountain, located atop the Continental Divide on Hwy 93 where Montana and Idaho meet, has over 300 inches of pristine snowfall every year. These undiscovered slopes await the avid skiers and snowboarders! Cross-Country skiing in the Bitterroot Valley offers you quiet, unsurpassed beauty while you are skiing on some of the most beautiful trails in the world! Snowmobiling continues to increase in popularity and the fabulous winter scenery in our valley is the best you will find anywhere. Here in our valley, snowy conditions can start as early as late October and last until April or May. You won’t find a better or more scenic place to travel by snow than right here in our Bitterroot Valley!

Photo by Nici Wallner

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Autumn in the Bitterroot

Photo by Nathan DeBoer

Autumn is beautiful in the Bitterroot, with crisp temperatures to enjoy the abundant leaves of red and gold. Fall brings frosty mornings and snow-capped mountains. The sky is dotted with the v-shaped formations of Canadian Geese honking their way south. Tamaracks, aspens and cottonwoods splash golden patches amid the dark green pines and firs. Tree-lined streets in Hamilton and Stevensville explode with vivid reds and oranges. Harvest season brings apple trees heavy with ripe fruit and the deer, elk and moose are in full antler. McIntosh Apple Day, held in October, recalls the glory of the apple boom in the Bitterroot and gives you an opportunity to enjoy a great small town festival. Don’t Miss This One! October only averages .78 inches of rain and the average high temperature in October is 58.7°F with a low of 31°F. If you plan on hiking into the higher elevations, don’t forget to bring your winter gear. Explore the 1.6 million acres of Bitterroot National Forest and enjoy nearly 750,000 acres of protected wilderness. Hunting season opens on deer, elk, bear and moose. Remember - Don’t forget to bring a camera to take home a Bitterroot memory!

Hunting in the Bitterroot The Bitterroot Valley and the surrounding Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountain ranges of Western Montana offer the hunter excellent big game hunting for elk, mule deer, whitetail and black bear, as well as turkey, geese, pheasant and small game birds.

Tips for Bitterroot Hunters

Photo by Marie Christopher

Photo by Marie Christopher

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•All hunters during the firearm deer season should wear “hunter orange” (hat, cap, vest, jacket or rain gear). It must be the outermost garment and be visible from all sides. Also, put an orange vest or bright bandana on pets (dogs, horses, etc.) •Hunters should treat every firearm as if it were loaded and be careful where they point the muzzle. •Hunters should be sure of their target and the area beyond it. •Know where your hunting partners are at all times and never assume you are alone in the woods. •Every hunter should carry: map, compass, flashlight, extra food and water, extra clothes, sunglasses, first-aid kit, pocket knife, waterproof matches, and firestarter. •Take a Wilderness First Aid Course. •If you plan on drinking water from streams or lakes, don’t forget a water filter or chemical purification. •Be aware that there may be bears in the area, store food properly. Also, carcasses should not be closer than 100 yards to your sleeping area. •Your cell phone can save your life, but don’t depend on having sufficient coverage, particularly in remote parts of the Bitterroot National Forest. •Don’t become someone our local search and rescue crews need to find! Be prepared! •Please follow the ‘Pack It In, Pack It Out’ and ‘Leave No Trace’ principles while camping. Contact the Bitterroot National Forest for more information at (406) 363-7100 or www.fs.usd gov/bitterroot

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Adventures

Montana Highway 38, also known as Skalkaho Highway, starts about 3 miles south of Hamilton and heads east through the Sapphire Mountains for 54.3 miles to Porter’s Corner. This is a well-maintained dirt-gravel road for most of the way, but has quite a few narrow and harrowing spots for the unaccustomed. Skalkaho Falls is a spectacular water scene about 25 miles into the trip on the one-lane portion of the road. The falls flow down the side of the mountain, under the highway and down into the canyon below, creating a damp but beautiful site in early summer, but leaves only a hint of its glory in the later months. Many visitors will be pulled off on both sides of the road to view the falls so ‘caution’ is the word. Beyond the falls you climb to Skalkaho Pass. There are a few areas to pull off for a picnic or rest until you reach the pass. From the pass, it’s a much easier drive down to the Flint Creek Valley to Porter’s Corner. From there, you can take Montana Highway 1 south to Georgetown Lake or north to Philipsburg. Seventeen miles south of Hamilton, turning west onto Montana Highway 473, will take you along the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, then 23 miles southwest on your way to Painted Rocks State Park. The lake is a manmade reservoir originally built as an irrigation project that put hundreds of men to work in the 30’s. This area offers 25 camp sites with vault toilets, grills, fire rings, picnic tables, boat ramp, drinking water, and limits of RV/trailers to 25 feet. For those in hopes of seeing some Montana wildlife, continue driving south on Hwy 93 to Sula. Turning left onto MT Hwy 472, or East Fork Road, your drive will follow the East Fork of the Bitterroot River to the Broad Axe Lodge, which has been designated a Montana Wildlife Viewing Area. Dinner guests often see Bighorn Sheep and other wildlife on the hillside from the binoculars on each table. Continuing down Highway 93 will bring you to the MontanaIdaho border at Lost Trail Pass. The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce, in cooperation with Gold West Country, Big Hole Tourism Association, and the Salmon Chamber of Commerce, operate a Visitor Information Center at the pass. Stop to stretch your legs at the foot of Lost Trail Powder Mountain Ski Area before continuing your journey, or call it a day and head back to the valley for some rest. Take Highway 38 to the east at Lost Trail Pass and drive 17 miles to the Big Hole National Battlefield operated by the National Park Service. This site memorializes the bravery of the Nez Perce and U.S. soldiers and volunteers who fought there during the epic flight of the Nez Perce in 1877, and preserves the scene of one of the most famous battles of the Indian Wars. Entry fees to the park is now free of charge.The visitor center houses a small museum with exhibits of the Nez Perce, military clothing and equipment, a 12 minute introductory video presentation, books sales, area information, and a Junior Ranger activity program for first through

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eighth grade school children. A minimum of four hours is recommended to view the museum exhibits, the film and walk the battlefield trails. Take a Self-Guided walk through the battlefield from sunrise to sunset. Educational groups (such as school groups) should contact the park office to make a reservation prior to visiting the battlefield. Making a reservation will assure staff availability for your visit, and will allow you to learn about all education opportunities offered.

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Lewis & Clark Continuing south into the town of Darby, visitors will see the historic Darby Ranger Station and Visitor Center on the left side of the road. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, having been restored to its 1930s era condition when it was the district office. Pick up visitor information on valley attractions, as well as wood permits, maps, day-use passes for Lake Como and campground information. It is open throughout the summer season. Historians will love to visit Darby’s Pioneer Memorial Museum located in one of the first hand-hewn homestead cabins built in the area. In 1958, an interested citizen purchased the building and paid to have it moved to its present location, adjacent to the city park in the center of Darby. Make sure to see the pride and joy of Darby, the Darby Community Library. Walk through town to check out some of the fun shops and stores in Darby, truly a step back in time. Leaving Darby, look to the west into the Bitterroot Mountain Range and see Trapper Peak, the highest peak in the Range, rising to 10,157 feet above sea level at the summit. There is a spot to pull off to the right of the highway with an interpretive sign for some stunning photo opportunities.

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North Along the Lewis & Clark Trail North of Hamilton on US Hwy 93, Travelers’ Rest State Park is situtated just south of Lolo, at the location of a Native American campsite which Lewis & Clark and their Corps of Discovery used in 1805 and 1806. Lewis wrote in his diary about the “fine, bould stream” nearby “Travellers Rest.” Programs are presented by interpretive staff, all knowledgeable in Lewis and Clark history. Self-guided tours include a trail to cross the bridge over the creek and stand in the heart of a Lewis and Clark campsite, or to listen to the voices of history. Picnic spots are available. Following the trail of the Corps of Discovery, turn west near Lolo on Hwy 12 towards Lolo Hot Springs Resort. The Indians knew of the hot springs long before the arrival of Lewis and Clark.  It was a mineral lick for wild game and an ancient meeting place and bathing spot for the Indians.  The springs were not only

a landmark but also a rendezvous point for early explorers and trappers. Today, everyone can enjoy the soothing waters. There is a restaurant, art gallery, RV Park, campground and teepees, water, electric hook-ups, and dump station. Continuing on Hwy 12 towards Idaho, Lolo Pass Visitor Information Center is at the top of Lolo Pass at the Idaho/ Montana border. The center serves as one of the many historical landmarks off Highway 12 (Lewis & Clark Highway) and has information on the explorers’ journey across the Bitterroot Mountains. Also the 1877 flight of the Nez Perce Indians, and historical, natural, and general information about the area. Picnic tables and a public restroom are available. In winter, Lolo Pass area serves as a major trailhead for cross-country skiing and snowmobiling. Visitors can find winter usage information and may purchase parking permits and maps.

Hamilton MT 59840

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Making The Valley Your New Home The Bitterroot Valley is a place many found to make their home. There are many reasons to move to our valley beside the scenic beauty and the many activities that are close at hand. The Retire & Senior Volunteer Program, RSVP, provides people 55 and older the opportunity to apply their experiences to meet community needs. RSVP has operated acrosss the nation for over 30 years and is very active in our community. Volunteers with RSVP serve a diverse range of non-profit organizations, public agencies, and faith-based groups. Among other activities, they mentor youth, organize neighborhood watch programs, help with blood drives and immunization clinics and lend their business skills to community groups that provide needed social services. The Senior Center here in the valley, will keep you actively involved with a wide range of social events throughout the year. The Human Resource Council offers services which include housing, food and employment programs. The web site has a database of social service resources and services for Ravalli County. (www.hrcxi.org) Some state of Montana offices that are in Ravalli County: * Child and Family Services - located at 108 Pinckney St * Disability Services/Vocational Rehabilitation Services 316 N 3rd St * Ravalli County Public Assistance - located at 310 N 3rd St * Job Service - located at 274 Old Corvallis Rd Suite D

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Aging Services - Services for Montana residents who are age 60 or older are primarily delivered by a network of 10 Area Agencies on Aging, which reaches all geographic areas of the state. Ravalli County Council on Aging is responsible for planning, coordinating and delivering services in Ravalli County, from Florence to Sula, (www.ravallicooa.org/index.html) Programs include: Meals on Wheels, Supplemental Food Programs, Homemaker Services, Information, Assistance & Referral and Long-Term Care Ombudsman. The Council on Aging also operates the Bitterroot Transportation. which serves the Hamilton Senior Center at 820 North 4th Street, lunch is served three days a week. Other Social Services: * Ravalli Services Corporation - Services for Disabled Population, 905 N First St 363-5400 * Shelters & Homeless Resources - S.A.F.E., Salvation Army, Montana Council of Homelessness *Haven House Emergency Food - 316 N Third Suite 162 363-2450 * Youth Home Inc. (www.youthhomes.com/index.html) * RSVP Volunteer Center 363-1102 * United Way of Ravalli County 375-0937 * WIC - Ravalli County - Supplemental foods, nutrition education and referrals for health and social services for pregnant and nursing women and children under 5 - 205 Bedford Suite P 375-6685 * Riverside Christian Center - Food pantry, emergency gas vouchers - 390 Fairgrounds Rd * Assisted Housing * Ravalli County Council on Aging - located at 310 Old Corvallis Road 363-5690 For more information call Chamber 406-363-2400

Community Information The Bitterroot Valley is in Ravalli County and lies between the Sapphire Mountains on the East and the Bitterroot Mountains on the West. Ravalli has an estimated 40,450 residents in 2011. Hamilton, the county seat, is the state’s 19th largest city with a population of 4,363 in 2011. Other towns in Ravalli County include Stevensville, Darby and Pinesdale. In the 1990’s Ravalli County was one of the fastest growing counties in Montana and in 2010 showed a population increase of 11.5 percent over the decade. Retail Trade is the biggest subsector of the county. Other significant subsectors include Health Care & Social Assistance, Educational Services, Manufacturing, and Accommodation & Food Services. However, it is the small subsectors that have seen the most growth in recent years. Ravalli County contains 1,850 square miles of public forest lands, which has played a significant role in its economic development. Historically, these lands contributed to the economy through lumber and wood products manufacturing. Today, these public forests are considered an important draw for tourism and migration to the area. Another draw to our valley is its proximity to the city of Missoula. Estimates suggest that roughly 15 to 20 percent of employed residents work in Missoula County. Ravalli County has five elected County Commissioners. The Valley is 96 miles long and 25 miles wide at the widest spot encompassing 2,394 square miles that is 74% public ownership and only 26% privately owned. The average per capital personal income in the county is $42,603 and $45,041 for the state.

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On the north end of the valley is Florence, at an elevation of 3,218. It is an unincorporated community with approximately 765 residents. Going from north to south, Stevensville is the next community with an elected mayor and town council. Their elevation is 3,370 with approximately 1,815 city residents. Next is another unincorporated community, Victor. It is at an elevation of 3,404 with approximately 745 residents. Corvallis, south of Victor, is also unincorporated with 976 people and an elevation of 3,477. Hamilton, the county seat, has an elected mayor and city council in a community of 4,363 in the city limits and sits at an elevations of 3,572. Darby is incorporated and is the farthest town to the south, with an elected mayor and city council. It has an elevation of 3,887 and approximately 722 living in the town.

Driver's License Exam Stations You may apply for a driver's license at any driver exam station, regardless of where in Montana you live. The state laws governing driver licensing are found in the Driver's Licenses chapter of the Montana Code Annotated. Please be prepared to pay for your license with cash or by check, since credit cards are not accepted. Below are stations located nearest to Ravalli County. Stevensville 102 Main Street, Suite A 777-4388 Monday: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm Tuesday through Friday: 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Montana Sapphires & Diamonds “It’s about the Sparkle” Custom Design & Manufacturing

Locally Owned & Operated Since 1983

Fine Jewelry 201 West Main Street ~ Hamilton, MT 59840 ~ 406-363-6236 mikesell-j@cybernet1.com www.mikesellsfinejewelry.com

Bitterroot Dancers Inc.

DANCE SCHEDULE

Dances are held at the: Bedford Building (City Hall) 223 S 2nd St, Hamilton

Dance Times: 7:00 - 11:00 p.m.

Dance with us in Hamilton, Montana

2 dances each month! (406) 381-1392 BitterrootDancersInc@gmail.com For more information:

Hosted by Bitterroot Dancers, Inc., a Montana non-profit volunteer organization committed to keeping country western dance available locally.

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L

ankford Drafting &

Design Inc.

“Designing your Dreams”

Complete Construction Drawings, since 1990 l

Custom Homes l Additions l Remodels l Log l Commercial l Residential

Dean Lankford: Owner

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Quality fly fishing gear with the largest selection of flies in the Bitterroot Valley. Guided fishing on the Bitterroot, Blackfoot Clark’s Fork & Missouri Rivers

1963 North 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-1000 ~ www.ospreyoutfittersflyshop.com 74

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Community Profile

The current population of Ravalli County is 40,841 with the median age of 46. Ravalli County’s median household income is $42,603, and the average household net worth is $440,359. 28% of Ravalli County’s population are long term residents having lived in their homes for more than 5 years, while 19% of Ravalli County’s population have moved in the last year. Ravalli County

Montana

Household income distribution represents the distribution of Ravalli County income brackets at the household level. Overall, the median household income for Ravalli County is $42,603, which is 5% lower than that of Montana ($45,041). Income data for Ravalli County is sourced from census, 2015.

United States

Population

40,841

1,017,057

Median Household Income

$42,603

$45,041

$52,961

Average Household Net Worth

$440,359

$393,457

$495,853

Long-term Residents (5+ Years)

28%

32%

35%

316,352,297

Drove a car alone

Annual Turnover 19%

20%

18%

Other Worked at home

Median Age

Means of Transportation to work: Drove a car alone: (10,706) 70% l Carpooled: 2,195 (14%) l Bus: 30 (%) l Subway or elevated: 6 (0%) l Motorcycle: 44 (0%) l Bicycle 44 (0%) l Walked: 715 (5%) l Other means: 126 (1%) l Worked at home: 1,513 (10%) l

46 year

40 years

37 years

Walked Carpooled

A Li’l Bit of Heaven

The Alta Ranch is tucked away in a picturesque and pristine setting in the Bitterroot Mountains 90 miles south of Missoula, Montana and 30 miles southwest of Darby, Montana. With five vacation homes (authentic log cabins) on 150 acres, the Alta Ranch offers plenty of privacy and room to roam.

Unforgettable Montana Experience 9203 West Fork Rd - Darby MT 59829 (406) 349-2142 www.alta-ranch.com

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Come stay at A Li’l Bit of Heaven here in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. Completely furnished vacation rentals, borders National Forest on three sides with complete privacy. Come enjoy Montana and all we have to offer. Margie & John Mikesell 7987 Highway 93 South Sula, MT 59871 - 406-821-3433 www.alilbitofheaven.com

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Galleries

We invite you to enjoy our local Galleries. We have a wide variety of many distinctive noted artists from Montana and around the world who have chosen the Bitterroot to make their home. The selection of their works is endless, with a lot of one-of-a-kind “Montana Made”. The galleries offer bronze sculptures, wood carvings, and Native American cultural items. You are only limited by your imagination in this multi-talented valley. Things change frequently so visit more than once and find that special treasure. Better yet! Stop at the Chamber to get a list of all the unique art and Gift Galleries in our talented valley.

The Band Shell is an outdoor stage with the Bitterroot Community Band performing the 2nd and 4th Thursdays during the summer at 8:00 p.m. The Band Shell is located at the Claudia Driscoll Park, 910 West Main Street in Hamilton. Stevensville Theater has 99 seats and showcases local talent in 6 productions per year. The Theater is located in Stevensville at 319 Main Street, 777-2722.

Artists

This group of artists hosts an Open Studio Tour at various locations in the Bitterroot in June. Dozens of artists and galleries participate in the Annual Artists Along the Bitterroot Open Studio Tour. Studios include fused glass artistry, leatherworking, painting, sculpting, woodworking, fine art jewelry, silk painting, pottery, and photography. Green signs along the highway lead to a different and exciting way to spend a day in the Bitterroot. Check with the Chamber or go to www.artistsalongthebitterroot. com. For more information call (406) 777-3542.

Music

Hamilton Players Inc., is a 186 seat airconditioned year-round theater. They have 5 Main stage productions, special events, guest artists, youth theater camps, and workshops. The Playhouse is located at 100 Ricketts Road, Hamilton - 375-9050. Hamilton Performing Arts Center is located in the Hamilton High School, at

Lolo Family Practice

NEWBORN / PEDIATRIC MEDICINE • ADOLESCENT MEDICINE

ADULT AND GERIATRIC MEDICINE • WOMEN’ S HEALTH/GYN MINOR SURGICAL PROCEDURES • IMMUNIZATIONS • COLPOSCOPY

Along The Bitterroot

317 Fairgrounds Road. The PAC is a 700 seat, state-of-the-art facility. They present monthly performing arts series of various music genres, dance, theatre and student and community performances. Call 3756060 ext. 6294. Tuesdays at Twelve is home to great outdoor concerts at RC Museum in Hamilton every Tuesday from noon to 1 p.m. beginning in June.

Since 1962, the Bitterroot’s Most Dependable Nursing Home Private rooms and newly remodeled rooms • Specializing in care for Alzheimer’s in older adults • Therapy for rehabilitation residents provided by Marcus-Daly therapists

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225 North 8th Street • Hamilton, MT 59840 406-363-1144 • www.valleyviewestates.org T & R Magazine


Every year during the 2nd weekend in June, the Bitterroot Valley welcomes artists from all across Montana to the Annual Montana Professional Artists Association Show & Sale. In 2015, the show falls on June 12-14. The show fills the Conference Center of the Bitterroot River Inn with paintings, sculptures, pastels, food and a great time for all visitors. The show, the 11th in the MPAA annual lineup, attracts fine art buyers and viewers from many areas outside the Valley as well as a vibrant local crowd well-educated in the arts. The artists’ demonstrations, lively conversations and celebrated Friday Night Reception are popular attractions with art enthusiasts. MPAA was the brainchild of Mari Bolen, sculptor, and Michele Kapor, painter. In 1993, they sweet-talked J.R Eason, sculptor and the late Jerry Johnson, painter, into joining together to create MPAA, an annual show. The first shows were in the Daly-Leach Community Room in February and the old Banque Club meeting room upstairs in the spring. From there, they showed in various venues throughout Montana and Wyoming as the group grew to 20 artists. In 2005, they designated the Bitterroot River in as their official home show and also continued showing at other venues, as well. Now the MPAA Show is one of the most popular art shows in western Montana and its noted Montana artists welcome hundreds to enjoy their fine arts. www.montanaprofessionalartistsassoc.com bolen@montanaprofessionalartistsassoc.com or 406-961-3887.

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3/31/2015 1:59:19 PM

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Resources

Airport Ravalli County Airport .................375-6388 Stevensville Airport ......................777-2410 Missoula Airport ...........................532-8659 Animal Shelter Bitterroot Humane Association 340 Fairgrounds Rd, Hamilton .......363-5311 Better Business Bureau ........(509) 455-4200 MT. Office of Consumer Protection...............(800) 481-6896 Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce. 105 E. Main, Hamilton .....................363-2400 Cities of the Bitterroot Darby ............................................... 821-3753 Hamilton ...........................................363-2101 Stevensville ......................................777-5271 Community Resources Bitterroot Valley Job Service ............363-1822 Ravalli Services Corp. ..................... 363-5400 Emergency Numbers Sheriff and/or Ambulance ...................... 911 To Report a Fire .......................................911 First Call For Help (domestic abuse) ........211 To Burn ............................................ 363-3033 Ravalli County Sheriff ..................... 375-4060 Hamilton City Police ....................... 363-2100 Stevensville City Police ................... 777-3011 Darby City Police ............................ 821-3748 Road Conditions ...................1-800-226-7623

Newspapers Ravalli Republic (daily) ....... 363-3300 Bitterroot Star (weekly) ........ 777-3928 Post Offices Conner .................................. 821-4776 Corvallis ............................... 961-3821 Darby .................................... 821-3441 Florence ................................ 273-2731 Hamilton ............................... 363-1445 Stevensville ........................... 777-5812 Sula ...................................... 821-3852 Victor .................................... 642-3361 Ravalli County Services County Commissioners ......... 375-6500 Clerk & Recorders ................ 375-6555 Drivers License ..................... 777-4388 Election Office ...................... 375-6556 Vehicle Registration/Titles ... 375-6585 Sanitarian .............................. 375-6565 Public Health ........................ 375-6670 Road Dept. ............................ 363-2733 Fairgrounds ........................... 363-3411 Taxes ..................................... 375-6600 Weed District ........................ 777-5842 Schools Corvallis ............................... 961-4211 Darby .................................... 821-3841 Florence ................................ 273-6751 Hamilton ............................... 375-6060 Stevensville ........................... 777-5481 Victor .................................... 642-3221 Lone Rock ............................. 777-3314 Head Start ............................. 363-6101 Social Security .................... 800-289-5034 Montana ............................... 1-800-525-5555

Internet Connects Cybernet 1 222 N 2nd St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-2183 Rocky Mountain Internet 305 S 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-8088 Verizon Wireless at Bitterroot Wireless Hamilton 1220 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-9905 VELOCITY WIRELESS 1265 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-1075 KOPAVI SYSTEMS INC 400 W Main St Ste 204 Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-0514 QUANTIX 217 N 3rd St Ste K Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-0930

Forest Service ................................. 363-7100 Camp Site Reservations http://fwp.mt.gov/parks/accommodatioms/ campimg/

Swimming Pools Hamilton .............................. 375-8200 Stevensville .......................... 777-5827

VERIZON WIRELESS RETAILER 1120 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 203-3040

Hospital Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital ......363-2211 Convenient Care ...............................363-0597

Telephone Directories Legacy Community Pages ........1-801-465-4105 Local Pages ...............................1-888-249-6920 QWest Communications ............1-800-244-1111 Zip Local ................................ 1-4006-880-8850

Bitterroot Wireless 2020 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-9905

Internal Revenue Service Federal Tax Information .......1-800-829-1040 Montana Tax Information .....1-406-444-6900 Library Bitterroot Public Library .................. 363-1670 Stevensville Library ......................... 777-5061 Darby Library ................................... 821-4771 Mental Health Services Bitterroot Valley Counseling & Education 217 N. 3rd St., Hamilton ................ 363-3882 Western Montana Mental Health Center 1205 W. Main St., Hamilton .......... 532-9101 Museums Darby .................................. 821-3753 Hamilton ............................... 363-3338 Stevensville ............................777-3201 Victor ................................... 642-3997

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Utilities Bitter Root Disposal ............. 363-3630 (Garbage Service) Victor Transfer (dump)........... 642-3375 NorthWestern Energy .......... 1-888-467-2669 Ravalli County Electric ........ 961-3001 Alternate Number .............. 961-3004 One Call Before You Dig ......1-800-424-5554 Hamilton Water & Sewer...... 363-2131

Simmons Dale 322 Cooper Loop Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 821-9990 Rocky Mountain Internet 773 Park St Stevensville, MT 59870 (406) 777-4088

Veterans Administration Benefits & Information .........1-800-827-1000 Valley Vets Service Center ....363-9838 Western MT Ag Research .. 1-406-961-3025

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REAL ESTATE AGENTS: Bruce Gould 120 South 5th St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-8796 bruce.gould@prumt.com www.PrudentialMontanaRE.com Rod Freeman 911 Westside Road - Hamilton (406) 369-0320 rod@bitterroothorseproperty.com www.bitterroothorseproperty.com REAL ESTATE - COMMERCIAL RENTAL The Creamery - Brad Schnepf 400 West Main - Hamilton MT 59840 (703) 739-2999 fax (702) 739-2995 bschnepf@marnellcorrao.com www.MarnellProperties.com REAL ESTATE - COMPANIES: Alpine Realty - Dorene Sain 808 North Main St - Darby MT 59829 (406) 821-3771 fax (406) 821-3810 info@montanaoutback.com www.montanaoutback.com

Cardinal Properties, Inc. -320 South 2nd St Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4430 fax (9406) 363-4432 info@cardinalproperties.net www.cardinalproperties.net

Montana Land Company 144 Mountain Goat Rd - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4788 fax (406) 363-4789 cathy@mtlandcompany.com www.mtlandcompany.com

Coldwell Banker Western States Assoc. 115 West Main St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1250 fax (406) 363-2796 tlund@cybernet1.com www.coldwellbankerwsa.com

Montana Westgate Realty, Inc. 2134 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4700 fax (406) 363-4702 realtyhm@montanawestgate.com www.montanawestgate.com

Cornerstone Realty 935 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-3000 fax (406) 363-3001 callcorky@callcorky.com www.callcorky.com

Berkshire Hathaway 120 South 5th St #201 - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-0166 fax (406) 375-0165 montanainfo@prumt.com www.prumt.com

Diamond Bar-S Land Company 140 Cherry St #101 at The Mill - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-9800 fax 363-4515 brokerbob@cybernet1.com www.diamondbarsland.com

Realty Executives 320 North 1st St #D - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-9431 fax (406) 375-9432 reexecs@reexecs.com www.reexecs.com

Discover Montana Realty 127 West Main St #1 & 2 - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1643 fax (800) 293-9428 henry@discovermontana.net www.discovermontana.net

Windermere Real Estate 1920 North First St #D Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-3222 fax (406) 363-3511 bobp@windermere.com www.windermere.com

Real Estate Professionals

REAL ESTATE - MORTGAGE BROKER US Bank 1265 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-6700 fax (406) 363-6784 shelley.ayers@usbank.com www.usbank.com

Driscoll Realty LLP 109 North 4th #101 - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2233 driscollrealty@bresnan.net www.kathleendriscoll.com Bitterroot Valley Board of Realtors 224 North 4th St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2000 fax (406) 363-4511 layna@bvboar.net www.bvbor.net By Owner/Polumsky 410 North 1st St #A - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1606 fax (406) 363-1606 andy@byowner-mt.com www.byownerhamilton.com

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Exit Realty Bitterroot Valley 99 Marcus St 3rd Floor - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-9251 fax (406) 363-4685 max@exitrmt.com Exit Realty Bitterroot Valley/Stevensville 406 Main Suite C - Stevensville MT 59870 (406) 239-1421 Lambros Real Estate, ERA 514 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-6668 fax (406) 363-3252 bitterroot@lambros.com

REAL ESTATE PROPERTY CARE/ MANAGEMENT Alpine Realty - Dorene Sain 808 North Main St - Darby MT 59829 (406) 821-3771 fax (406) 821-3810 info@montanaoutback.com www.montanaoutback.com Cardinal Properties - Barbara Liss 320 South 2nd St - Hanilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4430 fax (406) 363-4432 info@cardinalproperties.net www.cardinalproperties.net

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Courtyard Apartments 306 Courtyard Circle - Corvallis MT 59828 (406) 961-4890 fax (406) 961-4891 c.courtyardsofcorvallis@bresnan.net Highland Property Management 460 Stonegate Dr - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-5787 fax (406) 363-5786 christin@highland-propertymanagement.com www.highland-propertymanagement.com Real Property Management- Sapphire 236 Christofferson Lane - Corvallis MT 59828 (406) 360-2732 rchild@rpmsapphire.com www.rpmsapphire.com

REAL ESTATE - RENTALS Highland Property Management 460 Stonegate Dr - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-5787 fax (406) 363-5786 christin@highland-propertymanagement.com www.highland-propertymanagement.com REAL ESTATE - TITLE COMPANIES First American Title Co. - Sherri Williams 1438 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2340 fax (406) 2346 hamiltonmt@firstamholding.com www.firstamholding.com

First Montana Title - Ken Kanenwisher 250 West Main St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2661 fax (406) 363-6960 firstmttitle@qwestoffice.net Stewart Title of Ravalli County - Laura Fortune 1920 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 362-7004 fax (406) 363-7023 laura@stewartmt.com www.stewartmt.com

Buon appetito Dining in the Bitterroot Valley has fabulous dining for everyone’s tastes. Whatever your preference, you can find it at our many restaurants in the valley. BAKERY: River Rising 337 West Main St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4552 Red Rooster Artisan Bakery 310 South First ST - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 381-1129 BEVERAGE & BREWING: Bandit Brewing Co. 308 E Tanner Ave - Darby (406) 363-8662 Big Creek Coffee Roasters 1091 South First - Hamilton (406) 369-6217 www.bigcreekcoffeeroasters.com Bitter Root Brewing 101 Marcus St - Hamilton (406) 363-7468 www.bitterrootbrewing.com Blacksmith Brewing Company 114 Main St - Stevensville (406) 777-0680 www.blacksmithbrewing.com Hidden Legend Winery 1345 US Hwy 93 North #5 - Victor (406) 363-6323 www.hiddenlegendwinery.com

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Higher Ground Brewing 518 North 1st Street - Hamilton (406) 375-5204 www.highergroundbrewing.com CASINOS/TAVERNS: Office/Silver Coin Casino 109 West Main St - Hamilton (406) 363-6969 DINING/CATERING: Caffe Firenze 281 Rodeo Dr - Florence (406) 273-2923 www.caffefirenze.com

Broad Axe Lodge, Inc 1237 East Fork Rd - Sula (406) 821-3878 Caffe Firenze 281 Rodeo Dr - Florence (406) 273-2923 www.caffefirenze.com Coffee Cup Cafe 500 South 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-3822

RESTAURANTS: A Taste of Paris 109 North 4th Street #106 - Hamilton (406) 369-5875

The Edge 140 Bitterroot Plaze Dr - Hamilton (406) 375-0007

Back Door Deli 105 S. 3rd - Hamilton (406) 363-4480 backdoordeli@cybernet1.com

Figaro’s Pizza 1151 North 1st #B - Hamilton (406) 375-0164 www.figaros.com

Bitter Root Brewing 101 Marcus St - Hamilton (406) 363-7468 www.bitterrootbrewing.com

Kodiak Jaks II 109 South 1st - Hamilton (406) 363-5695

BJ’s Restaurant 900 North 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-4650 Bradley O’s Steakhouse 1831 Hwy 93 South - Hamilton (406) 375-1110 www.bradleyos.com

McDonald’s 707 North 1st ST - Hamilton (406) 363-6644 Moose Creek BBQ 105 North Second - Hamilton (406) 363-9152 www.moosecreekbbq.net

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Pizza Hut 1002 North 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-1502

Skalkaho Steak House 1380 Skalkaho Hwy 7 Mile Marker (406) 363-3522

Triple Peaks Cafe 2424 Meridian Road - Victor (406) 642-6000

Second Street Sushi, LTD 322 Second St - Hamilton (406) 363-0600

Subway of Hamilton, Inc. 1146 North 1st St Hamilton (406) 363-4609

Viva Oaxaca 201 Main Street - Stevensville (406) 777-0014

The Catering Table 205 Main Street - Stevensville (406) 777-7090 www.cateredtable.com

HEALTH FOODS: Rainbow’s End Natural Foods 910 North 1st St Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1626

Red Rooster Artisan Bakery 310 South First ST - Hamilton (406) 381-1129 Signal Grill 131 West Main St Hamilton (406) 375-9099

The Wild Mare 283 Second St - Corvallis (406) 381-6552 www.thewildmare.com

Schools The Bitterroot Valley is home to seven school districts and has five private schools.

Private Schools Blodgett View Christian School K -8 Hamilton Christian Academy K-8 Parochial Pines Academy K-6 Evergreen Montessori – Pre K – 1st Grace Lutheran Preschool Pre K Merging Waters Educational Center

406-375-0733 406-363-5434 406-961-3055 406-363-7279 406-363-1924 406-381-3775

2011-2012 ANB**

Corvallis Darby Florence Hamilton Lone Rock Stevensville Victor

K-6 649 203 469 825 227 474 197

7-8 241 53 149 250 58 154 59

9-12 482 131 278 558 391 108

Total 1372 387 896 1633 285 1019 364

Total

3044

964

1948

5956

• • •

* Fall enrollment is taken the first Monday in October ** All schools use a three year average ANB calculation ANB is used for budget purposes.

Enrollment Montana law requires schools to count students twice each year to determine the number of students who are enrolled. The primary enrollment date is taken on the first Monday in October (referred to as the October count) and the secondary count is taken on February 1st (the February count).

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District Corvallis Darby Florence Hamilton Lone Rock Stevensville Victor

Phone Number 406-961-4211 406-821-3841 406-273-6751 406-363-2280 406-777-3314 406-777-5481 406-642-3221

K-2 Enrollment 1,372 387 896 1,633 285 (K-8 only) 1,019 364

The University & College of Technology in Missoula is approximately 46 miles from Hamilton. Bitterroot College Program of the University of Montana is located in Ravalli County (Hamilton) The Bitterroot College connects a diverse rural community to a wide array of learning opportunities. We achieve student success, lifelong learning, and community engagement through responsive and accessible academics, workforce preparation an enrichment programming. Bitterroot College of the University of Montana in Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-0100 or www.umt.edu/bcp

Greetings!

This Poem is meant as a warm welcome to all who chose to begin again in a place; this place, in Montana, where the dream of “HOME” has come true! In town Look around Can’t wait to find A place to dine Then I see another sign Happen to have A coupon for that From : The Greetings Welcome Packet Where I got this map Used the Jerry Wessel’s scraper, to clear the windshield Stopped by Lakeland Feed to get dog food and horse feed Big Sky Candy satisfied my chocolate sweet tooth Farmers Insurance now has me covered Home at last I had a blast The information made it fast For me to find exactly what I need today We are so glad to be there for you to help in any way we can. A warm Bitterroot welcome To friends & members of our community-Home at last “We Invite you to explore the beautiful valley – our Montana treasure”! © 02/08/2015 Darlene Baeten

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Montana’s Gems Our area has some of the largest Sapphire deposits in the world! So whether you are looking for a day of family fun, or a stunning jewelry piece for yourself or a gift, you can find it all at Sapphire Studio. Our Studio is just around the corner, in Hamilton, but our jewelry is out of this world. Choose to purchase items already created, or design your own with stones you find in your gravel. The sapphires you mine and process are considered some of the finest in the world, and since sapphires are a symbol of the Treasure State, you will be proud to wear a Montana memory of your very own! Our hours are seasonal, so contact us by phone for hours or appointment. Only a short 3 miles from the heart of downtown Hamilton, you can complete your mining in as little as 1 1/2 hours, and have the rest of the day to explore our beautiful Bitterroot Valley. We have all you need for your mining adventure, just be sure to bring your eyeglasses, camera, and clothes that can take a little dirt ! The Bitterroot Valley is nestled between the Sapphire and Bitterroot Mountain ranges. It is home to some of the best recreation spots in the US, including hiking, biking, fishing, skiing, wildlife and nature viewing ~ you name it! Whatever takes you outdoors, you can find it here in the Bitterroot! Other sources to find these precious gems are at Mikesell’s Fine Jewelry, located at 201 West Main Street in Hamilton and Asmus Jewelers & Coins at 700 North First Street also in Hamilton.

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It is a Montana treasure you will want to take home with you

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We Bring Your Home To Life

Domestic Exotic Specialty

406-360-1930

Proudly Serving Bitterroot and Missoula Valley

Moving soon? NorthWestern Energy makes it easy to start, stop or transfer service right from our website with a My Energy Account. You can also: • Track your energy use • Sign up for paperless billing

• Sign up for EZ Pay • Make a one-time payment • Report a power outage

NorthWesternEnergy.com

Customer Service 888-467-2669 M-F, 7am to 6pm 24/7 Emergency Service

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B itterroot ~ Valley ~

• Calendar of Events • Reverse Directory • Chamber Members • Dining / Menu Guide

W

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Ravalli County Bank Need a Loan? We’ve got you covered! Construction

Mortgage

Home Equity

Vacation

Auto

Come see one of our friendly Loan Officers today! 224 W. Pinckney St., P.O. Box 150, Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-1222 • www.familyofbanks.com Voted by the Ravalli Republic

“The Bitterroot’s Best”

Outdoor Dining Server l Bartender l Sports Bar l Place for a first date l Business Lunch l Bloody Mary l Wine List l l

hamilton

Wine & Liquor

For your enjoyment l

Patio Dining Trout Pond l 12 TV’s

l

Our Steaks, seafood, pasta, salads, soups are made fresh daily

FOOD • DRINKS • SPORTS HAMILTON, MONTANA

Outstanding Selection of Wines with Monthly Tastings

140 Bitterroot Plaza Dr - Hamilton MT 59840 - (406) 375-0007

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Community Information County Commissioners, City Mayors Four (4) Incorporated Towns Number of Volunteer Fie Departments Personnel - 158 Number of Law Enforcement Officers 42 Land Ownership: Public 74% Private 26% 25 Miles Wide - 96 Miles Long 2,394 sq. miles

ngler’s odge & abins 815B US Hwy 93 S - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-0980 www.anglerslodgemt.com www.visitmt.com

Tax Rate: Per capita taxes: 43% of US Avg. Real Property - Approximate 105 1.32% of Market Calue Business Equipment 1.2% of Mkt. Value Median Household Income 2011 $43,512 Average Household Income 2011 $36,024 Per Capital Income 2011 $24,641

Features beautiful, completely furnished individual lodges overlooking our own private lake and the Bitterroot Mountains. Rentals By: Day - Week - Month

NO SALES TAX

Housing - Median Reported Sales Price: Single Family: $213,500 Median House Rental $588 Commercial $1.00 Retirement Centers 7 Climiate Avg. Min Jan. 17.6 Degrees April 32 Degrees July 50 Degrees Oct. 31 Degrees

Avg. Max 33 Degrees 60 Degrees 83.7 Degrees 61 Degrees

Open Year Round!

Great for: l Weddings l Family Reunions lCorporate Retreats l Vacation Rentals l Romantic Evenings

Average Rainfall: 12-15 Inches Growing Days: 130-150 Days

Population Projections: 2015 2020 2025 2030

T & R Magazine

50,860 56,540 62,370 68,360

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Welcome to our Beautiful Bitterroot Valley The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce would like to extend our heartfelt welcome to you and your family. We invite you to visit us and enjoy our lifestyle. Please let us know if we can be of further assistance as you explore our valley ‘From River To Ridge’™ Our valley - 96 miles in length and 25 miles wide - is nestled between the Bitterroot Mountains on the west and the Sapphire Mountain range on the east. This natural setting creates a sublime year-round climate and has earned us the reputation as the “Banana Belt of Montana”. The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce is comprised of six (6) distinct communities with a modest population of only 40,212. Each community is unique and has its own story to tell. Join us as we present to you our communities, our culture, our way of life and the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. We extend to you an invitation to visit the Bitterroot Valley Chamber - Come see us, learn more about our valley and the many grandeurs of Glacier Country and Western Montana.

Enjoy your stay!

105 East Main - Hamilton MT 59840 - (406) 363-2400 localinfo@bvchamber.com www.bitterrootchambercom

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Al Mitchell Chamber Director

Pat Easley Editor/Office Manager

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Index of Advertisers We would like to thank all of the following who helped make this publication possible A Lil' Bit of Heaven - page 75 A2Z Personnel - page 19 Alta Ranch - page 75 Angler's Lodge & Cabins - page 3 Bitterroot Dancers - page 73 Bitterroot River Inn - page 62 Blacksmith Brewing - page 46 Bradley O's - page 37 Brewfest - page 24 Bruce Gould - page 72 Canyon View Dental - page 75 City of Hamilton - page 29-30-31 Copacetic Woodflooring - page inside back cover Craig Siphers - page 74 Daly Mansion - page 52 Edward Jones - Willa Carr Lande - page 39 Farm Bureau Financial Services - page 37 First American Title - page 37 First Interstate Bank - page 19 First Security Bank - page 53 Habitat for Humanity - page 59 Hamilton Assembly of God - page 59 Hardtime Bluegrass Festival - page 63 Higherground Brewing - page 49 Iron Horse Athletic Club - page 38 Kinetico Quality Water - page 23 Langford Drafting - page 74 Legacy Phone Directory - back cover Lost Trail Powder Mountain - page 65 Marci Almond Realtor - page 33 Marie Christopher - page 34 Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital - page 55 Merchants Moving & Storage - page 33 Mikesell's Fine Jewelry - page 73 Milton Development LLC (Grants Meadow) - page 23 Missoula International Airport - page 6 Montana Westgate - page 70 Morrison-Maierle Inc - page 67 NorthWestern Energy - inside back cover Osprey Outfitters - page 74 Paper Clip - page 33 ProTravel International - page 73 Ravalli County Bank - inside front cover Ravalli Electric Co-op - page 27 REMLC - page 61 River to Ridge Magazine - page 82 T & R Magazine

Sapphire Lutheran Home - page 33 Sapphire Studios - page 61 Schrock Construction - page 57 Sears of Hamilton - page 37 Smoke ‘EM’ Staining - page 27 St. Mary's Historical Mission - page 9 Stewart Title of Ravalli - page 71 The Catered Table - page 63 The Edge - inside front cover The Montana Chocolate Co - page 69 Tin Cup Lodge - page 39 TownHouse Inn of Hamilton - page 39 Travellers Rest Cabins - page 70 Valley Drug - page 37 Valley Mini Storage - page 62 Valley View Estates - page 76 Western Montana Clinic, Lolo Family Practice - page 76 Western Montana Clinic, Lolo Family Practice - page 56 Wilderness Spirit Cabins - page 73 Windermere Real Estate - page 59 Your Outdoor Living Market - page 77

Table of Contents: Visit the Bitterroot Valley - Travel Information Communities u Darby u Hamilton u Corvallis u Victor u Stevensville u Florence n Accommodations (Lodging) n 108 Things To Do n Brewery & Wine Trail n Valley Map n Calendar of Annual Events n Fishing n Biking in the Bitterroot n Sightseeing n Historical n Real Estate n Seasons in the Valley n Community Information n Dining n Medical Services n Prehistoric n Arts & Culture n Camping/Hiking/Birdwatching n Community Information n

Page 6

n

Page 32 Page 31 Page 28 Page 10 Page 8-9 Page 7 Page 11 Page 12 Page 44 Page 45 Page 20 Page 35-36 Page 29-30 Page 42-43 Page 52-53 Page 79-80 Page 57-61 Page 62-64 Page 80-81 Page 54-56 Page 62-63 Page 76-77 Page 60 Page 72

Photos: Patrick Chaplin - Eric Elander - Marie Christopher - Scott Watters - Nathan DeBoer - Ann Bethea Chase Cooper - Nici Wallner Contributing writers: Chuck Stranahan and Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital

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TTheravel Information Missoula International Airport is the Gateway to Western Montana. It is conveniently located within 1 mile of the busy shopping district of North Reserve, ten minutes from downtown Missoula and the University of Montana and just 45 miles from Hamilton. Four airlines - Alaska, Allegiant, Delta, and United - have operations at the airport and serve twelve nonstop destinations: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Oakland, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, and Seattle. Two gift shops, rental cars, a travel service, a real estate rental office, and two restaurants are on-site. Missoula International Airport is also home to the largest aerial firefighting depot in the U.S., the base of operations for the legendary 'Smokejumpers,' the Museum of Mountain Flying, Aeronautics, Homestead Helicopters, and two Fixed Base Operators: Minuteman Jet Center and Northstar Jet. www.flymissoula.com

Bitterroot Airports The Bitterroot Valley has two airports. Stevensville Airport is on the north end of the valley at an elevation of 3,620 feet. The hard surface runway is 3,800 feet in length. The Hamilton Airport is in the middle of the valley and at an elevation of 3,638 feet. The runway is 4,200 feet in length and is paved and lighted.

Mileage from Hamilton Missoula 45 miles Glacier Nat. Park 184 miles Spokane 249 miles West Yellowstone 314 miles Billings 383 miles Boise 420 miles Salt Lake City 465 miles To Missoula

Florence 22 Miles Unincorporated Community

Stevensville

Population ~ 765

Florence Elevation 3,218 10 Miles

Victor Unincorporated Community

Population ~ 1,815

Stevensville Victor

Population ~ 745

7 Miles

96 Miles

City - 206 Buck Ave All Offics - 406-777-5271

Hamilton 4 Miles City - 223 South Second St All Offices - 406-363-2101

Elevation 3,370

Corvallis

Elevation 3,477

Hamilton

Elevation 3,572

18 Miles

Population ~ 4,363

Grantsdale

Corvallis Unincorporated Community Population ~ 976

Darby County Offices

Darby

205 Bedford - Hamilton Assessor - 406-375-2700 Clerk/Recorder - 406-375-6555

Elevation 3,887 8 Miles

Vehicle Registration - 406-375-6585 Conner Drivers License - 406-777-4388 102 Main Street in Stevensville

City - Tanner Street All Offices - 406-821-3753 Population ~ 722 11 Miles

Sula

Lost Trail Visitor Info. Center Elevation 7, 014

To Salmon, ID

Gateway MISSOULA

TO WESTERN MONTANA

flymissoula.com

DIRECT FLIGHTS

to twelve major markets.

CONNECTING FLIGHTS

to thousands of destinations. Nonstop service to:

• LAS VEGAS, LOS ANGELES, OAKLAND, PHOENIX-MESA • MINNEAPOLIS, SALT LAKE CITY • ATLANTA, CHICAGO, DENVER, SAN FRANCISCO • PORTLAND, SEATTLE

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Community of

Florence

Things To Do Around Florence Threemile Wildlife Management area encompasses 6,050 acres. The area may be accessed by two-wheel drive vehicles between May 15 and December 1. The area lends itself to mountain biking in the summer motorcycles and ATV’s are not permitted in this area. The primary goal is to provide winter range for elk and compatible recreational opportunities for the public. Threemile provides a mixture of motorized access and walk-in hunting opportunities for elk, mule deer, grouse and black bear. Regulations for hunting district 204 apply to Threemile. Few elk inhabit this area during the summer months, but are often observed nonetheless. Most likely are songbirds and raptors. Activities offered are: Bicycling, Big Game, Bird Watching, Bird hunting, Bow Hunting, Deer Hunting and Camping. Threemile Wildlife Management area is located 9 miles east of Florence. Call 406-542550 for more information.

T & R Magazine

The bike trail begins in Lolo and runs all the way to Hamilton. This trail was completed in 2012 with the completion of the four-lane of Hwy 93 in Victor. Bikers, walkers and joggers alike take advantage of the trail as a safe and fun-filled family outing. Hideout Mountain is a playground that your kids will want to stay all day with many surprises! Farmers Markets are a weekly event during the summer months, flowers to fruits, vegetables and local crafts. If you like walking, biking or riding, Florence has great trails. Along Highway 93 you can go north to Lolo onto Chief Looking Glass Campground (on the Bitterroot River) or you can go south to Stevensville Bass Creek Campground or Poker Joe River Access - bicycling is encouraged! The Doug Vulcan trail runs from Florence to the Bitterroot River where Fish, Wildlife & Parks maintains river access. On the west side of the Bitterroot River, you can follow the Lewis and Clark Trail where Capt. Clark and his men returned from Oregon in 1806. Get Outdoors Day in Florence is held in June and begins early with a run, then demonstrations, exhibits, an old pick-up show, great music and some great old fashioned fun. There are fly fishing demonstrations, bike repair booth and free pony rides to keep young and old alike entertained. Florence also hosts many golf tournaments and the second Saturdays they host a free pancake breakfast at the Fire Department from 8 am to noon. There are also seasonal bazaars, crafts and quilt shows.

History of Florence Its earlier settlers called the town ‘One Horse’ for the little creek that drains through it from the Bitterroot Mountains. In 1880, the town was renamed Florence for the wife of A.B. Hammond. Mr. Hammond was instrumental in opening the Bitterroot Valley for lumbering, and brought the railroad to the Bitterroot to transport timber. He set up a sawmill in the center of one of the Bitterroot’s best logging areas, and this site became the town of Florence in 1888. There was a town to the north called Carlton, which merged with Florence, thus the school name of Florence Carlton. Around the turn of the century, Florence had a post office, railroad depot, hotel, catholic and disciple churches, I.O.O.F. Hall, blacksmith shop, livery stable, school, several stores, a small creamery and, of course, saloons.

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Montana’s first permanent settlement is thriving as a great little community - overflowing with small town charm. The Stevensville Main Street organization, working with all of the community businesses, strives to ensure that the community grows and prospers. The first Friday of every month residents and visitors enjoy ‘First Friday’ when the Main Street Businesses stay open late and show you their Stevensville hospitality. In the summer there are many community events, including Western Heritage Days, the Creamery Picnic, Scarecrow Festival, plays, and their Annual Christmas Celebration the first week in December.

Community of

Stevensville

History Historic St. Mary’s Mission “Where Montana Began” - 48 years before Montana attained statehood! On September 24, 2016, St. Mary’s Mission and Montana will celebrate the 175th anniversary of the first pioneer settlement in Montana. All are invited to see the reenactment of the Salish Indians welcoming the Blackrobe Missionaries. Learn more about the settlers who helped shape the early beginnings of Montana before statehood. During the decade 1831-1841 four separate delegations of the Salish and Nez Perce Indian tribes traveled to St. Louis to petition for “Black Robes” to live among them. Belgian Jesuit, Fr. Pierre Jean DeSmet, along with 5 missionaries were sent in response to the requests. On September 24, 1841 St. Mary’s Mission established the first church in the Pacific Northwest and the first settlement in Montana. In November of 1845, Fr. Anthony Ravalli, S.J., arrived at St. Mary’s after being recruited from Italy by Fr. DeSmet. Fr. Ravalli was a true renaissance man in addition to being a Jesuit priest. He was Montana’s first physician, surgeon and pharmacist. Fr. Ravalli was an architect, artist, sculptor, and built the first grist mill and sawmill. He was assigned to St. Mary’s during 1845-1850 and again from 1866 until his death in 1884. Ravalli County was named in honor of Fr. Ravalli in 1893. Historic St. Mary’s Mission truly is “Where Montana Began” 48 years before Montana became a state. The photo gallery in Chief Victor’s Cabin, circa 1861, brings a sense of the 19th century when the Indian and European cultures merged. The Chapel, Fr. Ravalli’s log cabin and pharmacy are all restored to the 1879 era, furnished with items handmade by Fr. Ravalli. The Salish encampment represents the native homeland of the Bitter Root Salish, while St. Mary’s Chapel represents the first pioneer settlement in the Montana. Historic St. Mary’s Mission is the story of remarkable people in a turbulent time, and the assimilation of two very different cultures against the backdrop of the American Frontier. Walk through history and see, touch and hear this fascinating, controversial, and important chapter of this nation’s past.

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“Fair-skinned men wearing long black robes will teach us a new way of praying and a new moral law. The Black Robes will bring peace, but their arrival will mean the beginning of the end of all the people who inhabit this land ...” Shining Shirt, Salish Medicine Man & Prophet

T & R Magazine


Stevensville where Montana began

Stevensville was recently named as one of the most beautiful towns in Montana to visit!!!

St. Mary’s MISSION

West End of 4th Street in Stevensville saintmarysmission.org stmary@cybernet1.com

GUIDED TOURS: April 15 - October 15 Tuesday - Friday 10 am to 4 pm Saturday 11 am to 3 pm (406) 777-5734 GIFT SHOP: April 15 thru October 15 10 am to 5 pm Museum & Gift Shop located in the Visitor Center

Stevensville, MT - Where Montana Began Group tours by appointment Length of guided tour: 1:15 hour

“First in Agriculture, Education, Medicine and Religion” T & R Magazine

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Community of

Victor

Welcome to Victor - Located in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. The 100 square mile unincorporated town has a population of about 2,500. Victor is nestled between the Bitterroot Mountain Range, Bitterroot River and the Sapphire Mountain Range. This positions the community of Victor for some of the most breath-taking panoramic views in this valley. The warmth and charm of Victor provides you with small community traditions and the ability to experience nature out your back door. With mountain corridors and the river close by, there is an abundance of wildlife and fowl. You’re just minutes away from a labyrinth, corn maze, float trip down the Bitterroot River, hike or horseback ride from one of the many trailheads. You can unwind at one of Victor’s vacation rentals, lodges or Bed and Breakfasts. Enjoy fantastic dining at Victor’s restaurants - known to be some of the Valley’s best! For larger groups, choose from one of the privately owned event destination centers - each having a unique landscape and charm. The town has a variety of businesses, with over 120 small businesses spread throughout the community. Victor’s school has over 300 students from K-12, including the new Mary Stuart Rogers Performing Arts Center with a capacity of 270. This new venue, with state-ofthe-art equipment, was opened in 2009. Like most small Montana rural communities, Victor is close knit, helping and enjoying the town they live in. Events such as Victor Heritage Museum Annual Chocolate Tasting (the first Monday in December) or the ‘Field of Screams’, Western Montana’s #1 Haunted Attraction, shows how this community takes pride in their town!

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History of Victor

Timbered Bitterroot Mountains to the west and meadows with tall grasses flowing in the breeze. Bitterroots, camas bulbs and other native crops scattered along the foothills, cold crisp mountain streams finding their way to the river. Visualize numerous Salish sweat lodges along Sweat House Creek . . . Salish campsights arranged in a circle on Indian Prairie Loop and Chief Victor Camp Road are just a few locations where the Salish tribe used to camp and hunt. The people of the Red Willow (the Salish), a nomadic tribe, occupied the Bitterroot Valley including Victor before the earliest trappers and explorers came. Plenty of Horses christened as Victor, was chosen as chief of the Salish tribe. Chief Victor died in the summer of 1870 on a hunt near Three Buttes in eastern Montana. In the mid 1860’s, A. Sterne Blake and his Shoshone wife came to the valley and were among the original founders of Victor. Mr. Blake was also the first elected State Legislator from Missoula County, which at that time Victor was a part of. Founding of the townsite, originally named Garfield after President James A. Garfield, was August 20, 1881. It was later discovered when applying for a post office destination for the town, the name ‘Garfield’ had already been taken. The name Victor was made official December 12, 1881. Shortly after, Victor experienced the railroad and silver mining boom along with prosperity in lumber and agriculture. For more information on the Victor community visit us at www.victormt. com.

Labyrinth photo

T & R Magazine


Accommodations

u MOUNTAIN SPIRIT INN - Hotels/Motels 308 South Main St Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-3405 info@mountainspiritinn.com www.mountainspiritinn.com

u A LI’L BIT OF HEAVEN - Vacation Rental 7987 Hwy 93 South Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3433 mtlilbit@earthlink.net www.alilbitofheaven.com

u REMLC CITY CENTER - Hotel/Motel 415 W Main St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-1651 remlcvs1@aol.com www.remlcsportsmanslodging.com

u ALTA RANCH, LLC - Lodges 9203 West Fork Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 349-2142 info@alta-ranch.com www.alta-ranch.com

u RYE CREEK LODGE - Lodge 458 Rye Creek Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-3366 ryecreek@hughes.net www.ryecreeklodge.com

u ANGLER’S LODGE & CABINS - Lodges & Cabins 815B Hwy 93 South Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-0980 anglerscabins@gmail.com www.anglerslodgemt.com

u SULA COUNTRY STORE & RESORT - RV Park 7060 Hwy 93 South Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3364 sularesort@montana.com www.bitterroot-montana.com

u ANGLERS ROOST - RV Park 815 Hwy 93 South Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-1268 anglersroost@montana.com www.anglersroost-montana.com

u TIN CUP LODGE - Lodge 582 Tin Cup Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-1620 tincuplodge@aol.com www.tincuplodge.com

u BITTERROOT CABINS - Cabins 1967 North First Street Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-2258 info@bitterrootcabins.com www.bitterrootcabins.com

u TOWNHOUSE INNS OF HAMILTON - Hotels/Motels 1113 North 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-6600 mariec@townpump.biz www.townhouseinnhamiltoncom

u BITTERROOT RIVER BED & BREAKFAST LLC 501 South Ave. Stevensville, MT 59870 - (406) 777-5205 gonefishin@bitterrootriverbb.com www.bitterrootriverbb.com

u TRAVELLERS REST CABINS AND RV PARK 601 North Main St Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-3282 goldcreek@gci.net www.travellersrestmt.us

u BITTERROOT RIVER INN - Hotel/Motel 139 Bitterroot Plaza Dr Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 375-2525 brinn@cybernet1.com www.bitterrootriverinn.com u BITTERROOT RIVER RANCH 4301 West Fork Road Darby, MT 59829 - (509) 531-4934 bitterrootriverranch@gmail.com www.bitterrootriverranch.com

u TRIPLE CREEK RANCH - Ranch 5551 West Fork Rd Darby, MT 59829 - (406) 821-4600 info@triplecreekranch.com www.triplecreekranch.com u WILDERNESS SPIRIT CABINS, LLC - Cabins 472 Woodcrest Lane - Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 271-4450 tracyrosemoyers@gmail.com

u BLACK RABBIT RV PARK - RV Park 2101 North 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-3744 brabbit@bigsky.net www.blackrabbitrv.com u BROAD AXE LODGE, INC. - Lodge 1237 East Fork Rd Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3878 tamarack@bigsky.net u DEFFY’S MOTEL - Motel 321 South 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 - (406) 363-1244 deffysmotel@qwestoffice.net u EAST FORK HOUSE - Vacation Rental 1969 East Fork Rd Sula, MT 59871 - (406) 821-3559 tlw@nv.net www.eastforkhouse.net u HARLAND CABIN, THE - Cabin 2262 Old Darby Rd Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-6265 theharlancabin@gmail.com www.harlancabin.com

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TRAVEL AGENTS . . . u BIG SKY TRAVEL 300 B Main Street - Stevensville, MT 59870 (406) 777-6934 info@bigskytvl.com www.bigsky-travel.com u PROTRAVEL INTERNATIONAL 405 Charlos Street - Stevensville, MT 59870 (619) 453-0559 connie.thompson@protravelinc.com www.protravelinc.com

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108 Things To Do

In The Bitterroot Valley the Bitterroot’s Bucket List . . .

The Bitterroot Valley is full of activities for every outdoor enthusiasts. Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains, open valleys, pristine streams, and miles of unsurpassed scenery and wildlife. No matter which direction you take, you will be sure to find what you are looking for right here in the Bitterroot Valley .... come, sit back and enjoy everything we have to offer.

1. HIKE THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS

The Bitterroot Mountain Range runs most of the border between Montana and Idaho and is one of the valley’s beautiful scenic points. With numerous hiking trails up and down the valley and with varying degrees of hiking challenges, you will not be disappointed with any you choose. Stop by the Chamber to pick up a brochure or visit any Forest Service location at www.fs.usda.gov/ bitterroot for locations and descriptions. Bitterroot Valley’s local bookstores also carry guidebooks on local hiking trails.

2. RIDE A HORSE INTO THE WILDERNESS

There are 1,340,000 acres in the Selway-Bitterroot, located in Ravalli County, Montana and Idaho County, Idaho. It is the third largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states. You will experience some of most scenic views and have time to let your mind wander and experience what it used to be like in our Montana wilderness.

3. CAMP IN THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS

Camping in the Bitterroot Valley is an experience you will not forget. There are 26 developed campgrounds and 1,500 miles of access to trails, fishing, boating, biking and much, much more. Sleeping under the Big Montana Skies you will see a blanket of stars with a beauty only found in Montana. Visit www.fs.usa,gov/ bitterroot for more information regarding camping in the valley.

4. EXPLORE BIRDING/NATURE TRAIL

From Lolo to Lost Trail Pass, you can see 25 prime birding and nature viewing sites. Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, located in Stevensville, MT, is a good place to begin your adventure. For a map and other information on birding in the Bitterroot Valley go to www.montanabirdingtrail.org

5. VISIT LEE METCALF NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Driving or walking through Lee Metcalf Refuge, you will be able to view the wonders of wildlife in a single 2½ mile stretch of nature trails. You can also stop by their information center and view all the exhibits they have as well as ask questions regarding the refuge. Call 406-777-5552 or visit www.fws.gov/leemetcalf.

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6. HIKE BLODGETT CANYON

Blodgett Canyon is a glacially carved canyon. This canyon has vertical cliffs and is home to herds of mountain goats as well as several species of birds. Hiking this canyon is a must when visiting our valley. Call 406-363-7100 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/ bitterroot.

7. ROCK CLIMBING IN THE BITTERROOT CANYONS

This sport has become increasingly popular as a climbing destination. Many canyons on the west side of the Bitterroot Valley offer rock climbing at its very best. Visit www.bitterrootclimbers.org for more information regarding this sport.

8. SWIMMING AT LAKE COMO

Lake Como waters are fed by snow-covered peaks 10,000 feet above the lake. There is a sandy beach roped off so adults and kids alike can enjoy the stunning view as well as enjoy a more relaxed atmosphere. For information regarding usage www.fs.usda. gov/bitterroot.

9. BOATING AT PAINTED ROCKS RESERVOIR

Painted Rocks State Park is located on the West Side of the Bitterroot River up the West Fork. It offers boating as well as fishing in a quiet and secluded setting. There are 25 campsites with grills, fire pits, tables, boat ramp and dock, as well as drinking water. Visit www.fwp.mt.gov/parks/visit for more information.

10. VISIT OUR STATE WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS

Threemile and Calf Creek Wildlife Management Areas were created to provide winter range for elk and recreational opportunities to the public. Threemile, which is located east of Florence, offers 6,089 acres and Calf Creek, east of Hamilton, has 2,333 acres. Threemile is a mixture of motorized and walk-in. Calf Creek is by foot, horseback or mountain bike. Call 406-5425500 or visit www.fwp.mt.gov.

11. FLOAT THE BITTERROOT RIVER

Abundant wildlife and rooted deep in history, the Bitterroot River winds its way north between the Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains. You will see a wide range of birds as well as wildlife along its banks as you enjoy a quiet, relaxing float trip down this beautiful river. For information on a listing of local outfitters, call the Chamber at 406-363-2400 or visit bitterrootchamber.com.

12. FISH BLUE RIBBON TROUT STREAM

The Bitterroot River flows north for almost 100 miles. It is known for its aquatic insect hatches and is a place to fish for big trout. Catch and Release fishing is practiced. To receive a copy of the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Park’s current regulations call 406-5425500 or visit any local fly shop or visit www.fwp.mt.gov.

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13. HUNTING FOR BIG GAME

With 1.6 million acres of public land in the Bitterroot and Lolo National Forest, the Bitterroot is a hunter’s paradise. From elk, moose, deer, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, black bear and mountain lion, hunters come to the Bitterroot for an experience that will last them a lifetime. Call the Chamber for information or visit www.bitterrootchamber.com.

14. OBSERVE WILDLIFE AT THE TELLER REFUGE

The Teller Wildlife Refuge maintains 1,200 acres of farmland and river bottom dedicated to the conservation of native riparian habitat. Approximately 40 acres are open for the public to enjoy. Call 406-961-3507 or visit www.theteller.org.

15. BIKING IN THE BITTERROOT

No matter what kind of biking enthusiast you are or what age group you are in, the Bitterroot Valley has a trail for you. From mountain trails to our newly paved bike path that parallels US 93 for 45 miles from Lolo to Hamilton. If you did not bring your bike, no problem, we have local bike shops here to accommodate your every need. Valley Bicycles rents mountain bikes and they will be more than happy to fit you with a bike for your bicycling adventure, Call 406-363-4428 or email valleybicycles@yahoo. com.

21. PICNIC PLACES IN THE BITTERROOT

The Bitterroot has numerous places in which to relax and enjoy the beauty of our valley. Call the Chamber for more information on places to spread your blankets and relax. 406-363-2400.

22. SKIING AT LOST TRAIL POWDER MOUNTAIN

Lost Trail Powder Mountain features over 50 marked trails and 1,800 acres. Its longest run is 2.5miles and they have some of the best snow in Montana with over 300 inches annually. Visit www. losttrail.com.

23. CROSS COUNTRY SKIING IN THE BACK COUNTRY

You can begin your adventure at any Forest Service road or trail head. Chief Joseph trailhead is a beautiful place to begin your journey into the wilderness. Maps are available at the trailhead for your convenience as well as at your local Chamber and other businesses in the valley. Visit www.bitterrootxcskiclub.net for more information regarding this adventure.

24. SNOWMOBILING TRAILS

The Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains of our valley offer snowmobilers their destination for this activity. Explore areas that can only be seen during the winter by snowmobiling across vast acres of our beautiful mountain trails.

16. RIDE THE TRANSAMERICAN BICYCLE TRAIL

25. TRAVEL THE SAME TRAIL AS LEWIS & CLARK

17. PHEASANT HUNTING IN THE BITTERROOT

26. NEZ PERCE HISTORIC TRAIL

Between April and September, hundreds of cyclists across the country ride the 75 miles between Lost Trail Pass and Florence along Hwy 93, just one small portion of the 4,250 miles of the TransAmerican Bicycle Trail. Taking the same path that Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery took while traveling through the Bitterroot Valley. For a map of the trail, go to www.adventurecycling.org/routes/transamerican.cfm. Pheasant as well as other upland game bird hunting on 800 acres of prime upland habitat is where the Fetch Inn Lodge offers quality hunting. The lodge sits at the edge of the largest wilderness in the lower 48 states. Call 363-5111 or visit www. fetch-inn.com.

18. RIDE ATV’S IN BACK COUNTRY OF THE BITTERROOT

A great way to see our the beautiful scenery and wildlife is by four-wheel vehicles. There are two designated ATV trails, Overwhich Falls Trail and Chain of Lakes Trail. You will be able to view a wide range of wildlife and superb scenery. Rye Creek Lodge offers guided tours for this adventure. Call 821-4844.

19. GOLFING IN THE VALLEY

The Hamilton 18-hole Golf Course in Hamilton was designed by Gary Jacobson and has 6,545 yards of golf. Listed as one of the best public courses in the northwest, it was established in 1924. In Stevensville there is a 9-hole, Whitetail Golf Course. It features 2,859 yards of golf and this course was designed by Jason Allen.

20. TRAP SHOOTING

The Hamilton Trap Club has an excellent Five-Stand range. It is open Sunday and Wednesday afternoons. It is located on the Hamilton Airport Road in Hamilton, Visit www.hamiltontrapclub. com. The Whittecar Rifle Range is west of Hamilton and has six shooting ranges open to the public Wednesday through Sunday.

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Lewis and Clark entered the valley near Lost Trail Pass in September of 1805 where they came across the Salish Indian tribe. The Indians helped sustain the travelers with food and fresh horses. On their return trip in July of 1806, they once again traveled through the Bitterroot. For information on this epic event visit www.edgate.com/lewisandclark/expedition or stop by the Chamber for a brochure on their epic journey. The Bitterroot Valley is rooted deep in history and one of the historic stories was the Nez Perce Indians on their flight from the US Army in 1877. Hundreds of Nez Perce men, women and children, along with their livestock, traveled over 1,170 miles on a four-month journey in search of a new home after being forced to flee from their homeland. For more information on this story visit www.nezpercetrail.net.

27. VISIT HISTORIC ST. MARY’S MISSION

In 1841, Fr. Pierre Jean DeSmet, at the request of the Salish and Nez Perce Indian Tribes, established St. Mary’s Mission, making it the first church and pioneer settlement in the Pacific Northwest. Another Jesuit missionary, Father Anthony Ravalli, arrived in 1844 to be Montana’s first physician and pharmacist. For more information on this unbelievable story, call 406-777-5734 or visit www.saintmarysmission.org.

28. FORT OWEN STATE PARK

Parts of this 250x125 foot adobe and log trading post, stand steeped in history. In 1850, Major John Owen established the fort as a regional trade center. Period furnishings and artifacts are displayed in the restored rooms of the east barracks. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Call 406-542-5500 or visit www.stateparks.mt.gov/parks/visit/fortowen.

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29. VISIT THE DALY MANSION

In 1886 Copper King Marcus Daly and his wife, Margaret, purchased the original homestead here in the Bitterroot Valley, where they built a Queen Anne style Victorian summer home. It has over 56 rooms, 25 bedrooms, 15 bathrooms and 7 fireplaces. The three-story, 24,000 square foot home is surrounded by 50 beautifully landscaped acres. Tours are available during the summer months from May through October. Call 406-363-6004 or visit www.dalymansion.org.

30. RAVALLI COUNTY MUSEUM

Designed by A.J. Gibson in 1900, this historic brick building served as the county’s courthouse until 1979. Now it is the home of numerous exhibits from Natural History Room, Military Room, A Walk through the Bitterroot and the Lewis and Clark Discovery Rooms. Rotating exhibits as well as traveling exhibits are on display. Located at 205 Bedford Street in Hamilton, the Ravalli County Museum is a must stop while in the Bitterroot. Call 406363-3338 or visit www.brvhsmuseum.org.

31. ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Marcus Daly promised land for the church’s construction and this English Gothic structure was built. Today it still stands much like it was back in the late 1800’s. Margaret Daly was a devout Episcopalian and a patroness of the church. Tours are available and can be scheduled by calling 406-363-3025 or visit www. bitterrootepiscopal.org.

32. STEVENSVILLE MUSEUM

Preserving the early growth of the Bitterroot, the Stevensville Museum displays numerous artifacts and pictures so you can turn back the clock and see what it was like in the early years of the valley. They are located at 517 Main Street in Stevensville, call 406-777-1007 or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com for more information.

33. VICTOR HERITAGE MUSEUM

The Victor Museum is housed in what once was the Victor Depot. The museum hosts numerous relics and a vast array of articles from days gone by. The museum is located in downtown Victor or give them a call 406-642-3997 for more information. Also visit www.victorheritagemuseum.org.

34. DARBY PIONEER MEMORIAL MUSEUM

The Darby Museum houses a rare collection of home and business artifacts, which were donated by many pioneer families of the area. It was one of the first hand-hewn homestead cabins built in the area, and a photo of the cabin at its original site is on display. The museum is located on Main Street in Darby. For more information call 406-821-3753.

35. HISTORIC FOREST AND GUARD STATIONS

The Alta Ranger Station, which was built in 1899, is the oldest surviving Forest Service Ranger Station and is located on the West Fork of the Bitterroot River. The East Fork Guard Station near Sula, a cabin on the East Fork of the Bitterroot River. The lookouts provide beautiful views of the Sapphire, Bitterroot and Pintler mountain ranges. For more information on how to rent the lookouts or cabins, call 406-363-7100 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/ bitterroot.

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36. DRIVING THE HISTORIC EASTSIDE HIGHWAY

If you are looking for a relaxing drive through the Bitterroot Valley, the Eastside Highway from Florence to Hamilton will provide you many historic sites and unsurpassed beauty of the valley. This roadway was the primary road before US 93 was constructed. Stop by the Chamber to pick up a brochure to make sure you see all the historic stops along the way.

37. VISIT THE ART GALLERY

The Bitterroot Valley has a galley of various artists and craftsmen. The valley is a paradise for local artists - it seems to bring out their creative juices. You will enjoy browsing through galleries and see the variety of talents we have right here in the valley.

38. ENJOY THE PERFORMING ARTS

Artists perform in a wide range of entertainment. Hamilton Performing Arts, Hamilton Players, Stevensville Playhouse, MAPS Media Institute, and the schools up and down the valley put on plays with exceptional talent. Call 406-363-7946 or stop by Chamber for information regarding the many varieties of performing arts to enjoy here in the valley.

39. ENJOY MONTANA A CAPPELLA CHOIR

The Montana A Cappella Society is a vocal choir from the Bitterroot Valley. They perform at various functions without instrumental accompaniment. The group has received international recognition and the society’s been invited to the prestigious International Choral Festival in Cork, Ireland. For more information as well as available CDs, go to www. montanaacapella.org.

40. LIVE THEATER AT HAMILTON PLAYHOUSE

For over 30 years, the Hamilton Players have brought entertainment to the Bitterroot. They provide several full scale productions each season as well as children’s workshops and numerous off-site special events. The Playhouse is located at 100 Ricketts Road in Hamilton, call 406-375-9050 or visit www. hamiltonplayers.com.

41. ENJOY SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK

The Hamilton Players bring Shakespeare in the Park to the Bitterroot every year with a different touring performance. It is the only professional touring theater program in the state that produces Shakespeare’s plays and they are free to the public. Call 406-375-9050 or visit www.hamiltonplayers.com.

42. ARTIST ALONG THE BITTERROOT

The vast beauty of the valley seems to draw artists here to make their home. Beautiful and unique pieces of art can be found up and down the valley. Artists Along The Bitterroot hosts an Open Tour Studio in the spring and these events are free to the public. Call 406-531-0853 or visit www.artistsalongthebitterroot.com.

43. MONTANA PROFESSIONAL ARTISTS ASSOC.

The Montana Professional Artists Association hosts a Show and Sale every June at the Bitterroot River Inn in Hamilton. This show features artists from all over Montana. Admission is free call 406-961-3887 or visit www.montanaprofessionalartists.com.

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44. BREWERY TOURS IN THE BITTERROOT

The Bitterroot Valley boasts of five breweries right here in the Bitterroot Valley. Bitter Root Brewing and Higherground Brewing are both located in Hamilton. Blacksmith Brewing and Wildwood Brewery are located in Stevensville and Bandit Brewery is in Darby. See page 44 for more information on our valley breweries.

45. TOUR OF WINERIES AND HARD CIDER

Six businesses right here in the Bitterroot Valley are the home of some of the best wines, meads and hard cider you will find. Trapper Peak Winery and Montana Cider Work are both located in Darby. Blodgett Canyon Cellars and Swanson’s Mountain View Distillery are in Corvallis and Hidden Legend Winery in Victor. See page 44 for more information on our valley wineries.

46. VISIT HULS DAIRY

Very few dairies are left here in the Bitterroot Valley, but Huls is one of them. A family operated dairy since 1908 with state of the art processing technology. For a tour and directions call 406-9618887 or visit www.hulsdairy.com.

47. LIFELINE FARMS VISIT

With a herd of around 400 Brown Swiss Cows, sheep, lambs, pigs and an array of vegetables, herbs and flowers, Lifeline Farms is an agricultural wonder. Selling their own organic beef, pork, cheese and milk, makes them special to our valley. For a tour and directions call 406-642-3873 or visit www.lifelinefarm.com. This is a stop you do not want to miss while you are here in the Bitterroot Valley.

48. MUJUICE DAIRY & BY-PRODUCTS

Taking a vacation is something this family never has the luxury of doing. Jeff Lewis’s father, Rollie, began milking back in 1979 and passed the business to his son Jeff, who continued to developed the dairy. Jeff began to look at options in which to use some of their resources. Besides producing his MuJuice - he also developed another revenue stream called Moo-Poo, a great compost to help everything come up green!! Jeff and his family have deep roots here and they are just another reason why our community is a great place to live. To get more information call 406-360-1828.

49. HISTORICAL FEED MILL

Lakeland Feed & Supply has been in this same location since the 1930’s. This tour is great for kids as well as adults to learn how traditional methods are combined with the latest scientific knowledge. Visitors are welcome to tour this facility. Call 406-363-2334 to schedule a tour or visit www.lakelandfeeds.com.

50. ALPACA TOUR

Looking for something special - learn about one of the newest livestock industries in the Bitterroot. These animals furnish a wonderful, warm, lightweight, hypoallergenic fiber, that is turned into socks, garments and accessories of all kinds. For more information on these wonderful animals call 406-381-0409.

51. VISIT AN EMU RANCH

Wild Rose Emu is one of two Emu Ranches in Montana. Clover Quinn is a remarkable woman as she has approximately 120 emus she takes care of. Emus are a prehistoric bird originating in Australia, they have no wing muscles but can run 35-40 miles

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per hour for short distances. 95% of the emu is a usable bird ... their meat, oil for your skin, supple leather, their feathers and their dark green eggs. Ranch is located at 284 Rose Lane in Hamilton and Clover welcomes visitors. Call 406-363-1710 or visit www. wildroseemu.com.

52. HORSE RANCHES IN THE VALLEY

Horses have always been a part of Montana, and the Bitterroot is blessed to have several organizations here that use horses as a healing process between men and animals. You will find a listing of these places by contacting the Chamber at 406-363-2400.

53. LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS

When spring comes to the valley, Farmers Markets from Darby to Florence begin their weekend markets. From locally grown produce, plants, flowers, baked goods and handcrafted items, these markets are packed every weekend with people wanting to take home something special from the Bitterroot Farmers Markets. Check the Calendar of Events to see starting dates and locations.

54. VISIT OUR FARM STANDS OR ORCHARDS

Several farm stands and orchards in the valley are open seven days a week during the growing season. You will find the best of the Bitterroot right here in our valley. For more information on our local food producers visit www.bitterrootvalleyfood.info/ producer%20directory.html.

55. WESTERN RESEARCH CENTER

MSU’s Western Research Center is located at 580 Quast Lane NE of Corvallis. The center addresses agricultural needs for its area of the state. To find out more information call 406-961-3025 or visit www.ag.montana.edu/warc.

56. GET OUTDOORS

Florence’s Hideout Mountain sets aside a day in June for National Get Outdoors Day. There are activities of all kinds for kids and adults to enjoy. Hiking, biking, fishing, tennis and girding are just some of the great activities designed to get you outdoors and enjoy what the Bitterroot has to offer.

57. PARSONS PONY FARM FOR KIDS

What a great time kids have, whether they are experienced or it is their first ride. They are all assisted by an experienced wrangler and fitted with a helmet for their safety. Make sure you bring your camera to preserve the moment. Visit www.parsonsponies.com.

58. TAKE A TOUR OF THE DOLL MUSEUM

Located on the Eastside in Florence, this unique treasure showcases more than a thousand dolls. There is a variety of different dolls from Germany, Japan, New Zealand and Canada, with some being nearly two centuries old. Call 406-273-6332 for more information.

59. STARS SHINE AT THEATRE SCHOOL

The Hamilton Players offer three theater schools for students K-12. They focus on fundamental performance skills, improvisation, introductory theater etiquette and technical skills. Call 406-375-9050 or visit www.hamiltonplayers.com for information on dates.

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60. YOUTH HISTORY CAMP

The Daly Mansion hosts this event in June. Some of the activities include 19th century lawn games, participation in historic reenactments, all with hands-on activities. This camp is geared to kids from 4th grade to 8th. Call 363-6004 ext. 3 for more information.

61. SUMMER READING PROGRAMS AT THE LIBRARY

The Bitterroot Public Library in Hamilton offers a Summer Reading Program beginning in June. Libraries up and down the valley offer various programs for kids and adults of all ages to keep them interested in reading. Contact the Chamber for more information on the various programs offered.

62. CAMP INVENTION SCIENCE

A week-long summer enrichment program for children entering grades one through six. The Camp Invention program instills vital 21st century life skills such as problem-solving and teamwork through hands-on fun!!!! Held at the Middle School in Hamilton at 209 South 5th St or visit www.campinvention.org.

63. DANCE STUDIOS

There are several dance studios located in the valley to develop the talents of local children; Bitterroot Dancers, Ballet Bitterroot, Dance EFX, Groovz Studio and River Street Dance Theatre. Call the Chamber for more information regarding these studios 406363-2400.

64. GLAMPING IN THE BITTERROOT

Glamping is the newest trend for camping. You can enjoy warm, comfortable sleeping accommodations, gourmet meals, guided tours, fishing, hiking, horseback riding and more, or just sit back and relax and enjoy the beautiful scenery. Call 406-821-3115 or visit www.glamourcamping.net.

65. MONTANA WEDDING

You could not ask for a more romantic place for your wedding than right here in the Bitterroot Valley! Several unique settings, as well as charming lodges and cabins, make the valley the perfect spot for that special event. Call Creative Solutions, 406-546-7727, or stop in at your local Chamber for more information.

66. TAKE IN A HORSE SHOW

Five nationally sanctioned Cutting Horse Competitions are held in the Bitterroot Valley. These events are held at the Sapphire Event Center located at 1750 Eastside Hwy near Corvallis. Visit www. sapphireeventcenterllc.com.

67. UNIQUE OUTDOOR PAINTING EXPERIENCE

You can enjoy a unique outdoor painting experience in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. Guests will be treated to a day of oil painting with award winning American Impressionist, Tricia Bass. Your day will include the use of an original French plein air easel,oil paints, brushes and canvas. Your paintings are yours to keep for an unforgettable Montana experience here in the Bitterroot Valley.

68. WHAT’S COOKIN’

The Taste of Home Cooking School is held at the Performing Arts Center in Hamilton in September. This event is usually a sell-out,

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and the culinary specialists give a step-by-step instruction on how to make some very special recipes. You receive a gift bag and a Taste of Home cookbook. www.tasteofhome.com/cooking-schools.

69. A DIFFERENT KIND OF GOLF

Disc Golf . . . when you play on this course, it has baskets and ‘tones’ instead of holes. You do not need to bring your clubs but you will need a Frisbee. Spiritwood is a private 22 hole Disc Golf course. Kids and adults will enjoy this ‘Montana’ way to golf. Visit www.spiritwooddiscgolf.com or call 406-531-2707. For something different for the whole family, make sure you make this a stop.

70. FIND INNER PEACE BY WALKING THE LABYRINTH

The Redsun Labyrinth is an 800-year-old pattern. Labyrinths have been used for 4,000 years as a spiral design pattern. The walk takes approximately ½ hour and can also be used for ceremonies. Call 406-642-6675 or visit www.redsunlabyrinth.com.

71. CANDY IS DANDY IN THE BITTERROOT

With three candy stores in the Bitterroot Valley, there is no shortage of ways to satisfy your sweet tooth. All feature locally owned, homemade recipes of some of the best sweets you can imagine. Big Sky Candy, at 319 West Main in Hamilton - www. bigskycandy.com; Old West Gallery & Antiques, located at 202 South Main Street in Darby - www.montanaoldwestgallery. com; The Montana Chocolate Company, at 755 Main Street in Stevensville - www.mtchocolatecompany.com, offer you true Montana sweets that will keep you comin’ back for more.

72. KEEPING FIT

There are a number of fitness centers in the valley which offer passes for our visitors at every level of fitness. The Canyons Athletic Club - www.thecanyonsathleticclub.com; Iron Horse Athletic Club - www.ironhorseathleticclub.com; Right to Bear Arms www.rtbamt.com, all offer our visitors a way to keep up with their regular routines while visiting our valley.

73. HOT SPRINGS OFFER RELAXING RELIEF

Lolo Hot Springs was well know to the Indians long before the arrival of Lewis and Clark, and you can visit them at www. lolohotsprings.com. Lost Trail Hot Springs is another spot in the valley, which is just south of Sula. You can visit them at www. losttrailhotsprings.com. Both hot springs offer lodging where you can relax and enjoy your beautiful surroundings.

74. ENJOY A NIGHT OUT

There will be no shortage if you are looking to dine out in the Bitterroot. A number of excellent and unique cuisines are offered by our local restaurants. From sushi to mouth-watering sandwiches, you won’t be disappointed at the variety of excellent choices to choose from. Check with the Chamber for a listing of some of our finest restaurants in the valley at www.bitterrootchamber.com.

75. ATTEND MONTANA MULE DAYS

The Bitterroot hosts Montana Mule Days in June, and this show has over 100 classes including log pulling, driving classes, western pleasure, trail class, team penning and costume classes. The event is held at the Ravalli County Fairgrounds in Hamilton. Call 406-363-3411 or visit www.montanamuledays.com.

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76. HERITAGE DAYS IN STEVENSVILLE

Stevensville’s Western Heritage Days is a step back in history. Wagon rides, barnyard games, Chuck Wagon Cook-off, vendors with handmade items, tours of Montana’s first settlement, music, beer and lots of great food. Call 406-777-3773 or visit www. mainstreetstevensville.com for more information.

77. SENIOR PRO RODEO

Cowboys from across the country come to compete in the National Senior Pro Rodeo held in Hamilton and Darby. All competitors are over the age of 40 and give the audience their money’s worth. From bull riding to barrel racing, this event has everything you want to see at a professional rodeo. Call 406-363-3411 or visit www.seniorrodeo.com.

78. ELITE BULL CONNECTION

Darby brings in professional bull riders for this event to ride some of the best bulls found anywhere. Eight seconds can seem like a life time to try and stay mounted on a thousand pounds of pure muscle and meanness. An event that is dubbed as “the most dangerous eight seconds in sports”, is an event you will want to see, and it is happening right here in our Bitterroot Valley in Darby. Visit www.southvalleyevents.com.

83. BITTERROOT CHAMBER’S MICROBREW FESTIVAL

This event, sponsored by the Bitterroot Valley Chamber the fourth Saturday in July, offers the best microbrews, wine and meads Montana and the Northwest have to offer. With food, great music and a relaxed atmosphere, people come from all over to partake in the Annual Microbrew Festival held in Hamilton. You will return year after year to this event, which has been dubbed as Bitterroot’s Best Event! Call 406-363-2400 or visit www.bitterrootchamber.com for more information regarding this festival.

84. LAKE COMO TRIATHLON

If you are up for a challenge, then the Lake Como Triathlon is what you are looking for. Lake Como is the perfect setting for this event and is limited to 100 racers. Swim, bike and run in one of the most scenic places in Montana. Visit www.lakecomotri.com.

85. BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL IS HARDTIMES

If you like Bluegrass - you will not want to miss the Annual Hardtime Bluegrass Festival, which is located 10 miles south of Hamilton. This three-day event has some of the best bluegrass bands from all around the Northwest. Bring your lawn chairs and sit and listen to music that will have your feet stomping. Call 406821-3777 or visit www.hardtimesbluegrass.com.

79. RIDE DE ROOT IN THE BITTERROOT

86. STEVENSVILLE CREAMERY PICNIC

80. TOUR OF THE BITTERROOT

87. BIG SKY RENAISSANCE FAIRE

Beginning in Darby, riders will meander their way through the beautiful back roads on the east side of the Bitterroot Valley, skirting the towns on Hamilton, Corvallis, and Victor, while enjoying breathtaking views of the Bitterroot mountains. Bikers can experience one of the most beautiful rides of their life during this event. Call 406-529-7887 or visit www.ridederoot.com. The Bitter Root Land Trust sponsors this event to focus on getting people out biking and enjoying our beautiful Bitterroot Valley. This event is for all bikers no matter what your level of expertise may be. An event for the whole family to participate in - call 406375-0956 or visit www.tourofthebitterroot.org.

81. ENJOY DARBY LOGGER DAYS

Timber sport competitions ranging from log rolling, pole climbing, saw cutting and axe throwing ... all in celebration of those who work in this time honored tradition of logging. There is music, vendors, food and lots of fun. This event is held at Connor Field in Darby. Call 406-381-5114 for more information regarding this event.

82. DALY DAYS IN HAMILTON

Celebrating Daly Days in Hamilton is a two-day event that has a host of activities for young and old alike. The Daly Mansion has activities and demonstrations for everyone to experience what it was like back in the early 1900s. Downtown Hamilton has events, vendors, games, music, food, and a good old fashioned street dance. Car Show, Dutch Oven Cookoff and a Kiss the Pig Contest are just a few of the activities that happen during this two-day event. Hamilton is the place to be the fourth weekend in July - so don’t miss this celebration. Call 406-375-1900 for more information or visit www.hamiltondowntownassociation.org.

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When a fire destroyed the creamery in 1911, the manager told the community if they could rebuild the business in 30 days, he would host the biggest celebration the town had ever seen. So 101 years later the Creamery Picnic has remained an annual event for the town of Stevensville. For more information regarding this event call 406-777-3773 or visit www.creamerypicnic.com. 4th Annual Renaissance Faire will be held on Highway 93, one mile from Stevensville - just look for all the colorful flags along the highway. Acres of parking and jaw-dropping family entertainment. There will be jousting, full metal combat, vendors, music and great food. You will see Robin Hood stealing from the King and Queen to give to the patrons and games of chance with the gypsies. Call your local Chamber for more information 406363-2400.

88. BITTER ROOT RIVERFEST EVENT

Bitter Root Water Forum hosts this event to help educate children and family alike to the importance of our local riparian area. Lessons on the dynamics of a watershed are hands-on, where you can learn by experience. What better way to help our kids understand the importance of where they live and how to take care of the land and water. Visit www.brwaterforum.org for more information.

89. CELTIC GAMES AND GATHERING

Held on the Daly Mansion grounds, this festival brings in clans from all over. The two-day event has traditional Scottish and Celtic music, bagpipes, dancers, Highland competitions, authentic Scottish and Irish food, wares and cultural demonstrations. This unique event is one you won’t want to miss. For more information call 406-274-8886 or visit www.bitterrootscottishirishfestival.org.

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90. RAVALLI COUNTY FAIR

Featuring exhibits, carnival rides, vendors, agricultural displays and nightly entertainment, the Ravalli County Fair is something everyone looks forward to. The fair is an exciting time for those who look forward to entering their homemade, home grown or home raised entries for a chance to win a ribbon and/or money for their hard endeavors. Don’t miss the Ravalli County Fair right here in Hamilton in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. 363-3411

91. SCARECROW FESTIVAL IN STEVENSVILLE

This annual event is sponsored by the Stevensville Art and Sculpture Society and held on the first Friday and Saturday in October. The public casts their ballots for their favorite scarecrow with cash prizes being awarded. This two-day fun-filled event also includes a pumpkin carving contest, wagon rides, late night business open houses with treats for everyone. Call 406-777-3773 or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com.

92. APPLE DAY AT THE MUSEUM

Hailed as the Biggest Bake Sale Under the Big Sky, the Annual McIntosh Apple Day Festival, held at the Ravalli County Museum, has over 700 apple pies made from scratch for sale. Apple butter, cider, carmel apples and a host of fresh fall produce. There are vendors from all over the state with their arts, crafts, food and produce. Come early and stay to the end. Call 406-3633338 or visit www.brvhsmuseum.org.

93. HAMILTON’S MAGICAL CHRISTMAS

Hamilton kicks off the Christmas Holidays the day after Thanksgiving by hosting their Annual Christmas Tree Lighting at the post office in Hamilton. Stroll the streets and enjoy caroling by our own Montana A Cappella Society. Stop in and enjoy your local businesses with their unique gift selections as well as treats for the evening. Burning barrels on the corners, Santa and Mrs. Claus, lights sparkling and the true meaning of Christmas is celebrated. Call 406-360-9124 or visit www. hamiltondowntownassociation.org.

94. MONTANA’S COUNTRY CHRISTMAS

Stevensville’s is full of holiday spirit during this festive time of year. Activities from arts, crafts, Parade of Lights, Live Nativity, Santa and wagon rides are part of this annual Christmas event. Come enjoy the holiday season in Stevensville, call 406-777-3773 or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com.

95. WALK THROUGH CENTENNIAL GROVE

Just 11.4 miles from Hamilton on the Skalkaho Highway is a wonderful place to stroll. This Grove is handicap accessible and includes at least 40 varieties of flowering plants and close to 100 different plants. Stop and enjoy the sounds and beauty of nature.

96. PAN FOR SAPPHIRES

Old and young alike will love panning for their own Montana Sapphires to take home. Whether you are looking for a bag of rocks, precious Montana Sapphires, a day of family fun, a stunning jewelry piece for yourself or a gift, you can find it all right here in the Bitterroot at the Sapphire Studio. Visit www. sapphiremining.com for more information.

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97. HORSE AND CARRIAGE RIDES

There is nothing like relaxing and enjoying the beautiful scenery here in the Bitterroot, and what better way to enjoy it than in a carriage. Horse drawn trolley, surrey and wagon rides are available for weddings, family reunions, and special occasions. Call Pioneer Carriage at 406-961-3602 for more information.

98. WESTERN AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER

The center was established in 1906 to deal with the booming apple industry in the Bitterroot Valley. The center is a research center for horticulture, soil and biological control of weeds, and is located on Quast Lane on the eastside of Corvallis. The facility is open to the public -- visit www.ag.montana.edu/warc for more information.

99. CHRISTMAS IN JULY

Step back in time into the grandeur of The Brooks. Built in 1894, this beautiful Queen Ann home has been turned into a charming Christmas Showcase, which is open year around for your enjoyment. For more information visit www.robbinsonmain.com.

100. SKALKAHO FALLS

Skalkaho Highway 38 is located south of Hamilton and is one of the most scenic drives in the valley. The falls in the spring provide roaring water from the melt off and is a spectacular sight to view. Bring your camera and a lunch basket and enjoy the view from the Falls. Contact your local Chamber for information on the Falls 406-363-2400.

101. CHOCOLATE TASTING EVENT

The Victor Heritage Museum hosts an Annual Chocolate Tasting Event the first Monday in December. This festive party and silent auction features a variety of chocolate for sampling. The museum is decorated to the hilt with Holiday Trimmings and no matter where you look you will see Chocolate! Visit www.victorheritagemuseum.org.

102. HALLOWEEN PARADE

Hamilton Downtown Businesses host an annual Halloween Parade, which is held on Halloween Day, unless Halloween is on a Sunday, in which case it will be held on Saturday. This event is fun for kids and adults alike. Businesses open their doors to hand out treats for the kids, and the streets are blocked off for the safety of everyone. Call 406-360-9124 for more information or visit www.hamiltondowntownassociation.org.

103. BIG SKY FIBER ARTS FESTIVAL

This event is held every other year and will be held in June at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. There will be exhibits, fiber art showcase, fiber stash sale, skein contest, vendors, workshops, food and lots of fun. This is where life’s threads are turned into art. Visit www.bigskyfiber.com for more information.

104. FIELD OF SCREAMS

For more than 15 years the Field of Screams has been scaring young and old alike. This outdoor fright-fest is five acres in size in which dozens of employees roam the field in haunting costumes, jumping out of the corn stalks and giving everyone an evening they will not forget. Field of Screams is located north of Hamilton, right off Hwy 93. Selected as one of the ‘scariest’ around! Take place in October.

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105. DANCING IN THE BITTERROOT

Country Western Dancing here in the Bitterroot is something that everyone can enjoy, and Bitterroot Dancers have regular dances on the weekends as well as instruction. This lively group is always looking for people to join them and have fun. Contact bitterrootdancersinc@gmail.com or call 406-381-1392.

106. DARBY DOG SLED RACES

The Darby Dog Derby is a sled dog race put on by the Bitterroot Mushers. Dog sledding history dates back over a thousands years and outdates any modern vehicle. It is believed that dog sledding started in the arctic region where no transportation was possible. The first dog sled race was held in Minnesota in 1886 and has since continued to become a popular sport. Visit www. bitterrootmushers.org.

107. OUTDOOR MUSIC CONCERTS

Tuesdays at 12 at the RC Museum in Hamilton and the Bitterroot Community Band held at Claudia Driscoll Park Band Shell in Hamilton, are outdoor concerts held throughout the summer months. This is a chance to sit back, relax with friends and listen to some great local music. Call the Chamber at 406-363-2400 or visit www.bitterrootchamber.com for times and dates. Photo by Chase Cooper

108. BRONC BUSTIN’ BARREL BURNIN’ PRCA RODEO

Darby is the place to view some of the best and most exciting bull and bronc riding as well as some great rodeos. Darby is known for ‘Hang On To Your Hat’ during these events as cowboys from all over try to stay in the saddle as some of the best rodeo stock tries to plant them in the dust. So if you like rodeo’s - Darby is where you will want to be! Call Cal Rurk 544-5536

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Calendar of Events

Connecting the Communities . . .

Call the Chamber at 406-363-2400 for dates for 2016 FIRST FRIDAYS are year-round. Call the Chamber for information 406-363-2400. FARMERS MARKETS run from May through mid-October. Call the Chamber for information 406-363-2400. Hamilton Farmers Market is held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th Streets in Hamilton. Call 406-9610004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket. webs.com. Harvest Valley Farmers Market is held on the South end of Main Street in Stevensville. Contact: Roger Flats 546-8554 North Bitterroot Valley Farmers Market is on US 93 and Eastside Highway in Florence. Contact Eric or Suzanne Winegart at 777-0709. Darby Farmers Market is held in Darby every Tuesday in Darby’s Main Street Park.

Performing Arts In The Bitterroot ‘Tuesday’s at 12’ Relax in the park, enjoy great food, and listen to local music during the months of June, July and August from12:00 to 1:00 p.m. Hamilton Playhouse has five (5) Mainstage productions each year. 406-375-9050 Stevensville Playhouse produces six (6) shows a year in Stevensville. 406-777-2722 Bitterroot Performing Arts Center, located in the Hamilton High School, performances monthly. 406-363-7946

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Annual Activities Corvallis American Legion Memorial Day Parade l Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival Bi-yearly – 1st Weekend in June l Mt. Professional Artists Assoc. Show & Sale - 2nd Weekend in June l StevensvilleWestern Heritage Days In June l Darby Strawberry Festival 3rd Weekend in July l Darby Logger Days 3rd Weekend in July l Elite Bull Connetion in July th l Daly Days – 4 Weekend in July l Hardtime Bluegrass Festival 4th Weekend in July l Microbrew Festival 4th Weekend in July l Creamery Picnic 1st Weekend in August rd l Tour of Homes – 3 Weekend in August l Ravalli County Fair Labor Day Weekend l Bronc Bustin’ & Barrel Burning held in September l Apple Days – In October l Hamilton Christmas Friday after Thanksgiving l Stevensville Christmas Celebration 1st Friday in December l Victor Chocolate Tasting 1st Weekend in December l Celtic Games & Gathering in August l

CALENDAR OF EVENTS MARCH 1 Hamilton Players present ‘The Drowsy Chaperone’. Based on the book by Bob Martin and Don McKellar. Sponsored by Tia Morello/Taco De Sol. Call 375-9050 MARCH 1, 6, 7 ‘Alice’s Adventures’ at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:30 pm. Call 360-489-7114 MARCH 5 Basics of Business Law at RCEDA Building Bittterroot Business, Bitterroot College Continuing Education SeriesBasics of Business Law, instructor is Richard Weber and is from 8:30 am to 11:30 am. Cost is $25. Call 3750100 for more information. MARCH 5-7 State A Girls Basketball Tournament in Hamilton at HHS Gymnasium. MARCH 6 Hamilton Christian Academy presents their 16TH Annual Auction & Chili Feed at 601 W Main Street in Hamilton at 5:30. Live & Silent Auction, Chili Feed & Cook-Off, Desserts. Call 961-9602 for more information. MARCH 6 First Friday in Stevensville “Get Lucky In Stevensville purchase a ticket to win a Merchants March Basket. Music, refreshments, fun for the whole family. 777-3773. MARCH 6-7 Hamilton Downtown Assoc. hosts Main Street Madness for their First Friday series and continues on Saturday. Great savings – stores open late on Friday. Call 363-1279, Russ Lawrence.

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MARCH 7 Free Archery & Crafts for the whole family from 10 am until noon at the Bedford Room in Hamilton. Free for the community. Call Jesse 406-350-2360. MARCH 7 Free Family Movie Night featuring ‘The Place’ at the Bedford Room in Hamilton at 6 pm. Free for the community, free popcorn, soda, candy and nachos. Call Jesse 406-350-2360. MARCH 7 RC Friends of NRA Annual Banquet at 1st Interstate Center at 5:30 pm – Dinner and Live and Silent Auction. Call 381-0354. MARCH 7 Lakeland Feed & Supply’s Customer Appreciation Day from 9 am to 6 pm. Call 363-2334. MARCH 8 ‘Alice’s Adventures’ at the Stevensville Playhouse at 2 pm. Call 360-489-7114 MARCH 8 Hamilton Players present International Women’s Day Reader’s Theater & Bake Sale at 8 pm. Call 375-9050 MARCH 9 & 11 Auditions for ‘Dear Old Butte’ at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:00 pm. Call 360-489-7114 MARCH 11 Steve Beck is Back!! This seminar on ‘Team Building’ will be at 309 Main Street in Stevensville. There will be 2 times available for this half-day session, lasting approximately 4 hours. 8 am to 12 noon and the second from 1 to 5 pm. Sponsored by the Stevensville Main Street Assoc. and Valley Drug & Variety. Call 777-3773 MARCH 11 The Catered Table presents its next Wine Tasting on Wed., March 11 at 6:30 at The Catered Table in Stevensville … they will feature wine and food of Chili. For reservations call 7777090. MARCH 12 BR Cross Country Ski presents ‘Roadless Areas and Wilderness, Our Best Landscapes’ beginning at 7 pm at the Presbyterian Church, 1220 West Main in Hamilton. Public invited. Call Jim 363-2110 for more information. MARCH 13 Shamrock Shuffle at the Eagles Lodge in Hamilton, 25 N 2nd St. Tacos and more from 5:30 7:00. Dance at 7:30 pm to 11:30 pm. Net proceeds to benefit Shepherd’s House in Hamilton. Call 363-1113 for more information.

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MARCH 14 Community Crab Feed hosted by Hamilton Downtown Assoc. at Community Room in City Hall, 223 S Second Street in Hamilton No host bar 5:30, dinner served at 6:30. Crab n fixins, Entertainment pkg. raffle, silent auction. $30 per person 360-9124 for more information. MARCH 14 The New-Matics band is playing this Saturday night , the 14th, at 9 pm, at the Rustic Hut in Florence. They are advertising it as rock and roll, but we know the swing, right ? So if you're looking for something to do Saturday, Come join the Bitterroot Dancers 381-1392 MARCH 15 Bitterroot Celtic Society Fundraising Breakfast/ Brunch Sunday, March 15th at Sapphire Lutheran Homes 501 N. 10th Street, Hamilton from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm for an Irish Breakfast/ Gourmet Brunch to raise funds for the Bitterroot Celtic Gathering & Games. Contact Dominic in the day at 363-2800 or Gary in the evening & weekends at 360-7570 for menu items and more information. $10.00 MARCH 17 Historic St. Mary’s Parish will be serving their annual St. Patrick’s Day Dinner in the Family Center, 400 Charlos St in Stevensville from 4 to 7 pm on Tuesday, March 17.Call 777-2067 for more information. MARCH 19 Ever wondered what a darkroom looked like in the sixties? Come see what Ernst Peterson’s looked like, built by Paul Stanton and Ken McBride, using Peterson’s own equipment. Stanton generously donated the equipment to Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St., Hamilton, for our 22nd Annual Ernst Peterson Photo Contest and Exhibit. With almost 240 photo entries, including an entry from a 2 year old who already loves photography, you can vote for your favorite one. The most votes win the People’s Choice Ribbon. Join us on March 19th at 6pm for our Award Ceremony where you can meet the judges, Mark Mesenko and Perry Backus. MARCH 19 Are you at risk? One of the top three cancers for men and women is colon cancer at MDMH. MDMH Colon Cancer Class is set for Thursday, March 19 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm at MDMH Conference Room. Call 375-4675 for more information. MARCH 20, 21 Stevensville High School Drama Performance at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:30 pm. Call 360-489-7114

MARCH 21 The Barnyard Bunch 11th Annual 4-H Tack Swap from 8 am to 5 pm at Lone Rock Elementary School Gym, 1112 Three Mile Creek Rd, north of Stevensville. Call Renita 777-0404 for more details or Theresa 207-1130. MARCH 21 BR Youth Home “No Place Like Home” at 1st Interstate Center at 6:00 pm Call 541-1650 – welcome to spring in ‘rustic chic’ style! Gala will have a fully-hosted bar, dinner and live and silent auctions. MARCH 24 Be a History Detective! North Valley Public Library invites children and teens, ages 8 and up, and their families to attend “Artifacts and History for Kids”! This is a traveling program presented by the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula, and is the last of our American Civil War programs. The Museum staff will bring a trunk full of artifacts, focusing on the American Civil War, and will teach children how to analyze the artifacts and draw conclusions from them. There will be learning, playing and crafts! Come and join us! Space is limited so please sign up in advance. To sign up, contact the library at 777-5061 or email maryw@northvalleylibrary.org Date: Tuesday, March 24th Time: 4:30-5:30pm Location: North Valley Public Library Community Room – 208 Main Street, Stevensville MT MARCH 27 Red Baraat at the Performing Center in Hamilton at 8:00 pm. Call 363-7946 for more information or www.bitterrootperformingarts.org MARCH 27, 28, 29 Selway-Pintler Wilderness Back Country Horsemen will host their State Convention at the Bitterroot River Inn in Hamilton. The public is invited to attend on Saturday for “Boomtown”, which is a town of heated wall tents housing vendors and partner groups from around the valley and the state (vision of the 1800’s) Saturday from 8 am to 6 pm Sunday from 9 am to 12. *Vendors*Partner Organizations with educational material*Crosscut Competition for viewing around noon (BCH members only participating)*Mule Raffle-tickets available (mule will be in park on Saturday)*Main Raffle-tickets available*Games & Shopping. Call 363-8230 for more information. MARCH 28 The Lady Eagles Auxiliary of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Bitter Root Aerie of Hamilton is hosting a FLEA MARKET, Saturday March 28, 2015. For reservation and information call Katie at 363-8909 or 363-2316. Reservations are now being taken from vendors for 6’x2.5’ table(s). Rental proceeds to Auxiliary local charities.

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MARCH 28 Bitterroot Dancers will host a dance with the band The New-Matics at Bedford Building from 7 to 11 pm. Dancers of all levels welcomed. $8 admission. Call 381-1392 bitterrootdancersinc@gmail.com APRIL 3 First Friday ‘Gardening Theme’ displays and information stores will be open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 APRIL 3 First Friday in Stevensville. Food, fun, music – retail sales and spring planting tips. Call 777-3773. APRIL 4 Annual Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce Banquet. Great food, fun, live and silent auction. Call 363-2400 for more information. APRIL 5 Community Easter Egg Hunt at RC Fair Grounds at 10 am hosted by Eagles 363-3411 APRIL 9 Medications & Supplements for Optimal Health at MDMH from 5:30 to 6:30. 363-2211 APRIL 9 The Homeschool History Faire takes place at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton on Thursday, April 9th at 6pm. Families throughout the Bitter Root Valley participate in this event, which allows the children to assume different roles of historical figures and share what they have learned about those figures to the public. Call the Museum at 406.363.3338 for details. APRIL 11 Concert at 7:30 pm at Stevensville Playhouse. 360-489-7114 APRIL 11 Mt. Rockies Blue Grass Assoc. Festival at the Lone Rock School, 1112 Three Mile Creek Rd. Come listen to some great fiddle music. Different band playing every 30 minutes. Call 777-3773 APRIL 11 Ravalli Republic Indoor Garage Sale at 1st Interstate Center. All day – call 363-3411 APRIL 15 Historic St. Mary’s Mission opens. Tours April through October 10 am to 4 pm. APRIL 17-19 Hamilton Players Presents ‘The Curious Savage’. Written by John Patrick. Call 375-9050.

APRIL 24 4H Carnival at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. 363-3411

MAY 1-3 My Kids Closet Consignment Sale at1st Interstate Center. Call 363-3411 for information.

APRIL 24 Handsome Little Devils (Squirm Burpee Circus) at the Performing Arts sTECenter in Hamilton at 7:30 pm. Call 363-7946 for more information or www.bitterrootperformingarts.org

MAY 1-3 Hamilton Players Presents ‘The Curious Savage’. Written by John Patrick. Call 375-9050.

APRIL 24-26 Hamilton Players Presents ‘The Curious Savage’. Written by John Patrick. Call 375-9050. APRIL 25 McManus In Love Benefit for Hamilton and Victor Masonic Lodges. At 7:30 at the PAC in Hamilton. 369-7002. APRIL 25 A Musical Evening at the Museum: "On the Air with The Dillon Junior Fiddlers" takes place at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton on Saturday, April 25th at 6pm. The performance this year is in old radio show format and explores different styles of fiddle music. Tickets will be available in March. Call the Museum at 406-363-3338 for details. APRIL 30 A Living Wax Museum, with Hamilton School District #3’s Spectra students takes place at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton on Thursday, April 30th at 6pm. Press a “button” and each child, dressed in full costume, comes to “life” and acts out a scene they have created, based on a historical figure. Call the Museum at 406-363-3338 for details. MAY 1 Fourth Grade Farm Fair at the RC Fairgrounds. This event is a hands-on event for 4th Graders throughout the Valley. Call 363-3411 for more information. MAY 1 Stevensville First Friday - Pie in the Big Sky Auction. Live auction at the Rocky Mtn. Bank in Stevensville at 6:30 until pies are gone. Fun, activities, music and great pies! 777-3773 MAY 1 First Friday ‘Birds and Bird Watching’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124. MAY 2 Florence Ace Hardware Customer’s Appreciation Day from 10 am to 2 pm. Ribbon Cutting at noon! MAY 2 Annual Shriner’s ‘Shoot for the Kids’ at 8 am at the Hamilton Trap Club. Call Chuck 360-4066.

MAY 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16 ‘Dear Old Butte’ play at the Stevensville Playhouse at 7:30. Call 777-2722 MAY 3, 10, 17 ‘Dear Old Butte’ play at the Stevensville Playhouse at 2:00 . Call 777-2722 MAY 2 Opening of Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ May Fest For Kids’. Call 961-0004 or visit www. hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton MAY 7 Nano: The Science of Small Exhibit, in collaboration with the spectrUM Discovery Area, opens on May 7th at 6pm at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford, Hamilton. Explore how small science can get by building a carbon nanotube, balance a tippy table, and more. The Science of Small exhibit will include a “Summer of Science” – with children’s hands-on science activities on Saturday mornings and Thursday night Science lectures that will cover a wide variety of subjects for the duration of the exhibit. Exhibit closes at the beginning of August. Call the Museum at 406.363.3338 for details. MAY 7 National Day of Prayer from 10 am to 5 pm. St. Mary’s Chapel will be open for prayer. Noon at the Veteran’s Park there will be prayer emphasis. Call 777-3773 MAY 9 Youth Conservation & Education Expo at Red Slack Barn, Teller Wildlife Refuge, 1180 Chaffin Lane in Corvallis. 10 am to 4 pm. Shooting, hunting, ethics and education. Call Tom 5314224, John 546-5995 or Lauren 961-3507. MAY 9 Mother’s Day Tea at the Daly Mansion. 3636004 ext 2 MAY 9 Free Cholesterol Screening at MDMH. Call 363-2211 MAY 9 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Safe’s Mother’s Day Cake Walk’. Call 961-0004 or visit www. hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton

APRIL 18 Rocky Mtn Elk Foundation Banquet at 1st Interstate Center. 363-3411

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MAY 9 Wine Fest, a wine tasting event sponsored by Hamilton Downtown Assoc. at the Community Room in City Hall, 223 S Second St from 6-9 pm. Samples of wine and food (for purchase). 360-9124 for tickets and information. MAY 15-17 Rocky Mtn Gem & Mineral Show at 1st Interstate Center. 9 am to 2 pm 381-7597 MAY 25 Corvallis Memorial Day Parade in Corvallis MT. Contact Doug Mason 546-4244 JUNE 2016 Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival. This bi-annual event features classes, vendors and fiber animal show. For exact date and information call Marty 777-2421 or spunoutnmt@aol.com JUNE 5 First Friday ‘Outdoor Recreation’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 JUNE 5 First Friday in Stevensville, western theme, music, food and fun!. Call 777-3773 JUNE 5-7 Artists Along The Bitterroot 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. Call Olive Parker 381-0284

JUNE 12-14 Hamilton Players present ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Sponsored by Ravalli County Bank. Based on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film. Call 375-9050. JUNE 12-13-14 Montana Mule Days at RC Fairgrounds. Montana Mule Days is an annual event that is great for all ages. Everyone in the family can participate; we have over 100 classes that include log pulling, driving classes, western pleasure, trail classes, team penning, costume class, plus many more. 361-0631 JUNE 12-13-14 Mt Professional Artist Assoc. Annual Art Show & Sale at BR River Inn. Reception June 12 at 6:00 pm. Event is always 2nd week of June. 961-3887 JUNE 13 TNT BBQ and Auction at Teller Wildlife Refuge. Call 961-3507 or www.tellerwildlife.org JUNE 13 35th Annual Bitterroot Day from 9 am to 2 pm. During Bitter Root Day, the Museum grounds are the setting for a beautifully crafted, large, outdoor walking exhibit centered on the history and culture of the Salish Tribe. Compete in the 3rd annual jerky contest. Call 363-3338

JUNE 19-20 Western Heritage Days & Chuck Wagon CookOff in Stevensville. Vendors, music, food and fun for the whole family. Saturday at 11 there will be a parade and events continuing downtown Saturday Night, Beer Garden, Music and a street dance. Call 777-3773 JUNE 19-21 Hamilton Players present ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Sponsored by Ravalli County Bank. Based on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film. Call 375-9050. JUNE 20 Western Heritage Day in Stevensville. Cow Pie Bingo, Salish Dancers, and Guided Tours at St. Mary’s Mission. A great time for the whole family. 777-5734 JUNE 20 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Father’s Day Gift Bag Drawing’. Call 961-0004 or visit www. hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton JUNE 22-25 Youth History Camp at the Daly Mansion. 3636004 ext 2

JUNE 12-14 Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival at the 1st Interstate Center. Call 363-3411 for more information.

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JUNE 23-24 Sr Pro Rodeo in Darby. 544-5536 JUNE 26-27 Sr Pro Rodeo Assoc. at RC Fairgrounds. 363-3411 JUNE 26-27 Big Sky Renaissance Faire just off Hwy 93, 1 mile north of Stevensville. Acres of free parking and family friendly entertainment. Food, music, games and fun for the whole family. 777-3773 JUNE 27-28 Bitterroot Quilters Guild Quilt Show at the 1st Interstate Center. Call 961-4528 or 363-3411 for more information regarding this event. Saturday from 10 to 7 – Sunday from 10 to 4. www. bitterrootquiltersguild.com JUNE 26-27 Senior Pro Rodeo held at the RC Fairgrounds in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information regarding this event. JUNE 26-28 Hamilton Players present ‘Singin’ in the Rain’. Sponsored by Ravalli County Bank. Based on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film. Call 375-9050.

JULY 4 4th of July Fireworks at RC Fairground at dusk 363-3411 Sponsored by the City of Hamilton, the community Fireworks Display is free and open to the public. Bring a picnic blanket or a lawn chair, and find yourself a spot on the grounds to watch the display JULY 4 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Friends of the Market’. Dress as non-veggies will join the Hamilton 4th of July Parade on Main Street. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton JULY 6-10 Hamilton Players presents Summer Theater School Session 1, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Jr. Production dates July 10-11. Call 375-9050 JULY 10 Relay for Life at RC Fairgrounds call 363-3411 for more information. JULY 12 Napa Car Show in Stevensville – “Stars, Guitars and Cars”. Over 70 cars, prizes, music and fun. 777-3773 for more information.

JULY 11-12 Elite Bull Connection in Darby, this event pits some of the best bovine athletes against the best bull riders in the Northwest and Canada. Call 544-5536 Cal Ruark JULY 18 Hamilton Players present Broadway and Bubbly Dinner Encore at Sapphire Lutheran Home at 7 pm. Call 375-9050 JULY 17-18 Darby Logger Days in Darby MT. Friday events begins at 5 pm until midnight. Saturday events begin at 9 am with Community Parade. Live music from 8 to midnight. Contact loggers@ darbyloggerdays.com JULY 18 The Strawberry Festival old-fashioned ice cream social. Music is provided by local musicians with vendors, raffles. This event is a fundraiser for the Darby Volunteer Fire Department, from 5 pm to 9 pm. 406-381-5114 JULY 20-24 Hamilton Players present Summer Theater School session 2. Intensive character development workshop. Grades 4-12. Enrollment limited and by audition. Call 375-9050

BITTERROOT VALLEY CHAMBER’S ANNUAL

Microbrew Festival

4th Saturday in July 3:00 - 10:00 pm

Legion Park in Hamilton $20 for 5 Tastes & A Commemorative Glass CALL FOR SPECIFIC DATES

406-363-2400

www.bitterrootchamber.com 24

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JULY 24, 25, 26 Hardtime Bluegrass Festival in the Bitterroot Valley. www.hardtimebluegrass.com for more information. JULY 24, 25 The Bitterroot Arts Guild sponsors this fine arts and quality crafts show, which features artists from throughout the state. Talent abounds and both the unusual as well as the usual craft items are offered. If you are looking for something beautiful, come to Art in the Park for a great day of fun. Call 821-4678 JULY 24-25 Daly Days Downtown Hamilton. Street vendors with crafts and food Friday and Saturday. Friday night street dance; Bitterrodders car show Saturday and activities for everyone. Events throughout Hamilton and Daly Mansion. Call 360-9124. JULY 24-25 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘Daly Days, Arts In The Park, Brewfest’. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton JULY 25 Lake Como Triathlon. Open Water Swim 0.9 mi, Mountain Bike 12.6 mi., & Trail Run 7.7 mi. This event is held at Lake Como just south of Hamilton. Open Water swim starts at 8:30 at the public beach. Registration opens March 23, 2015. 363-0514 for more information. JULY 25 Daly Days at the Mansion. Activities and fun for the whole family. 363-6004 JULY 25 Annual Chamber MicroBrew Fest on 2nd & Bedford in Hamilton. 3:00 – 10:00 pm 3632400. AUGUST 1 ‘Round Up At Riverside’ at the Daly Mansion. This is their annual major fundraiser. 33-6004 ext 2 AUGUST 7 First Friday ‘Dog Days’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 AUGUST 7-8 103rd Stevensville Creamery Picnic. Parade, Mt. State BBQ contest, crafters, music and lots of fun for the whole family. 777-3773 AUGUST 8 Bitterroot Secret Garden Tour from 9 am to 3 pm those attending will get a look at five home gardens, all south of Hamilton. Only 100 tickets will be sold. https://www.facebook.com/bitterrootsecretgardentour for more information.

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AUGUST 14-16 Hamilton Players present ‘The Odd Couple’ written by Neil Simon. Call 375-9050. AUGUST 15-16 Bitterroot Celtic Games here in Hamilton at the Daly Mansion. Call 274-8886 for more information. AUGUST 21-22 NRA Sanction Rodeo in Darby. Count on a wild rodeo weekend in Darby. Bareback, Saddle Bronc, Bull riding, Tie-down Roping and more. 544-5536 AUGUST 21-23 Hamilton Players present ‘The Odd Couple’ written by Neil Simon. Call 375-9050. AUGUST 22 Bitterroot Classic Triathlon. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Bitterroot Classic Triathlon. This year they are planning some special things for the racers and spectators. This event is held at the Bitterroot Aquatic Center on Kurtz Lane in Hamilton. First swim heat begins at 8:30. Registration opens April 20. Call 3630514 for more information. AUGUST 28-30 Hamilton Players present ‘The Odd Couple’ written by Neil Simon. Call 375-9050. AUGUST 30 Ice Cream Social Sat Victor Museum 12 noon to 3:00 pm. 363-3165 SEPTEMBER 4 First Friday ‘Midway on Main Street’ theme – displays and information, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 SEPTEMBER 2 RC Fair Parade downtown Hamilton beginning at 10 am. Call 363-2400 SEPTEMBER 2-5 The annual Ravalli County Fair is over 100 years old and is the largest event in Ravalli County. Featuring a wide variety of entertainment, 4-H and open class exhibits, community food vendors, children’s activities, business and artist booths. 363-3411 SEPTEMBER 5 RC Museum presents An Afternoon of Cowboy Music & Poetry. The art of yodeling and some good cowboy pickin’ will also be heard. Refreshments available. Call 363-3338 SEPTEMBER 11 9/11 Memorial at Veteran’s Park in Stevensville at 11 am. 777-3773

SEPTEMBER 12 Bella Boutique Fall Fashion Show Benefit for Emma’s House at 1st Interstate Center from 6 to 9 pm. 363-7216 SEPTEMBER 19 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Harvest Fest’. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th streets in Hamilton SEPTEMBER 12 Bark ‘n the Park. Join the Bitter Root Humane Association at the River Park in Hamilton. A free event for dogs and their families with games, pet related vendors, agility demos, contests, food and fun! It all starts with the Pet "Paw"rade at 11:00 am. Prize for best entry! Please call Michele Craig at 210-1375 for more information. SEPTEMBER 18-19-20 Sports Connection Gun Show at 1st Interstate Center. Fri., 1-5. Sat., 9-5. Sun., 9-3. 633-2206 SEPTEMBER 19-20 Bronc Bustin & Barrel Burning in Darby – World Class Bucking Horse Association is committed to assisting the people dedicated to the professional bucking horse futurities and set the utmost standards. Watch the most elite 4 and 5 year olds saddle broncs in North America do what they do best … BUCK. Call Cal Ruark 544-5536 SEPTEMBER 20 Salish Pilgrimage at 2 p.m. at St. Mary’s Mission in Stevensville. 777-5734 SEPTEMBER 27 Founders Day Celebration at 2 pm, celebrating 174 years as a community at historic St. Mary’s Mission. Call 777-5734 OCTOBER Hamilton Players present Costume Rental TBA. Call 375-9050 OCTOBER 2-10 Scarecrow Festival in Stevensville. Enjoy incredible works of art and design. Enter the Pumpkin Carving Contest. 777-3773 OCTOBER 2 First Friday ‘Moonlight Madness’ theme – great savings, special sales, businesses open until 11 pm. Call 360-9124 OCTOBER 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17 Stevensville Playhouse presents a musical (TBA) at the Playhouse at 7:30. 360-489-7114 OCTOBER 3 McIntosh Day at the Ravalli County Museum hailed as the biggest bake sale under the Big Sky. Arts, crafts, food and produce. Hand-baked apple pies, action and music. 363-3338

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OCTOBER 3 RC Museum presents their 2nd Annual Hard Cider Event. Enjoy all the sweet and tart goodies that Apple Day has to offer, and then join us for a relaxing and refreshing evening under the stars! Sample delicious cider created by cider makers from the Rocky Mountain northwest, locally catered food, and music! For more information, contact the Museum at 363-3338

OCTOBER 23-24 Murder Mystery Dinner at the Daly Mansion – this is in partnership with Hamilton Players. 363-6004 ext 2

OCTOBER 4, 11, 18 Stevensville Playhouse presents a musical (TBA) at the Playhouse at 2:00 pm. Call 360489-7114

OCTOBER 28 Affiliate Marketing for Beginners at Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Annette O’Leary-Coggins and is from 9 to noon. Cost is $25. Call 375-0100 for more information.

OCTOBER 7, 9, 14 & 16 Microsoft Excel Basics at RCEDA Building Bittterroot Business, Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Lee Tickell and is from 6 pm to 8 pm. Cost is $65. Call 375-0100 for more information. OCTOBER 9-11 My Kids Closet Sale at 1st Interstate Center. Sat 8-3 Sun. 9-1. 363-3411 OCTOBER 10 Hamilton Players present Hamilton Players Costume Ball. 375-9050 OCTOBER 10 Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Oktober Celebration of Cooperatives’. Call 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held on Bedford, 2nd and 4th Streets in Hamilton OCTOBER Ghost Tours at the RC Museum from 10 pm to 3 am Become a paranormal investigator for the night, gathering evidence and exploring rooms in the Museum, that are not on the regular tour! No children under 14 call 363-3338 OCTOBER 16-18 Hamilton Players presents ‘Pride & Prejudice’ based on a novel by Jane Austen. Sponsored by Chapter One Bookstore. Call 375-9050. OCTOBER 17 – Final Market for season Farmers Market in Hamilton ‘ Oktober Celebration of Cooperatives’. Call Laura 961-0004 or visit www.hamiltonfarmersmarket.webs.com. Held in Hamilton OCTOBER 21, 23 Website Building 101 at RCEDA Building Bittterroot Business, Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Annette O’Leary-Coggins and is from 9 am to noon. Cost is $45. Call 375-0100 for more information. OCTOBER 21, 23 & 28 QuickBooks Basics at Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Alice Mariana and is from 6 pm to 9 pm. Cost is $75. Call 375-0100 for more information.

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OCTOBER 23-25 & 30-31 Hamilton Players presents ‘Pride & Prejudice’ based on a novel by Jane Austen. Sponsored by Chapter One Bookstore. Call 375-9050

OCTOBER 30 QuickBooks Payroll at Bitterroot College Continuing Education Series. Instructor is Alice Mariana and is from 6 pm to 9 pm. Cost is $25. Call 375-0100 for more information. OCTOBER 31 Community Harvest Party at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Beginning at 5 pm. Food, games and fun! Hosted by the Bitterroot Calvary Chapel Church. 363-3411

NOVEMBER 11 Annual Veterans Day Memorial at the RC Museum at 2 pm. We begin our program at the Doughboy with the laying of the wreaths by Veterans Organizations and Auxiliaries. Following that there is a program in the Court Room on the 2nd floor with refreshments being served. Call 363-3338 NOVEMBER 14 Bitterroot Bounty held at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information. NOVEMBER 20-21 Bitterroot Art Guild Christmas Show and Sale at the 1st Interstate Center. Call 363-3411 for more information regarding this event. NOVEMBER 21 Festival of Wreaths At the Daly Mansion form 5:30-8:00 pm. Festive wreaths, swags, centerpieces and antique ornaments for your holiday decorating or gift giving. Cocktails and a spectacular assortment of hors d' oeuvres. Limited Seating. Please call Michele Craig at 210-1375 for more information.

OCTOBER 30 OR 31 Halloween Costume Parade at 4 pm downtown Hamilton. Lineup at Hamilton Post Office. 360-9124

NOVEMBER 27 Tree Lighting and Christmas Stroll. Enjoy caroling, tree lighting and Santa arrival. Warming barrels, free s’mores for kids in-store specials. Call 360-9124.

OCTOBER 30-31 Haunted Mansion Hayrides at Daly Mansion. 363-6004 ext 2

NOVEMBER28 Hamilton Players present ‘Forbidden Bitterroot’ a concert fundraiser, parody. Call 375-9050

NOVEMBER 1 Hamilton Players presents ‘Pride & Prejudice’ based on a novel by Jane Austen. Sponsored by Chapter One Bookstore. Call 375-9050

NOVEMBER 28 Small Business Saturday celebrate our small local businesses by shopping small at home. Special offers , no crowds, no traffic. 360-9124.

NOVEMBER 5-7 Southwest/Northwest Volleyball Tournament at the Hamilton High School.

DECEMBER 4 First Friday - Kids can help the shepherd locate his flock and win prizes in the ‘Sheep Trail’ promotion. Caroling and extended shopping hours. Call 360-9124

NOVEMBER 6 First Friday in Stevensville ‘Customer Appreciation’ Main Street Food Drive. Call 777-3773. NOVEMBER 6 First Friday ‘ArtRageous’ theme – celebrating art in all its forms, businesses open until 8 pm. Call 360-9124 NOVEMBER 6-8 ArtRAGEOUS art event at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information. NOVEMBER 6-9 Holly Jolly Artisan Show & Sale at the Daly Mansion. Call 363-6004 ext 2

DECEMBER 4-6 Sports Connection Gun Show at the 1st Interstate Center in Hamilton. Call 363-3411 for more information. DECEMBER 4-5-6 A Montana Country Christmas in Stevensville celebration begins with Parade of Lights, caroling, Nativity Exhibit at St. Mary’s Mission, Christmas treats, lots of fun for the whole family. 777-3773. DECEMBER 5 Splendor on Main Holiday Gala in Stevensville. Wine tasting, delicious hors d’oeuvres Buffet, Auction and Raffle. Call 777-3773.

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DECEMBER 5 Stevensville Booster Club Bazaar at the Stevensville High School from 10 am to 3 pm. Call 777-3773. DECEMBER 7 Victor Chocolate Tasting Event. From 4-9 pm. Call 642-3997. DECEMBER 11 Extended shopping hours in downtown Hamilton stores. Call 360-9124. DECEMBER 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20 Stevensville Playhouse presents a ‘Greetings’ at the Playhouse at 7:30. Call 777-2722 DECEMBER 19 Community Christmas Party at the Daly Mansion. 363-6004 ext 2

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DECEMBER 18 Celebration of Light! Celebrate the solstice with luminaria downtown, warming barrels and s’mores for kids, along with extended shopping hours. 360-9124. 2016 EVENTS FEBRUARY 17-20, 2016 13 C Girls/Boys District Basketball Tournament at HHS Gymnasium.

Ravalli Electric Co-op

FEBRUARY 24-27, 2016 Western “C” Girls and Boys Basketball Tournament at HHS Gymnasium. JUNE 2016 Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival. This bi-annual event features classes, vendors and fiber animal show. For exact date and information call Marty 777-2411 or spunoutnmt@aol.com SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 Founder’s Day at the Historic St. Mary’s Mission. 175 Years – Celebrate the founding of Stevensville at Historic St. Mary’s Mission – for more information call 777-5734.

“The Good Guys in the White Trucks”

NOVEMBER 5-7, 2016 Southwest/Northwest Volleyball Tournament at HHS Gymnasium.

Call the Chamber of Commerce 363-2400 for all of your 2016 Calendar of Events or go on line www.bitterrootchamber.com

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A Touchstone Energy Partner T & R Magazine

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Community of

C o r v a l l i s

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A great place to live or to visit! Corvallis, as its name suggests, is “the heart of the Bitterroot Valley.” Visit its historic buildings, drive or bike its rural roads, explore the river as it flows through the area…..for a taste of life in the valley as it was and as it is. The annual American Legion Memorial Day Parade is a not-to-be-missed event in Corvallis. The parade was first organized by returning World War I veterans, and has continued since to honor men and women who have died in our nation’s service. This is a wonderful event for people of all ages. It is preceded by a pancake breakfast, followed by a carnival, and draws people from all over the valley. Corvallis was one of the first settlements in the valley. Some of the Bitterroot’s most fertile soils are located in the Corvallis area, and the community has a long agricultural history, which continues to this day. Corvallis is home to the Western Montana Agricultural Research Experiment Station. Numerous historic farm houses along the Eastside Highway and along back roads attest to the area’s history, as do many buildings in the town area of Corvallis. Memories Café occupies a building built in 1881 as the first protestant church in the valley. The Brooks gift store occupies the former Brooks Hotel, ordered from a catalog and constructed in 1894! A wagon train brought Elijah and Margaret Chaffin to the Corvallis area in 1864. The Chaffin homestead is now part of The Teller, a private wildlife refuge, which offers lodging in the historic Chaffin and Slack houses. In 1871, a post office was established in Corvallis and the town site was platted in 1879. Corvallis has grown along with the rest of the valley (the population of the Corvallis School District was estimated in 2005 at more than 6,500), but remains an unincorporated community. In 1867, the first public school was opened, in what was then Missoula County, and Corvallis officially became School District No.1, a designation it still carries on Ravalli County records. Most residents would agree that the Corvallis community, in many ways, is centered around and defined by its schools. The Corvallis School District currently educates approximately 1,350 students in kindergarten

through 12th grade, and is the second largest school district in the county. The Corvallis Schools have a well-deserved reputation for excellence and progressive, child-centered educational programs. The U.S. Department of Education awarded Corvallis Middle School recognition as a Blue Ribbon School in 2002. The Corvallis community is shaped by its volunteer organizations. The Corvallis School District is governed by the elected, volunteer Corvallis School Board. Through donations, the volunteer Corvallis School Foundation supports programs that enrich and enhance the academic programs of the school district. In 2007, an all-weather track, football field, soccer fields, and playground were completed on school district property through the fundraising efforts of community members who formed the Corvallis Community Events Center Foundation. The Corvallis Volunteer Fire Department offers first class service to Corvallis and recently constructed a new fire hall and meeting room along the Woodside Cut-Off Road.

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Biking B

icycling is the second most-popular form of recreation in the U.S., with half the population getting on a bike annually. The City of Hamilton has rolled out the welcome mat for cyclists, as the gateway to the Bitterroot Valley’s plentiful road and mountain biking opportunities. The Bitterroot is simply an outstanding place to ride. The valley’s abundance of highly scenic paved roads, with relatively low traffic volume, is almost irresistible, while a paved bike path runs the length of the valley, from Lolo to Hamilton, providing 42 miles of relatively level cruising. For mountain bikers, the Bitterroot offers a network of Forest

Service roads, hundreds of miles of them, suitable for casual mountain biking; more serious bikers will find miles of challenging single-track routes, some of them easily accessible and others quite remote. Organized cycling events are starting to catch on as well, for both mountain and road bikers. The “Tour of the Bitterroot” mountain bike event will take place in, benefitting the Bitter Root Land Trust. More information is available at http:// www.tourofthebitterroot.org/. The “Ride De Root” is a 100-mile road ride set also in July, starting and finishing in Darby. Information on that event is at www.ridederoot.com. In Hamilton, the city has designated well-marked bike paths and bike routes to conduct cyclists safely through town.

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IN THE

Bitterroot

Downtown sidewalks have ample bicycle parking, and the city is implementing a comprehensive bike/pedestrian plan. Check the city non-motorized plan on their web site at www.cityofhamilton.net Hamilton also offers two excellent bike shops, Valley Bicycles and Ski, at 219 S. 1st Street, and Red Barn Bikes, off Sleeping Child Road at 399 McCarthy Loop. Both have knowledgeable sales and service staff, and can direct cyclists to suitable rides regardless of their skill levels. Favorite routes among road cyclists include Sleeping Child road, the Skalkaho Highway, the East and West Fork roads, and paved routes paralleling U.S. 93 and the Eastside Highway, coursing up and down the valley. Closer to Hamilton, Westside Road, Old Corvallis Road, and Golf Course Road are great options. Various

loops, and outand-back rides, can be strung together to make your ride as long or as short as you’d like. The Eastside Highway accesses some excellent rides, but from its terminus at Florence to a bit south of Victor Crossing, it offers little or no shoulder and sometimes high traffic volume, so riders should exercise great caution if including it in their route. Mountain bikers will find a nest of trails in the Skalkaho/Rye/Sleeping Child area. Between Lost Trail Pass and the West Fork of the Bitterroot, lies another network of trails that offer access to remote country and challenging rides. Lake Como also offers a mix of trails and gravel roads that are scenic, and capable of challenging riders of any level. The Coyote Coulee recreation trail,

located up Lost Horse canyon, is a mixeduse trail that offers hikers, horseback riders, and mountain bikers a great outing on mixed terrain. It’s useful to pick up a Forest Service map to keep track of the roads and road closures, and a stop at a local bike shop for route information is helpful, as well. The Chamber of Commerce and numerous local stores sell up-to-date road maps of the Bitterroot Valley. Several informal, weekly rides take place during the cycling season, some for experienced cyclists seeking a hard workout, others are more relaxed, “nodrop” rides, where the pace is set to accommodate the slowest in the group. Inquire at local bike shops for more information on these group rides, for both road cyclists and mountain bikers. The Bitterroot Valley is on a major, transcontinental bike route, the Transamerica, developed by the Adventure Cycling Association to help guide riders traveling cross-country. More than a thousand cycle tourists pass through the Bitterroot Valley every year on that route. Adventure Cycling and other organizations sponsor cycling tours that occasionally

pass through the area, “Cycle Montana” is another organization that hosts annual rides throughout Montana. In Montana, as in most states, bicycles are considered vehicles, and cyclists have the same rights and duties as the driver of any other vehicle. Key practices for safe riding include: wearing a helmet at all times, being visible, wearing bright colors, using lights when riding in conditions of adverse

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visibility, riding predictably with traffic, signaling intentions, and riding respectfully and defensively. When riding with others, ride in single file and in a straight line. State law also requires cyclists to remain as far to the right as practical, unless passing another vehicle or turning left. Bicycles are required to have a white reflector on the front, red in back, and reflectors on the spokes and pedals.

Cycling in the Bitterroot

Cycling and the Bitterroot were made for each other!

Bicycling plans a big role in Montana’s tranporation system. Montana was named the safest state to commute by bicycle in the United States. Casual or experienced rider, a bike commuter, a bicycle tourist always be safe and responsible. Most Montanans are pedestraians at one time or another every day. Whether you are walking for exercise, recreation or just walking to work or to the store. Use the cross-walks and be on the lookout for bikes as well as cars. Share the road is an integral part of the MDT’s Vision Zero, moving toward zero deaths and injuries on Monanan’s roads. Pay attention - share the road, motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians are all responsible for safety on Montana’s roadways. Whether driving, bicycling or walking everyone must pay attention, follow traffic signs and laws and use common courtesy, The end goal - eliminate bicycle, motor vehicle and pedestrian fatalities. To find out more about Montana and our safety rules go to www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/bikeped/ sharetheroad.shuml You can stop in at the Bitterroot Chamber, located at 105 East Main and pick up your free Bicycling the Big Sky of Montana.

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Hamilton - A Hub of Activities ... Located in the middle of the Bitterroot Valley is the county seat of Ravalli. Hamilton is home to over 4,400 people and the immediate area around the town has somewhere over 12,000 people. Downtown Hamilton has several historic buildings with unique shops and restaurants. Looking west on Main Street is a beautiful view of the Bitterroot Mountains. Beautiful street scape, trees, and street lamps invite one to enjoy the unique downtown shops. Highway 93, which passes through town, also boasts a variety of shops, grocery stores, and gas stations. The Chamber of Commerce is located on the corner of Main Street and Highway 93. The city offices are located in the historic Bedford Building just across the street from the Ravalli County Courthouse. The Ravalli County Museum, housed in the old courthouse, was built in 1900. Each July, Hamilton comes alive as the entire town celebrates ‘Daly Days’ in honor of the city founder, Marcus Daly. This event includes arts, crafts, and food vendors on the streets. The local businesses hold their annual sidewalk sales, games for the kids, and just a block away in the park, the Chamber of Commerce, holds its annual Micro-Brew Festival; all this makes for a weekend of events, sharing, reminiscing with old friends, and meeting new friends. The town of Hamilton hosts a variety of events throughout the year including Apple Day, Bitter Root Day, a variety of art functions, several plays, art, and craft shows and the Ravalli County Fair. These are just a few of the exciting activities planned throughout the year. Visit www.cityofhamilton.net

Hamilton’s History Hamilton was not a pioneer village in the days it was founded. Instead, it was a planned town of wide streets and avenues, a complete economic center for an area of farms and stock ranches. The History of Hamilton began when Marcus Daly, a great finance figure of the 1880 era in Butte and Anaconda mining development, made his way into the Bitterroot Valley seeking interests other than mining. About 1887, Mr. Daly bought up small sawmills west of the present site of Hamilton and almost overnight had established a lumber making industry on the bank of the Bitterroot River. Marcus Daly’s next move was to bring two men from another state to plan and develop his dream town. They were James Hamilton and Robert O’Hara who came from Minnesota in 1890. Mr. Daly named Hamilton after James Hamilton and the town was incorporated in 1894; Mr. O’Hara was named the first mayor.

Community of

H a m i l t o n

Hamilton was recently named as one of the most beautiful towns in Montana to visit!!!

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Darby is a small town with big, bull riding, bronc bustin’ rodeos!

Community of

D a r b y

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Darby is a small town located at the southern end of the Bitterroot Valley in southwestern Montana, just one hour from Missoula and 30 miles to the Idaho border. The Sapphire Mountains are to the East and the gorgeous Bitterroot Mountains are to the West, with many recreational opportunities abounding in the Bitterroot National Forest. The Bitterroot Valley is known as Montana’s ‘Banana Belt’ for its slightly warmer temperatures than the surrounding mountains. Darby was named in 1888 by its Postmaster James Darby; and its overall architecture has a distinct western flair. Log buildings still stand as a reminder of the gold dust days. Darby’s Pioneer Memorial Museum was originally one of the first hand-hewn homestead cabins built in the area. Warm, friendly people will greet you at the unique shops, grocery store, post office, library, restaurants, saloons and lodging establishments. Visitors will enjoy the National Museum of Forest Service History located here. To pay tribute to its founding fathers, Darby hosts Logger Days each summer. Darby is a rural small town that is horse-friendly. The lifestyle is laid back. The pace is slow. There are so many activities to participate in and enjoy, because Darby is the gateway to nature’s playground. Highlights of this prime recreation area include Alta Ranger Station, Darby Pioneer Memorial Museum, Lake Como Recreation Area, Lost Trail Ski Area, Painted Rocks Lake, Skalkaho Falls, and 3.5 million acres of untouched wilderness. The first USDA Forest Service ranger station was established in Darby, and visitors will enjoy the National Museum of Forest Service History located there. This is a great place to visit for families, fourwheelers, hikers, bicyclists, motorcyclists, anglers, hunters, nature lovers, photographers, skiers, and sightseers. The incredible scenery in western Montana will revitalize you. With a population in 2007 of 853 people, the town is a quiet one with spectacular scenery and fabulous fishing opportunities. Just minutes away are the East

and the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, known for some of the finest fishing in the country. The Painted Rocks State Park and reservoir, as well as other streams and lakes, make Darby prime territory for the fishing enthusiast. With Brook Trout, Mountain Whitefish, Rainbow Trout, and Westslope Cutthroat Trout prevalent, Darby and its surrounding areas is the perfect fishing destination providing a once in a life time “Big Sky” experience. Darby is located on Highway 93, which constitutes part of the Lewis and Clark Trail. This scenic highway, going all the way from Canada to Mexico, is part of the Transcontinental Bicycle Path and is close to the Continental Divide Hiking Trail. Skalkaho Falls, just north of Darby, is one of western Montana’s “must sees.” This breathtaking waterfall can be viewed close up from the road! Lake Como Recreation Area, approximately four miles north of Darby, is a beautiful mountain lake and is one of the Valley’s most popular camping and boating sites. The six-mile loop trail around Lake Como is suitable for hiking, mountain biking and accessing the lake for swimming or picnics. The first quarter mile is wheelchair accessible. Lake Como dam was constructed in 1905 to provide late season irrigation for the Bitterroot Valley farmers and ranchers. Early Forest Rangers, Than Wilkerson and Henry Tuttle, constructed a one-room Lodgepole Pine cabin with a sod roof in June 1899. The resulting Alta cabin is the first ranger station in the United States and still stands on the West Fork Ranger District. Alta Pines are the oldest ponderosa pines in the Bitterroot Valley and can be seen before reaching the ranger station.

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Photo by Chase Cooper

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Fly Fishing in the Bitterroot

Photo by Ann Bethea

Flyfishing, for many Bitterroot Valley residents and visitors alike, is the reason they are here. The Bitterroot River draws tens of million of dollars into the local economy annually – and accounts for many more millions from those who come here to fish

Seasoned anglers return to the river for its beauty, gentle wading, and public access at points that divide the river into a series of day floats. Finding the best spot is easy. Local fly shops gather information from the river’s regulars, and share it with visiting or beginning anglers. If you go to the famous Madison or Missouri, you’ll find a big river that demands a lot from those who fish it. Family fishing

and decide to stay. And even though the river drives a significant portion of the local real estate market, its trout are totally oblivious to that reality. All they care about is their own homes in the valley’s streams and the bugs they eat. The bugs are plentiful. The Bitterroot enjoys a full slate of fishable fly hatches. The trout are all wild, many of them native. The fishing, as a former guide once put it, will “delight the beginner and challenge the expert.”

opportunities are scarce. Hiking trails along small streams where youngsters can catch their first fish are virtually nonexistent. Not so with the Bitterroot. While it must be respected, as is the case with moving water anywhere, the Bitterroot River, for the most part, is easy to negotiate. The river’s native westslope cutthroat trout, fish that average ten to sixteen inches, take the fly aggressively. And larger fish, many of them wild rainbows and browns, intrigue the serious flyfisher. There are gentle nature trails along the

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valley floor, and day treks on trails into the Bitterroot Wilderness. These trails border trout streams, where experienced anglers can hone their skills as they tease brightly colored native cutthroats into taking their flies, and those just getting started in the sport – at any age – can enjoy the thrill of catching beautiful, wild fish. The opportunities are plentiful, and include pristine wilderness lakes within range for a day hike. There are U. S. Forest Service campgrounds at wilderness trailheads and along the river’s east and west forks, and private campgrounds along the river around Hamilton. Some of the locals simply drive to these campgrounds, park, and fish. If there is a nice riffle near the campground, (there usually is) they know the trout

will be there. Which flies to offer them? How to get started in this best thing to do in the Bitterroot? How to arrange a float

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trip, as a family outing or a fishing trip with an experienced professional guide who will reveal the river’s best fishing to you? Inquire at the Chamber of Commerce, and they’ll direct you to local member fly shops. You might discover why flyfishing is at the top of so many lists, and a hundred other things you might do instead are, by comparison, pleasant distractions.

The mountain lakes of the Bitterroot Wilderness Area are treasures. A few of them are accessible by vehicle (old pickup, 4-wheeler or rental car recommended) and some are in range of a day hike. The scenery alone is worth the trip – but most of them offer fishing for beautiful native cutthroat trout fishing to the angler who is geared up for it. Trout in mountain lakes can be fickle. At times they can be almost too easy, other times they seem to turn off completely. Usually it’s somewhere in between, shaded toward the easy side. Fishing for them can require special methods, methods that aren’t beyond the reach of even the beginning angler. The spin-fisher has a special advantage on a mountain lake: the clear plastic casting bubble. There are two types I recommend: one is the torpedo-shaped float with a small screw eye on each end; the other is a round model with a plug in it, designed to be filled with water. For the torpedo model, a flyfisherman’s tapered leader attaches to the heavy end. 36

Fishing The Bitterroot River offers one hundred

and Painted Rocks Lake. Feel free to stop into one of our many fly fishing shops for the latest information on licenses, guided fishing trips, and advice on where to go and what to use.

The thin end attaches to the line coming off the reel. Then, either a small unweighted spinner or a fly goes on the business end. Retrieve slowly, with the rod perpendicular to the line. Don’t jerk when a fish hits. Let the tip cushion the strike, then raise up. The sinking bubble, when filled with water, lets you fish a fly slowly across the bottom. A quick, short set is all that is required to strike. Too much and you’ll lose fish - or flies, or both. The fly angler, whether fishing from a float tube or shore, will need a long leader. I usually begin thinking of leaders for mountain lake fishing at about sixteen feet - although it is often possible to get by with less. Long light tippets, 5X, 6X, or smaller, are usually required. A floating line will work part of the time, but if I had to choose one line for all my mountain lake fishing, it would be an intermediate. An intermediate line sinks at a very slow rate, getting below the wind chops that can generate fish activity and blow a floating line out of control across the surface. Slow retrieves with the rod tip held

just below the surface will usually produce strikes. Experiment. The strike needs to be quick but not too heroic. One of the best ways is to leave the rod tip pointed forward and separate your hands. The trout that live in mountain lakes tend to like small ants, small dark caddis variants, midges, and small dark mayflies when they feed on the surface. Most of the fishing is subsurface, however. You can fish an ant or caddis variant underwater quite successfully, along with anything small that has peacock herl on it, such as a Prince nymph or soft-hackle peacock. Pheasant tail nymphs, Bird’s nests, Trueblood shrimp and twitch-pause nymphs and something with marabou on it round out the fly selection. There are lakes within an hour’s hike from a trailhead, lakes that require an expedition of several days to reach, and lakes that offer, after a few miles on the trail, an ideal spot for an all-day or an overnight visit. Pick up a guidebook, ask around locally, pick a spot that suits you, and do some exploring. And don’t forget to bring a camera, the beauty alone is worth the trip.

miles of fishable river, 11+ fishing access sites and some of the most pristine fishing areas in Montana. The Bitterroot is famous for its dry fly trout fishing, boasting 22” plus Browns during heavy spring skwala hatches. Lake fishing is also available at Lake Como

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Staying in Shape Motivation is what gets you started ... habait is what keeps you going. So if you are tired of starting over, stop giving up!

Sometimes easier said than done, but staying in shape is something that is actually fun here in the Bitterroot Valley. We offer such a large variety of things to help you keep moving and motivated. There are several gyms located in almost every community. Some of the activities to choose from are: Aerobics, Back Packing, Ballet, Baseball, Basketball, Biking, Boating, Bowling, CrossFit, Dancing, Fishing, Football, Frisbee, Golf, Gymnastics, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Ice Skating, Jogging, Rock Climbing, Roller Blading, Running, Skateboarding, Skiing, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tae Kwon Do, Tennis, Trampoline, Treadmill, Unicycling, Volleyball, Walking, Weightlifting, Zumba and Yoga. When was the last time you tried to jump rope or Hula Hoop? Things we did as kids kept us moving and in shape, so don’t think that just because we have reached a certain age that we can no longer do certain

things. Always check with your doctor before performing any physical activity but the majority of us can still participate in some sort of activity that help keep us fit. Walking is one of the best and is a great way to begin getting back in or staying in shape. Get out and walk your dog, you will both be happy. Staying in shape should be fun, but you have to pick something that you enjoy doing or you won’t stay with it. You should also pick more than one thing that keeps you motivted and moving because there are times when the weather or other forces cause you to stop one of them, so always have a backup. One thing I have noticed when I travel anywhere - no one takes the stairs any more. Use your legs, God gave you two so use them . . . remember if you don’t use it you will lose it! Also be careful what you eat, moderation is the key. Don’t eliminate things you like, it will just make you overeat and become frustrated. Bottom line, there are so many acitivities to enjoy, let’s try something new or old. Remember it is never too late to begin, start slow and take your first step ... it won’t be your last.

Get Fit For Your Life!! There’s plenty of action at Hamilton’s Iron Horse Athletic Club! Whether it be our state of the art equipment (high end free weights, weighted machines, and high quantities of Technogym treadmills, elliptycals, bikes, etc), our large line-up of FREE (with membership) instructor lead classes, or the many happy faces every time… the IHAC is a fun, well-equipped facility help get/stay in great physical condition. Attention to detail is crucial at IHAC. Always impeccably clean, we strive to make all aspects of your gym experience good ones. Pre-written workouts, group training (above and beyond classes), personal training… we’ll get you going- and keep you motivated! If you’ve been “not a gym person” – hold on… and look at just a few examples of how we can make this FUN: ZUMBA – like to dance? Kickboxing YOGA Bootcamps (with friends!) TRX- based body resistance/core strength BoxFit

You are experienced in gyms? Well come down and check us out! You’ll like IHAC. We’re in a classy timber –framed building (from the late 1800’s)…Downtown Hamilton. A perfect spot – to get FIT FOR YOUR LIFE!

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Big Skies

of Montana’s

Photo by Patrick Chaplin

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Bitterroot Valley

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Sightseeing Skalkaho Falls ... photo by Patrick Chaplin

The most impressive attraction in the Bitterroot Valley is, of course, the breathtaking scenery. From the first glow of morning to the star studded blanket of night, the valley offers one picturesque landscape after another. Capture the delicate pink petals of the ‘Bitterroot Flower’ with a micro camera lens, or take in the whole expanse of the valley from the seat of a chartered aircraft. There are endless ways to rediscover the Bitterroot Valley. The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce is the “first best place” to gather information about the valley and sight-seeing opportunities. They offer numerous brochures from outdoor activities to a cultural tour guide to help make your visit more enjoyable and to help you make sure you don’t miss anything.

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Call 363-2400 or visit the web site at www.bitterrootchamber.com. Lost Trail Pass Visitor Information Center is the Chamber’s branch location at the top of Lost Trail Pass on the Montana/Idaho border. The center is at a state rest area and is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

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1) Mile 1.3 Bitterroot River access point 2) Mile 2.2 The Hurtt Ranch house and barn were built in 1915 by members of the Daly Ditch Project for a Mr. Lemon who lived in Chicago. He was promoting the Apple Boom at 1. Florence 2. the turn of the century in the Bitterroot Valley. Prospective buyers would arrive in Missoula and stay at the Lemon Ranch to be wined and dined into purchasing valley property. 3) Mile 4.4 Lovely View of The Bitterroot River looking south. 4) Mile 5.3 View of the Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge with the entrance to the refuge at Mile 8.1. 5) Mile 6.1 Frank Lloyd Wright Home is one of the many Bitterroot Valley homes designed 3. by Frank Lloyd Wright during the early 1900’s. 6) Mile 6.6 Townsite of Bitterroot is at the turnoff at Rathburn Lane. The only remaining improvements at the originally planned site of the town that never was, are the fire hydrants. 4. 7) Mile 7.7 St. Mary’s Peak has a popular hiking trail to the mountain’s 9,343 foot summit, which provides a magnificent view of the valley below, with the Sapphire Mountains to the 5. east and the Bitterroot Mountains to the west. 6. 8) Mile 8.1 Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge was established in 1964 and dedicated in 1979 to the memory of the last Senator Lee Metcalf. The 2700 acre refuge is a popular feeding 7. 8. ground and nesting area for migrant and resident waterfowl. Hiking trails lead to the Bitterroot River and picnic area. 9) Mile 11.6 Bitterroot Cooperative Creamery originally on this site was built by a group of 269 local farmers from the Florence area after a fire destroyed the creamery building in Florence. The farmers built the new creamery in 1907 and John G. Howe took over the management 13. in 1908. This building also burned on June 20, 1911 and was rebuilt and opened again Stevensville 12. 10. on August 1, 1911. Stevensville has an annual Creamery Picnic, which is held the first 11. 9. weekend of August, commemorating the help the local townspeople gave John Howe to 14. rebuild the creamery. 10) Mile 11.8 South Entrance of Lee Metcalf Refuge located on Wild Fowl Lane. 11) Mile 12.0 Bass Home can be seen looking south from the highway after the south entrance to the Lee Metcalf Refuge. Built by A.J. Gibon in 1909 for brothers William E. and Dudley C. Bass, the brothers resided together there with their families. Thee home is now a private residence. 12) Mile 12.1 U.S. Forest Service Headquarters 13) Mile 12.1 Fort Owen Turn right after the Forest Service Headquarters toward the Bitterroot River to the turn off for the Fort Owen Monument. The fort was established by Major 15. John Owen in 1850, who purchased it from the Jesuits who had settled in the valley in the mid 1800’s. The post was active from 1850 to 1872. 16. 14) Mile 12.5 St. Mary’s Mission was established in 1841 by Father Pierre DeSmet, who 17. came in response to requests for Black Robes by various Indian tribes of western Montana and Idaho. It was the first white settlement in Montana. Guided tours are given during the summer months. Turn west and drive to the end of the road. Victor 15) Mile 17.1 Bell Crossing connects Eastside Highway with US Hwy 93. 16) Mile 17.8 Etna School was built in 1916 and used until 1957. It is now a private residence. 17) Mile 18.1 Martin Cramer Home built in 1893, is a Mansardic Victorian structure (the only one of its kind in the Bitterroot Valley) and is one of approximately 150 remaining in the US. It was built by Erick Erickson and John Lagerquist. Located east on Groff Lane, it is now a private residence. 18) Mile 25.0 Quast Home now a private residence, was built in 1904 by John Summers. Otto Quast purchased the home and ranch in 1913. 19) Mile 25.1 Montana State Western Agriculture Research Center was established in 1906 to deal with the booming apple industry in the Bitterroot Valley. The center, which now researches in horticulture, soil and biological control of weeds, is located on Quast Lane and is open to the public. 20) Mile 26.5 Corvallis Methodist Church was built in 1890. Methodist circuit riders served the Bitterroot Valley in the 1870’s. 21) Mile 26.6 Corvallis Christian Church was established in 1884 as a mission church. 19. 18. 22) Mile 26.7 Brooks Hotel which is now a private residence, was built in 1894 as a private home, then later became a hotel noted throughout Western Montana for its home-cooked 20. 21. meals. Corvallis 22. 23) Mile 26.8 Miller Home which is now a private residence, was built in 1887 for James 23. A. Hedge, owner of the Montana Lumber and Manufacturing Co. 24. 24) Mile 27.7 Corvallis Cemetery the resting place for many early settlers of the Bitterroot Valley, was established in the 1880’s. Turn left off the highway and drive east. 25) Mile 30.4 Marcus Daly Mansion Marcus Daly came to the Bitterroot Valley in the later part of the 1800’s. He was one of three “Copper Kings” in Montana and purchased his 269 Bitterroot Valley property in 1889. In 1897 A.J. Gibson of Missoula designed the Queen Anne style mansion. After Marcus Daly’s death, his wife Margaret had the home remodeled 25. and enlarged in 1910 according to her husband’s previously made plans. The home is now considered Georgian Revival with neo-classic porticos and was the summer home of Marcus Daly and his family. The mansion is now owned by the State of Montana and is managed 27. Hamilton by the Daly Mansion Preservation Trust. It is open to the public. 26. 28. 26) Mile 31.4 Tammany Castle Marcus Daly was noted for his breeding of expensive race horses. You can see a wonderful view of his horse stables by looking up from the highway due south. 27) Mile 32.0 Lovely View of Blodgett Canyon & The Bitterroot Mountains. 28) Mile 32.5 End of Eastside Highway Scenic & Historic Drive

Historic Eastside Highway

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UN-CORK ‘n ON TAP in the Bitterroot

MBeerontana ranks 2nd nationally in craft breweries per capita. first arrived in America with Christopher Columbus. When he landed, he noted that the natives were making a brew “of maize, resembling English beer.” Beer was of major concern in the new land, even for the pilgrims. The pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock, instead of traveling further south as planned, partly because they were out of beer. l 1863 - "Gilbert Brewery" was founded by Henry Gilbert, making it Montana Territory's first brewery. l 1920. Montana Prohibition laws went into effect l 1926 - Montana becomes the first state to repeal Prohibition enforcement. The petition to lift the ban stated its purpose was "to restore constitutional rights and liberty in the state of Montana by repealing all laws relative to prohibition except those relating to minors. Efforts to reinstate the law two years later in 1928 failed. l Late in 1933, Congress passed the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, which repealed the unpopular law. l 1997 - Cabaret License created as a reaction to the fast-rising prices of regular liquor licenses. Cabaret licenses are more affordable and allow restaurant owners to sell wine and beer. Montana ranks second in the US in beer consumption per capita. Montana has an estimated 730,259 legal beer drinkers, who on average drink 40.6 gallons each. To put it in perspective, that’s a little more than 81 growlers per person.

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Wildwood Brewing Blacksmith Brewing

Hidden Legend Winery

Mtn. View Distillery Blodgett Canyon Cellars

Bitter Root Brewery Higherground Brewing

Bandit Brewing Co. Mt. Cider Works

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Stop in for a beer. We are open seven days a week, with live music most Wednesdays & Saturdays at 6:00 – Always FREE Tap Room Hours: Sunday – Thursday 2PM – 8PM ~ Friday – Saturday 12PM – 8pm.

Blacksmith Brewing Company opened on October 25th, 2008. The building that houses our brewery and taproom was built in 1908. It began as a steam laundry and later became a blacksmith shop. With every brand the blacksmith made he would then burn it into the wall to make sure it was perfect. The brands still are embedded into our walls showing those who passed this way. It took a great vision to see what it could become and a lot of hard work. Blacksmith Brewing Company is located in Stevensville, Montana. A town rich in history, a valley surrounded by beauty, and a blue-ribbon river close at hand. You will be hard-pressed to find a better place on earth, with beer this good! Open seven days a week. Stop in for a beer! Tap Room Hours: Sunday – Thursday 2PM – 8PM ~ Friday – Saturday 12PM – 8pm With live music most Wednesdays & Saturdays at 6:00 – Always FREE

BLACKSMITHBREWING.COM OPEN Sunday – Thursday 2pm – 8pm Friday – Saturday 12pm – 8pm W i t h l i v e m u s i c We d n e s d a y s & Saturdays at 6:00 – Always FREE

Our Wonderful Team! Eric Hayes - Owner, Sheldon L. Scrivner Head Brewer, Mike Kelly - Brewers Assistant & The BEST Beertenders in the Bitterroot Valley: Marissa, Darcy, Stacey, Kristina, Sylke, Oriana, Stefanie, & Amy!

114 Main Street Stevensville MT 59870

114 MAIN STREET STEVENSVILLE, MT 59870

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(406) 777-0680 406.777.0680

blacksmithbrewing.com T & R Magazine


Wildwood Brewing began as a dream in the mind of Jim Lueders, an emigrant from Chicago. The Wildwood Project -- The Wildwood project started in earnest in 2002 when Lueders bought all that was left of the Saxer Brewery from his past employer. A suitable, and affordable site was found in the Bitterroot Valley, near Stevensville, just 24 miles south of Missoula. Construction began in the fall of 2009 with the pouring of the concrete, which utilizes as much waste fly ash from the Eastern Montana coal burning power plants In Spring of 2010,the timber frame structure, salvaged from a

Wisconsin barn originally built in 1901, was put back together at its new home. The roof system was completed using metal from 100% recycled material and made in Missoula. Locally available wheat straw bales were used as exterior insulation of the frame, nearly 800 of them in total. By fall of that year the bale walls were competed and plastered. The inside of the building was finished in early 2011 and the brewing tanks and equipment started to come into the building in February. The building of the brewery took nearly a year since Lueders had to have everything a certain way and did much of the work himself. Operations began in late January 2012 with the brewing of a Mai Bock which was labeled Bodacious Bock. The first brew was a keeper. Subsequent brews were: Discerning Pilsner, Mystical Stout, White Bark Wheat, and Ambitious Lager. Wildwood opened its doors on March 16, 2012. WildWood Brewing’s driveway is about 1/4 mile north of the Stevensville cut off road, just east of where the middle Kootenai Creek Road intersects Highway 93. We are across the highway (East) from Lucky Lil’s Casino. Look for a big yellow building with a rust colored roof and three large grain silos in front about 200 yards from the highway. The tap room is presently open everyday from 4:00pm to 8:00pm, but keep posted for seasonal hours. We have many fine beers on tap and sell 64 ounce growlers to go.

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ontanan, Kevin, can trace his roots directly back to Montana’s beginnings. “My Great- Great-Great-Uncle, Nelson Story, was among the first to establish a cattle herd in Montana by famously driving thousands of cattle from Texas to the Bozeman area in 1866. Nelson was even credited with kicking the box out from under outlaw George Ives in the first Virginia City “Vigilante hanging.” Kevin has worked as a Research Microbiologist since graduating from Montana State University in 1999, fermenting his first batch of “home brew” wine not long after. “I feel that my professional training really has helped prepare me for the winemaking process” Kevin explains. “Both often involve adding some of this to some of that, then carefully measuring the product. With winemaking, I just get to personally enjoy the results a little more than the stuff I’m mixing up in the lab.”

448 Eagle Lane - Corvallis, MT 59828 (406) 360-5680 T & R Magazine

B LODGETT Canyon Cellars 47


The dream of being a winemaker became reality when Painted Rocks opened in 2001 with friends and neighbors as partners. Inspired by the Scandinavian love for honeywine, Ken chose a Viking as the logo for the Mead—and Thorvald’s legend began! The Schultz Family took over in 2005 as sole owners and delved into the business of producing the best wine in Montana. Right from the start, Ken’s honeywines captured loyal customers and consistently wins prestigious medals. He used the wonderful natural flavors that come from the surrounding hills and meadows—pure, smooth honey, tart chokecherries, sweet huckleberries and the lovable, plentiful dandelion! The natural beauty of the area, the goodness of the local folks, and the dedication and hard work of the whole Schultz family, wife Lisa and sons Joe, Patrick and David, make this an inspired place to produce incomparable wines. Hidden Legend Winery is known for the quality honeywines it has always produced but Ken continues to discover new adventures. Montana’s famous Flathead Cherries recently became Ken’s newest project—a Flathead Cherry Riesling and a Flathead Cherry Merlot-Cabernet blend.

Stop in and ask about their various blends of mead! 1345 US Hwy 93 North #5 - Victor (406) 363-6323 www. hiddenlegendwinery.com

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518 First Street - Hamilton 406-375-5204 Tuesday - Saturday: 11 am - 8 pm Sunday: 1 pm - 8 pm For Higherground Brewing co-founders, Fenn and Jasper, dreaming up a business together made perfect sense. As life long friends they spent their days traversing the mountains and rivers of the Bitterroot Valley, making it the ideal place for their dream to come to life. Higherground Brewing Co. was established in Dec. 2011 after the two graduated from the University of Montana. Higherground Brewing is home of excellent brick fired pizzas, house-made soups and fresh salads, masterful beers and a welcoming atmosphere. Families are always welcomed! Dry Fly IPA (6.0%)- An American style IPA loaded with Cascade, Willamette, and Centennial hops and a balancing malt backbone.

Hand Crafted Beer

HigherGroundBrewing Co.

Summerfoot (5.4%)- A Pale ale infused with lemongrass and ginger root zest. Moderately hopped with Cascade hops. Flash Flood Milk Stout (6.0%)- Dark, rich roastiness with a milk chocolate sweetness. Base Camp Irish Red (5.7%)- Toasted malt character, medium hoppiness with a sweet finish. l

Clear Water Crystal Ale (5.4%)- Light, crisp and refreshing. Clear Water is our sessionable, easy drinking ale. Hurruh Scotch Ale (7.2%)- Smoky, earthy aromas lead way to rich maltiness and caramel sweetness. A dark brown appearance with ruby highlights. Addional seasonal beers on at all times!

Stone Fire Pizza

Salads HighergroundBrewing.com 518 1st St ~ Hamilton, MT l Soups (406) 375-5204 l Sandwiches l

Look for us on

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What makes Tim Bozik and his daughter, Nicol, co-owners of Bitter Root Brewing, listen to what their customers say. They know how to make beer and run a restaurant, all spiced with good tunes on Thursday and Saturday nights.

W

hat exactly is the Last Best Brew? For Bitter Root Brewing co-owner Tim Bozik, it's a lot more than his innovative marketing slogan. It's the beers he makes - great brews and fresh food. Bitter Root Brewing is more than a microbrewery making 1,350 barrels of beer per year, they also has a full restaurant on premises, called the Brewer's Grill, where you can enjoy a great meal with your Last Best Brew.

Bandit Brewing Co is a nano brewery in Darby, MT. that specializes in small batch beers, with 10 taps and have a new release every Thursday. Established in 2014, Bandit Brewing Co is housed in a former logging workshop two blocks off I-93 that runs through Darby. A town of 733, Darby is centrally located in the south corner of the Bitterroot Valley.

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Community means everything to us at Bitter Root Brewing. We buy local and support local as much as we can. The base malt used in all of our beers is 100% grown and malted in Montana. We employ over 20 local employees and hire all local craft and tradesmen. We also provide live music every Thursday and Saturday night with a great selection of both local and traveling musicians. Great Beer, Fresh Food, and a friendly environment make us The Last Best Brew!

101 Marcus Street - Hamilton (406) 363-7468 www.BitterRootBrewing.com

We are fortunate to have great skiing, hunting, fishing, hiking, and camping in our backyard! Brewery owner, JC McDowell is a small business entrepreneur and beer enthusiast who turned his hobby, home brewing great beer, into possibly the smallest commercial brewery in Montana. Drop by for a beer and a tour of their 40 gallon brewing system.

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roots reach back to 19th century Kansas, Keith has, above all, a respect for farming and growing the best grapes. His father, Rudy Smith, started the family vineyard at Mt. St. Helena in California. In 1988, the torch was passed on to Keith to watch over and cultivate the grapes.

159 acres of world- class grapes from California, while cellaring and aging take place in the bucolic Bitterroot Valley. The results are sumptuous wines that we think you’ll agree take the fullest advantage of the California growing climate and good old Western sensibility in the winemaking process. The best of both worlds? We certainly think so.

Keith has always maintained a delicate balance between that vineyard in California and his love of the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. In 2004, Keith founded the Trapper Peak Winery, bonded and headquartered in the great state of Montana. The Mt. St. Helena Vineyard continues to produce

At Trapper Peak Winery, our mission is to produce affordable wines of impressive quality in the great state of Montana. We strive to fuse the inherent qualities of California grapes with the essence and charm of Big Sky Country. Trapper Peak is dedicated to a downto-earth approach that embraces wine drinkers from all walks of life.

A fourth generation farmer whose

Our winery is located in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana, right on the continental divide. Rising atop the valley, at an elevation of 10,157 feet, is the Trapper Peak for which our winery is named. Our beautiful valley is blessed with plentiful fertility and mild weather, perfect for cellaring the wines we enjoy so much. trapperpeakwinery.com

75 Cattail Lane Darby MT 59829 (406) 821-1964

261 Rye Creek Rd - Darby MT (406) 360-5078

Montana CiderWorks is a bonded winery located on Rye Creek Road in Darby, Montana. Their mission is to offer exceptional English-style ciders crafted from Bitterroot Valley apples and other local fruits. Traditional cider is a naturally fermented beverage made from apple juice. It was the drink of choice for Americans from Revolutionary times until Prohibition. Montana CiderWorks honors 100 years of sustainable agriculture in Montana’s orchards by offering exceptional draft ciders. T & R Magazine

Distribution Locations: In Hamilton Hamilton’s Market Place 600 S. 1st St Super 1 Foods - Hwy 93 N In Corvallis Wild Mare Restaurant - 283 2nd St In Stevensville Stevensville Super 1 Foods 39 - Stevensville Cutoff Rd

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Historical Sites Daly Mansion

The Daly Mansion, built in the late 1800’s by Marcus Daly for a summer home for his family, was originally called ‘Riverside’. Mr. Daly, an Irish immigrant, made his fortune just as copper was coming into use for telegraph and electric wire. The GeorgianRevival style mansion has 25 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms covering 24,000 square feet. After Mrs. Daly’s death in 1941, the Mansion was closed and boarded up until 1987, when it was opened to the public. Over two million dollars in restorations have been completed in the Mansion, the grounds and the outbuildings. The three-story mansion is on 50 treed acres off the Eastside Highway. Included on the mansion grounds are a tennis court, swimming pool, greenhouse, playhouse, and a laundry building. The Daly Mansion is open daily for tours and is host to special events, weddings and reunions. The Daly Mansion welcomes guests with disabilities. We have an elevator that travels from the 1st floor, 2nd floor and 3rd floor. There is handicap parking next to the house for state-issued parking permit holders. Much of the Daly Mansion is accessible to guests in wheelchairs, although some areas are not due to the historic architecture of the building.

Tours are available from Mid-May through October. Fall/Winter season tours are available - call for week day appointments 3636004. Adults are $9.00, Seniors $8.00, Youth $6.00 (ages 6-17) and under 6 are free.

Photo by Eric Elander

Visit Copper Barron Marcus Daly’s Restored Summer Home in Hamilton, Montana - Tours Daily Mid May - Mid October

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Fort Owen

Historical St. Mary’s Mission

Major John Owen’s frontier trading post and Indian Agency is located half a mile west of Stevensville. Self-guided tours are available to see the preserved structures of the original Fort. Built of adobe and logs, Fort Owen is the site of the first permanent white settlement in Montana. Father Pierre DeSmet came to the area in 1841 and established St. Mary’s Mission among the Flathead Indians. In 1850, Major John Owen arrived in the valley and set up camp north of St. Mary’s. In time, Major Owen established a trading post and military strong point named Fort Owen, which served settlers, Indians, and missionaries in the valley. Fort Owen still has permanent structures that stand today. Fort Owen is a State Park and sits at an elevation of 3,398 feet. The park has a vault toilet, a picnic table, and celebrates Fort Owen Day each 4th of July. There are no fees to visit the park but donations are welcome. It is located just north of Stevensville.

St. Mary’s Mission was founded in 1841 by Father DeSmet in response to the local Native Americans request for “Black Robes”. The chapel was built in 1866 by Father Ravalli, Montana’s first physician, surgeon and pharmacist. This versatile man also taught classes in the Native Salish language and built Montana’s first gristmill and sawmill. Mission grounds include the chapel, Chief Victor’s cabin, Father Ravalli’s residence and pharmacy, and the dove coot built by the Father. St. Mary’s Visitor Center has a gift shop, museum, art gallery and research library. It is located at the west of 4th Street in Stevensville. www.saintmarysmission.org Tours are from April 15 - October 15. Both St. Mary’s Mission and Fort Owen, a regional trade center which was established in 1850, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Healthcare Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital (MDMH) is proud to be a rural critical care hospital, committed to meeting the needs of its community. Our comprehensive medical, surgical, clinic, and emergency care services provide each patient with the highest possible level of medical care. To fulfill that commitment the hospital maintains a highly trained staff, invests in cutting edge technologies, upgrades its facilities and implements best practices to ensure the delivery of quality healthcare.

state-of-the-art conference technologies, comfortable seating and adjustable lighting. The new birthing center is a quiet homelike setting equipped with Jacuzzi tubs, space for the family and more. The new birthing center coupled with the one-onone service from the highly trained staff, makes it a perfect way to welcome a new born into this world. These new additions to the hospital will ensure that patients receive the quality of care that they are accustomed to close to home. Marcus Daly Imaging Services expanded the registration area making it more

whether it is in observation, inpatient or intensive care unit. Marcus Daly Medical Staff continues to grow; adding Joshua Pacheco, MD to the Emergency Department and Timothy Woods, MD, orthopedic surgeon at Bitterroot Orthopedics and Sports Medicine. Dr. Pacheco is certified by the American Board of Emergency Physicians and his philosophy of care emphasizes patient relations and education. Dr. Woods is certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgeons and brings 24 years of experience to the valley. His expertise includes trauma and elective surgeries, ranging from joint replacements to hand surgery to broken bones.

Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital is proud to be your award-winning hospital. MDMH 2014 Awards include: Bitterroots Best Employer Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital and Yvonne Courchesne, MD with was the first in Montana to become Corvallis Family Medicine was one of the many hospitals and voted Bitterroot’s Best Physician, healthcare providers across the Most Wired Hospital, Mountain-Panation to implement a fully integrated state-of-the-art electronic health Pictured from left to right: John Courchesne, MD, Larry Brouwer, cific Quality Health “Commitment record system. The secure electronic MD, Jennifer Feighner, MD and Mitchell Marzo, MD., four of the to Quality Award”, Hospice Honors Outstanding Award, and Home Health health record means a patient’s most MDMH Hospitalists National Recognition. Marcus Daly up-to-date medical information is comfortable and relaxing, and added a Memorial Hospital is also proud to say provided to all members of their healthsatellite x-ray location for the convenience we have an exceptionally low surgical site care team. Our patients can also access of clinic patients. New MRI technology infection rate and high customer service their health information online through was included with the expansion featuring satisfaction ratings! MyHealth. MyHealth allows patients to the MR450w wide bore, 32 channel MRI safely and securely request a prescription refill and appointment, ask about their visit, machine located in a custom GEM Suite. The new MRI provides patients with a view clinical record summaries, discharge more comfortable exam with open, flexible instructions, labs, imaging results and percoils that naturally follow the contours of sonal information online. the body. This department offers compreEmergency Adding to the many enhancements, Marcus hensive imaging and radiological services A 24/7 state-of-the-art patient centered with the most advanced Bone Density, Daly Memorial Hospital opened a new Emergency Department staffed with a comCT, Mammography, MRI, Ultrasound and Intensive Care Unit. The new patient and plete medical team, including emergency X-ray technologies, sophisticated electronstaff centric facility boasts 9,470 square medical physicians, EMT’s and paramedic medical record system, and a competent feet featuring five private patient rooms, ics, nurses, and support staff. and caring medical team! including isolation and bariatric rooms, as

Key Services at MDMH

well as sky lights for natural lighting. The facility includes evidence-based technology, strategically placed nurse stations, and comfortable waiting area, consultation rooms and much more! Patients have the space for their family, technology, natural lighting and expansive views and an experienced care team for optimal healing in the new Intensive Care Unit. Also included are three new conference rooms and renovated and decorated birthing suites. The conference rooms are designed and equipped for community education. These rooms include

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MDMH’s continually strives to meet the needs of the patients they serve. We have expanded the Hospitalist Program. Jennifer Feighner, MD, Hospitalist Program Medical Staff Director is joined by eight Hospitalists. The full-time hospitalists are Jason Cohen, MD, John Courchesne, and Mitchell Marzo, MD. The part-time hospitalists are Lawrence Brouwer, MD, Allen W. Jones, Jr., MD, Brett Heath, MD, Robert Smith, MD, and Randy Stewart, MD. This team is ready to care for you when you are admitted into the hospital

Imaging Marcus Daly Imaging Services is equipped with advanced clinical and diagnostic applications of imaging technology, including X-ray, CT Scans, MRI Scans, Mammography, Ultrasound, Bone Densitometry, and Fluoroscopy and PACS (picture archiving and communication systems).

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Laboratory The MDMH Laboratory Department is open 24hrs a day and is equipped with upto-date high-speed technology and automated instruments. This department serves over 30,000 patients and processes over 110,000 procedures annually.

FAASM, FCCP, brings 26 years of experience in sleep disorders, and is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the American Board of Sleep Medicine. The MDMH Sleep Center received program accreditation from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

Rehabilitation

Surgery

The MDMH Rehabilitation Center is specifically designed to meet the needs of both adult and pediatric patients. The rehabilitation staff is experienced in occupational, physical, and speech therapies, and includes therapists certified in orthopedics, pediatrics and hand therapy. The center is equipped with evidence-based state-of-art technology and the only HydroWorx therapy pool of its kind in western Montana.

Sleep The MDMH Sleep Center brings a new level of care to residents of the Bitterroot Valley who suffer from sleep disorders by offering the latest in medical technology and the highest quality diagnostic and treatment services. Director Rolf Holle, MD,

The MDMH Surgery Center offers Ravalli County residents the opportunity to have surgical procedures performed within minutes of their homes. The surgery center, offers a comfortable, naturally lit waiting area, friendly staff, state-of-the-art surgery suites and recovery center for outpatient and inpatient surgeries. Marcus Daly’s highly skilled board certified surgeons and surgical team, offer an extraordinary level of surgical care in a wide range of surgical specialties and focuses on minimally invasive techniques for a wide range of surgical procedures. Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital is located at 1200 Westwood Drive, Hamilton, MT, phone (406) 363.2211 or visit mdmh.org.

Our Mission

Daly Excellence our commitment to the Bitterroot Valley is quality, accessible, personalized healthcare.

Vision

The Marcus Daly healthcare team aspires to be a trusted community leader known for exceeding the expectations of those we serve. We promise exceptional care delivery by dedicated, compassionate professionals who take pride in achieving the level of satisfaction.

Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital’s Emergency Department is a patient centered state-of-the-art facility, staffed with Board Certified Emergency Physicians and an experienced and compassionate care team. “My experience in the emergency department was outstanding! I was in a room immediately and treated by compassionate medical staff. Their Orthopedic Surgeon was on-hand, and his expertise was thorough and impressive,” said David Haacke

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The Bitterroot Valley also offers numerous nursing homes and assisted living facilities which offer professional and personalized care for the aged. Health educators, medical, dental, mental health, homeopathic, eye care clinics, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, chiropractic, nursing homes, home health and hospice, and therapists all provide the latest in quality care for the whole family. Physicians, family nurse practitioners, registered and licensed practical nurses as well as certified nursing assistants, are ready

to help you with any medical need that may arise. Several pharmacies are located throughout our valley providing you with prescription needs. The Valley also offers medical and oxygen supplies. Bitterroot Imaging - Open MRI is another feature the Valley has to offer which provides greater patient comfort and a number of unique features and benefits for both patients and physicians. Walk-in clinics in the Valley offer patients fast, friendly and professional diagnosis when time is of the essence.

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Wildlife Babies

Photos by Nathan DeBoer

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A Day in the Bitterroot Photo by Patrick Chaplin

A Day in Itself The Lake Como Recreation Area, just north of Darby, offers a variety of day, overnight, extended backpacking, motorized and non-motorized use. Early-day settler W. B. Harlan, who was reminded of a painting of Lake Como in Italy when he first saw the lake, coined the name. You will want to pack a cooler for lunch, take your towels, umbrellas, water toys and swimsuits. Don’t forget the sunscreen. There is an accessible day-use area, which requires Day passes for parking while using the facilities. Passes are available at several locations in Hamilton and Darby. Swimming, fishing, boating and water skiing are popular sports at the lake. The swimming area has beach access and is roped off from the rest of the lake. Lake Como is a large irrigation reservoir which lies in a beautiful canyon. During irrigation season it is drawn down

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and activities may fluctuate according to water levels. Restrooms, drinking water, and garbage removal services are provided. There is a hikers’ trail which leads along the north side to an unimproved campground above some falls at the head of the lake. A day at the lake is a great opportunity to relax with family and friends. Enjoy yourself! Take the short drive back to town for a short nap and head out early in the evening to enjoy at hearty meal at one of the great restaurants in the area.

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Springtime in the Bitterroot Springtime - when the temperatures wakens with new life. Fragrant apple blossoms abound in the foothills beneath snow-capped mountain peaks. Willows and cottonwoods sprout fresh leaves. The Bitterroot River swells with melted snow and gentle rain. Red-breasted robins punctuate warm breezes with song. Rich green-carpeted meadows, calves frolic, lambs bound, and foals try out their spindly legs. In wild woods and river bottoms, deer, elk, moose and bighorn sheep raise their young. The average temperature in April is 57.9°F with a low of 32.2°F., with average rainfall of 1.05”. Take a drive to Lee Metcalf to watch ducklings, wild swans and new fawns. Bring your

binoculars for a close-up look, and capture the beauty of spring with your camera. Farmers Markets start up in the spring in Darby, Hamilton, Stevensville and Florence. Enjoy the many choices of local vegetables and produce for sale. Afternoons are a wonderful time to spend at the golf course, or walk, bike or skate the paved paths along the roadways to the river.

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Boating, Canoeing & Rafting The Bitterroot River offers over 76 miles of floatable river, from six miles south of Darby to Missoula. The Salmon River is just 90 miles south of Hamilton and is a good white water rafting river. Lake Como and Painted Rocks Lake are popular spots for canoes, jet skis, fishing boats, ski boats and everything in between. Stop by the Chamber for more information regarding the many recreational opportunities in the valley, or visit our web site at bitterrootchamber.com

Bird & Wildlife Watching Summer in the Bitterroot Summer - We are blessed with over 16.5 hours of sunlight that make our summer days long and warm. This gives us all the time in the world to do all the fun things that make the Bitterroot so special. The nights are comfortably cool and make for great sleeping weather. Traveling down our back roads, the air is perfumed with the refreshing scent of the new-mown hay. You can watch the eagles soar, listen to the meadowlarks sing, and see and hear the hummingbirds hovering over the flowers. Lake Como and the Bitterroot River warm to swimming temperatures during the summer or just enjoy the solitude of a shoreline walk. During the summer season you need to be prepared for all kinds of weather. The average temperature in July is 82.8°F with a low of 49.3°F, so you may want to put on a light jacket in the evening. You don’t usually have to worry about getting stuck in a rainstorm as the valley only averages one inch during the month of July! Summertime is the perfect time to explore, enjoy and experience the valley. Each of our communities has special summer events that showcase the history, the culture and the artists of the area. From parades, rodeos, and art shows, to festivals of music and microbrews, there is something special happening for every age and interest. Throughout the summer, one can enjoy ongoing events including the monthly First Friday in Stevensville and Hamilton and on Saturday mornings there are Farmers’ Markets in Stevensville and Hamilton; Tuesday evenings in Darby. ‘Tuesdays at 12’ is a great time in Hamilton to hear local music and enjoy lunch in the park. You won’t want to miss the Ravalli County Museum’s ‘Saturday Series’ program, either. End of August and the first of September, we end the summer with a thrill. Join us for the Ravalli County Fair and Carnival! We promise you an entertaining ‘old fashion’ family experience.

Camping The Bitterroot National Forest has 28 campgrounds, many of which are open year-round. Amenities vary per site and more information is available at the Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce www.bitterrootchamber.com or any of the Forest Service information sites. We also have full hookup, privately owned campgrounds with both forest and river accesses. http://fwp.mt.gov/parks/accommodatioms/campimg/

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There are over 230 species of birds that can be found throughout the season utilizing the Bitterroot Valley and its surrounding mountain counterparts. Some of the most notable species found here are the Blue Grouse, Long-billed Curlew, Flamulated Owl, Black Swift, Calliope Hummingbird, Williamson’s Sapsucker, Black-backed Woodpeckers, Cordilleran Flycatcher, Violet-green Swallow, Pygmy Nuthatch, Rock Wren, Varied Thrush, Cassin’s Vireo, MacGallivray’s Warbler, and Cassin’s Finch. Many of these species can be found at sites along the Bitterroot Birding and Nature Trail. Wildlife is plentiful and available for viewing at Centennial Grove, 12 miles south of Hamilton on Skalkaho Highway. A selfguided trail skirted with 200-year old ponderosa pine meanders close to Skalkaho Creek. Big Horn Sheep can be viewed on the slopes of the East Fork, and west of Darby. Larry Creek Fire Ecology Trail, near the Charles Waters Campground, explores the beneficial effects of fire. The Willoughby Environmental Education Area is a one-mile interpretive trail that encompasses a wide spectrum of Montana landscape - from sagebrush to pine forests with streams located on the trail. A picnic shelter and restroom facility is located there as well - just 10 miles east of Hwy 93 off Bell Crossing. Teller Wildlife and Lee Metcalf are two refuges that are located in the Bitterroot Valley which enable our visitors to view a vast assortment of wildlife and birds. There are easy trails to follow as well as signs and benches along the way. Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, established on February 4, 1964, is a 2,800-acre refuge located in the Bitterroot River Valley of southwest Montana. The refuge is approximately 2 miles north of Stevensville and 25 miles south of Missoula in Ravalli County, Montana. Elevation ranges from about 3, 225 feet on the north end of the refuge to about 3, 314 feet on the south. This floodplain refuge provides a diverse mosaic of western mountain valley habitats including gallery and riverfront forest, wet meadow, wetlands, and grassland benches. The refuge provides opportunities for the public to enjoy compatible wildlife-dependent public use activities including hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, environmental education, and interpretation. The refuge is a very popular community and tourist destination.

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For the Younger Set

Got Kids? Check out the trout fishing pond and the Lewis and Clark interpretive trail in Hieronymus Park at the north end of Hamilton. There is also the Canyons Hideaway Playground at Claudia Driscoll Park - the perfect picnic spot for the family. Kiwanis Park has a playground and is right next to River Park, offering paved trails for biking and walking, or river access for splashing or floating. Lewis & Clark Park in Stevensville has a swimming pool, playground, and tennis courts. Victor and Darby also have city parks with playground equipment. Don’t forget to visit Darby’s skateboard park, which is located near the rodeo arena northwest of Darby. Florence has the famous Hideout Mountain, an 8,000 square-foot playground with a mountain maze, 3 slides, climbing wall and toddler area. Visit Kids First at the Westview Center in Hamilton for information call 375-3636.

ATV Tours Guided ATV tours are available through Bitterroot Adventures. Call Rye Creek Lodge at 821-3366 for package information and rates.

Photo by Nathan DeBoer

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Swimming For those lazy, hot days in the summer - we have two outdoor pools for swimming and swimming instruction. Bitterroot Aquatic Center, 59 Kurtz Lane in Hamilton, hosts an outdoor pool, indoor 90°F degree pool, lessons, open swim, water exercise and therapy classes, bathhouse, showers, and lifeguards. Call 375-8200 for more information. Stevensville also has a public outdoor pool and they can be reached at 777-5827. It includes a bathhouse and is located in Lewis & Clark Park at the end of 1st Street in Stevensville. The Canyons Athletic Center has an indoor heated pool with swim lanes, hot tub, shower, steam room and sauna. Open swim times are available. Call 363-2816 for day pass and/or membership information.

Tennis Tennis, anyone? Head on over to the Westview Center, Main and 9th Street in Hamilton, or Lewis & Clark Park at the end of 1st Street in Stevensville. Corvallis is another place where tennis courts are available. If indoor tennis appeals to you, visit the Canyons Athletic Center for a day pass and a chance to play on state-of-the-art courts located inside the air-controlled athletic center. The center is located at 472 Tammany Lane in Hamilton. Call 363-2816 for court reservations.

Hiking and Backpacking

All hiking and backpacking enthusiasts will find miles of terrific trails surrounding the Bitterroot Valley. Whether you are a novice looking for a simple day hike or an experienced hiker looking for multi-day trips into the backcountry, the majestic Bitterroots and Sapphire mountains will not disappoint you. The rugged terrain and beautiful peaks offer miles of breathtaking views and simple to challenging trails for all to enjoy. The same holds true for biking trails around the valley. Information on these hiking and biking trails can be found at any Forest Service headquarters and the Bitterroot Chamber of Commerce.

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Clover Quinn and her husband Joe became interested in emus in 1996 while searching for a meat low in cholesterol. Even though they knew next to nothing about the exotic birds it was love at first sight. First they wanted to see if they wintered well and when they did Wild Rose Emu Ranch began. At first the Quinns didn’t have much information on the birds and wanted them mostly for their meat, but they began to learn a lot about the oil. Refined from the fat on the back of the harvested bird, emu oil is odorless and colorless and has proved successful in treating a whole host of skin conditions. Emus yield five basic byproducts - meat, oil, eggs, leather and feathers - the oil has been the easiest for the Quinns to market and has been the most successful. Her Wild Rose Emu products are now sold in stores all over the valley, ranging from oil products, lotions, to animal shampoos.

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According to scientists the birds were never able to fly and have essentially remained unchanged for 80 million years. With flat breast bones and no wing muscles, they developed long, powerful legs and can reach speeds of 40 miles per hour. Emus are curious and easily spooked, but at the Quinn’s ranch they seem to enjoy visitors and sometimes sit down to rest. “They almost always stay outdoors,” Quinn said. “They won’t stay inside unless it’s 20 below outside.” Standing amid the 40 or so adolescents, with their shrill prehistoric cries reminding you of a Jurassic Park soundtrack, she coaxes and dodges the fleet-footed, five-foot-tall birds. Wild Rose Emu Ranch is home to approximately 120 emus, who enjoy the Big Sky and majestic view of the Bitterroot Mountain range. Emu ranching has taken agriculture to a new level, with this 95% usable bird, which provides a healthy red meat as well as a remarkable oil for the skin, a strong, supple leather, silky and bristly feathers; and 5 ½ inch dark green eggs. Long rectangular pens house the adult breeding pairs. About every three days a hen will lay an egg, which promptly gets collected and taken to an incubator. About seven weeks in the humid, 97-degree chamber, the eggs are moved to the hatcher. After placing a ready-to-hatch egg on a flat surface, Quinn uttered a few short whistles to mimic peeps made by hatchlings. Responding to the sound of siblings, the egg wobbled back and forth. It takes about six hours for a chick to hatch completely after poking the initial hole, Quinn said. In nature, the male will sit on the eggs and does not eat at all for the entire incubation period. His fat is enough for him to last up to a year with no food. He raises the babies, while the female goes off to do her own thing. Quinn welcomes people of all ages to come out and tour her emu ranch - or check out Wild Rose Emu Ranch web site - www. wildroseemu.com - the Quinn’s can be reached at 363-1710 or at wildrose@bitterroot.net.

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Winged Wonders A glittering rainbow of kaleidoscope colors fill the Bitterroot Valley sky each spring and summer as the hummingbirds return to breed and nest here in Southwestern Montana. Three distinct Bitterroot Valley hummingbird species are prevalent in this area, including the smallest breeding bird in North America, the Calliope; the feisty, rusty-backed colored Rufous; and the shy lesser seen Black-chinned. Males are quite colorful for attracting mates, where females are more gray and green to camouflage on their nests, aiding in detouring predation. Hummingbird breeding in May, and nesting in June, most abundantly occurs along the timbered Bitterroot Mountain foothills, where dense vegetation and running water creeks provide lots of small protein rich insects. Females conduct all nesting duties on their own with no assistance from the male. The tiny nest contains two eggs about the size of dried white beans. The well constructed nest is built of tiny rootlets, plant fibers, and the inside lined with soft plant down. A binding agent of elastic spider silk is utilized as a sort of glue to hold all the materials together, and attach or weld the nest to a limb securely. These tiny and highly intelligent birds frequent sugar-water feeders as they move down the valley floor and along the Sapphire Range foothills. There are many opportunities to view these migrating winged creatures in the valley while they linger to build fat reserves for metabolized fuel for the long journey south. It’s commonly believed by researchers that their average life span is 3 to 4 years, but amazingly, a nine-year old male Black-chinned hummer was captured and safely released along the Sapphire Range foothills in 2009. A recent consecutive five-year migration / breeding study yielded over 18,000 individual hummingbirds encountered in the Bitterroot Valley. To publicly view these Bitterroot feathered treasures, one may visit Skalkaho Steakhouse where there is a history of providing sugar-water feeders that host a marvelous variety of colorful hummingbirds. The place is a buzz with the small bird’s wings beating 40-80 beats per second. A few other quick facts, normal flight speed, 30 mph. Escape speed 50mph, Heart rate 250 beats per minute at rest, 1200 bpm feeding, length 2.75 3.75 inches, normal body temp. 105108 Degrees

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Bitterroot’s Treasurers Some of the most beautiful treasurers in the Bitterroot come from the four (4) legged kind. Richard and Shelley Peters, owners of Alpaca Hill Drygoods, are one of the Valley’s alpaca breeders. Once you have the fiber you need to find a way to clean and spin the cashmere-like fiber so it can be turned into a piece of artwork. They found a Kalispell mill to help them with their supply of fiber so it could be turned into works of art. Peters also turned to the alpacas’ native homeland in South America and found artists who have worked with the fiber for years – thus began Alpaca Hill Drygoods here in the Bitterroot. They showcase handiwork of South America textile artisans who create wearable art made from the soft alpaca fiber as well as Shelley’s own creations from tapestry luggage to hats. She has learned to crochet, felt, weave and embellish the fiber into beautiful, wearable items. Her love for the animals show not only in the animals themselves but in the garments produced from the fibers that are up to 12 to 14 inches long. Shelley states that every item is a relationship with a specific animal. They invite people to come and take a tour and check out the many wonderful items on display. They are located at 695 Bass Lane in Corvallis and store hours are noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Special tours can be made by appointment. For more information go to www.montanasurialpacas.com. Another alpaca breeder in the Valley is Rocking L Alpacas. Alpacas are shorn once a year, which give them relief from summer heat, and their fleece grows back by winter. The alpacas on the Lischkes’ ranch are raised for their fleece, which they send up to a mill in Kalispell. Alpaca fleece comes in 22 recognized colors and can be dyed or spun in its natural color. Aside from selling fleece, the Lischkes also sell some animals. Their love for these animals can be seen when you visit the ranch watching neighbors young and old enjoy petting the gentle animals. The Lischke’s have mastered the use of the alpaca fiber and it shows in their beautifully handcrafted items. They also offer tours and welcome people to stop by, sit, relax and enjoy. Their ranch is located at 1760 Red Crow Road in Victor - (406) 642-3085 and email address is ervandmo@wildblue.net. So if you are looking for something different to do while in the Bitterroot ... make sure you check out our Alpacas. You won’t be disappointed!

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After a long day of skiing stop at any one of our award-winning valley micro-breweries, grab a brew, sit back and listen to some local sounds. Take a break from the outdoors relax, see a movie, live theater, music, dance, and more.

Winter Wonderland

Bitterroot Valley is a Winter Wonderland sheltered between the Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountains. The valley is spared much of the harsh blizzard winds and record-breaking wind chill temperatures that blanket other areas of the northwest. Although the mercury occasionally dips below zero, Bitterroot winters are usually mild, earning the valley nickname, ‘Banana Belt of Montana.’ While snow seldom accumulates more than 6 inches on the valley floor, the annual average at Lost Trail Ski Resort is 300 inches of pristine powder. Billions of stars, meteor showers and rare displays of Northern Lights adorn the deep black night skies. You need to dress warm and in layers to adjust for comfort during vigorous outdoor activity, as the high temperature in January is 34.4°F with a low of 16.8°F. Make sure you are prepared when traveling by carrying a warm blanket, a sand bag, folding shovel, cell phone and emergency food, when driving away from populated areas. Lost Trail Powder Mountain has some of the best powder to be found anywhere, and you don’t have to worry about the crowds on the 25 runs of this family-friendly ski resort! Cross country ski trails offer spectacular views at every turn on the Continental Divide, and if you get cold you can stop at the warming huts. Emergency caches are located along the 33 groomed and un-groomed trails at Chief Joseph Pass. We also have great snowmobile trails that lead to frozen waterfalls and open meadows in the East Fork, Skalkaho and Lost Trail areas. Are you ready for some fun?

Lost Trail Powder Mountain, located atop the Continental Divide on Hwy 93 where Montana and Idaho meet, has over 300 inches of pristine snowfall every year. These undiscovered slopes await the avid skiers and snowboarders! Cross-Country skiing in the Bitterroot Valley offers you quiet, unsurpassed beauty while you are skiing on some of the most beautiful trails in the world! Snowmobiling continues to increase in popularity and the fabulous winter scenery in our valley is the best you will find anywhere. Here in our valley, snowy conditions can start as early as late October and last until April or May. You won’t find a better or more scenic place to travel by snow than right here in our Bitterroot Valley!

Photo by Nici Wallner

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Autumn in the Bitterroot

Photo by Nathan DeBoer

Autumn is beautiful in the Bitterroot, with crisp temperatures to enjoy the abundant leaves of red and gold. Fall brings frosty mornings and snow-capped mountains. The sky is dotted with the v-shaped formations of Canadian Geese honking their way south. Tamaracks, aspens and cottonwoods splash golden patches amid the dark green pines and firs. Tree-lined streets in Hamilton and Stevensville explode with vivid reds and oranges. Harvest season brings apple trees heavy with ripe fruit and the deer, elk and moose are in full antler. McIntosh Apple Day, held in October, recalls the glory of the apple boom in the Bitterroot and gives you an opportunity to enjoy a great small town festival. Don’t Miss This One! October only averages .78 inches of rain and the average high temperature in October is 58.7°F with a low of 31°F. If you plan on hiking into the higher elevations, don’t forget to bring your winter gear. Explore the 1.6 million acres of Bitterroot National Forest and enjoy nearly 750,000 acres of protected wilderness. Hunting season opens on deer, elk, bear and moose. Remember - Don’t forget to bring a camera to take home a Bitterroot memory!

Hunting in the Bitterroot The Bitterroot Valley and the surrounding Bitterroot and Sapphire Mountain ranges of Western Montana offer the hunter excellent big game hunting for elk, mule deer, whitetail and black bear, as well as turkey, geese, pheasant and small game birds.

Tips for Bitterroot Hunters

Photo by Marie Christopher

Photo by Marie Christopher

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•All hunters during the firearm deer season should wear “hunter orange” (hat, cap, vest, jacket or rain gear). It must be the outermost garment and be visible from all sides. Also, put an orange vest or bright bandana on pets (dogs, horses, etc.) •Hunters should treat every firearm as if it were loaded and be careful where they point the muzzle. •Hunters should be sure of their target and the area beyond it. •Know where your hunting partners are at all times and never assume you are alone in the woods. •Every hunter should carry: map, compass, flashlight, extra food and water, extra clothes, sunglasses, first-aid kit, pocket knife, waterproof matches, and firestarter. •Take a Wilderness First Aid Course. •If you plan on drinking water from streams or lakes, don’t forget a water filter or chemical purification. •Be aware that there may be bears in the area, store food properly. Also, carcasses should not be closer than 100 yards to your sleeping area. •Your cell phone can save your life, but don’t depend on having sufficient coverage, particularly in remote parts of the Bitterroot National Forest. •Don’t become someone our local search and rescue crews need to find! Be prepared! •Please follow the ‘Pack It In, Pack It Out’ and ‘Leave No Trace’ principles while camping. Contact the Bitterroot National Forest for more information at (406) 363-7100 or www.fs.usd gov/bitterroot

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Adventures

Montana Highway 38, also known as Skalkaho Highway, starts about 3 miles south of Hamilton and heads east through the Sapphire Mountains for 54.3 miles to Porter’s Corner. This is a well-maintained dirt-gravel road for most of the way, but has quite a few narrow and harrowing spots for the unaccustomed. Skalkaho Falls is a spectacular water scene about 25 miles into the trip on the one-lane portion of the road. The falls flow down the side of the mountain, under the highway and down into the canyon below, creating a damp but beautiful site in early summer, but leaves only a hint of its glory in the later months. Many visitors will be pulled off on both sides of the road to view the falls so ‘caution’ is the word. Beyond the falls you climb to Skalkaho Pass. There are a few areas to pull off for a picnic or rest until you reach the pass. From the pass, it’s a much easier drive down to the Flint Creek Valley to Porter’s Corner. From there, you can take Montana Highway 1 south to Georgetown Lake or north to Philipsburg. Seventeen miles south of Hamilton, turning west onto Montana Highway 473, will take you along the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, then 23 miles southwest on your way to Painted Rocks State Park. The lake is a manmade reservoir originally built as an irrigation project that put hundreds of men to work in the 30’s. This area offers 25 camp sites with vault toilets, grills, fire rings, picnic tables, boat ramp, drinking water, and limits of RV/trailers to 25 feet. For those in hopes of seeing some Montana wildlife, continue driving south on Hwy 93 to Sula. Turning left onto MT Hwy 472, or East Fork Road, your drive will follow the East Fork of the Bitterroot River to the Broad Axe Lodge, which has been designated a Montana Wildlife Viewing Area. Dinner guests often see Bighorn Sheep and other wildlife on the hillside from the binoculars on each table. Continuing down Highway 93 will bring you to the MontanaIdaho border at Lost Trail Pass. The Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce, in cooperation with Gold West Country, Big Hole Tourism Association, and the Salmon Chamber of Commerce, operate a Visitor Information Center at the pass. Stop to stretch your legs at the foot of Lost Trail Powder Mountain Ski Area before continuing your journey, or call it a day and head back to the valley for some rest. Take Highway 38 to the east at Lost Trail Pass and drive 17 miles to the Big Hole National Battlefield operated by the National Park Service. This site memorializes the bravery of the Nez Perce and U.S. soldiers and volunteers who fought there during the epic flight of the Nez Perce in 1877, and preserves the scene of one of the most famous battles of the Indian Wars. Entry fees to the park is now free of charge.The visitor center houses a small museum with exhibits of the Nez Perce, military clothing and equipment, a 12 minute introductory video presentation, books sales, area information, and a Junior Ranger activity program for first through

T & R Magazine

eighth grade school children. A minimum of four hours is recommended to view the museum exhibits, the film and walk the battlefield trails. Take a Self-Guided walk through the battlefield from sunrise to sunset. Educational groups (such as school groups) should contact the park office to make a reservation prior to visiting the battlefield. Making a reservation will assure staff availability for your visit, and will allow you to learn about all education opportunities offered.

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Lewis & Clark Continuing south into the town of Darby, visitors will see the historic Darby Ranger Station and Visitor Center on the left side of the road. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, having been restored to its 1930s era condition when it was the district office. Pick up visitor information on valley attractions, as well as wood permits, maps, day-use passes for Lake Como and campground information. It is open throughout the summer season. Historians will love to visit Darby’s Pioneer Memorial Museum located in one of the first hand-hewn homestead cabins built in the area. In 1958, an interested citizen purchased the building and paid to have it moved to its present location, adjacent to the city park in the center of Darby. Make sure to see the pride and joy of Darby, the Darby Community Library. Walk through town to check out some of the fun shops and stores in Darby, truly a step back in time. Leaving Darby, look to the west into the Bitterroot Mountain Range and see Trapper Peak, the highest peak in the Range, rising to 10,157 feet above sea level at the summit. There is a spot to pull off to the right of the highway with an interpretive sign for some stunning photo opportunities.

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North Along the Lewis & Clark Trail North of Hamilton on US Hwy 93, Travelers’ Rest State Park is situtated just south of Lolo, at the location of a Native American campsite which Lewis & Clark and their Corps of Discovery used in 1805 and 1806. Lewis wrote in his diary about the “fine, bould stream” nearby “Travellers Rest.” Programs are presented by interpretive staff, all knowledgeable in Lewis and Clark history. Self-guided tours include a trail to cross the bridge over the creek and stand in the heart of a Lewis and Clark campsite, or to listen to the voices of history. Picnic spots are available. Following the trail of the Corps of Discovery, turn west near Lolo on Hwy 12 towards Lolo Hot Springs Resort. The Indians knew of the hot springs long before the arrival of Lewis and Clark. It was a mineral lick for wild game and an ancient meeting place and bathing spot for the Indians. The springs were not only

a landmark but also a rendezvous point for early explorers and trappers. Today, everyone can enjoy the soothing waters. There is a restaurant, art gallery, RV Park, campground and teepees, water, electric hook-ups, and dump station. Continuing on Hwy 12 towards Idaho, Lolo Pass Visitor Information Center is at the top of Lolo Pass at the Idaho/ Montana border. The center serves as one of the many historical landmarks off Highway 12 (Lewis & Clark Highway) and has information on the explorers’ journey across the Bitterroot Mountains. Also the 1877 flight of the Nez Perce Indians, and historical, natural, and general information about the area. Picnic tables and a public restroom are available. In winter, Lolo Pass area serves as a major trailhead for cross-country skiing and snowmobiling. Visitors can find winter usage information and may purchase parking permits and maps.

Hamilton MT 59840

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Making The Valley Your New Home The Bitterroot Valley is a place many found to make their home. There are many reasons to move to our valley beside the scenic beauty and the many activities that are close at hand. The Retire & Senior Volunteer Program, RSVP, provides people 55 and older the opportunity to apply their experiences to meet community needs. RSVP has operated acrosss the nation for over 30 years and is very active in our community. Volunteers with RSVP serve a diverse range of non-profit organizations, public agencies, and faith-based groups. Among other activities, they mentor youth, organize neighborhood watch programs, help with blood drives and immunization clinics and lend their business skills to community groups that provide needed social services. The Senior Center here in the valley, will keep you actively involved with a wide range of social events throughout the year. The Human Resource Council offers services which include housing, food and employment programs. The web site has a database of social service resources and services for Ravalli County. (www.hrcxi.org) Some state of Montana offices that are in Ravalli County: * Child and Family Services - located at 108 Pinckney St * Disability Services/Vocational Rehabilitation Services 316 N 3rd St * Ravalli County Public Assistance - located at 310 N 3rd St * Job Service - located at 274 Old Corvallis Rd Suite D

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Aging Services - Services for Montana residents who are age 60 or older are primarily delivered by a network of 10 Area Agencies on Aging, which reaches all geographic areas of the state. Ravalli County Council on Aging is responsible for planning, coordinating and delivering services in Ravalli County, from Florence to Sula, (www.ravallicooa.org/index.html) Programs include: Meals on Wheels, Supplemental Food Programs, Homemaker Services, Information, Assistance & Referral and Long-Term Care Ombudsman. The Council on Aging also operates the Bitterroot Transportation. which serves the Hamilton Senior Center at 820 North 4th Street, lunch is served three days a week. Other Social Services: * Ravalli Services Corporation - Services for Disabled Population, 905 N First St 363-5400 * Shelters & Homeless Resources - S.A.F.E., Salvation Army, Montana Council of Homelessness *Haven House Emergency Food - 316 N Third Suite 162 363-2450 * Youth Home Inc. (www.youthhomes.com/index.html) * RSVP Volunteer Center 363-1102 * United Way of Ravalli County 375-0937 * WIC - Ravalli County - Supplemental foods, nutrition education and referrals for health and social services for pregnant and nursing women and children under 5 - 205 Bedford Suite P 375-6685 * Riverside Christian Center - Food pantry, emergency gas vouchers - 390 Fairgrounds Rd * Assisted Housing * Ravalli County Council on Aging - located at 310 Old Corvallis Road 363-5690 For more information call Chamber 406-363-2400

Community Information The Bitterroot Valley is in Ravalli County and lies between the Sapphire Mountains on the East and the Bitterroot Mountains on the West. Ravalli has an estimated 40,450 residents in 2011. Hamilton, the county seat, is the state’s 19th largest city with a population of 4,363 in 2011. Other towns in Ravalli County include Stevensville, Darby and Pinesdale. In the 1990’s Ravalli County was one of the fastest growing counties in Montana and in 2010 showed a population increase of 11.5 percent over the decade. Retail Trade is the biggest subsector of the county. Other significant subsectors include Health Care & Social Assistance, Educational Services, Manufacturing, and Accommodation & Food Services. However, it is the small subsectors that have seen the most growth in recent years. Ravalli County contains 1,850 square miles of public forest lands, which has played a significant role in its economic development. Historically, these lands contributed to the economy through lumber and wood products manufacturing. Today, these public forests are considered an important draw for tourism and migration to the area. Another draw to our valley is its proximity to the city of Missoula. Estimates suggest that roughly 15 to 20 percent of employed residents work in Missoula County. Ravalli County has five elected County Commissioners. The Valley is 96 miles long and 25 miles wide at the widest spot encompassing 2,394 square miles that is 74% public ownership and only 26% privately owned. The average per capital personal income in the county is $42,603 and $45,041 for the state.

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On the north end of the valley is Florence, at an elevation of 3,218. It is an unincorporated community with approximately 765 residents. Going from north to south, Stevensville is the next community with an elected mayor and town council. Their elevation is 3,370 with approximately 1,815 city residents. Next is another unincorporated community, Victor. It is at an elevation of 3,404 with approximately 745 residents. Corvallis, south of Victor, is also unincorporated with 976 people and an elevation of 3,477. Hamilton, the county seat, has an elected mayor and city council in a community of 4,363 in the city limits and sits at an elevations of 3,572. Darby is incorporated and is the farthest town to the south, with an elected mayor and city council. It has an elevation of 3,887 and approximately 722 living in the town.

Driver's License Exam Stations You may apply for a driver's license at any driver exam station, regardless of where in Montana you live. The state laws governing driver licensing are found in the Driver's Licenses chapter of the Montana Code Annotated. Please be prepared to pay for your license with cash or by check, since credit cards are not accepted. Below are stations located nearest to Ravalli County. Stevensville 102 Main Street, Suite A 777-4388 Monday: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm Tuesday through Friday: 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

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Hosted by Bitterroot Dancers, Inc., a Montana non-profit volunteer organization committed to keeping country western dance available locally.

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Community Profile

The current population of Ravalli County is 40,841 with the median age of 46. Ravalli County’s median household income is $42,603, and the average household net worth is $440,359. 28% of Ravalli County’s population are long term residents having lived in their homes for more than 5 years, while 19% of Ravalli County’s population have moved in the last year. Ravalli County

Montana

Household income distribution represents the distribution of Ravalli County income brackets at the household level. Overall, the median household income for Ravalli County is $42,603, which is 5% lower than that of Montana ($45,041). Income data for Ravalli County is sourced from census, 2015.

United States

Population

40,841

1,017,057

Median Household Income

$42,603

$45,041

$52,961

Average Household Net Worth

$440,359

$393,457

$495,853

Long-term Residents (5+ Years)

28%

32%

35%

316,352,297

Drove a car alone

Annual Turnover 19%

20%

18%

Other Worked at home

Median Age

Means of Transportation to work: Drove a car alone: (10,706) 70% l Carpooled: 2,195 (14%) l Bus: 30 (%) l Subway or elevated: 6 (0%) l Motorcycle: 44 (0%) l Bicycle 44 (0%) l Walked: 715 (5%) l Other means: 126 (1%) l Worked at home: 1,513 (10%) l

46 year

40 years

37 years

Walked Carpooled

A Li’l Bit of Heaven

The Alta Ranch is tucked away in a picturesque and pristine setting in the Bitterroot Mountains 90 miles south of Missoula, Montana and 30 miles southwest of Darby, Montana. With five vacation homes (authentic log cabins) on 150 acres, the Alta Ranch offers plenty of privacy and room to roam.

Unforgettable Montana Experience 9203 West Fork Rd - Darby MT 59829 (406) 349-2142 www.alta-ranch.com

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Come stay at A Li’l Bit of Heaven here in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. Completely furnished vacation rentals, borders National Forest on three sides with complete privacy. Come enjoy Montana and all we have to offer. Margie & John Mikesell 7987 Highway 93 South Sula, MT 59871 - 406-821-3433 www.alilbitofheaven.com

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Galleries

We invite you to enjoy our local Galleries. We have a wide variety of many distinctive noted artists from Montana and around the world who have chosen the Bitterroot to make their home. The selection of their works is endless, with a lot of one-of-a-kind “Montana Made”. The galleries offer bronze sculptures, wood carvings, and Native American cultural items. You are only limited by your imagination in this multi-talented valley. Things change frequently so visit more than once and find that special treasure. Better yet! Stop at the Chamber to get a list of all the unique art and Gift Galleries in our talented valley.

The Band Shell is an outdoor stage with the Bitterroot Community Band performing the 2nd and 4th Thursdays during the summer at 8:00 p.m. The Band Shell is located at the Claudia Driscoll Park, 910 West Main Street in Hamilton. Stevensville Theater has 99 seats and showcases local talent in 6 productions per year. The Theater is located in Stevensville at 319 Main Street, 777-2722.

Artists

This group of artists hosts an Open Studio Tour at various locations in the Bitterroot in June. Dozens of artists and galleries participate in the Annual Artists Along the Bitterroot Open Studio Tour. Studios include fused glass artistry, leatherworking, painting, sculpting, woodworking, fine art jewelry, silk painting, pottery, and photography. Green signs along the highway lead to a different and exciting way to spend a day in the Bitterroot. Check with the Chamber or go to www.artistsalongthebitterroot. com. For more information call (406) 777-3542.

Music

Hamilton Players Inc., is a 186 seat airconditioned year-round theater. They have 5 Main stage productions, special events, guest artists, youth theater camps, and workshops. The Playhouse is located at 100 Ricketts Road, Hamilton - 375-9050. Hamilton Performing Arts Center is located in the Hamilton High School, at

Lolo Family Practice

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317 Fairgrounds Road. The PAC is a 700 seat, state-of-the-art facility. They present monthly performing arts series of various music genres, dance, theatre and student and community performances. Call 3756060 ext. 6294. Tuesdays at Twelve is home to great outdoor concerts at RC Museum in Hamilton every Tuesday from noon to 1 p.m. beginning in June.

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225 North 8th Street • Hamilton, MT 59840 406-363-1144 • www.valleyviewestates.org T & R Magazine


Every year during the 2nd weekend in June, the Bitterroot Valley welcomes artists from all across Montana to the Annual Montana Professional Artists Association Show & Sale. In 2015, the show falls on June 12-14. The show fills the Conference Center of the Bitterroot River Inn with paintings, sculptures, pastels, food and a great time for all visitors. The show, the 11th in the MPAA annual lineup, attracts fine art buyers and viewers from many areas outside the Valley as well as a vibrant local crowd well-educated in the arts. The artists’ demonstrations, lively conversations and celebrated Friday Night Reception are popular attractions with art enthusiasts. MPAA was the brainchild of Mari Bolen, sculptor, and Michele Kapor, painter. In 1993, they sweet-talked J.R Eason, sculptor and the late Jerry Johnson, painter, into joining together to create MPAA, an annual show. The first shows were in the Daly-Leach Community Room in February and the old Banque Club meeting room upstairs in the spring. From there, they showed in various venues throughout Montana and Wyoming as the group grew to 20 artists. In 2005, they designated the Bitterroot River in as their official home show and also continued showing at other venues, as well. Now the MPAA Show is one of the most popular art shows in western Montana and its noted Montana artists welcome hundreds to enjoy their fine arts. www.montanaprofessionalartistsassoc.com bolen@montanaprofessionalartistsassoc.com or 406-961-3887.

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Resources

Airport Ravalli County Airport .................375-6388 Stevensville Airport ......................777-2410 Missoula Airport ...........................532-8659 Animal Shelter Bitterroot Humane Association 340 Fairgrounds Rd, Hamilton .......363-5311 Better Business Bureau ........(509) 455-4200 MT. Office of Consumer Protection...............(800) 481-6896 Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce. 105 E. Main, Hamilton .....................363-2400 Cities of the Bitterroot Darby ............................................... 821-3753 Hamilton ...........................................363-2101 Stevensville ......................................777-5271 Community Resources Bitterroot Valley Job Service ............363-1822 Ravalli Services Corp. ..................... 363-5400 Emergency Numbers Sheriff and/or Ambulance ...................... 911 To Report a Fire .......................................911 First Call For Help (domestic abuse) ........211 To Burn ............................................ 363-3033 Ravalli County Sheriff ..................... 375-4060 Hamilton City Police ....................... 363-2100 Stevensville City Police ................... 777-3011 Darby City Police ............................ 821-3748 Road Conditions ...................1-800-226-7623

Newspapers Ravalli Republic (daily) ....... 363-3300 Bitterroot Star (weekly) ........ 777-3928 Post Offices Conner .................................. 821-4776 Corvallis ............................... 961-3821 Darby .................................... 821-3441 Florence ................................ 273-2731 Hamilton ............................... 363-1445 Stevensville ........................... 777-5812 Sula ...................................... 821-3852 Victor .................................... 642-3361 Ravalli County Services County Commissioners ......... 375-6500 Clerk & Recorders ................ 375-6555 Drivers License ..................... 777-4388 Election Office ...................... 375-6556 Vehicle Registration/Titles ... 375-6585 Sanitarian .............................. 375-6565 Public Health ........................ 375-6670 Road Dept. ............................ 363-2733 Fairgrounds ........................... 363-3411 Taxes ..................................... 375-6600 Weed District ........................ 777-5842 Schools Corvallis ............................... 961-4211 Darby .................................... 821-3841 Florence ................................ 273-6751 Hamilton ............................... 375-6060 Stevensville ........................... 777-5481 Victor .................................... 642-3221 Lone Rock ............................. 777-3314 Head Start ............................. 363-6101 Social Security .................... 800-289-5034 Montana ............................... 1-800-525-5555

Internet Connects Cybernet 1 222 N 2nd St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-2183 Rocky Mountain Internet 305 S 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-8088 Verizon Wireless at Bitterroot Wireless Hamilton 1220 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-9905 VELOCITY WIRELESS 1265 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-1075 KOPAVI SYSTEMS INC 400 W Main St Ste 204 Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 363-0514 QUANTIX 217 N 3rd St Ste K Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-0930

Forest Service ................................. 363-7100 Camp Site Reservations http://fwp.mt.gov/parks/accommodatioms/ campimg/

Swimming Pools Hamilton .............................. 375-8200 Stevensville .......................... 777-5827

VERIZON WIRELESS RETAILER 1120 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 203-3040

Hospital Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital ......363-2211 Convenient Care ...............................363-0597

Telephone Directories Legacy Community Pages ........1-801-465-4105 Local Pages ...............................1-888-249-6920 QWest Communications ............1-800-244-1111 Zip Local ................................ 1-4006-880-8850

Bitterroot Wireless 2020 N 1st St Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 375-9905

Internal Revenue Service Federal Tax Information .......1-800-829-1040 Montana Tax Information .....1-406-444-6900 Library Bitterroot Public Library .................. 363-1670 Stevensville Library ......................... 777-5061 Darby Library ................................... 821-4771 Mental Health Services Bitterroot Valley Counseling & Education 217 N. 3rd St., Hamilton ................ 363-3882 Western Montana Mental Health Center 1205 W. Main St., Hamilton .......... 532-9101 Museums Darby .................................. 821-3753 Hamilton ............................... 363-3338 Stevensville ............................777-3201 Victor ................................... 642-3997

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Utilities Bitter Root Disposal ............. 363-3630 (Garbage Service) Victor Transfer (dump)........... 642-3375 NorthWestern Energy .......... 1-888-467-2669 Ravalli County Electric ........ 961-3001 Alternate Number .............. 961-3004 One Call Before You Dig ......1-800-424-5554 Hamilton Water & Sewer...... 363-2131

Simmons Dale 322 Cooper Loop Hamilton, MT 59840 (406) 821-9990 Rocky Mountain Internet 773 Park St Stevensville, MT 59870 (406) 777-4088

Veterans Administration Benefits & Information .........1-800-827-1000 Valley Vets Service Center ....363-9838 Western MT Ag Research .. 1-406-961-3025

T & R Magazine


REAL ESTATE AGENTS: Bruce Gould 120 South 5th St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-8796 bruce.gould@prumt.com www.PrudentialMontanaRE.com Rod Freeman 911 Westside Road - Hamilton (406) 369-0320 rod@bitterroothorseproperty.com www.bitterroothorseproperty.com REAL ESTATE - COMMERCIAL RENTAL The Creamery - Brad Schnepf 400 West Main - Hamilton MT 59840 (703) 739-2999 fax (702) 739-2995 bschnepf@marnellcorrao.com www.MarnellProperties.com REAL ESTATE - COMPANIES: Alpine Realty - Dorene Sain 808 North Main St - Darby MT 59829 (406) 821-3771 fax (406) 821-3810 info@montanaoutback.com www.montanaoutback.com

Cardinal Properties, Inc. -320 South 2nd St Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4430 fax (9406) 363-4432 info@cardinalproperties.net www.cardinalproperties.net

Montana Land Company 144 Mountain Goat Rd - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4788 fax (406) 363-4789 cathy@mtlandcompany.com www.mtlandcompany.com

Coldwell Banker Western States Assoc. 115 West Main St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1250 fax (406) 363-2796 tlund@cybernet1.com www.coldwellbankerwsa.com

Montana Westgate Realty, Inc. 2134 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4700 fax (406) 363-4702 realtyhm@montanawestgate.com www.montanawestgate.com

Cornerstone Realty 935 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-3000 fax (406) 363-3001 callcorky@callcorky.com www.callcorky.com

Berkshire Hathaway 120 South 5th St #201 - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-0166 fax (406) 375-0165 montanainfo@prumt.com www.prumt.com

Diamond Bar-S Land Company 140 Cherry St #101 at The Mill - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-9800 fax 363-4515 brokerbob@cybernet1.com www.diamondbarsland.com

Realty Executives 320 North 1st St #D - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-9431 fax (406) 375-9432 reexecs@reexecs.com www.reexecs.com

Discover Montana Realty 127 West Main St #1 & 2 - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1643 fax (800) 293-9428 henry@discovermontana.net www.discovermontana.net

Windermere Real Estate 1920 North First St #D Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-3222 fax (406) 363-3511 bobp@windermere.com www.windermere.com

Real Estate Professionals

REAL ESTATE - MORTGAGE BROKER US Bank 1265 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-6700 fax (406) 363-6784 shelley.ayers@usbank.com www.usbank.com

Driscoll Realty LLP 109 North 4th #101 - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2233 driscollrealty@bresnan.net www.kathleendriscoll.com Bitterroot Valley Board of Realtors 224 North 4th St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2000 fax (406) 363-4511 layna@bvboar.net www.bvbor.net By Owner/Polumsky 410 North 1st St #A - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1606 fax (406) 363-1606 andy@byowner-mt.com www.byownerhamilton.com

T & R Magazine

Exit Realty Bitterroot Valley 99 Marcus St 3rd Floor - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-9251 fax (406) 363-4685 max@exitrmt.com Exit Realty Bitterroot Valley/Stevensville 406 Main Suite C - Stevensville MT 59870 (406) 239-1421 Lambros Real Estate, ERA 514 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-6668 fax (406) 363-3252 bitterroot@lambros.com

REAL ESTATE PROPERTY CARE/ MANAGEMENT Alpine Realty - Dorene Sain 808 North Main St - Darby MT 59829 (406) 821-3771 fax (406) 821-3810 info@montanaoutback.com www.montanaoutback.com Cardinal Properties - Barbara Liss 320 South 2nd St - Hanilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4430 fax (406) 363-4432 info@cardinalproperties.net www.cardinalproperties.net

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Courtyard Apartments 306 Courtyard Circle - Corvallis MT 59828 (406) 961-4890 fax (406) 961-4891 c.courtyardsofcorvallis@bresnan.net Highland Property Management 460 Stonegate Dr - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-5787 fax (406) 363-5786 christin@highland-propertymanagement.com www.highland-propertymanagement.com Real Property Management- Sapphire 236 Christofferson Lane - Corvallis MT 59828 (406) 360-2732 rchild@rpmsapphire.com www.rpmsapphire.com

REAL ESTATE - RENTALS Highland Property Management 460 Stonegate Dr - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-5787 fax (406) 363-5786 christin@highland-propertymanagement.com www.highland-propertymanagement.com REAL ESTATE - TITLE COMPANIES First American Title Co. - Sherri Williams 1438 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2340 fax (406) 2346 hamiltonmt@firstamholding.com www.firstamholding.com

First Montana Title - Ken Kanenwisher 250 West Main St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-2661 fax (406) 363-6960 firstmttitle@qwestoffice.net Stewart Title of Ravalli County - Laura Fortune 1920 North 1st St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 362-7004 fax (406) 363-7023 laura@stewartmt.com www.stewartmt.com

Buon appetito Dining in the Bitterroot Valley has fabulous dining for everyone’s tastes. Whatever your preference, you can find it at our many restaurants in the valley. BAKERY: River Rising 337 West Main St - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-4552 Red Rooster Artisan Bakery 310 South First ST - Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 381-1129 BEVERAGE & BREWING: Bandit Brewing Co. 308 E Tanner Ave - Darby (406) 363-8662 Big Creek Coffee Roasters 1091 South First - Hamilton (406) 369-6217 www.bigcreekcoffeeroasters.com Bitter Root Brewing 101 Marcus St - Hamilton (406) 363-7468 www.bitterrootbrewing.com Blacksmith Brewing Company 114 Main St - Stevensville (406) 777-0680 www.blacksmithbrewing.com Hidden Legend Winery 1345 US Hwy 93 North #5 - Victor (406) 363-6323 www.hiddenlegendwinery.com

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Higher Ground Brewing 518 North 1st Street - Hamilton (406) 375-5204 www.highergroundbrewing.com CASINOS/TAVERNS: Office/Silver Coin Casino 109 West Main St - Hamilton (406) 363-6969 DINING/CATERING: Caffe Firenze 281 Rodeo Dr - Florence (406) 273-2923 www.caffefirenze.com

Broad Axe Lodge, Inc 1237 East Fork Rd - Sula (406) 821-3878 Caffe Firenze 281 Rodeo Dr - Florence (406) 273-2923 www.caffefirenze.com Coffee Cup Cafe 500 South 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-3822

RESTAURANTS: A Taste of Paris 109 North 4th Street #106 - Hamilton (406) 369-5875

The Edge 140 Bitterroot Plaze Dr - Hamilton (406) 375-0007

Back Door Deli 105 S. 3rd - Hamilton (406) 363-4480 backdoordeli@cybernet1.com

Figaro’s Pizza 1151 North 1st #B - Hamilton (406) 375-0164 www.figaros.com

Bitter Root Brewing 101 Marcus St - Hamilton (406) 363-7468 www.bitterrootbrewing.com

Kodiak Jaks II 109 South 1st - Hamilton (406) 363-5695

BJ’s Restaurant 900 North 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-4650 Bradley O’s Steakhouse 1831 Hwy 93 South - Hamilton (406) 375-1110 www.bradleyos.com

McDonald’s 707 North 1st ST - Hamilton (406) 363-6644 Moose Creek BBQ 105 North Second - Hamilton (406) 363-9152 www.moosecreekbbq.net

T & R Magazine


Pizza Hut 1002 North 1st St - Hamilton (406) 363-1502

Skalkaho Steak House 1380 Skalkaho Hwy 7 Mile Marker (406) 363-3522

Triple Peaks Cafe 2424 Meridian Road - Victor (406) 642-6000

Second Street Sushi, LTD 322 Second St - Hamilton (406) 363-0600

Subway of Hamilton, Inc. 1146 North 1st St Hamilton (406) 363-4609

Viva Oaxaca 201 Main Street - Stevensville (406) 777-0014

The Catering Table 205 Main Street - Stevensville (406) 777-7090 www.cateredtable.com

HEALTH FOODS: Rainbow’s End Natural Foods 910 North 1st St Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 363-1626

Red Rooster Artisan Bakery 310 South First ST - Hamilton (406) 381-1129 Signal Grill 131 West Main St Hamilton (406) 375-9099

The Wild Mare 283 Second St - Corvallis (406) 381-6552 www.thewildmare.com

Schools The Bitterroot Valley is home to seven school districts and has five private schools.

Private Schools Blodgett View Christian School K -8 Hamilton Christian Academy K-8 Parochial Pines Academy K-6 Evergreen Montessori – Pre K – 1st Grace Lutheran Preschool Pre K Merging Waters Educational Center

406-375-0733 406-363-5434 406-961-3055 406-363-7279 406-363-1924 406-381-3775

2011-2012 ANB**

Corvallis Darby Florence Hamilton Lone Rock Stevensville Victor

K-6 649 203 469 825 227 474 197

7-8 241 53 149 250 58 154 59

9-12 482 131 278 558 391 108

Total 1372 387 896 1633 285 1019 364

Total

3044

964

1948

5956

• • •

* Fall enrollment is taken the first Monday in October ** All schools use a three year average ANB calculation ANB is used for budget purposes.

Enrollment Montana law requires schools to count students twice each year to determine the number of students who are enrolled. The primary enrollment date is taken on the first Monday in October (referred to as the October count) and the secondary count is taken on February 1st (the February count).

T & R Magazine

District Corvallis Darby Florence Hamilton Lone Rock Stevensville Victor

Phone Number 406-961-4211 406-821-3841 406-273-6751 406-363-2280 406-777-3314 406-777-5481 406-642-3221

K-2 Enrollment 1,372 387 896 1,633 285 (K-8 only) 1,019 364

The University & College of Technology in Missoula is approximately 46 miles from Hamilton. Bitterroot College Program of the University of Montana is located in Ravalli County (Hamilton) The Bitterroot College connects a diverse rural community to a wide array of learning opportunities. We achieve student success, lifelong learning, and community engagement through responsive and accessible academics, workforce preparation an enrichment programming. Bitterroot College of the University of Montana in Hamilton MT 59840 (406) 375-0100 or www.umt.edu/bcp

Greetings!

This Poem is meant as a warm welcome to all who chose to begin again in a place; this place, in Montana, where the dream of “HOME” has come true! In town Look around Can’t wait to find A place to dine Then I see another sign Happen to have A coupon for that From : The Greetings Welcome Packet Where I got this map Used the Jerry Wessel’s scraper, to clear the windshield Stopped by Lakeland Feed to get dog food and horse feed Big Sky Candy satisfied my chocolate sweet tooth Farmers Insurance now has me covered Home at last I had a blast The information made it fast For me to find exactly what I need today We are so glad to be there for you to help in any way we can. A warm Bitterroot welcome To friends & members of our community-Home at last “We Invite you to explore the beautiful valley – our Montana treasure”! © 02/08/2015 Darlene Baeten

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Montana’s Gems Our area has some of the largest Sapphire deposits in the world! So whether you are looking for a day of family fun, or a stunning jewelry piece for yourself or a gift, you can find it all at Sapphire Studio. Our Studio is just around the corner, in Hamilton, but our jewelry is out of this world. Choose to purchase items already created, or design your own with stones you find in your gravel. The sapphires you mine and process are considered some of the finest in the world, and since sapphires are a symbol of the Treasure State, you will be proud to wear a Montana memory of your very own! Our hours are seasonal, so contact us by phone for hours or appointment. Only a short 3 miles from the heart of downtown Hamilton, you can complete your mining in as little as 1 1/2 hours, and have the rest of the day to explore our beautiful Bitterroot Valley. We have all you need for your mining adventure, just be sure to bring your eyeglasses, camera, and clothes that can take a little dirt ! The Bitterroot Valley is nestled between the Sapphire and Bitterroot Mountain ranges. It is home to some of the best recreation spots in the US, including hiking, biking, fishing, skiing, wildlife and nature viewing ~ you name it! Whatever takes you outdoors, you can find it here in the Bitterroot! Other sources to find these precious gems are at Mikesell’s Fine Jewelry, located at 201 West Main Street in Hamilton and Asmus Jewelers & Coins at 700 North First Street also in Hamilton.

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It is a Montana treasure you will want to take home with you

T & R Magazine


We Bring Your Home To Life

Domestic Exotic Specialty

406-360-1930

Proudly Serving Bitterroot and Missoula Valley

Moving soon? NorthWestern Energy makes it easy to start, stop or transfer service right from our website with a My Energy Account. You can also: • Track your energy use • Sign up for paperless billing

• Sign up for EZ Pay • Make a one-time payment • Report a power outage

NorthWesternEnergy.com

Customer Service 888-467-2669 M-F, 7am to 6pm 24/7 Emergency Service

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B itterroot ~ Valley ~

• Calendar of Events • Reverse Directory • Chamber Members • Dining / Menu Guide

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Bitterroot Valley Tourism & Relocation Magazine  

Tourism and Relocation information regarding the Bitterroot Valley. For more information contact the Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce 4...

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